BARONETAGE
Last updated 27/09/2017
Names of baronets shown in blue
have not yet proved succession and, as a
result, their name has not yet been placed on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage.
Date Type Order Name Born Died Age
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the baronet was
baptised on that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate
that the baronet was buried on that date
BROWNLOW of Belton,Lincs
26 Jul 1641 E 1 John Brownlow c 1594 23 Nov 1679
to Extinct on his death
23 Nov 1679
BROWNLOW of Humby,Lincs
27 Jul 1641 E 1 William Brownlow c 1595 1666
MP for Lincolnshire 1653
1666 2 Richard Brownlow 30 Aug 1668
30 Aug 1668 3 John Brownlow 26 Jun 1659 16 Jul 1697 38
MP for Grantham 1689-1697
16 Jul 1697 4 William Brownlow 5 Nov 1665 6 Mar 1701 35
MP for Peterborough 1689-1698 and
Bishops Castle 1698-1700
6 Mar 1701 5 John Brownlow 16 Nov 1690 27 Feb 1754 63
He was subsequently created Viscount
Tyrconnel (qv) in 1718 with which title
the baronetcy then merged until its
extinction in 1754
BROWNRIGG of London
9 Mar 1816 UK 1 Robert Brownrigg 8 Feb 1758 27 May 1833 75
27 May 1833 2 Robert William Colebrooke Brownrigg 29 Jul 1817 6 Aug 1882 65
6 Aug 1882 3 Henry Moore Brownrigg 17 Oct 1819 28 Jan 1900 80
28 Jan 1900 4 Douglas Egremont Robert Brownrigg 25 Jul 1867 14 Feb 1939 71
14 Feb 1939 5 Nicholas Gawen Brownrigg 22 Dec 1932
BRUCE of Stenhouse,Clackmannan
26 Jun 1629 NS 1 William Bruce Feb 1630
Feb 1630 2 William Bruce 19 Aug 1621 c 1660
c 1660 3 William Bruce Mar 1682
Mar 1682 4 William Bruce Mar 1721
Mar 1721 5 Robert Bruce c 1760
c 1760 6 Michael Bruce 1 Nov 1795
1 Nov 1795 7 William Bruce 17 Nov 1827
17 Nov 1827 8 Michael Bruce 31 Mar 1798 14 Dec 1862 64
14 Dec 1862 9 William Cuningham Bruce 20 Sep 1825 29 May 1906 80
29 May 1906 10 William Waller Bruce 27 Sep 1856 23 Mar 1912 55
23 Mar 1912 11 Michael William Selby Bruce 27 Mar 1894 26 May 1957 63
26 May 1957 12 Francis Michael Ian Bruce 3 Apr 1926
BRUCE of Balcaskie,Scotland
21 Oct 1668 NS 1 William Bruce 1 Jan 1710
1 Jan 1710 2 John Bruce 19 Mar 1710
to Extinct on his death
19 Mar 1710
BRUCE of Dublin
23 Dec 1812 UK 1 Stewart Bruce c 1764 19 Mar 1841
to Extinct on his death
19 Mar 1841
BRUCE-CLIFTON of Downhill,co.Londonderry
29 Jun 1804 UK 1 Henry Hervey Aston Bruce 1822
1822 2 James Robertson Bruce 4 Sep 1788 22 Apr 1836 47
22 Apr 1836 3 Henry Hervey Bruce 22 Sep 1820 8 Dec 1907 87
MP for Coleraine 1862-1874 and 1880-1885
Lord Lieutenant Londonderry 1877-1907
PC [I] 1889
8 Dec 1907 4 Hervey Juckes Lloyd Bruce 5 Oct 1843 8 May 1919 75
8 May 1919 5 Hervey Ronald Bruce 9 Dec 1872 18 May 1924 51
For further information on the death of this
baronet,see the note at the foot of this page
18 May 1924 6 Hervey John William Bruce 29 Jun 1919 20 Jun 1971 51
20 Jun 1971 7 Hervey James Hugh Bruce (Bruce-Clifton 3 Sep 1952 7 Feb 2010 57
from 1997)
7 Feb 2010 8 Hervey Hamish Peter Bruce-Clifton 20 Nov 1986
BRUCE-GARDNER of Frilford,Berks
12 Feb 1945 UK 1 Charles Bruce-Gardner 6 Nov 1887 1 Oct 1960 72
1 Oct 1960 2 Douglas Bruce Bruce-Gardner 27 Jan 1917 25 Nov 1997 80
25 Nov 1997 3 Robert Henry Bruce-Gardner 10 Jun 1943
BRUCE-HOPE of Craighall,Fife
19 Feb 1628 NS See "Hope"
BRUDENELL of Deene,Northants
29 Jun 1611 E 1 Thomas Brudenell 16 Sep 1663
He was subsequently created Baron
Brudenell of Stonton (qv) in 1628 with
which title the baronetcy then merged.
Currently the baronetcy remains merged
with the Marquessate of Ailesbury
BRUNNER of Druids Cross,Lancs
and Winnington Old Hall,Cheshire
27 Jul 1895 UK 1 John Tomlinson Brunner 8 Feb 1842 1 Jul 1919 77
MP for Northwich 1885-1886 and 1887-1909
PC 1906
1 Jul 1919 2 John Fowler Leece Brunner 24 May 1865 16 Jan 1929 63
MP for Leigh 1906-1910,Northwich 1910-1918
and Southport 1923-1924
16 Jan 1929 3 Felix John Morgan Brunner 13 Oct 1897 2 Nov 1982 85
2 Nov 1982 4 John Henry Kilian Brunner 1 Jun 1927 18 Nov 2015 88
18 Nov 2015 5 Nicholas Felix Minturn Brunner 16 Jan 1960
BRUNTON of Stratford Place,London
17 Jul 1908 UK 1 Sir Thomas Lauder Brunton 14 Mar 1844 16 Sep 1916 72
16 Sep 1916 2 James Stopford Lauder Brunton 11 Oct 1884 25 Jul 1943 58
25 Jul 1943 3 Edward Francis Lauder Brunton 10 Nov 1916 1 Jan 2007 90
1 Jan 2007 4 James Lauder Brunton 24 Sep 1947
BRYDGES of Wilton,Hereford
17 May 1627 E 1 Giles Brydges c 1573 12 Sep 1637
MP for Tewkesbury 1621-1622 and
Herefordshire 1625-1629
12 Sep 1637 2 John Brydges 1623 21 Feb 1652
21 Feb 1652 3 James Brydges Sep 1642 16 Oct 1714 72
He subsequently succeeded to the Barony
of Chandos (qv) in 1676 with which title
the baronetcy then merged. Later merged
with Dukedom of Chandos until its
extinction in 1789
BRYDGES of Boultibrook,Hereford
9 Oct 1807 UK See "Jones-Brydges"
BRYDGES of Denton Court,Kent
27 May 1815 UK 1 Samuel Egerton Brydges 30 Nov 1762 8 Sep 1837 74
MP for Maidstone 1812-1818
8 Sep 1837 2 John William Egerton-Barrett-Brydges Nov 1791 1863 71
to Extinct on his death
1863
BUCHAN-HEPBURN of Smeaton
Hepburn,Haddington
6 May 1815 UK 1 George Buchan-Hepburn 26 Jun 1819
26 Jun 1819 2 John Buchan-Hepburn 17 Jun 1776 8 Oct 1833 57
8 Oct 1833 3 Thomas Buchan-Hepburn 30 Sep 1804 17 Dec 1893 89
MP for Haddingtonshire 1838-1847
17 Dec 1893 4 Archibald Buchan-Hepburn 12 Mar 1852 17 May 1929 77
17 May 1929 5 John Karslake Thomas Buchan-Hepburn 20 Mar 1894 8 Feb 1961 66
8 Feb 1961 6 Ninian Buchan Archibald John Buchan-
Hepburn 8 Oct 1922 22 Feb 1992 69
22 Feb 1992 7 John Alistair Trant Kidd Buchan-Hepburn 27 Jun 1931
BUCHANAN of Burgh St Peters,Norfolk
21 Nov 1775 GB See "Leith-Buchanan"
BUCHANAN of Dunburgh,Stirling
14 Dec 1878 UK 1 Sir Andrew Buchanan 7 May 1807 12 Nov 1882 75
PC 1863
12 Nov 1882 2 James Buchanan 7 Aug 1840 16 Oct 1901 61
16 Oct 1901 3 Eric Alexander Buchanan 19 Aug 1848 29 Jul 1928 79
29 Jul 1928 4 Charles James Buchanan 16 Apr 1899 25 May 1984 85
25 May 1984 5 Andrew George Buchanan 21 Jul 1937
Lord Lieutenant Nottingham 1991-
BUCHANAN of Lavington,Sussex
6 Feb 1920 UK 1 James Buchanan 16 Aug 1849 9 Aug 1935 85
He was subsequently created Baron
Woolavington (qv) in 1922 with which
title the baronetcy then merged until
its extinction in 1935
BUCHANAN-JARDINE
of Castle Milk,Dumfries
20 Jul 1885 UK 1 Robert Jardine 24 May 1825 17 Feb 1905 79
MP for Ashburton 1865-1868, Dumfries
1868-1874 and Dumfries-shire 1880-1892
17 Feb 1905 2 Robert William Buchanan Jardine 21 Jan 1868 30 Jan 1927 59
30 Jan 1927 3 John William Buchanan-Jardine 7 Mar 1900 5 Nov 1969 69
5 Nov 1969 4 Andrew Rupert John Buchanan-Jardine 2 Feb 1923 24 Aug 2010 87
24 Aug 2010 5 John Christopher Rupert Buchanan-Jardine 20 Mar 1952
BUCK of Hamby Grange,Lincs
22 Dec 1660 E 1 John Buck c 1669
c 1669 2 William Buck c 1655 15 Aug 1717
15 Aug 1717 3 Charles Buck c 1692 20 Jun 1729
20 Jun 1729 4 Charles Louis Buck 31 Jan 1722 7 Jun 1782 60
to Extinct on his death
7 Jun 1782
BUCKLEY of Mawddwy,Merioneth
11 Dec 1868 UK 1 Edmund Buckley 16 Apr 1834 21 Mar 1910 75
MP for Newcastle uner Lyme 1865-1878
21 Mar 1910 2 Edmund Buckley 7 May 1861 20 Jan 1919 57
to Extinct on his death
20 Jan 1919
BUCKWORTH-HERNE-SOAME
of Sheen,Surrey
1 Apr 1697 E 1 John Buckworth 18 Oct 1662 12 Jun 1709 46
12 Jun 1709 2 John Buckworth 5 Apr 1700 3 Jan 1759 58
MP for Weobly 1734-1741
3 Jan 1759 3 Everard Buckworth 23 Apr 1704 2 Feb 1779 74
2 Feb 1779 4 John Buckworth 8 Jul 1726 10 Jun 1801 74
10 Jun 1801 5 Everard Buckworth-Herne 12 Nov 1732 15 Jul 1814 81
15 Jul 1814 6 Buckworth Buckworth-Herne-Soame 17 Apr 1762 21 Jan 1822 59
21 Jan 1822 7 Peter Buckworth-Herne-Soame 24 Apr 1793 25 Feb 1860 66
25 Feb 1860 8 John Buckworth-Herne-Soame 21 Jun 1794 4 Feb 1888 93
4 Feb 1888 9 Charles Buckworth-Herne-Soame 29 May 1830 25 Mar 1906 75
25 Mar 1906 10 Charles Buckworth-Herne-Soame 18 Sep 1864 25 Aug 1931 67
25 Aug 1931 11 Charles Burnett Buckworth-Herne-Soame 26 Sep 1894 20 Apr 1977 82
For further information on this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
20 Apr 1977 12 Charles John Buckworth-Herne-Soame 28 May 1932 28 Jul 2013 81
28 Jul 2013 13 Richard John Buckworth-Herne-Soame 17 Aug 1970
BULKELEY of Penrhyn,Carnarvon
17 Jun 1661 E See "Williams-Bulkeley"
BULKELEY of Dunlaven,Wicklow
9 Dec 1672 I 1 Richard Bulkeley 7 Sep 1634 17 Mar 1685 50
17 Mar 1685 2 Richard Bulkeley 17 Aug 1660 7 Apr 1710 49
to Extinct on his death
7 Apr 1710
BULL of Hammersmith,London
25 Nov 1922 UK 1 William James Bull 29 Sep 1863 23 Jan 1931 67
MP for Hammersmith 1900-1918 and
Hammersmith South 1918-1929. PC 1918
23 Jan 1931 2 Stephen John Bull 11 Oct 1904 9 Mar 1942 37
9 Mar 1942 3 George Bull 19 Jun 1906 9 Sep 1986 80
9 Sep 1986 4 Simeon George Bull 1 Aug 1934
BULLER of Lupton House,Devon
13 Jan 1790 GB 1 See "Yarde-Buller"
BULLER of Trenant Park,Cornwall
3 Oct 1808 UK 1 Edward Buller 24 Dec 1764 15 Apr 1824 59
to MP for East Looe 1802-1820
15 Apr 1824 Extinct on his death
BULLER of Dilhorne,Staffs
20 Jan 1866 UK See "Manningham-Buller"
BULLOCK of Crosby,Lancs
26 Jan 1954 UK 1 Harold Malcolm Bullock 10 Jul 1890 20 Jun 1966 75
to MP for Waterloo 1923-1950 and Crosby
20 Jun 1966 1950-1953
Extinct on his death
BULLOUGH of Kinloch Castle,Oban
21 Jan 1916 UK 1 Sir George Bullough 28 Feb 1870 26 Jul 1939 69
to Extinct on his death
26 Jul 1939
BUNBURY of Stanney Hall,Cheshire
29 Jun 1681 E 1 Thomas Bunbury 22 Aug 1682
22 Aug 1682 2 Henry Bunbury c 1657 20 Dec 1687
20 Dec 1687 3 Henry Bunbury 29 Nov 1676 12 Feb 1733 56
MP for Chester 1701-1727
12 Feb 1733 4 Charles Bunbury 9 Feb 1708 10 Apr 1742 34
MP for Chester 1733-1742
10 Apr 1742 5 William Bunbury c 1710 11 Jun 1764
11 Jun 1764 6 Thomas Charles Bunbury May 1740 31 Mar 1821 80
MP for Suffolk 1761-1784 and 1790-1812
31 Mar 1821 7 Henry Edward Bunbury 4 May 1778 13 Apr 1860 81
MP for Suffolk 1830-1832
13 Apr 1860 8 Charles James Fox Bunbury 4 Feb 1809 18 Jun 1886 77
18 Jun 1886 9 Edward Herbert Bunbury 8 Jul 1811 5 Mar 1895 83
MP for Bury St.Edmunds 1847-1852
5 Mar 1895 10 Henry Charles John Bunbury 9 Jan 1855 18 Dec 1930 75
18 Dec 1930 11 Charles Henry Napier Bunbury 19 Jan 1886 24 Jun 1963 77
24 Jun 1963 12 John William Napier Bunbury 3 Jul 1915 28 Aug 1985 70
28 Aug 1985 13 Michael William Bunbury 29 Dec 1946
BUNBURY of Aughre,Tyrone
30 Aug 1787 I See "Richardson-Bunbury"
BUNCE of Otterden,Kent
May 1660 E 1 James Bunce c 1600 13 Dec 1670
13 Dec 1670 2 John Bunce 24 Jan 1630 1683 53
1683 3 John Bunce c 1659 1687
1687 4 James Bunce c 1710
c 1710 5 John Bunce c 1720
c 1720 6 James Bunce 15 Aug 1741
to On his death the baronetcy became either
15 Aug 1741 extinct or dormant
BURBIDGE of Littleton Park,Middlesex
25 Jan 1916 UK 1 Richard Burbidge Mar 1847 31 May 1917 70
31 May 1917 2 Richard Woodman Burbidge 7 Dec 1872 3 Jun 1945 72
3 Jun 1945 3 Richard Grant Woodman Burbidge 23 Jun 1897 2 Feb 1966 68
2 Feb 1966 4 John Richard Woodman Burbidge 5 Oct 1930 31 May 1974 43
31 May 1974 5 Herbert Dudley Burbridge 13 Nov 1904 31 Mar 2001 96
31 Mar 2001 6 Peter Dudley Burbidge 20 Jun 1942
BURDEN-SANDERSON of Banbury Road
10 Aug 1899 UK 1 John Scott Burden-Sanderson 21 Dec 1828 23 Nov 1905 76
to Extinct on his death
23 Nov 1905
BURDETT of Bramcote,Warwicks
25 Feb 1619 E 1 Thomas Burdett 3 Aug 1585 c 1647
c 1647 2 Francis Burdett 10 Sep 1608 30 Dec 1696 88
30 Dec 1696 3 Robert Burdett 11 Jan 1640 18 Jan 1716 76
MP for Warwickshire 1679-1681 and
Lichfield 1689-1698
28 May 1716 4 Robert Burdett 28 May 1716 13 Feb 1797 80
MP for Tamworth 1748-1768
13 Feb 1797 5 Francis Burdett 25 Jan 1770 23 Jan 1844 73
MP for Boroughbridge 1796-1802,
Middlesex 1802-1804 and 1805-1806,
Westminster 1807-1837 and Wiltshire
North 1837-1844
23 Jan 1844 6 Robert Burdett 26 Apr 1796 7 Jun 1880 84
7 Jun 1880 7 Francis Burdett 23 Mar 1813 31 May 1892 79
31 May 1892 8 Francis Burdett 5 Jul 1869 13 Apr 1951 81
to On his death the baronetcy became
13 Apr 1951 dormant
BURDETT of Burthwaite,Yorks
25 Jul 1665 E 1 Francis Burdett 29 Sep 1642 c 1719
c 1719 2 Francis Burdett 2 Aug 1675 11 Sep 1747 72
11 Sep 1747 3 Hugh Burdett 18 Nov 1715 8 Sep 1760 44
8 Sep 1760 4 Charles Burdett 22 May 1728 19 Jul 1803 75
19 Jul 1803 5 Charles Wyndham Burdett 19 Jul 1771 Dec 1839 68
Dec 1839 6 Charles Wentworth Burdett 26 Sep 1806 25 Aug 1848 41
25 Aug 1848 7 Charles Wentworth Burdett 4 Nov 1835 22 May 1892 56
For further information on this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
22 May 1892 8 Charles Grant Burdett 1875 20 Nov 1918 43
20 Nov 1918 9 Charles Coventry Burdett 1902 2 Jun 1940 37
2 Jun 1940 10 Henry Aylmer Burdett 28 Nov 1881 23 Aug 1943 61
23 Aug 1943 11 Savile Aylmer Burdett 24 Sep 1931 5 Jul 2017 85
5 Jul 2017 12 Crispin Peter Burdett 8 Feb 1967
BURDETT of Dunmore,Carlow
11 Jul 1723 I See "Weldon"
BURGES of East Ham,Essex
4 May 1793 GB See "Smith-Burges"
BURGES of Burghfield,Berks
21 Oct 1795 GB see "Lamb"
BURGOYNE of Sutton,Beds
15 Jul 1641 E 1 John Burgoyne 29 Jan 1591 9 Oct 1657 66
MP for Warwickshire 1645-1648
9 Oct 1657 2 Roger Burgoyne 10 Mar 1618 16 Sep 1677 59
MP for Bedfordshire 1640 and 1641-1648
and Warwickshire 1656-1658
16 Sep 1677 3 John Burgoyne c 1651 9 Apr 1709
9 Apr 1709 4 Roger Burgoyne 1716
1716 5 John Burgoyne c 1705 1716
1716 6 Roger Burgoyne 23 Apr 1710 31 Dec 1780 70
MP for Bedfordshire 1735-1747
31 Dec 1780 7 John Burgoyne 21 Sep 1739 23 Sep 1785 46
23 Sep 1785 8 Montagu Roger Burgoyne 2 May 1773 11 Nov 1817 44
For further information about this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
11 Nov 1817 9 John Montagu Burgoyne 17 Oct 1796 17 Mar 1858 61
17 Mar 1858 10 John Montagu Burgoyne 23 Oct 1832 19 Mar 1921 88
to Extinct on his death
19 Mar 1921
BURGOYNE of the Army
18 Apr 1856 UK 1 Sir John Fox Burgoyne 24 Jul 1782 7 Oct 1871 89
to Field Marshal 1868
7 Oct 1871 Extinct on his death
BURKE of Glinsk,Galway
2 Aug 1628 I 1 Ulick Burke c 1594 c 1660
c 1660 2 Edmund Burke c 1686
c 1686 3 Ulick Burke 1708
1708 4 John Burke c 1722
c 1722 5 Festus Burke c 1730
c 1730 6 Theobald Burke c 1740
c 1740 7 Henry Burke 15 Mar 1748
15 Mar 1748 8 Ulick Burke 11 Apr 1759
11 Apr 1759 9 Henry John Burke Apr 1814
Apr 1814 10 John Ignatius Burke 19 Mar 1784 1845 61
1845 11 Joseph Burke 31 Jan 1786 30 Oct 1865 79
30 Oct 1865 12 John Lionel Burke 26 Nov 1818 21 Jul 1884 65
21 Jul 1884 13 Theobald Hubert Burke 25 Mar 1833 4 Apr 1909 76
to Extinct on his death
4 Apr 1909
BURKE of Marble Hill,co.Galway
5 Dec 1797 I 1 Thomas Burke 1813
1813 2 John Burke c 1782 14 Sep 1847
MP for co.Galway 1830-1832
14 Sep 1847 3 Thomas John Burke 7 Jun 1813 9 Dec 1875 62
MP for co.Galway 1847-1865
9 Dec 1875 4 John Charles Burke 7 Feb 1858 16 Aug 1880 22
16 Aug 1880 5 Henry George Burke 30 Dec 1859 20 Jan 1910 50
20 Jan 1910 6 Thomas Mallachy Burke 8 Jan 1864 19 Dec 1913 49
19 Dec 1913 7 Gerald Howe Burke 17 Nov 1893 30 Dec 1954 61
30 Dec 1954 8 Thomas Stanley Burke 20 Jul 1916 2 Apr 1989 72
2 Apr 1989 9 James Stanley Gilbert Burke 1 Jul 1956
BURNABY of Broughton Hall,Oxon
31 Oct 1767 GB 1 William Burnaby c 1710 c 1777
c 1777 2 William Chaloner Burnaby 1746 19 Feb 1794 47
19 Feb 1794 3 William Crisp Hood Burnaby c 1788 1 Aug 1853
1 Aug 1853 4 William Edward Burnaby Jul 1824 19 Aug 1881 57
19 Aug 1881 5 Henry Burnaby 1829 1914?
to Extinct on his death
1914? For further information on this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
BURNE-JONES of Rottingdean,Sussex
4 May 1894 UK 1 Edward Coley Burne Burne-Jones 28 Aug 1833 17 Jun 1898 64
17 Jun 1898 2 Philip Burne-Jones 2 Oct 1861 21 Jun 1926 64
to Extinct on his death
21 Jun 1926
BURNETT of Leys,Kincardine
21 Apr 1626 NS 1 Thomas Burnett 1653
1653 2 Alexander Burnett by May 1663
by May 1663 3 Thomas Burnett after 1656 Jan 1714
MP for Scotland 1707-1708
Jan 1714 4 Alexander Burnett 1758
1758 5 Robert Burnett 1759
1759 6 Thomas Burnett May 1783
May 1783 7 Robert Burnett 20 Dec 1755 5 Jan 1837 81
5 Jan 1837 8 Thomas Burnett 22 Aug 1778 16 Feb 1849 70
Lord Lieutenant Kincardine 1847-1849
16 Feb 1849 9 Alexander Burnett 1789 20 Mar 1856 66
20 Mar 1856 10 James Horn Burnett 22 Jun 1801 17 Sep 1876 75
Lord Lieutenant Kincardine 1863-1876
17 Sep 1876 11 Robert Burnett 28 Aug 1833 15 Jan 1894 60
15 Jan 1894 12 Thomas Burnett 27 Nov 1840 25 Jan 1926 85
Lord Lieutenant Kincardine 1920-1926
25 Jan 1926 13 James Lauderdale Gilbert Burnett 1 Apr 1880 13 Aug 1953 73
13 Aug 1953 14 Alexander Edwin Burnett 26 Apr 1881 9 May 1959 78
to On his death the baronetcy became
9 May 1959 dormant
BURNETT of Selborne House,Surrey
17 Oct 1913 UK 1 Sir David Burnett 22 Aug 1851 7 Jul 1930 78
7 Jul 1930 2 Leslie Trew Burnett 22 Sep 1884 17 Jul 1955 70
17 Jul 1955 3 David Humphery Burnett 27 Jan 1918 19 May 2002 84
19 May 2002 4 Charles David Burnett 18 May 1951
BURNEY of Preston Candover,Hants
27 Jan 1921 UK 1 Sir Cecil Burney 15 May 1858 5 Jun 1929 71
Admiral of the Fleet 1920
5 Jun 1929 2 Charles Dennistoun Burney 28 Dec 1888 11 Nov 1968 79
MP for Uxbridge 1922-1929
11 Nov 1968 3 Cecil Denniston Burney 8 Jan 1923 19 Apr 2002 79
19 Apr 2002 4 Nigel Dennistoun Burney 6 Sep 1959
BURNS of Wemyss Bay,Renfrew
24 Jun 1889 UK 1 George Burns 10 Dec 1795 2 Jun 1890 94
2 Jun 1890 2 John Burns 24 Jun 1829 12 Feb 1901 71
He was subsequently created Baron
Inverclyde (qv) in 1897 with which title
the baronetcy then merged until its
extinction in 1957
BURRARD of Walhampton,Hants
3 Apr 1769 GB 1 Harry Burrard 1707 12 Apr 1791 83
MP for Lymington 1741-1778
12 Apr 1791 2 Harry Burrard (Burrard-Neale from 1795) 16 Sep 1765 7 Feb 1840 74
MP for Lymington 1790-1802, 1806-1807,
1812-1823 and 1832-1835
7 Feb 1840 3 George Burrard 6 Apr 1769 17 May 1856 87
17 May 1856 4 George Burrard 13 Oct 1805 7 Sep 1870 64
MP for Lymington 1828-1832
For information on the death of this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
7 Sep 1870 5 Harry Burrard 13 Oct 1818 15 Apr 1871 52
15 Apr 1871 6 Harry Paul Burrard 5 Sep 1846 19 Dec 1933 87
19 Dec 1933 7 Sidney Gerald Burrard 12 Aug 1860 16 Mar 1943 82
16 Mar 1943 8 Gerald Burrard 17 Jan 1888 22 Feb 1965 77
to Extinct on his death
22 Feb 1965
BURRARD of Lymington,Hants
12 Nov 1807 UK 1 Harry Burrard 1 Jun 1755 18 Oct 1813 58
18 Oct 1813 2 Charles Burrard 2 Mar 1793 12 Jul 1870 77
to Extinct on his death
12 Jul 1870
BURRELL of Knipp,Sussex
15 Jul 1766 GB 1 Merrick Burrell 3 Apr 1699 6 Apr 1787 88
MP for Great Marlow 1747-1754, Grampound
1754-1768, Haslemere 1774-1780 and
Great Bedwyn 1780-1784
6 Apr 1787 2 Peter Burrell 16 Jun 1754 29 Jun 1820 66
He was subsequently created Baron
Gwydir (qv) in 1796 with which title
the baronetcy then merged until the
extinction of both titles in 1915
BURRELL of Valentine House,Essex
31 May 1774 GB 1 Charles Raymond 22 Apr 1713 24 Aug 1788 75
24 Aug 1788 2 William Burrell 10 Oct 1732 20 Jan 1796 63
MP for Haslemere 1768-1774
20 Jan 1796 3 Charles Merrik Burrell 24 May 1774 4 Jan 1862 87
MP for New Shoreham 1806-1862
4 Jan 1862 4 Percy Burrell 10 Feb 1812 19 Jul 1876 64
MP for New Shoreham 1862-1876
19 Jul 1876 5 Walter Wyndham Burrell 26 Oct 1814 24 Jan 1886 71
MP for New Shoreham 1876-1885
24 Jan 1886 6 Charles Raymond Burrell 29 Mar 1848 6 Sep 1899 51
6 Sep 1899 7 Merrik Raymond Burrell 14 May 1877 22 Dec 1957 80
22 Dec 1957 8 Walter Raymond Burrell 11 Dec 1903 4 May 1985 81
4 May 1985 9 John Raymond Burrell 20 Feb 1934 29 May 2008 74
29 May 2008 10 Charles Raymond Burrell 27 Aug 1962
BURROUGHS of Castle Bagshaw,Wicklow
1 Dec 1804 UK 1 William Burroughs c 1753 1 Jun 1829
to MP for Enniskillen 1802-1806,Colchester
Jun 1829 1817-1818 and Taunton 1818-1819
Extinct on his death
BURROWS of London
19 Mar 1874 UK 1 George Burrows 28 Nov 1801 12 Dec 1887 86
12 Dec 1887 2 Frederick Abernethy Burrows 30 Dec 1846 9 Nov 1904 57
9 Nov 1904 3 Ernest Pennington Burrows 11 Jul 1851 4 Aug 1917 66
to Extinct on his death
4 Aug 1917
BURTON of Stockerston,Leics
22 Jul 1622 E 1 Thomas Burton c 1580 4 Sep 1655
Sep 1655 2 Thomas Burton by 1618 3 Apr 1659
3 Apr 1659 3 Thomas Burton 4 Jul 1657 14 Nov 1705 48
Nov 1705 4 Charles Burton by 1688 c 1750
to Presumably extinct on his death
c 1750 For further information on this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
BURTON of Pollacton,Carlow
2 Oct 1758 I 1 Charles Burton 1702 6 Jun 1775 72
6 Jun 1775 2 Charles Burton Apr 1812
Apr 1812 3 Charles Burton 17 May 1779 6 Jan 1830 50
6 Jan 1830 4 Charles Burton 17 May 1842
17 May 1842 5 Charles William Cuffe Burton 13 Jan 1823 2 Oct 1902 79
to Extinct on his death
2 Oct 1902
BURTON-CHADWICK of Bidston,Cheshire
3 Jul 1935 UK 1 Sir Robert Burton Chadwick (Burton-Chadwick
from 1936) 20 Jun 1869 21 May 1951 81
MP for Barrow in Furness 1918-1922 and
Wallasey 1922-1931
21 May 1951 2 Robert Burton-Chadwick 22 Jun 1911 28 Aug 1983 72
28 Aug 1983 3 Joshua Kenneth Burton-Chadwick 1 Feb 1954
BUSWELL of Clipston,Northants
7 Jul 1660 E 1 George Buswell c 1625 6 Mar 1668
to Extinct on his death
6 Mar 1668
BUSWELL of Clipston,Northants
5 Mar 1714 GB 1 Eusebius Buswell 1681 by 1741
to Extinct on his death
by 1741
BUTCHER of Danesfort,Kerry
28 Jun 1918 UK 1 John George Butcher 15 Nov 1853 30 Jun 1935 81
He was subsequently created Baron
Danesfort (qv) in 1924 with which title
the baronetcy then merged until the
extinction of both titles in 1935
BUTCHER of Holland,Lincs
22 Jul 1960 UK 1 Sir Herbert Walter Butcher 12 Jun 1901 11 May 1966 64
to MP for Holland with Boston 1937-1966
11 May 1966 Extinct on his death
BUTLER of Cloughgrenan,co.Carlow
16 Aug 1628 I 1 Thomas Butler c 1640
c 1640 2 Edmund Butler c 1650
c 1650 3 Thomas Butler by 1649 c Feb 1703
c Feb 1703 4 Pierce Butler 1670 17 Apr 1732 61
PC [I] 1712
17 Apr 1732 5 Richard Butler 1701 25 Nov 1771 70
25 Nov 1771 6 Thomas Butler 1735 7 Oct 1772 37
7 Oct 1772 7 Richard Butler 14 Jul 1761 16 Jan 1817 55
MP for Carlow County 1801-1802
16 Jan 1817 8 Thomas Butler 23 Oct 1783 9 Nov 1861 78
9 Nov 1861 9 Richard Pierce Butler 4 Mar 1813 21 Nov 1862 49
21 Nov 1862 10 Thomas Pierce Butler 16 Dec 1836 9 Mar 1909 72
9 Mar 1909 11 Richard Pierce Butler 28 Sep 1872 25 Mar 1955 82
25 Mar 1955 12 Thomas Pierce Butler 18 Sep 1910 9 Apr 1994 83
9 Apr 1994 13 Richard Pierce Butler 22 Jul 1940
BUTLER of Polestown,Kilkenny
8 Jul 1645 I 1 Walter Butler c May 1650
c May 1650 2 Richard Butler c 1679
c 1679 3 Walter Butler c 1678 8 Oct 1723
8 Oct 1723 4 Edmund Butler c 1708 c Oct 1762
to On his death the baronetcy became either
c Oct 1762 extinct or dormant
BUTLER of Old Park,Devizes,Wilts
28 Jan 1922 UK 1 Robert Reginald Frederick Butler 19 Jun 1866 19 Nov 1933 67
19 Nov 1933 2 Reginald Thomas Butler 27 Apr 1901 22 Mar 1959 57
22 Mar 1959 3 Reginald Michael Thomas Butler 22 Apr 1928 1 Jul 2012 84
1 Jul 2012 4 Reginald Richard Michael Butler 3 Oct 1953
BUTLER of Edgbaston,Warwicks
29 Jan 1926 UK 1 William Waters Butler 14 Dec 1866 5 Apr 1939 72
to Extinct on his death
5 Apr 1939
BUTLIN of London
28 Jun 1911 UK 1 Henry Trentham Butlin 24 Oct 1845 24 Jan 1912 66
24 Jan 1912 2 Henry Guy Trentham Butlin 7 Jan 1893 16 Sep 1916 23
to Extinct on his death
16 Sep 1916
BUTT of Westminster,London
25 Jul 1929 UK 1 Sir Alfred Butt 20 Mar 1878 8 Dec 1962 84
MP for Balham and Tooting 1922-1936
8 Dec 1962 2 Alfred Kenneth Dudley Butt 7 Jul 1908 10 Feb 1999 90
to Extinct on his death
10 Feb 1999
BUTTON of Alton,Wilts
18 Mar 1622 E 1 William Button c 1584 16 Jan 1655
MP for Morpeth 1614 and Wiltshire
1628-1629
16 Jan 1655 2 William Button c 1614 8 Mar 1660
8 Mar 1660 3 Robert Button 1622 c 1679
c 1679 4 John Button 29 Nov 1712
to Extinct on his death
29 Nov 1712
BUXTON of Shadwell Lodge,Norfolk
25 Nov 1800 GB 1 Robert John Buxton 27 Oct 1753 7 Jun 1839 85
MP for Thetford 1790-1796
7 Jun 1839 2 John Jacob Buxton 13 Aug 1788 13 Oct 1842 54
MP for Great Bedwyn 1818-1832
13 Oct 1842 3 Robert Jacob Buxton 13 Mar 1829 20 Jan 1888 58
to MP for Norfolk South 1871-1885
20 Jan 1888 Extinct on his death
BUXTON of Belfield,Dorset
30 Jul 1840 UK 1 Thomas Fowell Buxton 1 Apr 1786 19 Feb 1845 58
MP for Weymouth & Melcombe Regis 1818-1837
19 Feb 1845 2 Edward North Buxton 16 Sep 1812 11 Jun 1858 45
MP for Essex South 1847-1852 and Norfolk
East 1857-1858
11 Jun 1858 3 Thomas Fowell Buxton 26 Jan 1837 28 Oct 1915 78
MP for Kings Lynn 1865-1868. Governor of South
Australia 1895-1899
28 Oct 1915 4 Thomas Fowell Victor Buxton 8 Apr 1865 31 May 1919 54
For information on the death of this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
31 May 1919 5 Thomas Fowell Buxton 8 Nov 1889 28 Oct 1945 55
28 Oct 1945 6 Thomas Fowell Victor Buxton 18 Aug 1925 14 Nov 1996 71
14 Nov 1996 7 Jocelyn Charles Roden Buxton 8 Aug 1924 25 Apr 2014 89
25 Apr 2014 8 Crispin Charles Gerard Buxton 29 Mar 1958
BUZZARD of Munstead Grange,Surrey
25 Jun 1929 UK 1 Sir Farquhar Buzzard 20 Dec 1871 17 Dec 1945 73
17 Dec 1945 2 Anthony Wass Buzzard 28 Apr 1902 10 Mar 1972 69
10 Mar 1972 3 Anthony Farquhar Buzzard 28 Jun 1935
BYASS of Port Talbot,Glamorgan
30 Jan 1926 UK 1 Sidney Hutchinson Byass 24 Jul 1862 18 Feb 1929 66
18 Feb 1929 2 Geoffrey Robert Sidney Byass 30 Sep 1895 29 Oct 1976 81
to Extinct on his death
29 Oct 1976
BYNG of Southill,Bedford
15 Nov 1715 GB 1 George Byng 27 Jan 1663 17 Jan 1733 69
He was subsequently created Viscount
Torrington (qv) in 1721 with which title
the baronetcy then merged
BYRNE of Nether Tabley,Cheshire
17 May 1671 E See "Leicester"
Sir Hervey Ronald Bruce, 5th baronet
At the inquest into the death of Sir Hervey, evidence was given that he was probably dazed
by the vivid lightning while he was watching an electrical storm from the Middle Parade in
Eastbourne. Temporarily blinded, he stumbled over a seat support, which caused him to pitch
over a railing, falling a distance of 15 feet onto the lower Parade, landing on his head. The fall
caused a fracture of his skull and laceration of the brain, and he subsequently died in hospital.
The following report on the inquest appeared in the London "Telegraph" of 21 May 1924:-
'An inquest was held at Eastbourne yesterday concerning the death, on Sunday evening, of
Major Sir Hervey Bruce, Bt., who had been staying for some time at 3, Chatsworth-gardens.
'Evidence of identification was given by the Rev. Francis Courtney Bruce, a relative of the late
baronet, who, he said, had served in the Highland Light Infantry and the Irish Guards.
'Ernest Gillespie said he saw Sir Hervey Bruce walking along the lower parade, and afterwards
mounting the steps near the pier to the upper promenade. A minute or two later, Sir Hervey
passed on to the concrete projection on which garden seats are arranged. He caught hold of
a seat as though trying to move it, and, stumbling at the same instant, he pitched over the
iron railings on to the brick parade below.
'Raymond Low, an hotel waiter, who was sitting near, deposed that Sir Hervey seemed to trip
over the leg of the seat, and, finding himself falling, caught hold of the seat, which he pulled
over without, however, saving himself.
'Police-constable Winter said that he found the deceased lying face downwards; he was
unconscious and apparently only just alive. The distance of the fall was about thirteen feet,
and the railing was 2ft 6in high. There was a storm at the time, and the lightning was very vivid.
'Dr. Kenneth Millward, house surgeon at the Princess Alice Hospital, said that Sir Hervey
expired about ten minutes after his admission to that institution. There was fracture of the base
of the skull and laceration of the brain. The nose also was broken. Sir Hervey had evidently
fallen on to his head.
The Coroner, in returning a verdict of accidental death, said that the fall was not a great one,
but as Sir Hervey Bruce was a big, heavy man the fatal result was not surprising.'
Sir Charles Burnett Buckworth-Herne-Soame, 11th baronet
Not all titled people live in stately homes and enjoy massive incomes.....the following story
which appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 October 1931 illustrates the point:-
'The only surviving male member of a famous old Surrey family, Sir Charles Burnett Buckworth-
Herne-Soame, can claim the distinction of being the only baronet in Great Britain who has been
out of work and in receipt of unemployment pay.
'Sir Charles, who is thirty-six years of age, has been living at Sheen Cottage, Coalbrookdale,
Shropshire, so named after Sheen in Surrey, where the first baronet was born three centuries
ago. The present holder succeeded to the title on the death of his father, Sir Charles
Buckworth-Herne-Soame, a prominent Midlands solicitor, who was sixty-eight years of age.
'The new baronet signed on at Ironbridge employment exchange the day after succeeding to
the title, and received 13s. in out-of-work pay. He walked over a mile in the rain for the
purpose of signing on. Apart from his unemployment pay he had nothing more in the way of
income than 10s. per week disability pension in respect of war wounds. His father met with an
accident some years ago, and had to give up his practice as a solicitor.
'The new baronet has worked as a labourer in various capacities. He has broken stones in a
quarry, and has acted as foreman of a gang of navvies on road work. Then his job as general
labourer for the Office of Works at the restoration of Buildwas Abbey came to an end. He has
been living with Lady Buckworth-Herne-Soame, a pretty brunette, in their six-roomed cottage,
Lady Soame doing all the housework, including washing, and digging the garden.
'The new baronet, before he was wounded in the war, was a keen footballer. He is today a
champion of ex-Service men's rights and is a member of the committee of the Coalbrookdale
branch of the British Legion. It was while interesting himself in the case of an ex-Service man
that he met his wife, whose father is another official of the British Legion.
'Coalbrookdale has not regarded him as Sir Charles Buckworth-Herne-Soame, eleventh baronet,
but as Charlie, one of themselves, "who has worked up at Buildwas Abbey." I sat with Sir
Charles, the unemployed labourer, in the small living room of his cottage (writes a correspond-
ent) and he talked to me about his affairs. His voice drones with the characteristic accent of
a Shropshire lad. "The title," he said, "means nothing to me. Indeed, it has been a handicap.
I have worked as a labourer, and my pay was a general labourer's wage of 113/4d. an hour. It
used to be a shilling an hour until they cut us down by a farthing. We could manage quite well
on that amount, for there is only my wife and myself. We have no family, and if we do not have
any children the title will become extinct with me.
"Naturally, I have been glad of the unemployment pay. I have no false pride, for it is all that is
coming in from the outside." I asked the new baronet if he would continue holding the title. Sir
Charles said: "I can do nothing else, although it is not much use having a title without the
necessary money to back it up."
A further story appeared 27 years later, and little appears to have changed in the intervening
period. The Daily Mail of 9 July 1958:-
Sir Charles Burnett Buckworth-Herne-Soame was weeding the flower garden at his cottage.
"It's true I've dropped my title to become a working man," said the 63-year-old eleventh
baronet. So I learned the secret his mates and fellow villagers have kept for 20 years. Every-
body calls him Charlie in Coalbrookdale, near Shrewsbury.
'He earns 11 a week, turning a wheel that sprays water on to the coal on a conveyor belt at
the Buildwas power station. And the man whose lineage and coat of arms are featured in
Shrewsbury Museum has joined the Union of Municipal and General Workers.
'Every day, in a boiler suit, he cycles from Sheen Cottage to work. Shifts: 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. or
3 p.m. to 10 p.m. He is on holiday this week. At home. "Of course it's true that I work for a
living," he said. "Why not? I like being a working man. I like my job. I like my mates."
'The title dates from the early 18th century. The villagers still call Sir Charles's wife Lady
Soame. Said Percy Seed, landlord of the Grove Tavern: "I'm glad to say Charlie pops in for a
pint of mild most nights. He plays dominoes and darts and we're all his pals. His son Charles
plays for the local darts team and his daughter Mary is a steel welder. They're a nice family."
'Twenty-six-year-old Charles John, who will be 12th baronet some day, is a labourer on a
building estate and is married to a local girl. "We're proud of the title," he said, "but Dad thinks
more of his union card than his family crest."
Sir Charles Wentworth Burdett, 7th baronet
After a military career as a lieutenant in the 52nd regiment, and later in the 2nd
Staffordshire Militia, Burdett left England in the 1860s and went to New Zealand, where he
took part in the 'Maori Wars' of that decade. Some reports state that Sir Charles 'came to
grief in England' and was compelled to leave the army.
After the wars were over, information on Burdett is scarce, but he appears to have eked
out a hand to mouth existence by 'stripping bark from trees, cooking for bushmen, and
doing odd jobs about squatters' stations.'
In early November 1888, Sir Charles got himself into trouble and was punished very harshly
for what seems to have been an extremely minor offence. According to the New Zealand
newspaper, the 'Marlborough Express' of 10 November 1888:-
'Sir Charles Burdett was charged with stealing two roses valued at two pence, the property
of the Mayor, Councillors, and burgesses of Auckland. The baronet, who presented a
venerable and dilapidated appearance, pleaded "not guilty." The evidence showed that a
constable met a person carrying a bunch of roses, and asked where he got them. Sir
Charles gave conflicting answers, and was arrested, charged with stealing from Albert Park,
from which the flowers had been missed. A search proved that roses had been recently
plucked, and the footmarks left in the soil corresponded exactly with the aristocratic boot
of the accused. The roses were identified by an expert as being the same variety as those
missed from the park. The accused argued that nobody saw him take them. He was found
guilty, and sentenced to fourteen days hard labour.'
In a reaction to this sentence a petition was sent to the New Zealand government praying
for a remission of the sentence. One newspaper commented that 'thefts of flowers from
gardens continue, but the thieves now take the precaution of taking off their boots.' For
its part, the government enquired of the justices the reason for the sentence and the
justices replied that, Sir Charles being an educated man, they thought it right to make an
example of him.
The newspapers weighed into the debate and were polarised in their attitude. A typical
editorial was that of the 'Marlborough Express' of 21 November 1888:-
'Considerable attention has been directed to the case of Sir Thomas [sic] Burdett, of
Auckland, who was convicted recently of stealing two roses, and sent to gaol for fourteen
days. Some journals took up the case of the baronet very warmly, and a petition was sent
to the Colonial Secretary on his behalf. Other journals criticised unfavourably what they
chose to term the maudlin pity that was extended to the aristocratic thief. Both sides
appear to have taken an extreme view of the case. Sir Charles Burdett, though aged, drunk,
a baronet, and anything else that might be pleaded in mitigation of sentence, was a thief.
He stole two roses that belonged to somebody else, and he was not forced by hunger to
steal, nor did he take a loaf or a joint. He simply stole two roses, and by no process of
ingenious reasoning could such an act be construed otherwise than as a theft. That being
so, it remained to the Bench to adjudge the proportion of punishment the offence called
for. Fourteen days is usually given for the theft of some more useful article than a flower;
for the act of picking a flower is hardly such strong evidence of a felonious disposition as
the theft of say a knife, or a shilling, or a brooch. On the whole, one should think a 24
hours' term should meet the case. The Auckland Bench erred on the wrong side in reference
to the baronet's antecedents, which they took too strongly to accentuate his criminality;
the other side err in the opposite direction, in holding that his position and antecedents
should palliate his offence and mitigate his sentence. We should say - put antecedents and
position aside, and regard the man as a flower-stealer, and then deal with him. That being
so, we take exception to the sentence as illogically harsh, and not in keeping with the
ordinary course of justice.'
In August 1890, Sir Charles was admitted to the Costley Home for the Aged Poor in
Auckland. According to Burke's Peerage, Sir Charles was already dead by that time, since
it gives a date of death of March 1890. This date is, however, incorrect, since newspaper
reports record that he died in the Costley Home on 22 May 1892.
He was succeeded by his son, Sir Charles Grant Burnett, whose later occupation was given
in various newspapers as a 'gum digger.' In an earlier version of this note I assumed that
a 'gum digger' was slang for a dentist, but I subsequently received an email from Mike
Leach, a retired New Zealand history teacher, who advised me that a 'gum digger' was a
person who searched for lumps of kauri gum, a fossilized resin which was used in the
production of varnish. The gum was primarily found in the northern section of the North
Island of New Zealand and was a major source of income for the local population, many of
whom were migrants from Dalmatia, on the east coast of the Adriatic Sea. Because the
soil in which the lumps of gum were to be found was often swampy in nature, the diggers
wore rubber boots which became known as "gum boots." This name is still used throughout
Australia and New Zealand for what are known in England as "Wellingtons." My thanks to
Mike for enabling me to correct my egregious error.
Sir Montagu Roger Burgoyne, 8th baronet [E 1641]
In 1817, Sir Montagu Burgoyne was prosecuted by his local churchman under a long disused
Act of Elizabeth I which imposed monetary penalties for failure to attend divine worship. He
brought his action in a fashion in which he could, if successful, keep a share of any fines levied
against Sir Montagu. A close reading of the following report reveals that the plaintiff in this
case appears to have been an ignorant and grasping opportunist who was motivated by the
chance of monetary gain. I would be surprised if anyone, having read the note below, does not
have complete sympathy for Sir Montagu.
The case was heard before Baron [of the Exchequer Sir Robert] Graham [1744-1836]. The
report of the trial is taken from "The Annual Register" for 1817, and has been edited, in the
interest of reducing its length, by eliminating some extraneous matter:-
'Bedfordshire Lent Assizes-The Rev. Edward Drake Free, Clerk, v. Sir Montague Roger Burgoine
'This was an action of a very novel as well as of a very extraordinary description, and excited a
considerable degree of interest throughout the country. Dr. Free, who is Rector of Sutton,
appeared in Court, dressed in his canonicals, and was prepared to take part in the conduct of
his own cause. The Court throughout was crowded almost to suffocation.
'Mr. Daniels proceeded to open the pleadings: he stated that this was a qui tam action [this
is short for "qui tam pro domino rege quam pro se ipso in hac parte sequitur." A qui tam writ is
one whereby a private individual who assists a prosecution can receive all or part of any
penalty imposed. The use of this writ in the United Kingdom was largely eliminated by the
passing of the Common Informers Act 1951], brought by the Rev. Dr. Free, under the statute
of the 23rd of Elizabeth, to recover penalties from the defendant, for neglecting to attend
divine worship, in the parish church of Sutton, in this county, or in any other place of public
prayers for 19 months, whereby he became liable to pay a fine of 20 per month, amounting
in the whole to 380.
'Mr. Jamesson said, it became his duty to detail to the Court and Jury the particulars of this
case. The plaintiff was Rector of the parish of Sutton, and the defendant was lord of the manor
in which the said parish was situated. The action was brought, as stated by his learned friend,
to recover penalties under the statute of Elizabeth, for non-attendance at divine worship at
his parish church, thereby, and in consequence of his example, spreading contagion around the
country in which he resided. It was his wish to abstain altogether from a statement of the circ-
umstances under which this action had been brought; he should, therefore, confine himself to
the simple observation, that the plaintiff, in coming forward as the accuser of the defendant,
was solely actuated by a desire to enforce the laws for the observance of religious worship.The
statute under which this action was brought was the 23rd of Elizabeth, by the fifth section of
which it was enacted, that all persons in England absenting themselves from divine worship,
either at their own parish church, or some other place appointed for public prayer, for one
month, forfeited a penalty of 20. This penalty was equally divided into three parts, one of
which went to the Queen, another to the poor of the parish, and the third to the informer. He
should be enabled to prove, in this case, that the defendant had absented himself from his
parish church for nineteen months; and having done so, he should be entitled to a verdict for
the full amount of the penalties, or in all events for twelve months, which was the period within
which the statute required the action to be brought. Witnesses were then called to prove the
case.
'Mrs. Margarete Johnstone deposed as follows:- I resided at the parish of Sutton on the 2nd of
April, 1815. I attended the church every Sunday from that day to the first Sunday in April,
1816. I know the person of Sir Montague Burgoyne, and during all that period I never saw him
come to church. I am quite sure I attended church every Sunday. I sometimes Sir Montague
on horseback. In cross-examination, she said she was servant to Dr. Free, and had been so
for four years.
'John Northfield, parish-clerk of Sutton, corroborated the testimony of the last witness. He saw
Sir Montague come to church in April, 1816. He sometimes saw him coursing during the year
1815. Mr. Jamesson here closed his case.
'Mr. Sergeant Blosset said, if this was the plaintiff's case, his client was entitled to a verdict,
as no evidence had been offered of Sir Montague Burgoyne living in the parish of Sutton. Mr.
Baron Graham, however, considered this to be a mere oversight, and recalling the witnesses,
they proved the fact alluded to. Mr. Sergeant Blosset now addressed the jury on the part of
the defendant. He said, that however unwilling he might be to trespass on the Court by any
very extended observations on this case, yet he could not help remarking that the assertion
made by Dr. Free, that he had stood forward as the champion of the Church of England and of
the clergy, was not borne out by the facts. When a reverend gentleman came forward into a
Court of Justice in his canonicals, and in the character of an informer, to support a qui tam
action, upon a statute which, although unrepealed, had been in disuse for upwards of one
hundred and fifty years, he rather apprehended he would not be hailed by those whose
interests he professed to represent, as a person likely to reflect much credit upon their sacred
character. That such conduct was consistent with the true spirit of the Christian religion, he
believed no man of liberal feelings would allow. With regard to the statute on which this action
was brought, he was willing to admit that it remained unrepealed; but, at the same time, it was
proper to remark, that it originated in causes of a political nature, and was by no means
applicable to times like the present. Its operations were meant only to apply to Roman Catholics
and Dissenters, at a period when the Church of England might be considered as in danger. The
principles of toleration which had since been disseminated, however, and the firm foundation
upon which the Church of England had been established, were such, that no man possessing
the slightest claims to liberality would venture to put the construction upon the statute which
it had received from the reverend plaintiff in this case.
'Without entering on the construction of the statute, he should be enabled to meet the plaintiff
in the most conclusive manner: for, in the first instance, he should be enabled to prove, that
for several months of that period during which the servant of the reverend plaintiff had so
positively sworn that she had regularly attended Sutton church, no divine service had been
performed in the church at all: he meant the months of June, July, August, and part of Sept-
ember; during which months the plaintiff had so shamefully neglected his duties that he had
received admonition from the bishop of the diocese. He should also prove, that at other periods,
the reverend plaintiff was so inattentive to the performance of the religious service of his
church, that his parishioners were constantly in a state of uncertainty as to the hour at which
service was to commence, or whether it would be performed at all. Independent of this, it was
no very pleasant thing for the defendant, when he did go to church, to hear a sermon delivered
which, instead of inculcating divine truths, was made the vehicle of personal abuse to himself.
With these facts before them, the jury would be able to form a pretty correct judgment of the
motives of this action.
'The next ground on which he rested with confidence, on the goodness of his own cause, he
derived from the statute of Elizabeth itself; for by the statute of the 1st of Elizabeth, which
was embraced by the 23rd, it was enacted, that where the defendant in a qui tam action,such
as that now before the Court, could assign a reasonable excuse for absenting himself from
public worship, and should afterwards conform to his religious duties, the action should be
quashed. On this head of defence he should be enabled to prove that Sir Montague Burgoyne,
who was a general in the British service, had returned from Gibraltar in 1814, in a most precar-
ious state of health, and had continued thus afflicted down to the present day, a circumstance
which he hoped, in addition to the uncertainty of the performance of church service at Sutton,
would be considered a sufficient excuse for his non-attendance.
'With regard to his sentiments on the subject of religion, those would be best proved by the
evidence he would adduce to its being his invariable practice to read the church prayers to his
family every Sunday, when capable from the state of his health so to do; and if unable himself
to perform that duty, to call upon Lady Burgoyne to read for him. He should also prove that
prayers were frequently read in his house by the Rev. Dr. Hughes, in his occasional visits to his
family.
'There was another ground on which he was still more decidedly entitled to a verdict. This was
to be found in the statute of the 1st James II, c.4, whereby it was enacted, that any person
offending against the statute of Elizabeth, by a non-attendance of divine worship, became
exonerated from all consequences, by conforming to the rules of his church before judgment
was obtained, and declaring himself publicly to be a faithful son of the Church of England. This
Sir M. Burgoyne had done in the presence of the bishop of the diocese himself, and was there
ready again to declare openly in court, his high veneration for, and accordance in, all the
principles of the Christian religion.
'Evidence was then called to support the defendant's case. Lawrence Coxall, churchwarden of
the parish of Sutton, proved, that Sutton church had been shut up from the 25th of June to
3rd of September. Thomas Brown, the other churchwarden, corroborated the testimony of the
last witness, and proved that the church had been farther shut from the 15th of September to
the 5th of November, no service having been performed. Dr. M'Garth, a medical gentleman,
proved the precarious state of Sir Montague Burgoyne's health from his return from Gibraltar to
the present moment, and the danger of his going to church at particular stages of his disorder.
Lucy Carrington, nurse in Sir Montague's family, bore testimony to her master or mistress
invariably reading prayers to the family on the Sunday when they did not go to church. The
Rev. Dr. Hughes occasionally visited Sir Montague's family for weeks together, and always read
prayers to the family when they did not go to church.
'Mr. Baron Graham being of opinion that a reasonable excuse for the non-attendance of the
defendant at his parish church had been proved, Mr. Sergeant Blosset did not call any more
witnesses. Mr. Baron Graham summed up the evidence. His Lordship abstained from making any
remark upon the motives by which the plaintiff had been actuated in this action; but at the
same time remarked, that no liberal mind could have construed the statute of Elizabeth in the
manner in which it had been construed by him. He left it for the Jury to say, whether a reason-
able excuse had not been proved for the non-attendance of the defendant at church, and
whether, in other respects, the case of the plaintiff had not received a complete answer.
'The Jury without hesitation found the defendant - Not Guilty.'
Sir Henry Burnaby, 5th baronet
In February 1914, the 'London Gazette' published a Supplement which contained the 'Roll
of the Baronets of England, Ireland, Scotland [Nova Scotia], Great Britain and the United
Kingdom' which had been prepared in conformity with the Royal Warrant dated 8 February
1910.
A note appended to the baronetcy of Burnaby of Broughton Hall says "No information can
be obtained by the Registrar as to Sir Henry Burnaby. It is not known whether he is alive."
On 27 January 1915, the following report appeared in the 'Chicago Daily Tribune':-
'Official news has at length been received in England of the death of old Sir Henry Burnaby,
at the age of nearly 90, in some remote portion of Spain. For a number of years Sir Henry,
fifth holder of a baronetcy created in the middle of the eighteenth century in favour of
Admiral Sir William Burnaby of Broughton Hall, Oxfordshire, captain general and governor of
Jamaica, and who reinstated in Pensacola the colonists who had been driven thence by the
Spaniards, has been regarded as missing.
'He was formerly in the royal navy, but resigned as far back as 1852, on marrying at Madrid
Donna Carmen Maria Torrente. He thereupon settled down in Spain, and from that time
forth ceased to hold any kind of communication with the land of his birth. He never took the
trouble of drawing the small naval pension to which he was entitled, and it was only by
mere chance that last fall it was ascertained that he had died a few weeks previously in a
small Andalusian townlet, without issue.'
At one point my listings showed a date of death of Sir Henry Burnaby of 18 September 1894,
but I can no longer recall the source of this date. On the basis of the note included in the
Supplement to the London Gazette, it seems more likely that the date of 1914 inferred in
the 'Chicago Daily Tribune' report is closer to the mark, and I have according used this date,
subject to a question mark.
Sir George Burrard, 4th baronet
Sir George drowned while bathing at Lyme Regis. The following report appeared in the
'Hampshire Advertiser' on 14 September 1870:-
'Sir George, it appears, hired a bathing machine on the Lyme Regis coast, on Wednesday
morning, about 9 o'clock. He could swim, and after the machine had been pushed into the water
he went about 100 yards sideways from it. There was rather a surf, but the sea was not very
rough. The bathing woman lost sight of him and raised an alarm. Four boats put out to rescue
him, and she ran for a doctor. His body was found among the breakers in seven feet of water,
and brought to shore. Mr. E. Linsell, a visitor at Lyme, stated at the inquest that he saw Sir
George floating on his back like a good swimmer. He heard him shout, but not as if in distress.
It was also stated that from the time Sir George went out to the recovery of his body was only
about fifteen minutes. He was quite dead when recovered. "Accidental death" was the verdict
of the jury.'
Sir Charles Burton, 4th baronet [E 1622]
In "The Proceedings of the Old Bailey" for 7 September 1722, there is the following entry:-
'Sir Charles Burton, Bart. of St. Gregory, was indicted for privately stealing out of the Shop
of Joseph Ward, a Cornelian Seal set in Gold, value 15s on the 12th of July last. It appeared
that the prisoner cheapened a Seal at Mr. Ward's Shop, but could not agree upon the price.
Mrs. Kirton missing a Seal, and observing a Handkerchief in his Hand, desired him to shake it.
which he did, holding one corner of it fast; but she took it from him, and the Seal dropt out.
The prisoner in his Defence said, he knew not how the Seal came there, unless she put it
there. Some of his Neighbours gave him the Character of a civil Gentleman, come of a good
Family in Lincolnshire, but lately, by Misfortunes, reduc'd. Guilty to the value of 4s and 10d.'
Sir Charles was initially sentenced to be transported, but at the next Sessions in October 1722,
this judgment was reversed, and the Court ordered that Sir Charles "be privately whipt."
Sir Thomas Fowell Victor Buxton, 4th baronet
This report of Sir Victor's death appeared in the Launceston [Tasmania] "Daily Telegraph" on
5 September 1919:-
'The death occurred in England recently, in tragic circumstances, of Sir Victor Buxton, Bart.,
(a son of the late Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, a former Governor of South Australia), who
succumbed as the result of a motor accident. He had been attending a presentation of
decorations at Chelmsford, and was motoring home to his residence, Wanliss Park, Waltham
Abbey. When within a few hundred yards of the Park, something went wrong with the motor,
Lady Buxton, who was with her husband, alighted and walked the remaining distance home.
Sir Victor drove on through the park with the chauffeur, and near the house attempted to
change into another seat. He stumbled, and, losing his balance, fell out. He clung to the door
of the car for a moment, but had to release his hold, and fell beneath the car, part of which
passed over his left leg, causing a compound fracture. Sir Victor was carried home, and on
the following day was removed to hospital, where alarming symptoms developed. His leg was
amputated, but after the operation he gradually sank and died. His thoughtfulness was shown,
at the inquest, by the following letter, which he wrote to his chauffeur the day after the
accident.
"You helped me well last night, and I am much obliged to you and others who brought me in
so carefully. The accident was through no fault of yours. I was changing from one seat to
another, and in doing so I lost my balance and fell out. Thanking you - T.F.V. Buxton."
'Frederick George Bellingham, the chauffeur, said he only entered Sir Victor's service on the
day of the accident. The Coroner returned a verdict of accidental death, and exonerated the
chauffeur.
'Sir Victor was 55 [sic] and the fourth baronet, his mother being a daughter of the first Earl of
Gainsborough. Having travelled extensively in Africa, he was an authority on native questions
and missions, regarding which he had written notable publications. He was prominently
connected with the Royal Geographical and Zoological Societies. In 1905 he was High Sheriff
of Essex, and he had been a member of the Essex Territorial Force Association and also
Commandant of the 1-2nd Essex Volunteer Regiment. He was a brother of Mr. Noel Buxton
[later 1st Baron Noel-Buxton], ex-M.P. for North Norfolk. His heir is Thomas Fowell Buxton,
born in 1889'
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