BARONETAGE
Last updated 03/07/2014
Names of baronets shown in blue 
have not yet proved succession and, as a
result, their name has not yet been placed on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage.
Date Type Order Name Born Died  Age
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the baronet was
baptised on that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate 
that the baronet was buried on that date
JACKSON of Hickleton,Yorks
31 Dec 1660 E 1 John Jackson                                    c 1631 c 1670
c 1670 2 John Jackson                         15 Mar 1653 6 Feb 1680 26
6 Feb 1680 3 Bradwardine Jackson              c 1670 c 1730
to     Extinct on his death                        
c 1730
JACKSON of Fort Hill,Armagh
21 Apr 1813 UK 1 George Jackson                                   1770 1846 76
to     Extinct on his death                        
1846
 
 
JACKSON of Arlsey,Beds
22 May 1815 UK 1 John Jackson                                   30 Dec 1763 17 May 1820 56
MP for Dover 1806-1820                
17 May 1820 2 Keith Alexander Jackson                  8 Jan 1798 21 Aug 1843 45
21 Aug 1843 3 Mountstuart Goodricke Jackson 6 Jan 1836 16 Nov 1857 21
16 Nov 1857 4 Keith George Jackson                    2 Aug 1842 3 Sep 1916 74
3 Sep 1916 5 Robert Montresor Jackson                    11 Mar 1876 4 Dec 1940 64
4 Dec 1940 6 John Montresor Jackson                  14 Oct 1914 31 May 1980 65
31 May 1980 7 Robert Jackson                                 16 Mar 1910 17 Apr 2000 90
17 Apr 2000 8 Keith Arnold Jackson          24 Apr 1921
JACKSON of Birkenhead,Lancs
4 Nov 1869 UK 1 William Jackson                          28 Apr 1805 31 Jan 1876 70
MP for Newcastle under Lyme 1847-1865
and Derbyshire North 1865-1868
31 Jan 1876 2 Henry Mather Jackson                 23 Jul 1831 8 Mar 1881 49
MP for Coventry 1867-1868
8 Mar 1881 3 Henry Mather Jackson (Mather-Jackson
from 1886)                           19 Oct 1855 23 Mar 1942 86
Lord Lieutenant Monmouth 1933-1942
23 Mar 1942 4 Edward Arthur Mather-Jackson 8 Jan 1899 8 Nov 1956 57
8 Nov 1956 5 George Christopher Mather Mather-Jackson 12 Mar 1896 19 Nov 1976 80
19 Nov 1976 6 Anthony Henry Mather Mather-Jackson 9 Nov 1899 11 Oct 1983 83
11 Oct 1983 7 William Mather Jackson                                 18 Sep 1902 19 Jan 1985 82
19 Jan 1985 8 William Thomas Jackson                     12 Oct 1927 13 Mar 2004 76
13 Mar 2004 9 William Roland Cedric Jackson 9 Jan 1954
JACKSON of Stansted House,Essex
4 Aug 1902 UK 1 Thomas Jackson                         4 Jun 1841 21 Dec 1915 74
21 Dec 1915 2 Thomas Dare Jackson            14 Jun 1876 7 Feb 1954 77
7 Feb 1954 3 George Julius Jackson         4 Jun 1883 21 Feb 1956 72
21 Feb 1956 4 Walter David Russell Jackson 8 Mar 1890 15 Dec 1956 66
15 Dec 1956 5 Michael Roland Jackson            20 Apr 1919
JACKSON of Eagle House,Wimbledon,Surrey
10 Feb 1913 UK 1 Thomas Graham Jackson                21 Dec 1835 7 Nov 1924 88
7 Nov 1924 2 Hugh Nicholas Jackson            21 Jan 1881 1 Nov 1979 98
1 Nov 1979 3 Nicholas Fane St.George Jackson 4 Sep 1934
JACKSON of Wandsworth,Surrey
4 Jul 1935 UK 1 Henry Jackson                       22 Aug 1875 23 Feb 1937 61
to     MP for Wandsworth Central 1924-1929
23 Feb 1937 and 1931-1937                             
Extinct on his death                        
  JACOB of Bromley,Middlesex
11 Jan 1665 E 1 John Jacob                                   c 1598 13 Mar 1666
Mar 1666 2 John Jacob                              c 1633 1674
1674 3 John Jacob                                 c 1665 31 Mar 1740
31 Mar 1740 4 Hildebrand Jacob                        c 1718 4 Nov 1790
to     Extinct on his death                        
4 Nov 1790
JACQUES of Middlesex
2 Sep 1628 E 1 John Jacques                          c 1599 15 Jan 1661
to     MP for Haslemere 1640             
Jan 1661 Extinct on his death                        
JAFFRAY of Skilts and Park Grove,Warwicks
8 Oct 1892 UK 1 John Jaffray                                     11 Oct 1818 4 Jan 1901 82
4 Jan 1901 2 William Jaffray                                5 Jun 1852 27 Nov 1914 62
27 Nov 1914 3 John Henry Jaffray                9 Dec 1893 23 Apr 1916 22
23 Apr 1916 4 William Edmund Jaffray                29 Jul 1895 24 Oct 1953 58
24 Oct 1953 5 William Otho Jaffray              1 Nov 1951
JAFFRAY of Edgehill,Abderdeen
24 Jun 1931 UK 1 Thomas Jaffray                  11 Apr 1861 23 Jul 1953 92
to     Extinct on his death                        
23 Jul 1953
JAMES of Creshall,Essex
28 Jun 1682 E 1 Cane James                                   c 1656 19 May 1736
19 May 1736 2 John James                               c 1692 29 Sep 1741
to     Extinct on his death                        
29 Sep 1741
  JAMES of Eltham,Kent
27 Aug 1778 GB 1 William James                                 c 1721 16 Dec 1783
MP for West Looe 1774-1783
16 Dec 1783 2 Edward William James                c 1774 16 Nov 1792
to     Extinct on his death                        
16 Nov 1792
JAMES of Langley Hall,Berks
28 Jul 1791 GB 1 Walter James James                       8 Feb 1759 8 Oct 1829 70
8 Oct 1829 2 Walter Charles James              3 Jun 1816 4 Feb 1893 76
He was subsequently created Baron
Northbourne (qv) in 1884 with which title 
the baronetcy remains merged
JAMES of Dublin
19 Mar 1823 UK 1 John Kingston James                   28 Apr 1784 28 Jan 1869 84
28 Jan 1869 2 John Kingston James                             26 Feb 1815 23 May 1893 78
23 May 1893 3 John Kingston Fullarton James 1 Dec 1852 11 Feb 1933 80
11 Feb 1933 4 Gavin Fullarton James              1 Sep 1859 12 Oct 1937 78
12 Oct 1937 5 Edward Albert James                 5 Sep 1862 6 Dec 1942 80
6 Dec 1942 6 Fullarton James                         15 May 1864 19 Jul 1955 91
19 Jul 1955 7 Gerard Bowes Kingston James 4 Feb 1899 dead
to     Extinct on his death                        
dead
JAMESON of Down Street,London
1 Feb 1911 UK 1 Leander Starr Jameson            9 Feb 1853 26 Nov 1917 64
to     Premier of the Cape Colony 1904-1908.
26 Nov 1917 PC 1907                                         
Extinct on his death                        
For information on this baronet, and the famous
"Jameson Raid," see the note at the foot of this
page                                 
  JANSSEN of Wimbledon,Surrey
11 Mar 1715 GB 1 Sir Theodore Janssen  [kt 1696] c 1654 22 Sep 1748
MP for Yarmouth IOW 1717-1721
22 Sep 1748 2 Abraham Janssen                   c 1699 19 Feb 1765
MP for Dorchester 1720-1722
19 Feb 1765 3 Henry Janssen                           21 Feb 1766
21 Feb 1766 4 Stephen Theodore Janssen 8 Apr 1777
to     MP for London 1747-1754                      
8 Apr 1777 Extinct on his death                        
JARDINE of Applegirth,Dumfries
For information on the legend of Spedlins Tower,
former home of the Jardine family,see the note
at the foot of this page                     
25 May 1672 NS 1 Alexander Jardine                        c 1695
c 1695 2 Alexander Jardine                                6 Feb 1699
6 Feb 1699 3 John Jardine                                       1683 1737 54
1737 4 Alexander Jardine                    1712 Dec 1790 78
Dec 1790 5 William Jardine                        17 Mar 1807
17 Mar 1807 6 Alexander Jardine                        1821
1821 7 William Jardine                                13 Feb 1800 9 Nov 1874 74
9 Nov 1874 8 Alexander Jardine                                10 Feb 1829 14 Jan 1893 63
14 Jan 1893 9 William Jardine                         11 Jun 1865 13 Dec 1915 50
13 Dec 1915 10 Alexander Jardine                       1 Aug 1868 27 Mar 1942 73
27 Mar 1942 11 William Edward Jardine                      15 Apr 1917 19 Apr 1986 68
19 Apr 1986 12 Alexander Maule Jardine                24 Aug 1947 6 Apr 2008 60
6 Apr 2008 13 William Murray Jardine                4 Jul 1984
JARDINE of Castle Milk,Dumfries
20 Jul 1885 UK See "Buchanan-Jardine"
JARDINE of Godalming,Surrey
20 Jan 1916 UK 1 John Jardine                               27 Sep 1844 26 Apr 1919 74
MP for Roxburghshire 1906-1918
26 Apr 1919 2 John Eric Birdwood Jardine 30 Sep 1890 24 Mar 1924 33
24 Mar 1924 3 Colin Jardine                              24 Sep 1892 24 Sep 1957 65
24 Sep 1957 4 Ian Liddell Jardine                        13 Oct 1923 25 Nov 1982 59
25 Nov 1982 5 Andrew Colin Douglas Jardine 30 Nov 1955
JARDINE of Nottingham,Notts
22 May 1919 UK 1 Ernest Jardine                       23 Sep 1859 26 Apr 1947 87
MP for Somerset East 1910-1918
26 Apr 1947 2 John Jardine                                 3 Oct 1884 1 Aug 1965 80
to     Extinct on his death                        
1 Aug 1965
JARVIS of Hascombe,Surrey
24 Jan 1922 UK 1 John Jarvis                             25 Mar 1876 3 Oct 1950 74
MP for Guildford 1935-1950
3 Oct 1950 2 Arnold Adrian Jarvis                     25 Oct 1904 21 Jan 1965 60
to     Extinct on his death                        
21 Jan 1965
JASON of Broad Somerford,Wilts
5 Sep 1661 E 1 Robert Jason                             c 1675
c 1675 2 Robert Jason                                27 Nov 1640 c 1687
c 1687 3 George Jason                                c 1697
c 1697 4 Robert Jason                                 c 1723
c 1723 5 Warren Jason                                   c 1705 12 Nov 1728
12 Nov 1728 6 Robert Jason                                   c 1708 5 May 1738
to     Extinct on his death                        
5 May 1738
  JEBB of Trent Place,Essex
4 Sep 1778 GB 1 Richard Jebb                                      30 Oct 1729 2 Jul 1787 57
to     Extinct on his death                        
2 Jul 1787
JEFFERSON of Thorhanby Hall,Yorks
7 Jul 1958 UK See "Dunnington-Jefferson"
JEFFREYS of Bulstrode,Bucks
17 Nov 1681 E 1 George Jeffreys                               1648 18 Apr 1689 40
He was subsequently created Baron
Jeffreys of Wem (qv) in 1685 with which title 
the baronetcy then merged until its 
extinction in 1702                          
JEHANGHIR of Malabar Hill,Bombay,India
16 Jul 1908 UK 1 Cowasjee Jehanghir                    8 Jun 1853 26 Jul 1934 81
26 Jul 1934 2 Cowasjee Jehanghir                    16 Feb 1879 17 Oct 1962 83
17 Oct 1962 3 Hirji Jehanghir                          1 Nov 1915 24 Feb 2000 84
24 Feb 2000 4 Cowasjee Jehanghir                    23 Nov 1953
JEJEEBHOY of Bombay,India
6 Aug 1857 UK 1 Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy                       15 Jul 1783 14 Apr 1859 75
14 Apr 1859 2 Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy                       9 Oct 1811 11 Jul 1877 65
11 Jul 1877 3 Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy                       3 Mar 1851 16 Jul 1898 47
16 Jul 1898 4 Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy                       25 Nov 1852 17 Jun 1908 55
17 Jun 1908 5 Rustomjee Cowasjee Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy 6 Mar 1878 6 Feb 1931 52
6 Feb 1931 6 Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy                       10 May 1909 24 Sep 1968 59
24 Sep 1968 7 Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy                        19 Apr 1913 10 Aug 2006 93
10 Aug 2006 8 Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy                        16 Nov 1957
JENKINSON of Walcot,Oxon and
Hawkesbury House Farm,Gloucs
18 May 1661 E 1 Robert Jenkinson                           c 1621 30 Mar 1677
MP for Oxfordshire 1654-1655,1656-1658
and 1659                                         
30 Mar 1677 2 Robert Jenkinson                     c 1654 30 Jan 1710
MP for Oxfordshire 1689-1710
30 Jan 1710 3 Robert Jenkinson                              23 Nov 1685 29 Oct 1717 31
MP for Oxfordshire 1710-1717
29 Oct 1717 4 Robert Bankes Jenkinson               24 Jan 1687 2 Jul 1738 51
MP for Oxfordshire 1717-1727
2 Jul 1738 5 Robert Jenkinson                            13 Aug 1720 8 Aug 1766 45
8 Aug 1766 6 Banks Jenkinson                                  20 Nov 1721 22 Jul 1790 68
22 Jul 1790 7 Charles Jenkinson,later [1796] 1st
Earl of Liverpool                           26 Apr 1727 17 Dec 1808 81
17 Dec 1808 8 Robert Jenkinson,2nd Earl of Liverpool 7 Jun 1770 4 Dec 1828 58
4 Dec 1828 9 Charles Cecil Cope Jenkinson,3rd Earl of
Liverpool                                   29 May 1784 3 Oct 1851 67
3 Oct 1851 10 Charles Jenkinson                                    23 Feb 1779 6 Mar 1855 76
MP for Dover 1806-1818        
6 Mar 1855 11 George Samuel Jenkinson              27 Sep 1817 19 Jan 1892 74
MP for Wiltshire North 1868-1880
19 Jan 1892 12 George Banks Jenkinson            10 May 1851 5 Jun 1915 64
5 Jun 1915 13 Anthony Banks Jenkinson                3 Jul 1912 15 Jan 1989 76
15 Jan 1989 14 John Banks Jenkinson                   16 Feb 1945
JENKINSON of Walton,Derby
17 Dec 1685 E 1 Paul Jenkinson                            1714
1714 2 Paul Jenkinson                             14 Jan 1722
14 Jan 1722 3 Jonathan Jenkinson                  28 Jun 1739
to     Extinct on his death                        
28 Jun 1739
JENKS of Cheape,London
8 Oct 1932 UK 1 Maurice Jenks                              25 Nov 1872 19 May 1946 73
19 May 1946 2 Richard Atherley Jenks               26 Jul 1906 9 Nov 1993 87
9 Nov 1993 3 Maurice Arthur Brian Jenks 28 Oct 1933 2 Oct 2004 70
2 Oct 2004 4 Richard John Peter Jenks                     28 Jun 1936
JENNER of Harley Street,London
25 Feb 1868 UK 1 William Jenner                              30 Jan 1815 11 Dec 1898 83
11 Dec 1898 2 Walter Kentish Williams Jenner 12 Oct 1860 12 Oct 1948 88
12 Oct 1948 3 Albert Victor Jenner              19 Dec 1862 4 Nov 1954 91
to     Extinct on his death                        
4 Nov 1954
JENOURE of Much Dunmow,Essex
30 Jul 1628 E 1 Kenelm Jenoure                          1629
1629 2 Andrew Jenoure                        c 1692
c 1692 3 Maynard Jenoure                            c 1667 c 1710
c 1710 4 John Jenoure                               28 Apr 1739
28 Apr 1739 5 Richard Day Jenoure                       c 1718 23 Mar 1744
23 Mar 1744 6 John Jenoure                                          15 Aug 1755
to     Extinct on his death                        
15 Aug 1755
JEPHCOTT of East Portlemouth,Devon
14 Feb 1962 UK 1 Harry Jephcott                    15 Jan 1891 29 May 1978 87
29 May 1978 2 John Anthony Jephcott                  21 May 1924 7 Aug 2003 79
7 Aug 2003 3 Neil Welbourn Jephcott                3 Jun 1929 12 Aug 2012 83
12 Aug 2012 4 David Welbourn Jephcott           9 Aug 1952
JEPHSON of Spring Vale,Dorset
1 Jun 1815 UK 1 Richard Mounteney Jephson 1 May 1765 17 Oct 1824 59
17 Oct 1824 2 Richard Mounteney Jephson 29 Jun 1870
29 Jun 1870 3 James Saumerez Jephson                   1802 17 Nov 1884 82
17 Nov 1884 4 Stanhope William Jephson                    17 Mar 1810 19 Jun 1900 90
to     Extinct on his death                        
19 Jun 1900
JEPHSON-NORREYS of Mallow,Cork
6 Aug 1838 UK 1 Charles Denham Orlando Jephson-Norreys 1 Dec 1799 10 Jul 1888 88
to     MP for Mallow 1826-1832 and 1835-1859
10 Jul 1888 Extinct on his death                        
JERMY of Bayfield, Norfolk
Nov 1663 E 1 Robert Jermy                               1600 1677 77
to     Nothing further is known of this baronetcy.
after 1663 According to the website http://jermy.org/valdar.
html "In 1663, certified by leading gentry to be
of ancient extraction and excellent estate,he was
recommended for a baronetcy but it was never
actually conferred upon him."
JERNINGHAM of Cossey,Norfolk
16 Aug 1621 E 1 Henry Jerningham                       1 Sep 1646
1 Sep 1646 2 Henry Jerningham                        c 1620 6 Oct 1680
6 Oct 1680 3 Francis Jerningham                   c 1650 26 Aug 1730
26 Aug 1730 4 John Jerningham                      6 Sep 1678 14 Jun 1737 58
14 Jun 1737 5 George Jerningham                    2 Jun 1680 21 Jan 1774 93
21 Jan 1774 6 William Jerningham                     7 Mar 1736 14 Aug 1809 73
14 Aug 1809 7 George William Stafford-Jerningham,later [1824] 27 Apr 1771 4 Oct 1851 80
8th Baron Stafford                                
 
4 Oct 1851 8 Henry Valentine Stafford-Jerningham,9th 2 Jan 1802 30 Nov 1884 82
Baron Stafford                                
30 Nov 1884 9 Augustus Frederick Fitzherbert
Stafford-Jerningham,10th Baron Stafford 28 Jun 1830 16 Apr 1892 61
16 Apr 1892 10 Fitzherbert Stafford-Jerningham,11th Baron 17 Jul 1833 12 Jun 1913 79
Stafford                                          
         
12 Jun 1913 11 Henry William Stafford Jerningham 28 Nov 1867 20 Dec 1935 68
to     Extinct on his death                        
20 Dec 1935
JERVIS-WHITE-JERVIS
of Bally Ellis,Waterford
6 Dec 1797 I 1 John Jervis-White-Jervis            10 Jun 1765 24 Oct 1830 65
24 Oct 1830 2 Henry Meredyth Jervis-White-Jervis 20 Nov 1793 17 Mar 1869 75
17 Mar 1869 3 Humphrey Charles Jervis-White-Jervis 1 Jan 1821 23 Jul 1887 66
23 Jul 1887 4 John Henry Jervis-White-Jervis 4 Jul 1857 18 Jan 1943 85
18 Jan 1943 5 Henry Felix Jervis-White-Jervis 1859 18 Sep 1947 88
to     Extinct on his death                        
18 Sep 1947 For further information on this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
JERVOISE of Idsworth,Hants
13 Nov 1813 UK See "Clarke-Jervoise"
JESSEL of Ladham House,Kent
25 May 1883 UK 1 Charles James Jessel            11 May 1860 15 Jul 1928 68
15 Jul 1928 2 George Jessel                          28 May 1891 18 Aug 1977 86
18 Aug 1977 3 Charles John Jessel                  29 Dec 1924
JESSEL of Westminster,London
30 Jun 1917 UK 1 Herbert Merton Jessel            27 Oct 1866 1 Nov 1950 84
He was subsequently created Baron Jessel
(qv) in 1924 with which title the baronetcy
then merged until its extinction in 1990
  JOCELYN of Hyde Hall,Herts
8 Jun 1665 E 1 Robert Jocelyn                           14 Jan 1623 12 Jun 1712 89
Jun 1712 2 Strange Jocelyn                     c 1651 3 Sep 1734
3 Sep 1734 3 John Jocelyn                            4 Oct 1689 1 Nov 1741 52
1 Nov 1741 4 Conyers Jocelyn                   19 Jul 1703 24 May 1778 74
24 May 1778 5 Robert Jocelyn                              31 Jul 1731 22 Jun 1797 65
He had previously been created Earl of
Roden (qv) in 1771 with which title the 
baronetcy remains merged
JODRELL of Sall Park,Norfolk
22 Jan 1784 GB 1 John Lombe                                   c 1731 27 May 1817
27 May 1817 2 Richard Paul Jodrell              26 Jun 1781 14 Jun 1861 79
14 Jun 1861 3 Edward Repps Jodrell              20 Jun 1825 12 Nov 1882 57
12 Nov 1882 4 Alfred Jodrell                            13 Aug 1847 15 Mar 1929 81
to     Extinct on his death                        
15 Mar 1929
JOHNSON of New York
27 Nov 1755 GB 1 William Johnson                              1715 11 Jul 1774 59
For further information on this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
11 Jul 1774 2 John Johnson                          1742 4 Jan 1830 87
4 Jan 1830 3 Adam Gordon Johnson                5 May 1781 21 May 1843 62
21 May 1843 4 William George Johnson                 19 Dec 1830 26 Jan 1908 77
26 Jan 1908 5 Edward Gordon Johnson             17 Mar 1867 15 Apr 1957 90
15 Apr 1957 6 John Paley Johnson                 12 Jun 1907 14 Dec 1975 68
14 Dec 1975 7 Peter Colpoys Paley Johnson 26 Mar 1930 24 May 2003 73
24 May 2003 8 Colpoys Guy Johnson                   13 Nov 1965
JOHNSON of Bath,Gloucs
1 Dec 1818 UK 1 Henry Johnson                    1 Jan 1748 18 Mar 1835 87
18 Mar 1835 2 Henry Allen Johnson                26 Sep 1785 27 Jun 1860 74
27 Jun 1860 3 Henry Franks Frederic Johnson 5 Feb 1819 20 Jun 1883 64
20 Jun 1883 4 Henry Allen William Johnson 9 Oct 1855 10 Apr 1944 88
10 Apr 1944 5 Henry Allen Beaumont Johnson 3 Jan 1887 24 Jul 1965 78
24 Jul 1965 6 Victor Philipse Hill Johnson           7 May 1905 5 Dec 1986 81
5 Dec 1986 7 Robin Eliot Johnson                 1929 Jul 1989 60
Jul 1989 8 Patrick Eliot Johnson                    1955
JOHNSON of Dublin
24 Nov 1909 UK 1 William Moore Johnson                  1828 9 Dec 1918 90
to     MP for Mallow 1880-1883. Solicitor 
9 Dec 1918 General [I] 1880-1881. Attorney General
[I] 1881-1883. PC [I] 1881
Extinct on his death                        
JOHNSON-FERGUSON of Springkell,Dumfries,
and Kenyon and Wiston,Lanark
18 Jul 1906 UK 1 Jabez Edward Johnson-Ferguson 27 Nov 1849 10 Dec 1929 80
MP for Loughborough 1885-1886 and
1892-1900
10 Dec 1929 2 Edward Alexander James Johnson-Ferguson 3 Mar 1875 27 Dec 1953 78
27 Dec 1953 3 Neil Edward Johnson-Ferguson 2 May 1905 18 Jun 1992 87
18 Jun 1992 4 Ian Edward Johnson-Ferguson 1 Feb 1932
  JOHNSON-WALSH of Dublin
24 Feb 1775 I 1 John Allen Johnson (Johnson-Walsh from 
9 May 1809) 19 Sep 1744 Dec 1831 87
Dec 1831 2 Edward John Johnson-Walsh c 1785 6 Dec 1848
6 Dec 1848 3 Hunt Henry Johnson-Walsh 1787 9 Sep 1865 78
9 Sep 1865 4 John Allen Johnson-Walsh 24 Apr 1829 3 May 1893 64
3 May 1893 5 Hunt Henry Allen Johnson-Walsh 18 Jan 1864 3 Sep 1953 89
to     Extinct on his death                        
3 Sep 1953
JOHNSTON of Caskieben,Aberdeen
31 Mar 1626 NS 1 George Johnston                   c 1650
c 1650 2 George Johnston                    c 1680
c 1680 3 John Johnston                          c 1648 23 Dec 1690
For further information on this baronet, see
the note at the foot of this page.
23 Dec 1690 4 John Johnston                        Nov 1724
Nov 1724 5 William Johnston                        c 1675 18 Mar 1750
18 Mar 1750 6 William Johnston                              Nov 1714 19 Mar 1794 79
19 Mar 1794 7 William Johnston                      Aug 1760 13 Jan 1844 83
MP for Windsor 1797-1802
13 Jan 1844 8 William Bacon Johnston                   17 Mar 1806 3 Aug 1865 59
3 Aug 1865 9 William Johnston                       31 Jul 1849 22 Nov 1917 68
22 Nov 1917 10 George Johnston                          21 Apr 1849 11 May 1921 72
11 May 1921 11 Thomas Alexander Johnston 15 Dec 1857 20 Dec 1950 93
20 Dec 1950 12 Thomas Alexander Johnston 3 May 1888 12 Apr 1959 70
12 Apr 1959 13 Thomas Alexander Johnston 7 Sep 1916 1985 68
1985 14 Thomas Alexander Johnston 1 Feb 1956
JOHNSTON of Elphinston,Haddington
18 Oct 1628 NS 1 Samuel Johnston                       c 1600 c 1644
c 1644 2 John Johnston                            c 1666
c 1666 3 James Johnston                       c 1700
to          nothing further is known of this baronetcy
c 1700
JOHNSTON of Gilford,Down
27 Jul 1772 I 1 Richard Johnston                      1 Aug 1743 22 Apr 1795 51
22 Apr 1795 2 William Johnston                       18 Jul 1765 8 Feb 1841 75
to     Extinct on his death                        
8 Feb 1841
JOHNSTON of London
22 Jan 1916 UK 1 Charles Johnston                       3 May 1848 10 Apr 1933 84
to     Extinct on his death                        
10 Apr 1933
JOHNSTONE of Westerhall,Dumfries
25 Apr 1700 NS 1 John Johnstone                        30 Sep 1711
MP for Scotland 1707-1708
30 Sep 1711 2 William Johnstone                   8 Oct 1727
MP for Dumfries 1708-1710 and
Dumfries-shire 1713-1722          
8 Oct 1727 3 James Johnstone                      10 Dec 1772
MP for Dumfries 1743-1754
10 Dec 1772 4 James Johnstone                        23 Jan 1726 3 Sep 1794 68
MP for Dumfries 1784-1790 and Weymouth
1791-1794                                               
3 Sep 1794 5 William Pulteney                    19 Oct 1729 30 May 1805 75
MP for Cromarty 1768-1774 and Shrewsbury
1775-1805                                    
30 May 1805 6 John Lowther Johnstone               c 1783 24 Dec 1811
MP for Weymouth 1810-1811
24 Dec 1811 7 Frederick George Johnstone Dec 1810 7 May 1841 30
MP for Weymouth 1832-1835
5 Aug 1841 8 Frederick John William Johnstone 5 Aug 1841 20 Jun 1913 71
MP for Weymouth 1874-1885
20 Jun 1913 9 George Fredric Thomas Tankerville
Johnstone                              1 Aug 1876 9 Jan 1952 75
9 Jan 1952 10 Frederic Allan George Johnstone 23 Feb 1906 19 Jul 1994 88
19 Jul 1994 11 George Richard Douglas Johnstone 21 Aug 1948
JOHNSTONE of Hackness,Yorks
6 Jul 1795 GB See "Vanden-Bempde-Johnstone"
JOICEY of Longhirst and Ulgham,Northumberland
3 Jul 1893 UK 1 James Joicey                                  4 Apr 1846 21 Nov 1936 90
He was subsequently created Baron Joicey
(qv) in 1906 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged                                           
JOLLIFFE of Merstham,Surrey
20 Aug 1821 UK 1 William George Hylton Jolliffe 7 Dec 1800 1 Jun 1876 75
He was subsequently created Baron Hylton
(qv) in 1866 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged                                           
JONES of Albemarlis,Carmarthen
25 Jul 1643 E 1 Henry Jones                           c May 1644
to     Extinct on his death                        
c May 1644
JONES of Ramsbury,Wilts
27 May 1774 GB 1 William Jones                         c 1737 3 May 1791
to     Extinct on his death                        
3 May 1791
JONES of Stanley Hall,Salop
3 Oct 1808 UK See "Tyrwhitt"
JONES of Cranmer Hall,Norfolk
30 Sep 1831 UK   See "Lawrence-Jones"      
JONES of Rottingdean,Sussex
4 May 1894 UK See "Burne-Jones"
JONES of Bron Menai,Anglesey
15 Jul 1910 UK See "Prichard-Jones"
JONES of St Mary's Court,Salop
4 Jul 1911 UK See "Bowen-Jones"
JONES of Pentower,Pembroke
9 Jul 1917 UK 1 Evan Davies Jones                 18 Apr 1859 20 Apr 1949 90
MP for Pembrokeshire 1918-1922. Lord Lieutenant
Pembroke 1932-1944             
20 Apr 1949 2 Tom Barry Jones                                1 Oct 1888 29 May 1952 63
to     Extinct on his death                        
29 May 1952
JONES of Dolerw,Montgomery
4 Jul 1918 UK See "Pryce-Jones"
JONES of Treeton,Yorks
23 May 1919 UK 1 Frederick John Jones                  1854 23 May 1936 81
23 May 1936 2 Walter Benton Jones          26 Sep 1880 5 Dec 1967 87
5 Dec 1967 3 Peter Fawcett Benton Jones 9 Jan 1911 11 Nov 1972 61
11 Nov 1972 4 Simon Warley Frederick Benton Jones 11 Sep 1941
JONES of Rhyll,Flint
28 Jan 1926 UK See "Probyn-Jones"
JONES-BRYDGES of Boultibrook,Hereford
9 Oct 1807 UK 1 Harford Jones-Brydges           12 Jan 1764 19 Mar 1847 83
PC 1835                                     
19 Mar 1847 2 Harford James Jones-Brydges 30 May 1808 11 Jun 1891 83
to     Extinct on his death                        
11 Jun 1891
JONES-PARRY of Madryn Castle,Carnarvon
30 Aug 1886 UK 1 Thomas Love Duncombe Jones-Parry 5 Jan 1832 18 Dec 1891 59
to     MP for Caernarfon 1882-1886 
18 Dec 1891 Extinct on his death                        
JOPSON of Osberton,Notts
19 Dec 1635 NS See "Bolles"
JOSEPH of Stoke-on-Trent,Staffs
8 Jul 1942 UK 1 Francis L'Estrange Joseph              31 Jul 1870 8 Feb 1951 80
to     Extinct on his death                        
8 Feb 1951
JOSEPH of Portsoken,London
16 Nov 1943 UK 1 Samuel George Joseph              15 Aug 1888 4 Oct 1944 56
4 Oct 1944 2 Keith Sinjohn Joseph,later [1987] Baron 
Joseph [L]                             17 Jan 1918 10 Dec 1994 76
10 Dec 1994 3 James Samuel Joseph            27 Jan 1955
JOYNSON-HICKS of Holmsbury,Surrey
20 Sep 1919 UK 1 William Joynson-Hicks,later [1929] 1st
Viscount Brentford 23 Jun 1865 8 Jun 1932 66
8 Jun 1932 2 Richard Cecil Joynson-Hicks,2nd Viscount 15 Nov 1896 27 Jun 1958 61
Brentford
27 Jun 1958 3 Lancelot William Joynson-Hicks,3rd Viscount 10 Apr 1902 25 Feb 1983 80
21 Jan 1956 1 Brentford
He was created a baronet 20 Jan 1956 (see below)
25 Feb 1983 4 Crispin William Joynson-Hicks,4th Viscount 7 Apr 1933
2 Brentford
JOYNSON-HICKS of Newick,Sussex
20 Jan 1956 UK 1 Lancelot William Joynson-Hicks 10 Apr 1902 25 Feb 1983 80
He succeeded as 3rd Viscount Brentford in 1958
with which title the baronetcy remains merged
JUCKES-CLIFTON of Clifton,Notts
22 May 1611 E See "Clifton"
JUDKIN-FITZGERALD of Lisheen,Tipperary
5 Aug 1801 UK 1 Thomas Judkin-Fitzgerald 5 May 1754 24 Sep 1810 56
24 Sep 1810 2 John Judkin-Fitzgerald 27 Aug 1787 28 Feb 1860 72
28 Feb 1860 3 Thomas Judkin-Fitzgerald 22 Jul 1820 27 Apr 1864 43
For further information on the death of this
baronet,see the note at the foot of this page
27 Apr 1864 4 Joseph Capel Judkin-Fitzgerald 9 Aug 1853 1917 63
to     Extinct or dormant on his death
1917    
JUXON of Albourne,Sussex
28 Dec 1660 E 1 William Juxon                        1637 11 Sep 1719 82
Sep 1719 2 William Juxon 8 Jun 1660 3 Feb 1740 79
to     Extinct on his death
3 Feb 1740
Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st and only baronet
The following biography of Jameson appeared in the Australian monthly magazine "Parade" in
its issue for September 1953:-
'Just before noon on January 2, 1896, a haggard little man with the stamp of the born leader,
peered through field glasses from the window of a ruined farmhouse not far from the seething
gold-mine town of Johannesburg. From the crest of the hill above the farm a cloud of white
dust was rising into the clear African sky. Through the dust Boer troops could be seen dragging
field guns into position. The man turned to the desperate, half-starved group behind him and
said bluntly: "We're done." Thus ended one of the most gallant lost causes in British history.
 
'The tough little man was Dr. Leander Starr Jameson, an Edinburgh medico, whose historic raid
into the Transvaal to emancipate British miners from harsh Boer dominance ended in surrender
at the tumbledown farmhouse on the veldt. The British sent him to gaol for his "enterprise."
They vindicated him three years later when they had to throw all the national might into a
costly full-scale war to achieve the same end. 
'Leander Starr Jameson was born in Edinburgh on February 9, 1853, youngest of 10 sons of a
Scottish solicitor. He took his medical degree in London in 1877, but his health was broken by
overwork, and in the following year he went to South Africa to set up practice in Kimberley,
then a roaring frontier mining town in the heart of the world's richest diamond field. Cecil 
Rhodes, Barney Barnato, Alfred Beit and other pioneers were scrambling ruthlessly to 
amalgamate the small mining companies into a handful of huge monopolies. East of the diamond
fields were the Boer republics of the Orange Free State and Transvaal, where, 50 years earlier,
the descendants of the old Dutch settlers had trekked from the Cape to escape British rule.
Here the patriarchal, bearded Boer farmers lived in primitive communities, reading their Bibles
and flogging their Kaffirs with equal heartiness. Northwards from Kimberley stretched 1000 miles
of rolling grasslands, sparsely inhabited by warlike Bantu tribes. Most powerful were the
Matabele, who, under their cruel but able chief Lobengula, held what is now Rhodesia
[Zimbabwe] in a grip of bloodshed and terror. 
 
'The scene fired Jameson's imagination. He became one of Cecil Rhodes' "Twelve Apostles," who
met at Rhodes' house to weave grandiose plans for a new British empire stretching from the
Cape, through Central Africa to Cairo and the Mediterranean. They were rudely jolted in 1887
when Portugal claimed all the land between East-Coast Mozambique and Portuguese West
Africa. Britain rejected the claim, but Rhodes saw the red light. If Portugal persisted, she would
effectively bar his drive north from the Cape to Cairo. The key was possession of Lobengula's
Matabele territory. 
 
'Portuguese, German and Belgian colonists were already angling for Lobengula's friendship. They
loaded him with presents of rifles, top hats, bath chairs, and champagne. They were somewhat
grieved when, after cheerfully accepting the presents. Lobengula still encouraged his warriors 
to stab to death all Europeans who tried to settle in his territory.
 
'In October, 1888, Dr. Jameson offered to go to Lobengula's great kraal at Bulawayo in his
professional capacity. He had heard that the black emperor was suffering from gout. The plan
succeeded. Lobengula celebrated his return to health by ceremonially slaughtering all the witch
doctors whose magic had failed. He then made Jameson Induna (chief) of his favourite regiment,
investing him with ox-hide shield, ostrich plume head-dress and two assegais at a barbaric
ceremony highlighted by wild dancing and the slaughter of oxen. He readily agreed to negotiate
a treaty. 
'Lobengula could not read English. The interpreter, it was subsequently claimed, was bribed to
misinterpret. It is generally conceded that Lobengula had no idea that he was signing away "all
the metals and minerals" in his vast territory for £100 a month and a supply of rifles and
ammunition. 
'Rhodes was delighted with Jameson's coup. He immediately formed the British South Africa
Company under royal charter to exploit his new "empire." The exultant Jameson threw up his
practice and rode across Matabeleland with the first 200 pioneer settlers to establish a British
settlement and fort at Salisbury. 
'In 1891 Jameson was on the move again. This time he pushed into wild country on the borders
of Portuguese Mozambique, seeking more concessions for the insatiable Rhodes. His party was
ambushed and almost wiped out by natives on the jungle-clad banks of the Pungwe River.
Jameson and a few others escaped almost naked and rowed themselves down river to the
hostile Portuguese port of Beira. Blistered by the sun, weak and delirious from fever, they were
thrown into prison by the Portuguese governor, who regarded them as alien filibusters. After a
while he released them and sent them back to Capetown. Portugal lodged a strong protest with
the British Government, which, as usual, disowned the expedition. Jameson, however, had
blazed the trail. Soon all the territory now known as Mashonaland was in British hands.
 
'The Matabele concessions cost the British South Africa Company nearly £250,000 in the first 
two years. Rhodes was aghast and feared bankruptcy. Again he was saved by Jameson. "Make
me administrator," said the fiery little doctor, "and I'll run the territory on £40,000 a year." He
was as good as his word, despite the bloody rebellion of his "friend" Lobengula in 1893, which
ended in the savage chief being driven from his kraal at Bulawayo to an unknown grave.
'Meanwhile trouble brewed between British settlers and the Boer Republic of the Transvaal,
ruled despotically by fanatical President "Oom Paul" Kruger, who was determined to preserve
the old pastoral life of the Boer farmers from the influence of the hated British. The discovery
of gold on the Rand in 1886 shattered his narrow policy. Thousands of Europeans, mostly
British, flocked to the booming mining centre of Johannesburg, which grew almost overnight
from a shanty village to a town of 100,000 people.
'The "uitlanders," as Kruger called them, outnumbered the Boers by four to one. They paid nine-
tenths of the taxes, but were rigidly excluded from any share in the government. Discontent
reached boiling point in 1895. British residents of Johannesburg, led by Col. Frank Rhodes
(brother of Cecil Rhodes) and Lionel Phillips (qv) (President of the Chamber of Mines), 
established a National Union of Reformers, which plotted to seize the town and proclaim their
independence from Kruger's government. Cecil Rhodes, now Premier of Cape Colony and chief
of the biggest Rand mining company, sent the rebels arms, ammunition and money.
'The National Union smuggled into Johannesburg 2000 rifles, a dozen Maxim machine-guns, and
100,000 rounds of ammunition. They planned to throw the Boers out of Johannesburg, then
march on Pretoria - the Transvaal capital - blow up the arsenal, arrest Kruger and form a
provisional government. Kruger, who had spies among the rebels, replied by building a fort
outside Johannesburg and concentrating 6000 Boer troops within a few miles of the town.
'Jameson, still administering the South Africa Company from Fort Salisbury, appealed to Rhodes
to allow him to dash into the Transvaal with a body of the British South Africa Company's 
police as soon as the rising broke out. Rhodes agreed on the clear understanding that Jameson
would not move till the Reform Union sent him a message appealing for help. In the meantime,
cautious counsels were prevailing in Johannesburg. Sir Hercules Robinson, British High 
Commissioner at the Cape, was already on his way to Pretoria to act as mediator between the
disgruntled British miners and the Boers. 
'The impetuous Jameson raved at what he considered a lost opportunity. He had already 
collected 500 mounted men, eight Maxim guns and three field guns at Pitsani, near Mafeking,
on the Transvaal border. Feverish with impatience, he sent frantic messages to Rhodes saying
he was ready to "kick the Dutch burghers all round the Transvaal," but Rhodes cautiously
advised him to wait. Kruger also was not anxious for a flare-up. When Boer army chiefs urged
him to attack first, he pulled his beard and muttered: "The tortoise has to stick its head from
its shell before you can chop it off."
'On Sunday, December 29, 1895, Jameson rashly decided to force the issue, firmly believing
direct action would inspire the wavering rebels in Johannesburg. Wearing a light overcoat over
his civilian clothes, he paraded his little force at Pitsani. Three hours later the invaders crossed
the border. They met no opposition. Messages were sent from Johannesburg asking them to
withdraw, but Jameson ignored them. On the third day the "invaders" reached Krugersdorp, 30
miles from Johannesburg. Jameson sent a message to the city urging the rebels to send an
escort of at least 200 men "to show I am not a pirate." No help came. Jameson, bitterly
disillusioned, decided on a gambler's throw - a direct swoop on Pretoria, the Boer capital.
 
'Jameson led his men across the rugged hills to the hamlet of Doornkop, where Commandant
Cronje's Boer troops began to close in on him. Some of Jameson's men were trapped in a 
swamp, where the Boers picked them off with rifles as they floundered helplessly. That night
the remainder, weary, foodless and despairing, camped in a narrow gully. All night the Boers
poured volleys into the camp till Jameson had lost 28 killed and 30 wounded. When dawn broke
his force was completely surrounded. When he saw the black muzzles of Boer guns lined up on
the ridge, he knew the only alternative to annihilation was surrender.
'Jameson and his men were taken in ox carts to Pretoria, where they were imprisoned for six
weeks in the squalid town gaol till Kruger, on the advice of Sir Hercules Robinson, handed them
over to the British Government for trial. The Government ran true to form in dealing with lost
causes. Rhodes was forced to resign the Premiership and other offices. Jameson was taken
ignominiously to London, where in June, 1896, he was sentenced to 15 months' imprisonment in
Holloway Gaol. Six months later he was quietly released because of ill-health.
 
'He returned to South Africa, where he was hailed as a hero. In 1904, with the Boer War won,
Jameson became Premier of Cape Colony. When in 1910 the new Dominion was formed by the
union of the British colonies of the Cape and Natal with the former Boer lands of the Transvaal
and Orange Free State, Jameson was knighted for his part in bringing it about. In 1911 he was
made a baronet. He returned to England in 1912 and died in London on November 26, 1917.'
[In May 1920 his body was taken to Rhodesia and buried near Cecil Rhodes].
 
The Jardine family and the legend of Spedlins Tower
 
 
The following version of the legend of Spedlins Tower appeared in the 'Camperdown Chronicle'
of 18 March 1930. Camperdown is a small town in south-western Victoria, Australia.
 
'A few miles north of Lochmaben, on the banks of the River Annan, stands Spedlins Tower. 
[In a more modern context, it may be better to say that Spedlins Tower stands a few miles
north of Lockerbie, scene of the infamous Pan Am flight 103 bombing in 1988]. A massive heap
now in ruins, it was for centuries the home of a noted Border family, the Jardines of Applegirth.
 
'A strange ghost story, founded on facts, is attached to it.
 
'At the entrance to the tower is a stone stair, and on the first landing of this stair is a massive
wooden trapdoor leading to the dungeon. The story is in close connection with this dungeon.
 
'Early in the 17th century [other versions place the events during the reign of Charles II], a 
grain mill that stood in close proximity to the tower was burned down. [Dunty] Porteous, the 
miller, being accused of wilfully setting it on fire, fled, but was arrested on the shores of the
Solway and confined in the dungeon by order of Alexander Jardine, the laird, who held judicial
powers in the district.
 
'Shortly after this the laird, as one of the members of Parliament for Dumfriesshire, was
summoned to Edinburgh. Before he started he gave full instructions that the prisoner was to
be well looked after and fed; but, unfortunately, he took the key of the dungeon away with
him, and only found out his mistake on reaching the end of his journey.
 
'He was horrified at the discovery, for he knew that this was the only means of getting food
and water to the prisoner, and a special horseman was at once dispatched with the key, and
instructed to ride with all speed.
 
'Meanwhile, at the tower every nook and corner had been searched for it, and desperate
efforts made to force the lock and bolts.
 
'The piercing cries of the prisoner nearly drove the laird's wife out of her mind, and besides
she had the thought of the terrible slur that would be cast on the good name of Jardine if
anyone died for want of food in their stronghold.
 
'As soon as the horseman arrived, the door was opened and a ghastly sight met the eyes
of the warders, for there on the floor lay the prisoner, dead, having gnawed nearly all the
flesh off one of his arms in an attempt to appease the pangs of hunger.
 
'The tragedy caused a great sensation, and as those were the days of superstition the
man's ghost naturally began to appear. The night watchman saw him running round waving
his blood-stained arm above his head, and the inmates of the tower could not sleep for the
noise he made.
 
'The place quickly got a bad name, and everyone went in fear and trembling of Dunty as the
ghost was called (and he still goes by this name in the district); peasants avoided the tower
after dark and even warriors, compelled to pass that way at night, would brace themselves
up and grip their swords tightly.
'The unhappy laird tried every means he could think of to get rid of his unwelcome guest
and was almost in despair, when a priest living on Tweedside came and volunteered to
pacify it.
'He brought with him a large black lettered Bible, which he opened and held at arm's length,
and then, accompanied by attendants swinging censers and carrying lighted tapers, he
proceeded to the dungeon where the prisoner died, next through the great hall and its alcoves,
and then through the upper chambers, prayers being chanted as he passed through them.
'Finally he carried the Bible to one of the window sills in the great hall and there deposited it
to act as the family's guardian, but he warned them if ever the Bible was removed the ghost
would return with worse powers.
'The Bible remained there till the tower was abandoned as a place of residence at the end of
the century, and was then removed to the new mansion on the other side of the river to
continue its good work.
'The tower and estates passed by sale out of the family of the Jardines of Applegirth in 1889,
but the Bible is still preserved as one of their most cherished heirlooms.
'Dunty, however, is still accused of periodically paying visits to members of the family.'
To this day, the folklore of the area says that, if you poke a stick into the dungeon, it will
be half-chewed when it is withdrawn.
Sir Henry Felix Jervis-White-Jervis, 5th and last baronet
The following article appeared in the 'New York Times' of 20 January 1943:-
'By the death of Sir John Henry Jervis-White-Jervis in London, his brother, Henry Felix, known 
as plain "Cap'n" Jervis to residents of Callender [Ontario, Canada] for more than a half century,
learned today that he had become fifth baronet of the line. He was shocked by the news
today of his accession to the title, but declined to see anyone but close friends.
'Declaring he had "nothing to say," the 83-year-old former lake captain and lumberman shut
the door on reporters. Friends said it was probably thirty years since Sir Henry last saw his
brother.
'A resident of Callender since 1890, Sir Henry, who still operates a tourist camp and boat-
renting service here despite his age, was the youngest of three brothers. The other two died
without leaving any sons, making him heir to the title. It is not known whether any estate
accompanies the title, but in any event, those who know Sir Henry do not expect him to leave
his present home because of his age.
'Sir Henry first came to Canada in the early Eighteen Eighties after two years of studying
forestry in Norway and Sweden. For a number of years he was connected with the Lands and
Forest Department, surveying lots for homesteading, but he is probably best known as a lake-
boat operator.'
Sir William Johnson, 1st baronet [GB 1755]
Sir William spent all his adult life in America, where he became a very powerful figure, due
largely to the rapport he established with the native Indian tribes. The following is his entry in
the 1920 edition of "The Encyclopedia Americana":-
'JOHNSON, SIR William, British superintendent-general of Indian affairs in North America: b.
Smithtown, County Meath, Ireland, 1715; d. near Johnstown, N.Y., 11 July 1774. His uncle,
Sir Peter Warren, offered his nephew the management of his entire property in New York, if
the latter would undertake its improvement and settlement. Johnson accepted the offer and 
in 1738 established himself upon a tract of land on the south side of the Mohawk, about 25 
miles from Schenectady, which Sir Peter had called Warrensburgh. In addition to the settling
and improving of the country, he embarked in trade with the Indians, whom he always treated
with perfect honesty and justice. He became a master of their language, speaking many of their
dialects as perfectly as they did themselves and was thoroughly acquainted with their beliefs
and customs. He was adopted by the Mohawks as one of their tribe, chosen a sachem
the Mohawks as one of their own tribe, chosen a sachem [chief] and named Wariaghejage or
Warraghiaghy, "he who has charge of affairs." In 1744 he was appointed colonel of the Six
Nations, in 1746 commissioner of New York for Indian affairs. In 1750 he became a member of
the provincial council. In 1754 be attended as one of the delegates from New York the congress
of Albany and also the great council held with the Indians on that occasion, at which they
strongly urged his reappointment as their superintendent. At the council of Alexandria, 14 April
1755, he was sent for by [General Edward] Braddock [1695-1755] and commissioned by him
"sole superintendent of the affairs of the Six United Nations, their allies and dependents." He
was also, pursuant to the determination of that council, created a major-general and 
commander-in-chief of the provincial forces destined for the expedition against Crown Point. At
the head of these forces, in September 1755, he defeated Baron Dieskau at Lake George. This
victory saved the colony from the French and Johnson received the thanks of Parliament for his 
victory, was voted £5,000 and on 27 Nov. 1755, created a baronet of Great Britain. On his 
arrival at Lac Saint Sacrament a few days before this battle, he gave to it the name of Lake
George, "not only in honor of his majesty, but to assert his undoubted domain here." In March
1756 he received from George II a commission as "colonel, agent, and sole superintendent of 
the affairs of the Six Nations, and other northern Indians." He held this office for the rest of his 
life. In 1758 was present with Abercrombie at Ticonderoga. General Prideaux led the expedition
against Fort Niagara in 1759. Johnson was second in command and upon the death of Prideaux, 
before that fort, succeeded to the command in chief. With upward of 1,000 Indian allies he
continued the siege with great vigor and cut to pieces the French army. He led the same Indian
allies the following year in the Canadian expedition of Amherst [qv] and was present at the 
capitulation of Montreal and the surrender of Canada to the British arms in 1 760. The war was
now at an end and the king granted to Sir William for his services a tract of about 10,000 acres
of land, north of the Mohawk. In 1764, the country being at peace and the Indians perfectly
contented, Sir William erected Johnson Hall, a large wooden edifice still standing. The village of 
Johnstown, with stores, an inn, a courthouse and an Episcopal church was soon laid out. In
1772 it became the shire town of Tryon County. Johnson lived in the style of an old English
baron of former days and exercised a liberal hospitality. In 1768 he concluded the Treaty of
Fort Stanwix. He wrote 'The Language) Customs and Manners of the Six Nations,' published 
in Proceedings of the Philosophical Society of Philadelphia (1772) and his letters have great
historical value.'
Sir John Johnston, 3rd baronet
The following is an extract from the Newgate Calendar:-
Sir John Johnston was born at Kirkcaldy, in Fifeshire. His father had had a good estate, but
had diminished it by extravagant living, so Sir John went young into the army to improve his
fortune. He went over to Ireland, where he thought to better his circumstances by marriage;
and getting into the acquaintance of a Mr Magrath, in the county of Clare, he, by his urbane
conversation, so gained his good opinion, that he frequently invited him to dinner. Mr Magrath
having a daughter, with ten thousand pounds as her portion, Sir John took every opportunity
to insinuate himself into her company, and so far gained upon her affections as to obtain her
consent to elope with him; but the father, having some hints given him of their private
courtship, kept a very watchful eye over their actions, and at last, being confirmed in his
suspicions, forbade Sir John his house, and kept his daughter close.
Miss Magrath being uneasy under her confinement, and deprived of the company of Sir John,
whom she loved to distraction, made a kinswoman her confidante, and entrusted her with a
letter to Sir John, to let him know how uneasy her life was, and that if he would come to
such a place, at a stated time, she would endeavour to make her escape, and meet him. But
the lady, thinking she should gain most by obliging her uncle, delivered the letter to him, 
instead of Sir John. Mr Magrath, having read it, sealed it up again, and sent it to Sir John, who
received it with a great deal of satisfaction, and immediately wrote an answer, and returned it
by the same messenger. But, repairing to the place of rendezvous, instead of meeting the 
lady, he fell into an ambuscade of fellows with sticks and clubs, who beat him so unmercifully
that he promised to relinquish his pursuit.
Having been in London some time, and spent his money, he was obliged to apply to some of
his countrymen for support; and Captain James Campbell, brother of the Earl of Argyll, having
a design to steal an heiress, one Miss Mary Wharton, he and Mr Montgomery were assistants
in the affair. Miss Wharton was the daughter of Philip Wharton, Esq., and at the age of 13, by
his death, inherited £1500 per annum, besides a personal property to the amount of £1000.
This young lady resided with her mother in Great Queen Street, and Captain James Campbell,
brother of the Earl of Argyll, wishing to possess so rich a prize, determined to marry her 
perforce, and for that purpose prevailed upon Sir John Johnston and Archibald Montgomery
to assist him in conveying Miss Wharton from her home, which being done, and a reward of
£100 offered for the apprehension of Captain Campbell and £50 a-piece for him and Mr
Montgomery. Sir John, being betrayed by his landlord, was apprehended and indicted for it,
the 11th of December 1690.
The evidence was, in substance, that Miss Mary Wharton, being an heiress of considerable
fortune, and under the care of her guardian (Mr Bierly), was decoyed out on the 10th of
November, and being met with by Sir John Johnston, Captain Campbell and Mr Montgomery, in
Queen Street, was forced into a coach with six horses (appointed to wait there by Captain
Campbell) and carried to the coachman's house, and there married to Captain Campbell, 
against the consent of herself, or knowledge of her guardian. The jury having found the 
prisoner guilty, he received sentence of death.
The enterprise succeeded but too well to Johnston's cost. Campbell, who was the real culprit,
escaped punishment, and married Margaret Leslie, daughter of David Lord Newark, after
Parliament had dissolved his first marriage; but every effort to save Johnston proved 
ineffectual. Miss Wharton afterwards married Colonel Bierly, who commanded a regiment of
horse in the service of William III.
At the place of execution, Sir John addressed the spectators in a long speech, in which he
not only endeavoured to make it appear he was blameless in the transaction for which he
suffered, but that he had been greatly wronged in printed papers, in which he was charged
with a rape at Chester, and a similar crime at Utrecht, in Holland. He was executed at Tyburn,
the 23rd of December 1690.
Sir Thomas Judkin-Fitzgerald, 3rd baronet
Sir Thomas committed suicide by drowning himself. The following report of the subsequent
inquest appeared in 'The Hull Packet and East Riding Times' of 6 May 1864:-
'On Friday last an inquest was held by Dr Morissy, coroner of the Dublin district, on the body 
of Sir Thomas Judkin Fitzgerald, who had committed suicide by drowning himself in the River Suir
on the Tuesday night previous. He was of an ancient family, and competent estates, but the
Fitzgeralds bear upon their ancestral name a blazonry of misfortune……….
'Sir Thomas, we are told, was deeply involved in debt; his liabilities pressed heavily upon him; he 
had been badgered by money lenders, solicitors, and the entire tribe of harpies who find their
favourite prey in an easygoing Irish landlord. And this torture, it would seem, had lasted for a
considerable time. There was at the last moment an execution in his house for £300, and that
drove the unhappy man to his deed of self-immolation. Not through the inquest, or any other
medium, shall we ever learn the full detail of the agony which rent his brain, and whirled him
away, so to speak, from his bed to the brink of the deep stream; but enough is known to
account for the act of madness committed by a man of violent temper, of sanguine hopes, of
gloomy fears, of every contradiction and intensity indeed which is possible in human nature,
wanting the strength of Christian faith and forbearance under suffering.
'This frenzied bankrupt had been for a week engaged in Dublin, in endeavouring to settle with
his more obdurate creditors, to raise a loan, or otherwise to avert the scandal of an avowed
financial collapse. These efforts failed, and with a deliberation which left a terrible question
for the jury to answer, Sir Thomas Judkin Fitzgerald sat down in the Irish capital, and wrote a
letter to his attorney, quitting Dublin immediately afterwards by train. The solicitor, apparently
after some delay, opened the epistle addressed to him, and found directions for the finding of
his client's body. Instantly the benevolent law was put in force; telegrams were despatched
for the peremptory arrest of the Lord of Golden Hills; but the murder had been done before the
alarm was sounded, and the 'dark night's work' was over.
 
'Silent and moody, the baronet had driven a car from Goold-cross station to Golden Hills; he
reached home half an hour after midnight; the butler waited for him; he visited his wife for a 
few minutes in her own room; he took tea, and 'ordered the things away' as usual; he drank no
wine or spirits - and was not in the habit of drinking them. And then, unbarring the hall door, he
went out alone into the park. 
'Presently a great fear came over the mind of his miserable wife. She aroused the household,
employing a strange expression - 'Sir Thomas has gone out somewhere, and he has not 
returned; I fear he has got a weakness' - a phrase indicating that he had exhibited dangerous 
eccentricities upon previous occasions. Men with lanterns searched the grounds until daylight,
and not till then was a letter found, in which Sir Thomas Judkin Fitzgerald declared his resolve
to die. How abject are the last words of the suicide, 'My body will be found in the weir, at that
part called the Pig-hole.' And 'my poor body will be found in the Suir at Pig-hole, where all the
salmon are taken, near where the white-thorn is that was lately cut.' See how, amid the 
insanity and distraction of that fearful midnight, method, order, and precaution prevailed in the
self-murderer's brain; he dreaded lest his remains should not be recovered from the water; he 
fixed upon the particular locality of his death; he threw off hat and coat before taking that
horrible plunge into the dark; in all things he acted as a rational being except in the one ghastly, 
guilty deed of embracing death in order to escape the clutches of a sheriff's officer.
'From all that it is possible to learn, we may infer that Sir Thomas wandered about the estate
which was so encumbered for hours before he rushed down [to] the black water by the weir.
We must assume, also, that he drugged himself before leaping into the stream, because he
was an admirable swimmer, and the common report went so far as to declare that he could
not drown himself if he felt inclined. However, there he floated in mid-river on Wednesday
morning, with foam upon his lips and his lungs still warm, so that hours must have elapsed
between his mad exit from the house at Golden Hills and the struggling rush into the weedy 
Suir.'
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