BARONETAGE
Last updated 22/03/2014
Names of baronets shown in blue 
have not yet proved succession and, as a
result, their name has not yet been placed on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage.
Date Type Order Name Born Died  Age
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the baronet was
baptised on that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate 
that the baronet was buried on that date
LEES of Black Rock,co.Dublin
30 Jun 1804 UK 1 John Lees                                        Sep 1811
Sep 1811 2 Harcourt Lees                                         29 Nov 1776 7 Mar 1852 75
7 Mar 1852 3 John Lees                                     31 Dec 1816 19 Jun 1892 75
19 Jun 1892 4 Harcourt James Lees                24 Apr 1840 22 Mar 1917 76
22 Mar 1917 5 Arthur Henry James Lees      18 Jan 1863 10 Mar 1949 86
10 Mar 1948 6 Jean Marie Ivor Lees                        30 Mar 1875 2 Apr 1957 82
2 Apr 1957 7 Charles Archibald Edward Ivor Lees 6 Mar 1902 4 Jan 1963 60
4 Jan 1963 8 Thomas Harcourt Ivor Lees 6 Nov 1941
LEES of South Lytchett Manor,Dorset
13 Feb 1897 UK 1 Elliott Lees                                  23 Oct 1860 16 Oct 1908 47
MP for Oldham 1886-1892 and
Birkenhead 1894-1906                         
16 Oct 1908 2 Thomas Evans Keith Lees                 11 Apr 1886 24 Aug 1915 29
24 Aug 1915 3 John Victor Elliott Lees        11 Dec 1887 16 Apr 1955 67
16 Apr 1955 4 Thomas Edward Lees           31 Jan 1925
LEES of Longdendale,Cheshire
2 Mar 1937 UK 1 William Clare Lees                   9 Dec 1874 26 May 1951 76
26 May 1951 2 William Hereward Clare Lees 6 Mar 1904 20 Apr 1976 72
20 Apr 1976 3 William Antony Clare Lees     14 Jun 1935
LEESE of Worfield,Salop
15 Jul 1908 UK 1 Joseph Francis Leese             28 Feb 1845 29 Jul 1914 69
MP for Accrington 1892-1909
29 Jul 1914 2 William Hargreaves Leese     24 Aug 1868 17 Jan 1937 68
17 Jan 1937 3 Oliver William Hargreaves Leese 27 Oct 1894 22 Jan 1978 83
22 Jan 1978 4 Alexander William Leese     27 Sep 1909 30 Jul 1979 69
to     Extinct or dormant on his death                            
30 Jul 1979      
   
  LE FLEMING of Rydal Hall,Westmorland
4 Oct 1705 E 1 William Fleming 25 Jul 1656 29 Aug 1736 80
MP for Westmorland 1696-1700
and 1704-1705
29 Aug 1736 2 George Fleming c 1670 2 Jul 1747
2 Jul 1747 3 William Fleming 31 Mar 1757
MP for Cumberland 1756-1757
31 Mar 1757 4 Michael Le Fleming 10 Dec 1748 19 May 1806 57
MP for Westmorland 1774-1806
19 May 1806 5 Daniel Fleming c 1785 1821
1821 6 Richard Fleming 4 Nov 1791 3 Apr 1857 65
3 Apr 1857 7 Michael Le Fleming 6 Apr 1828 1883 55
1883 8 Andrew Fleming Hudleston Le Fleming 1855 20 Oct 1925 70
20 Oct 1925 9 William Hudleston Le Fleming 26 May 1861 31 Oct 1945 84
1945 10 Frank Thomas Le Fleming 27 Dec 1887 5 Jul 1971 83
5 Jul 1971 11 William Kelland Le Fleming 27 Apr 1922 1 Nov 1988 66
1 Nov 1988 12 Quentin John Le Fleming 27 Jun 1949 4 Mar 1995 45
4 Mar 1995 13 David Kelland Le Fleming 12 Jan 1976
LEGARD of Ganton,Yorks
29 Dec 1660 E 1 John Legard c 1631 1 Jul 1678
MP for Scarborough 1660 and 1660-1661
Jul 1678 2 John Legard 16 Jun 1659 5 May 1715 55
5 May 1715 3 John Legard c 1685 14 Apr 1719
14 Apr 1719 4 Thomas Legard c 1686 1735
1735 5 Digby Legard c 1730 4 Feb 1773
4 Feb 1773 6 John Legard c 1758 16 Jul 1807
16 Jul 1807 7 Thomas Legard 5 Dec 1762 5 Jul 1830 67
5 Jul 1830 8 Thomas Digby Legard 30 May 1803 10 Dec 1860 57
10 Dec 1860 9 Francis Digby Legard 8 May 1833 5 Jan 1865 31
5 Jan 1865 10 Darcy Willoughby Legard 10 Dec 1843 12 Apr 1866 22
12 Apr 1866 11 Charles Legard 2 Apr 1846 7 Dec 1901 55
MP for Scarborough 1874-1880
7 Dec 1901 12 Algernon Willoughby Legard 14 Oct 1842 9 Sep 1923 80
9 Sep 1923 13 Digby Algernon Hall Legard 7 Dec 1876 5 Jan 1961 84
5 Jan 1961 14 Thomas Digby Legard 16 Oct 1905 27 Mar 1984 78
27 Mar 1984 15 Charles Thomas Legard 26 Oct 1938
LEICESTER of Tabley,Cheshire
10 Aug 1660 E 1 Peter Leicester 3 Mar 1614 11 Oct 1678 64
11 Oct 1678 2 Robert Leicester 11 Sep 1643 7 Jul 1684 40
7 Jul 1684 3 Francis Leicester 30 Jul 1674 5 Aug 1742 68
to     MP for Newton 1715-1727
5 Aug 1742 Extinct on his death                            
LEICESTER of Nether Tabley,Cheshire
17 May 1671 E 1 Gregory Byrne   Mar 1712  
Mar 1712 2 Daniel Byrne 1676 25 Sep 1715 39
7 Jul 1684 3 John Byrne c 1705 Jan 1742  
Jan 1742 4 Peter Byrne (Leicester from 1744) Dec 1732 12 Feb 1770 37
12 Feb 1770 5 John Fleming Leicester,later [1826] 1st
Baron de Tabley 4 Apr 1762 18 Jun 1827 65
18 Jun 1827 6 George Fleming Warren,2nd Baron de Tabley 28 Oct 1811 19 Oct 1887 75
19 Oct 1887 7 John Byrne Leicester,3rd Baron de Tabley 26 Apr 1835 22 Nov 1895 60
22 Nov 1895 8 Peter Fleming Frederic Leicester 25 Jan 1863 12 Jan 1945 81
12 Jan 1945 9 Charles Byrne Warren Leicester 30 Mar 1896 18 May 1968 72
to     Extinct on his death                            
18 May 1968
LEIGH of Stoneleigh,Warwicks
29 Jun 1611 E 1 Thomas Leigh 1 Feb 1626
1 Feb 1626 2 Thomas Leigh 1595 24 Feb 1672 76
He was subsequently created Baron Leigh
(qv) in 1643 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
in 1786 
LEIGH of Newnham,Warwicks
24 Dec 1618 E 1 Francis Leigh 21 Dec 1653
He was subsequently created Earl of
Chichester (qv) in 1644 with which title 
the baronetcy then merged until its 
extinction in 1653
LEIGH of Tyrone
Feb 1622 I 1 Daniel Leigh 1633
1633 2 Arthur Leigh 30 Jul 1638
to     Extinct on his death                            
30 Jul 1638
LEIGH of South Carolina,America
15 May 1773 GB 1 Egerton Leigh 11 Oct 1733 c 1785
c 1785 2 Egerton Leigh c 1760 27 Apr 1818
27 Apr 1818 3 Samuel Egerton Leigh 10 Nov 1796 c 1870
to     Extinct on his death                            
c 1870
LEIGH of Whitley,Lancs
22 May 1815 UK 1 Robert Holt Leigh 25 Dec 1762 21 Jan 1843 80
to     MP for Wigan 1802-1820
21 Jan 1843 Extinct on his death                            
LEIGH of Altrincham,Cheshire
9 Feb 1918 UK 1 John Leigh 3 Aug 1884 28 Jul 1959 74
MP for Clapham 1922-1945
28 Jul 1959 2 John Leigh 24 Mar 1909 13 Dec 1992 83
13 Dec 1992 3 Richard Henry Leigh 11 Nov 1936
  LEIGHTON of Wattlesborough,Salop
2 Mar 1693 E 1 Edward Leighton c 1650 6 Apr 1711
MP for Shropshire 1698-1700 and
Shrewsbury 1709-1710
Apr 1711 2 Edward Leighton 11 Aug 1681 6 May 1756 74
6 May 1756 3 Charlton Leighton c 1715 5 May 1780
5 May 1780 4 Charlton Leighton 1747 9 Sep 1784 37
MP for Shrewsbury 1774-1775 and 1780-1784
9 Sep 1784 5 Robert Leighton 1752 21 Feb 1819 66
21 Feb 1819 6 Baldwin Leighton 15 Jan 1747 13 Nov 1828 81
13 Nov 1828 7 Baldwin Leighton 31 May 1805 26 May 1871 65
MP for Shropshire South 1859-1865
26 May 1871 8 Baldwin Leighton 27 Oct 1836 22 Jan 1897 60
MP for Shropshire South 1877-1885
22 Jan 1897 9 Bryan Baldwin Mawddwy Leighton 26 Nov 1868 19 Jan 1919 50
19 Jan 1919 10 Richard Tihel Leighton 13 Feb 1893 26 Sep 1957 64
26 Sep 1957 11 Michael John Bryan Leighton 8 Mar 1935
LEIGHTON of Holland Park Road,Middlesex
11 Feb 1886 UK 1 Frederic Leighton 3 Dec 1830 25 Jan 1896 65
He was subsequently created Baron
Leighton (qv) in 1896 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
the following day
LEITH of Newcastle,Northumberland
12 Sep 1919 UK 1 Alexander Leith 24 Sep 1869 9 Nov 1956 87
to     Extinct on his death                            
9 Nov 1956
LEITH of Fyvie,Aberdeen
7 Mar 1923 UK See "Forbes-Leith"
LEITH-BUCHANAN
of Burgh St Peter,Norfolk
21 Nov 1775 GB 1 Alexander Leith 1741 3 Oct 1780 39
MP for Tregony 1774-1780
3 Oct 1780 2 George Alexander William Leith c 1765 26 Jan 1842
26 Jan 1842 3 Alexander William Wellesley Leith 30 Oct 1806 3 Apr 1842 35
3 Apr 1842 4 George Hector Leith (Leith-Buchanan from 1877) 10 Aug 1833 29 Sep 1903 70
29 Sep 1903 5 Alexander Wellesley George Thomas 
Leith-Buchanan 5 Dec 1866 29 Apr 1925 58
29 Apr 1925 6 George Hector Macdonald Leith-Buchanan 30 Jan 1889 1 Aug 1973 84
1 Aug 1973 7 Charles Alexander James Leith-Buchanan 1 Sep 1939 8 Feb 1998 58
8 Feb 1998 8 Gordon Kelly McNicol Leith-Buchanan 18 Oct 1974
  LEKE of Sutton,Derby
22 May 1611 E 1 Francis Leke by 1581 9 Apr 1655
He was subsequently created Earl of
Scarsdale (qv) in 1645 with which title
the baronetcy then merged until its
extinction in 1736
LEKE of Newark-upon-Trent,Notts
15 Dec 1663 E 1 Francis Leke 1 Nov 1627 Oct 1679 51
MP for Nottinghamshire 1666-1679
Oct 1679 2 Francis Leke 19 Jun 1681
to     Extinct on his death                            
Jun 1681
  LEMAN of Northaw,Herts
3 Mar 1665 E 1 William Leman 3 Sep 1667
MP for Hertford 1645-1653 and 1659-1660
Sep 1667 2 William Leman 19 Dec 1637 18 Jul 1701 63
MP for Hertford 1690-1695
18 Jul 1701 3 William Leman 1685 22 Dec 1741 56
22 Dec 1741 4 Tanfield Leman 13 Apr 1714 1762 48
to     On his death the baronetcy presumably
1762 became extinct, although it was assumed by
at least two parties in the late 1830s and 
early 1840s
For further information on the subsequent
history of this baronetcy, see the note at the
foot of this page
LE MARCHANT of Chobham Place,Surrey
14 Oct 1841 UK 1 Denis Le Marchant 3 Jul 1795 30 Oct 1874 79
MP for Worcester 1846-1847
30 Oct 1874 2 Henry Denis Le Marchant 15 Feb 1839 21 Jan 1915 75
21 Jan 1915 3 Denis Le Marchant 8 Jun 1870 29 Apr 1922 51
29 Apr 1922 4 Edward Thomas Le Marchant 23 Oct 1871 17 Nov 1953 82
17 Nov 1953 5 Denis Le Marchant 28 Feb 1906 20 Aug 1987 81
20 Aug 1987 6 Francis Arthur Le Marchant 6 Oct 1939
  LEMON of Carclew,Cornwall
24 May 1774 GB 1 William Lemon 11 Oct 1748 11 Dec 1824 76
MP for Penrhyn 1770-1774 and
Cornwall 1774-1824
11 Dec 1824 2 Charles Lemon 3 Sep 1784 13 Feb 1868 83
to     MP for Penrhyn 1807-1812 and 1830-1831,
13 Feb 1868 Cornwall 1831-1832 and Cornwall West
1832-1841 and 1842-1857
Extinct on his death                            
LENNARD of West Wickham,Kent
15 Aug 1642 E 1 Stephen Lennard c 1604 29 Jan 1680
Jan 1680 2 Stephen Lennard 2 Mar 1637 15 Dec 1709 72
MP for Winchilsea 1681 and Kent 1698-1700
and 1708-1709
15 Dec 1709 3 Samuel Lennard 2 Oct 1672 8 Oct 1727 55
to     MP for Hythe 1715-1727
8 Oct 1727 Extinct on his death                            
LENNARD of Bell House,Essex
30 Jun 1801 UK See "Barrett-Lennard"
LENNARD of Wickham Court,Kent
6 May 1880 UK 1 John Farnaby Lennard 27 Sep 1816 27 Dec 1899 83
27 Dec 1899 2 Henry Arthur Hallam Farnaby Lennard 7 Nov 1859 26 Feb 1928 68
26 Feb 1928 3 Stephen Arthur Hallam Farnaby Lennard 31 Jul 1899 20 Apr 1980 80
to     Extinct on his death                            
20 Apr 1980
LEON of Bletchley Park,Bucks
5 Jul 1911 UK 1 Herbert Samuel Leon 11 Feb 1850 23 Jul 1926 76
MP for Buckingham 1891-1895
23 Jul 1926 2 George Edward Leon 7 May 1875 14 May 1947 72
14 May 1947 3 Ronald George Leon 22 Oct 1902 29 Aug 1964 61
29 Aug 1964 4 John Ronald Leon 16 Aug 1934
LESLIE of Wardis,Aberdeen
1 Sep 1625 NS 1 John Leslie 1640
1640 2 John Leslie 1645
1645 3 William Leslie c 1680
to     On his death the baronetcy became dormant
c 1680
c 1800 4 John Leslie c 1750 30 Sep 1825 75
He assumed the title c 1800
30 Sep 1825 5 Charles Abraham Leslie 4 Jul 1796 1 Mar 1847 50
1 Mar 1847 6 Norman Robert Leslie 10 Dec 1822 12 Jun 1857 34
For information on the death of this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
12 Jun 1857 7 Charles Henry Leslie 27 Nov 1848 12 Oct 1905 56
12 Oct 1905 8 Norman Roderick Alexander David Leslie 10 Jan 1889 16 Jun 1937 48
16 Jun 1937 9 Henry John Lindores Leslie 26 Aug 1920 21 Jun 1967 46
21 Jun 1967 10 Percy Theodore Leslie 19 Nov 1915
LESLIE of Juniper Hill,Surrey
22 Jan 1784 GB See "Pepys"
LESLIE of Tarbert,Kerry
3 Sep 1787 I 1 Edward Leslie 1744 21 Nov 1818 74
to     Extinct on his death                            
21 Nov 1818
LESLIE of Glaslough,co.Monaghan
21 Feb 1876 UK 1 John Leslie 16 Dec 1822 23 Jan 1916 93
MP for Monaghan 1871-1880
23 Jan 1916 2 John Leslie 7 Aug 1857 25 Jan 1944 86
Lord Lieutenant Monaghan 1921-1922
25 Jan 1944 3 John Randolph Shane Leslie 24 Sep 1885 13 Aug 1971 85
13 Aug 1971 4 John Norman Ide Leslie 6 Dec 1916
L'ESTRANGE of Hunstanton,Norfolk
1 Jun 1629 E 1 Nicholas L'Estrange 27 Mar 1604 24 Jul 1655 51
24 Jul 1655 2 Hamon L'Estrange 8 Dec 1631 15 Feb 1656 24
15 Feb 1656 3 Nicholas L'Estrange 17 Oct 1632 13 Dec 1669 37
13 Dec 1669 4 Nicholas L'Estrange 2 Dec 1661 18 Dec 1724 63
MP for Castle Rising 1685-1689
18 Dec 1724 5 Thomas L'Estrange 1689 8 Nov 1751 62
8 Nov 1751 6 Henry L'Estrange 2 Sep 1760
2 Sep 1760 7 Roger L'Estrange 21 Apr 1762
to     Extinct on his death                            
21 Apr 1762
LETHBRIDGE of Westway House and
Winkley Court,Devon
15 Jun 1804 UK 1 John Lethbridge 12 Mar 1746 15 Dec 1815 69
MP for Minehead 1806-1807
15 Dec 1815 2 Thomas Buckler Lethbridge 21 Feb 1778 17 Oct 1849 71
17 Oct 1849 3 John Hesketh Lethbridge 1798 1 Mar 1873 74
1 Mar 1873 4 Wroth Acland Lethbridge 2 Jan 1831 26 Nov 1902 71
26 Nov 1902 5 Wroth Periam Christopher Lethbridge 19 Dec 1863 20 Feb 1950 86
20 Feb 1950 6 Hector Wroth Lethbridge 26 Aug 1898 29 Jun 1978 79
29 Jun 1978 7 Thomas Periam Hector Noel Lethbridge 17 Jul 1950
LETT of Walmer,Kent
31 Jan 1941 UK 1 Hugh Lett Apr 1876 19 Jul 1964 88
to     Extinct on his death                            
19 Jul 1964
LEVENTHORPE of Shingey Hall,Herts
30 May 1622 E 1 John Leventhorpe c 1560 23 Sep 1625
23 Sep 1625 2 Thomas Leventhorpe 18 May 1592 30 Apr 1636 43
30 Apr 1636 3 John Leventhorpe 30 Jul 1629 29 Nov 1649 20
29 Nov 1649 4 Thomas Leventhorpe 30 Nov 1635 27 Jul 1679 43
27 Jul 1679 5 Charles Leventhorpe 15 Sep 1594 30 Aug 1680 86
to     Extinct on his death                            
30 Aug 1680
LEVER of Hans Crescent,London
8 Feb 1911 UK 1 Arthur Levy Lever 17 Nov 1860 23 Aug 1924 63
MP for Harwich 1906-1910 and Hackney
Central 1922-1923
23 Aug 1924 2 Tresham Joseph Philip Lever 3 Sep 1900 30 Apr 1975 74
30 Apr 1975 3 Tresham Christopher Arthur Lindsay Lever 9 Jan 1932
LEVER of Hulme,Cheshire
6 Jul 1911 UK 1 William Hesketh Lever 19 Sep 1851 7 May 1925 73
He was subsequently created Baron
Leverhulme (qv) in 1917 with which title 
the baronetcy remained merged until its
extinction in 2000
LEVER of Allerton,Lancs
3 Feb 1920 UK 1 Samuel Hardman Lever 18 Apr 1869 1 Jul 1947 78
to     Extinct on his death                            
1 Jul 1947
LEVESON-GOWER of Sittersham,Yorks
2 Jun 1620 E See "Gower"
LEVINGE of High Park,co.Westmeath
26 Oct 1704 I 1 Richard Levinge 2 May 1656 13 Jul 1724 68
MP for Chester 1690-1695 and Derby 1710-11
Solicitor General [I] 1690-1695 and 1704-
1709. Speaker of the House of Commons
[I] 1692. Attorney General [I] 1711-1714.
Chief Justice of the Common Pleas [I]
1720-1724.  PC [I] 1721
13 Jul 1724 2 Richard Levinge 1685 27 Feb 1748 62
27 Feb 1748 3 Charles Levinge 1693 29 May 1762 68
29 May 1762 4 Richard Levinge c 1723 30 Oct 1786
30 Oct 1786 5 Charles Levinge 17 Apr 1751 19 Jan 1796 44
19 Jan 1796 6 Richard Levinge 29 Oct 1785 12 Sep 1848 62
12 Sep 1848 7 Richard George Augustus Levinge 1 Nov 1811 28 Sep 1884 72
MP for co.Westmeath 1857-1865
28 Sep 1884 8 Vere Henry Levinge 28 Nov 1819 22 Mar 1885 65
22 Mar 1885 9 William Henry Levinge 21 May 1849 17 Apr 1900 50
17 Apr 1900 10 Richard William Levinge 12 Jul 1878 30 Oct 1914 36
30 Oct 1914 11 Richard Vere Henry Levinge 30 Apr 1911 27 Dec 1984 73
27 Dec 1984 12 Richard George Robin Levinge 18 Dec 1946
LEVY of Humberstone Hall,Leics
4 Feb 1913 UK 1 Maurice Levy 9 Jun 1859 26 Aug 1933 74
MP for Loughborough 1900-1918
26 Aug 1933 2 Ewart Maurice Levy 10 May 1897 11 Apr 1996 98
to     Extinct on his death                            
11 Apr 1996
LEVY-LAWSON of Hall Barn,Bucks
and Peterborough Court,London
13 Oct 1892 UK 1 Edward Levy-Lawson             28 Dec 1833 9 Jan 1916 82
He was subsequently created Baron
Burnham (qv) in 1903 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged
LEWIS of Llangorse,Brecon
14 Sep 1628 E 1 William Lewis 26 Mar 1598 c Nov 1677 79
to     MP for Petersfield 1640 and 1640-1648,
Nov 1677 Breconshire 1660 and Lymington 1661-1677
Extinct on his death                            
LEWIS of Ledstone
15 Oct 1660 E 1 John Lewis c 1615 14 Aug 1671
to     Extinct on his death                            
14 Aug 1671
LEWIS of Harpton Court,Radnor
11 Jul 1846 UK 1 Thomas Frankland Lewis 14 May 1780 22 Jan 1855 74
MP for Beaumaris 1812-1826, Ennis 1826-
1828, Radnorshire 1828-1835 and Radnor
1847-1855.  Secretary to the Treasury
1827-1828. Vice President of the Board of
Trade 1828. Treasurer of the Navy 1830.
PC 1828
22 Jan 1855 2 George Cornewall Lewis 21 Apr 1806 13 Apr 1863 56
MP for Herefordshire 1847-1852 and Radnor 
1855-1863. Chancellor of the Exchequer 1855-
1858. Home Secretary 1859-1861. Secretary of
State for War 1861-1863.  PC 1855
13 Apr 1863 3 Gilbert Frankland Lewis 21 Jul 1808 18 Dec 1883 75
18 Dec 1883 4 Herbert Edmund Frankland Lewis 31 Mar 1846 7 Nov 1911 65
to     Extinct on his death                            
7 Nov 1911
LEWIS of Brighton,Sussex
6 Apr 1887 UK 1 Charles Edward Lewis 25 Dec 1825 10 Feb 1893 67
to     MP for Londonderry 1872-1886 and Antrim North
10 Feb 1893 1887-1892
Extinct on his death                            
LEWIS of Nantgwyne,Glamorgan
15 Feb 1896 UK 1 William Thomas Lewis 5 Aug 1837 27 Aug 1914 77
He was subsequently created Baron
Merthyr (qv) in 1911 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged,although,as at
31/12/2013,the baronetcy does not appear on 
the Official Roll of the Baronetage
LEWIS of Portland Place,London
1 Aug 1902 UK 1 George Henry Lewis 21 Apr 1833 7 Dec 1911 78
7 Dec 1911 2 George James Graham Lewis 12 Sep 1868 8 Aug 1927 58
For information on the death of this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
8 Aug 1927 3 George James Ernest Lewis 25 Feb 1910 2 Jan 1945 34
to     Extinct on his death                            
2 Jan 1945
LEWIS of Essendon,Herts
11 Feb 1918 UK 1 Frederick William Lewis 25 May 1870 24 Jun 1944 74
He was subsequently created Baron
Essendon (qv) in 1932 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
in 1978
LEWTHWAITE of Broadgate,Cumberland
26 Jan 1927 UK 1 William Lewthwaite 29 Oct 1853 13 Dec 1927 74
13 Dec 1927 2 William Lewthwaite 20 Jun 1882 13 Jun 1933 50
13 Jun 1933 3 William Anthony Lewthwaite 26 Feb 1912 25 Dec 1993 81
25 Dec 1993 4 Rainald Gilfrid Lewthwaite 21 Jul 1913 15 Apr 2003 89
15 Apr 2003 5 David Rainald Lewthwaite 26 Mar 1940 28 Jul 2004 64
to     Extinct on his death                            
28 Jul 2004
LEY of Westbury,Wilts
20 Jul 1619 E 1 James Ley 1552 14 Mar 1629 76
He was subsequently created Earl of
Marlborough (qv) in 1626 with which title
the baronetcy then merged until its
extinction in 1679
LEY of Epperstone Manor,Notts
27 Dec 1905 UK 1 Francis Ley 3 Jan 1846 27 Jan 1916 70
27 Jan 1916 2 Henry Gordon Ley 12 Mar 1874 27 Sep 1944 70
27 Sep 1944 3 Gerald Gordon Ley 5 Nov 1902 24 Mar 1980 77
24 Mar 1980 4 Francis Douglas Ley 5 Apr 1907 10 May 1995 88
10 May 1995 5 Ian Francis Ley 12 Jun 1934
LEYLAND of Hyde Park House,London
31 Aug 1895 UK See "Naylor-Leyland"
LIDDELL
of Ravensworth Castle,Northumberland
2 Nov 1642 E 1 Thomas Liddell 1650
1650 2 Thomas Liddell Nov 1697
Nov 1697 3 Henry Liddell c 1644 1 Sep 1723
MP for Durham 1689-1690 and 1695-1698 and 
Newcastle upon Tyne 1701-1705 and 1706-1710
1 Sep 1723 4 Henry Liddell,later [1747] 1st Baron 
Ravensworth 1 Aug 1708 30 Jan 1784 75
MP for Morpeth 1734-1747
30 Jan 1784 5 Henry George Liddell 25 Nov 1749 26 Nov 1791 42
26 Nov 1791 6 Thomas Henry Liddell 8 Feb 1775 7 Mar 1855 80
He was subsequently created Baron
    Ravensworth (qv) in 1821 with which title      
the baronetcy remains merged,although as at
31/12/2013 the baronetcy does not appear on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage
       
   
LIGHTON of Merville,co.Dublin      
   
1 Mar 1791 I 1 Thomas Lighton by 1756 27 Apr 1805
27 Apr 1805 2 Thomas Lighton 19 May 1787 11 May 1816 28
11 May 1816 3 Thomas Lighton 1814 1817 3
1817 4 John Lees Lighton 1 Jan 1792 5 Apr 1827 35
5 Apr 1827 5 John Hamilton Lighton 20 May 1818 29 Apr 1844 25
29 Apr 1844 6 Christopher Robert Lighton 28 May 1819 12 Apr 1875 55
For information on the death of his son John,
see the note at the foot of this page
12 Apr 1875 7 Christopher Robert Lighton 4 Jul 1848 15 Aug 1929 81
15 Aug 1929 8 Christopher Robert Lighton 30 Jun 1897 1 Aug 1993 96
1 Aug 1993 9 Thomas Hamilton Lighton 4 Nov 1954
LINDSAY of Evelick,Perth
15 Apr 1666 NS 1 Alexander Lindsay c 1690
c 1690 2 Alexander Lindsay 26 Feb 1660 c 1720
c 1720 3 Alexander Lindsay 6 May 1762
6 May 1762 4 David Lindsay c 1732 6 Mar 1797
6 Mar 1797 5 Charles Scott Lindsay 6 Mar 1799
to     Extinct on his death                            
6 Mar 1799
LINDSAY of West Ville,Lincs
4 Sep 1821 UK 1 Coutts Trotter 15 Sep 1767 1 Sep 1837 69
1 Sep 1837 2 Coutts Lindsay 2 Feb 1824 7 May 1913 89
to     Extinct on his death                            
7 May 1913  
LINDSAY of Dowhill,Kinross
27 Feb 1962 UK 1 Martin Alexander Lindsay 22 Aug 1905 5 May 1981 75
MP for Solihull 1945-1964
5 May 1981 2 Ronald Alexander Lindsay 6 Dec 1933 6 Mar 2004 70
6 Mar 2004 3 James Martin Evelyn Lindsay 11 Oct 1968
LINDSAY-HOGG of Rotherfield Hall,Sussex
22 Dec 1905 UK 1 Lindsay Lindsay-Hogg 10 Mar 1853 25 Nov 1923 70
MP for Eastbourne 1900-1906
25 Nov 1923 2 Anthony Henry Lindsay-Hogg 1 May 1908 31 Oct 1968 60
31 Oct 1968 3 William Lindsay Lindsay-Hogg 12 Aug 1930 7 Dec 1987 57
7 Dec 1987 4 Edward William Lindsay-Hogg 23 May 1910 18 Jun 1999 89
18 Jun 1999 5 Michael Edward Lindsay-Hogg 5 May 1940
  LIPPINCOTT of Stoke Bishop,Gloucs
7 Sep 1778 GB 1 Henry Lippincott 14 Sep 1737 30 Dec 1780 43
MP for Bristol 1780
30 Dec 1780 2 Henry Cann Lippincott 5 Jun 1776 23 Aug 1829 53
to     Extinct on his death                            
23 Aug 1829 For further information on this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
LIPTON of Osidge,Middlesex
29 Jul 1902 UK 1 Thomas Johnstone Lipton 10 May 1850 2 Oct 1931 81
to     Extinct on his death                            
2 Oct 1931 For further information on this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
LISTER of Park Crescent,Middlesex
26 Dec 1883 UK 1 Joseph Lister 5 Apr 1827 10 Feb 1912 84
He was subsequently created Baron Lister
(qv) in 1897 with which title the baronetcy
then merged until its extinction in 1912
 
LISTER-KAYE of Grange,Yorks
28 Dec 1812 UK 1 John Lister-Kaye 28 Feb 1827
28 Feb 1827 2 John Lister Lister-Kaye 18 Aug 1801 13 Apr 1871 69
13 Apr 1871 3 John Pepys Lister-Kaye 18 Feb 1853 27 May 1924 71
27 May 1924 4 Cecil Edmund Lister-Kaye 16 Jan 1854 27 Jan 1931 77
27 Jan 1931 5 Kenelm Arthur Lister-Kaye 27 Mar 1892 28 Feb 1955 62
28 Feb 1955 6 Lister Lister-Kaye 19 Dec 1873 12 Feb 1962 88
12 Feb 1962 7 John Christopher Lister Lister-Kaye 13 Jul 1913 15 May 1982 68
15 May 1982 8 John Philip Lister Lister-Kaye 8 May 1946
LISTON-FOULIS of Colinton,Edinburgh
7 Jun 1634 NS 1 Alexander Foulis c 1670
c 1670 2 James Foulis 19 Jan 1688
19 Jan 1688 3 James Foulis 1711
1711 4 James Foulis Jul 1742
Jul 1742 5 James Foulis 3 Jan 1791
3 Jan 1791 6 James Foulis 1825
1825 7 James Foulis 9 Sep 1770 2 May 1842 71
2 May 1842 8 William Foulis (Liston-Foulis from 1843) 27 Jul 1812 22 Feb 1858 45
22 Feb 1858 9 James Liston-Foulis 3 Jul 1847 29 Dec 1895 48
29 Dec 1895 10 William Liston-Foulis 27 Oct 1869 16 Apr 1918 48
16 Apr 1918 11 Charles James Liston-Foulis 4 Jan 1873 18 Jun 1936 63
18 Jun 1936 12 Archibald Charles Liston-Foulis 5 Aug 1903 9 Oct 1961 58
9 Oct 1961 13 Ian Primrose Liston Foulis 9 Aug 1937 5 Feb 2006 68
to     Extinct on his death                            
5 Feb 2006
LITHGOW of Ormsary,Argyll
1 Jul 1925 UK 1 James Lithgow 27 Jan 1883 23 Feb 1952 69
23 Feb 1952 2 William James Lithgow 10 May 1934
The Leman baronetcy
In the standard works on the baronetage, the baronetcy of Leman is presumed to have 
become extinct on the death of the 4th baronet in 1762. The title was, however, assumed
by an alleged cousin of the 4th baronet and continued to be assumed by his descendants.
 
The following [edited] report appeared in 'The Preston Chronicle' of 7 July 1838, reprinted from 
'The Derbyshire Courier' :-
'A singular instance of good fortune has just occurred to an intelligent and respectable
mechanic of Nottingham, named John Leman, who, after working in the stocking-frame for
some years, and subsequently being engaged in the lace making business, is now, in his
24th year, elevated to a baronetage, by the style and title of Sir John Leman, Baronet, of
Northaw, in the county of Hertford. He succeeds to the title and large estates attached
to it as the nearest heir-male of his cousin in the third degree, Sir Tanfield Leman, Bart. of
Northaw, who was nephew to the deceased John Leman, Esq., of Nottingham, a retired
gentleman in the army, the present Sir John's great grandfather. Sir John is great grandson
of the Rev. Philip Leman, rector of Warboys, Huntingdon. The title has been in abeyance for
many years, owing to the present possessor's want of pecuniary means to establish his
right to it, and the proceeds of the estate……have, in consequence, accumulated to an
extent almost incalculable. The decision in favour of the claimant was come to a few weeks
ago………..'
The supposed succession of this Sir John Leman is, however, totally at odds with the
succession shown in Cokayne's "Complete Baronetage" and must therefore be viewed
as being extremely doubtful. In any event, I have been unable to find any further reference
to the supposed new baronet.
In the newspaper report quoted above, there is a reference to estates of incalculable value.
Commencing in February 1853, if not earlier, a series of advertisements began to be published
in newspapers offering shares in the "Leman Estate Fund." The advertisements stated that
the value of the property which was to be divided amongst the subscribers was £3,000,000
and that, by purchasing shares for 10 shillings each, subscribers would receive a return of 
£15 per share when the final division of the estates took place. Not surprisingly, this offer
was too good to be true, and in December 1853 the principals of the scheme were convicted
of fraud and conspiracy.
Sir Norman Robert Leslie, 6th baronet
Sir Norman was killed by rebels during the Indian Mutiny. The following account of his death
(written by Major Macdonald, commander of the 5th Bengal Irregular Cavalry) appeared in the
'Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce' on 29 June 1857:-
'The following was received yesterday:-
                                  "Rohnee 14th June, 1857
"As it is probable that exaggerated accounts will reach you of the tragedy enacted here on the
night of the 12th instant, I send you in a few words a true account of the same to allay anxiety
on the part of the friends of the survivors.
"On the evening of the 12th instant, Lieut. Sir Norman Leslie and Dr. Grant joined me in front of
my house, as usual, to take tea, and about a quarter to 9 o'clock Dr G. got up to go into my
house to wind up the clock; before leaving, on his rising from his chair, he said 'who can these 
fellows be,' and at the same instant we heard a rush of feet towards where we were sitting. I
had just time to jump up, when I received three sword cuts on the head in quick succession.
I seized my chair by the arms and defended myself successfully from three other cuts made at
me, and succeeded in giving an ugly poke to my opponent which appeared to disconcert him 
and he at once bolted, followed by the others (three in all). I was streaming blood and made for 
the house (followed by Dr. Grant) to staunch my wounds. I found Dr. G severely wounded, one
deep cut in the arm and a second fearful gash on the hip. We then went back to see after poor 
Leslie, whom we found stretched on the ground in a dying state; he must have received his
death blow [from] the first cut and have fallen forwards on his face, for he was cut clean 
through his back into his chest, and breathing through the wound in his lungs [and he had] also
many cuts on the head; he was quite sensible, and said, as I bent over him 'oh Macdonald, it is
very hard to die in this manner,' and added 'my poor wife and children, what will become of 
them?' I told him he had only a few minutes to live and to make his peace with God, and that 
all should be done for his poor wife and family that could be done. Under such fearful 
circumstances he then applied himself to make his peace with God, poor fellow, and breathed
his last in about half an hour afterwards.
'It was a dark, cloudy night, the moon had not got up and the scoundrels had easily got within
a few paces of us before we heard the rush upon us. A Sentry was planted to the North and
we were sitting to the East of the house, and as we were attacked in silence and the whole
affair did not last one minute, even our servants were not aware of the attack till we appeared
before them covered with blood, and they were so astonished that I could scarcely get them
to the lines to turn out the Regiments or rather the small portion of it left at Head Quarters.
'Next moment we had every man off duty around us, the poor fellows receiving the greatest
sympathy and expressing the greatest horror of the deed.
'There was no tracing the miscreants on account of the darkness of the night; a small party of
the Sowars galloped off to Deogurh (two miles off) but found all quiet there, and Lieutenant
Cooper, Commanding Detachment of the 32nd Regiment, came over in a very short time with
fifty of his men, but I requested him to return with them as the hundred armed men in my lines 
were more than match (as they said themselves) for any odds composed of such miscreants.
'Dr. Grant says we are not dangerously wounded, though I was scalped by one of the cuts, and
my scalp found next morning on the scene of action! I can write no more being rather weak and
shaking. The murderers looked like sepoys in undress, and I have today heard that some of the
disbanded men are in the district trying to talk over the Southals, and probably they thought, if
they could only kill the European Officers the men of the Regiment might get disheartened and
either join them, or that they would not act so effectively without their European Officers. The
Doctor and myself had a most miraculous escape. I can't account for the fellows running away
and we in such a helpless condition."
The fate of the three attackers is graphically reported in a further letter from Major Macdonald
which was published in 'The Observer' on 13 September 1857:-
'Two days after my native officer said he had found out the murderers (of Sir Norman Leslie), 
and that they were three men of my own regiment. I had them in irons in a crack, held a drum-
head court-martial, convicted and sentenced them to be hanged the next morning. I took on my
own shoulders the responsibility for hanging them first, and asking leave to do so afterwards.
That day was an awful one of suspense and anxiety. One of the prisoners was of very high 
caste and influence, and this man I determined to treat with the greatest ignominy, by getting
the lowest caste man to hang him. To tell you the truth I never expected for a moment to 
leave the hanging scene alive, but I was determined to do my duty, and well knew the effect
that pluck and decision had on the natives. The regiment was drawn out; wounded cruelly as
I was, I had to see everything done myself, even to the adjusting of the ropes, and saw them
looped to run easy. Two of the culprits were paralysed with fear and astonishment, never
dreaming that I would dare to hang them without an order from Government. The third said he
would not be hanged, and called on the Prophet and on his comrades to rescue him. This was
an awful moment; an instant's hesitation on my part and probably I should have a dozen balls
through me; so I seized a pistol, clapped it to the man's ear, and said, with a look there was
no mistake about, 'Another word out of your mouth, and your brains shall be scattered on the
ground.' He trembled, and held his tongue. The elephant came up, he was put on his back, the
rope adjusted, the elephant moved, and he was left dangling. I then had the others up, and
off in the same way. And after some time, when I had dismissed the men of the regiment to 
their lines, and still found my head on my shoulders, I really could scarcely believe it.'
Sir George James Graham Lewis, 2nd baronet
Sir George was killed in Switzerland in August 1927 when he fell in front of a train. "The Times"
of 9 August 1927 reported his death as follows:-
'Sir George Lewis, the head of the firm of Lewis and Lewis, solicitors, who has been staying at
the Val Mont clinic at Les Planches, above Montreux, for about ten days, fell from the steps in
front of the Grand Hotel, Montreux-Territet, shortly after 3 o'clock this afternoon [i.e. 8
August], on to the electrified line of the Swiss Federal Railway at the moment when a train
was approaching from the direction of the Rhône Valley, The mutilated body, which has been
identified by his valet, is at Territet. His family have been informed of the accident.'
The Melbourne "Argus" of 19 August 1927 stated that "Sir George Lewis, principal of the
London legal firm of Lewis and Lewis, was killed by a train at Territet, where he was spending
a holiday. The reports of the tragedy were conflicting. Some said that Sir George Lewis was
sitting on the balustrade of the Grand Hotel, and that he overbalanced and fell, and was 
mangled by the train. Others said that he walked on to the line. The Montreux examining
magistrate's report discounts the hypothesis that Sir George Lewis committed suicide. The
magistrate suggests that Sir George was running to catch a train, for which he had a ticket
in his pocket, and that he slipped and fell on to the rails.'
John Hamilton Plumptre Lighton (26 June 1855-6 July 1872), son of Sir Christopher
Robert Lighton, 6th baronet
John Lighton died after being struck by a cricket ball, aged only 17. The following report 
appeared in "The York Herald" of 13 July 1872:-
'The Ripton Hall School Cricket Ground, Derbyshire, was on Saturday the scene of a fatal
accident to John Hamilton Plumptre Lighton, aged 17 years, the son of the Rev. Sir Christopher
Robert Lighton, Bart., of Ellaston Hall, situated between Norbury and Rocester, near Ashbourne,
Derbyshire. Deceased was a scholar at Ripton School conducted by the Rev. Dr. Dears. On
Friday afternoon deceased, accompanied by several of his school-fellows, proceeded to the
cricket ground adjoining the hall. A ball struck Lighton on the side of the head, immediately
above the right ear. He became stunned for a few minutes and continued play, but a short
time after was compelled to desist. He fell sick and gradually grew worse, until it was deemed
necessary to summon medical aid, when Lighton was found to be suffering from compression
on the brain, brought on by a blow from a cricket ball. Between twelve and half-past he 
became insensible, and, in spite of all efforts the poor young fellow died within an hour after-
wards. It is stated that deceased was either the fourth or fifth son of Sir C. Lighton, and that 
an elder brother of deceased's, in the navy, some years ago had the misfortune to stumble
from a ship's mast, and although not killed, remained in a very critical state for several
months, and then became stone blind. The inquest on the body was held at Ripton Hall, on
Saturday evening. The jury returned a verdict "That the deceased was accidentally killed
from a blow by a cricket ball."
Sir Henry Cann Lippincott, 2nd and last baronet
Sir Henry was acquitted of a charge of "violating the person" of a young girl at his trial in April
1810. The implication was that the charge was a "put-up job" in order to extort money from 
Sir Henry. The following report appeared in "The Times" of 26 April 1810, reprinted from the
"Bristol Mercury":-
'Wednesday Sir Henry Lippincott, Bart., was tried [at the Bristol Assizes], on the prosecution of 
Mary Milford, spinster (aged about seventeen) for the violation of her person; to which he
pleaded not guilty.
'The case, on the part of the Prosecutrix, was opened by Mr. Smith; and the evidence detailed
by the Prosecutrix appeared, in a very modest and prepossessing manner, to develop a scene
of much depravity. She stated, that on Sunday, the 3rd of December last, in company with
another young woman, of the name of Mary Jones, as they going to the cathedral, between
3 and 4 o'clock, as she supposed, to evening prayers, Mary Jones stopped to speak to two
gentlemen - one in regimentals, the other not; that Mary Jones shortly overtook the 
Prosecutrix, and instead of leading her into the Cathedral, conducted her through the arch
leading into the Cloisters; that they went up a flight of stairs, and Mary Jones led her into a
room which had a sofa in it, and that, until she arrived in that room, she was not aware but
that she was going into the Cathedral; that immediately afterwards the same two gentlemen
Jones had previously spoken to (who proved to be Sir H. Lippincott and a Captain Gregory),
entered the room ; that Capt. Gregory proposed to Mary Jones to go with him to his room to
dress; that Captain Gregory and Mary Jones left her; that Sir Henry then began to take liberties
with her person; that she resisted him; that he offered her money, two guineas, which she
refused; that he then proceeded to acts of violence; that he held both her hands behind her
by the wrists; that after using every effort to extricate herself, after making every noise in
her power, crying out and stamping with her feet, she at last fainted away, and he 
accomplished his purpose. That immediately on quitting the room, she informed Mary Jones of
what had passed, who censured her for not communicating it whilst in the room; that the same
evening she informed a Mrs. Sarah Jones (a witness who could not, we understand, be found),
and on the following day made a similar communication to Mrs. Roberts (the keeper of a 
huckster's shop in the Buck, and with whom she lodged), also to Sophia Jones, the sister of 
Mary Jones; that on the Monday se'nnight after the violation, the Prosecutrix, accompanied
by Sophia Jones, met Sir Henry in College-green, in the evening; that he laid hold of her; and
inquired how she did; that she replied by upbraiding him with having used her ill enough already.
That Sir Henry thereupon flung her into the arms of a lusty gentleman passing by, and said,
"Here, take this lass - I was intimate with her yesterday se'nnight." - The above facts were
delivered by the young woman with much seeming reluctance. She then underwent a long
cross-examination, in which she positively denied that she had ever said she had not fainted
away, or that she had ever talked of money as a remuneration for the injury she had sustained.
Mr. Short, surgeon, bore testimony to an appearance of her person having been violated, which
he observed, on examination, ten days afterwards.
'Here the Prosecutrix's evidence closed.
'On the part of Sir Henry, it was sworn by Mary Jones, that the room into which she retired with
Captain Gregory was not more than eight feet distance from the drawing-room; that she heard 
no noise; that she returned to the drawing-room in about ten minutes, and found Mary Milford
tying on her bonnet; that she did not appear discomposed or agitated; and that she sat upon
Captain Gregory's knee. This witness proved the door to have been locked on the Prosecutrix,
and that the carpet and sofa were rumpled.
'Here Mr. Thompson attempted to cross-examine the witness, as to the Prosecutrix having
informed her of the violence complained of, after she quitted the apartment; but the Learned
Recorder considered it unnecessary, inasmuch as that part of the evidence stood unimpeached;
and neither Mrs. Roberts or Sophie Jones were examined as to this particular point.
'Sophia Jones deposed, that Mary Milford had told her in a subsequent conversation, that Sir
Henry had not violated her person; and that she had, at Milford's request, applied to Sir Henry
for a pecuniary recompense. She, however, admitted that she had not made such statement
at the Council-House, when she gave her information, and confirmed the Prosecutrix's evidence
of having met Sir Henry on the Monday, when he flung her into the arms of a lusty gentleman,
with this addition, that the Prosecutrix called Sir Henry a villain, and that he used the 
expression above stated.
'Captain Gregory was minutely examined as to any noise in the house, and the appearance of
Mary Milford on his return to the room. He swore that he heard no noise, and that, on his 
return, the Prosecutrix appeared not discomposed. On being cross-examined, he admitted that
he found the door locked upon Mary Milford, and that when he entered the room, Sir Henry
said, "she would not consent to his being connected with her, nor receive money, although he
had offered it."
'Mrs. Roberts (who was originally before the Magistrates, a witness in support of the 
prosecution) deposed, that in several conversations with her on the subject, Mary Milford had
used fr4equent equivocations, and that she had said, she believed she had not fainted; that
she, Mrs. Roberts, had frequently cautioned her  against keeping company with Mary Jones,
who was "a woman given to the town;" and that during a visit that she (Milford) had paid in
London, in August last, she had heard that the Duke of Gordon would be obliged to pay £3000
for such a business, whether the attempt could be proved or not. It would be observed that
Milford had previously denied all this, in her cross-examination.
'Mr. Allard, Mr. Lowe, and Mr. Taylor (of Wotton-under-Edge), were called upon to rebut the
evidence of Mr. Short.
'After nearly seven hours' investigation (from eleven to six), the Recorder (Sir V[icary] Gibbs),
proceeded to address the Jury, and commented, in severe terms, upon the unconsistent
evidence of the Prosecutrix. He quoted a long paragraph from an eminent legal authority, upon
the difficulty of both establishing and rebutting such a charge: that in this case "the attempt
was made at noon-day, in the most public thoroughfare of the city, at the time a congregation
was assembling together for public worship, and in a room where windows looked into the
Cathedral;" added to which, the Prisoner had not taken to flight, and braved the charge; and
really, observed the Recorder, "the attempt to establish the alleged offence stands upon such
glaring improbabilities, that were it not that it is related in a Court of Justice, and the life of a
fellow-creature at stake upon it, it is too gross even for ridicule to smile at." - The Recorder
then said, that, if it were possible for a doubt to exist in the minds of any of the Jury, he
would go through the evidence; but if not, their verdict would save him the trouble.
'The Jury considered about a minute, and returned a verdict of Not Guilty.
'The Recorder, in conclusion, observed, that while he rejoiced in the acquittal of the Prisoner,
he could not consider any sort of censure due to those who conducted the prosecution.'
Sir Thomas Johnstone Lipton, 1st and only baronet
The following biography of Sir Thomas appeared in the Australian monthly magazine "Parade"
in its issue for February 1957:-
'When King Edward VII was Prince of Wales and an amiable patron of the grocery magnate Sir
Thomas Lipton, he was a visitor aboard the yacht Shamrock when the mainmast collapsed and
he missed decapitation by inches. Though he took the incident well at the time, he later wrote
with justifiable peevishness to a friend: "I do not know why Sir Thomas goes in for yacht racing,
for his goods are already so well known both sides of the Atlantic that he does not need to
to advertise." 
'But that was only the royal opinion. Sir Thomas knew better. In thirty years he spent more
than a quarter of a million pounds of his grocery-made money on trying to capture the famed
America's Cup - in reality no cup but an elaborately designed graceful silver jug - from the U.S.
He won hundreds of other trophies - so many indeed that he had detectives to guard them day
and night - for various European races, but he never got the America's Cup. It was, for 30 
years, magnificent publicity. His five losing Shamrocks made him one of the best-known figures
in the world and put his name where he wanted it - on everyone's lips. He was hailed in the
United States as the great sporting Englishman, the man who erased the bitter feelings which
had come to be associated with the racing of the Cup since the first race in 1851. The man 
who had been a multi-millionaire before he was 50 because he followed the precepts of two
lines he saw in a New York store: "He who on his trade relies, Must either bust or advertise," 
knew what he was about, despite King Edward's opinion to the contrary.
 
'Early in his yachting career Lipton was proposed for the most exclusive sailing club in the world,
the Royal Yacht Squadron at Cowes, Isle of Wight, and it is alleged that his proposer was King
Edward, then Prince of Wales. Lipton was blackballed, but the reason is not revealed in any
authoritative document. Lipton nevertheless remained one of the world's most ardent 
yachtsmen. His Shamrocks were superb racing machines, built for a special purpose.
 
'Thomas Johnstone Lipton was born in 1850 in Glasgow, where his Irish peasant parents had
emigrated during a potato famine. A few more pounds would have taken the family to America,
but they were not available. After some years Lipton senior scraped together enough to open
a tiny store in Stobcross St., Glasgow, for the sale of eggs, butter and ham. Thomas went to
work at the age of nine for half a crown a week, of which he was allowed to keep a penny. The
rest had to go to support the family.  At 12, he left this job and took another, as a cabin boy,
but he was sacked for careless polishing. He had saved the tiny fare from Glasgow to New York
from his tips and wages before he got the sack, and proceeded to New York on the slow 
immigrant steamer Devonia. Having promoted for himself free board and lodging touting for
customers off the ship for a landlord, he took a series of jobs which landed him broke and 
almost barefoot in various parts of the southern United States. He worked as a hand in the rice
and tobacco plantations, as a stoker on a river steamer, as a roustabout in half a dozen places,
wrote love letters for an amorous Spaniard and was beaten up by the Spaniard's wife. 
Eventually he worked a passage back to New York and got a job in a grocery store, where he
saw the famed couplet on advertising. 
'Having saved 500 dollars, he returned to see his mother, who seems to have been his one
strong affection - apart from his limitless admiration for himself. He took her a bag of flour and
a rocking chair. The morning after his arrival he was back behind the counter at Stobcross St.,
selling groceries. But the years in the United States had turned Lipton into a trader. Within a 
few days he astounded his parents by spending £18 buying sea-damaged hams, selling them for
more than 100 per cent. profit, and planning further ventures. They remonstrated, but he 
persisted. Soon he was buying pigs in Ireland, offloading them at Glasgow, and driving them
through the Glasgow streets so the wondering populace would see stencilled on their bulging
sides the news that they were "going to die for Lipton's customers."
 
'Lipton's market was famous in a few months, people coming from all over Glasgow not only to
buy his teas, eggs, butter, hams, coffee and staples, but to marvel at the crude "come-on"
advertisements plastered on the shop windows. At 27 he was already a very rich man,
tremendously energetic; pictures show him looking already between 45 and 50, partly because
of a wispy walrus moustache which hid his pleasant mobile mouth and showed only the too-
small, too-shrewd eyes and the uninteresting chin and nose. Later, when he shaved his mous-
tache to a thin line and adopted the tiny goatee which he preserved until his death, his face
assumed a look of benevolence not entirely belying his character. 
 
'Lipton's story is the story of the personal touch. Whenever he opened one of his thousands
of stores he made a point of being at the opening, and always served the first customer himself.
Although in 1898 he turned the business into a company, he retained the closest possible 
contact with it. When at last he had become an aging nuisance to the shareholders and
managerial staff alike, his biographer friend and critic, William Blackwood, tells how bitterly he
resented stepping aside, and how he indulged in "pathetic regrets and rather stupid resent-
ments."
 
'As his chain of stores expanded he began buying tea and coffee and cocoa plantations, a pork-
packing business to rival Swifts and Arrnours, and commenced chartering his own steamers. He
had no interest in anything but business and Lipton. He was never heard to discuss a topic of 
the day, or a book or a picture or a personality. His closest friends were Lord Dewar, Harry 
Lauder, and William Blackwood. who wrote fulsomely of him while he was alive and candidly of
him when he was dead. The four used to meet at Lipton's home, a large old-fashioned, stuffy,
badly furnished suburban villa called Osidge in an unfashionable part of North London.
 
'Blackwood records that if the conversation moved from Lipton's character and successes away
to other subjects Sir Thomas quickly brought it back. He never acknowledged that luck or the
kindness or aid of others had played even the most minor parts in his career. Blackwood's acid
after-death memoirs of his rich and powerful friend betray the hours of boredom he spent while
Lipton was alive, discoursing on the subject of Lipton. Lauder presented some rather special
competition to Sir Thomas, but never won the conversational stakes.
 
'Lipton had met the Prince and Princess of Wales on the occasion of Queen Victoria's Diamond
Jubilee. Princess Alexandra had got off to a bad start on her plan to promote a Jubilee dinner
of 700 tons of meat, bread, pudding, cheese and cake for 400,000 of England's poor. The 
money was slow in coming in until Lipton subscribed £25,000, was appointed to the Dinner
Committee, and organised it into a success. During World War I, Lipton lent his steam yacht,
Erin, to the Americans to use in succouring the unhappy Serbs, and himself sailed on it on
several of its Mediterranean trips of mercy. Later he handed the boat over to the British Navy
for use on patrol work in the Mediterranean, where it was eventually sunk by enemy action.
'Lipton's original challenge for the America's Cup was issued in 1899, with the first Shamrock,
built by the late great Clyde shipbuilder, William Fife. Fife made him another Shamrock later,
but Lipton shopped around for the other three boats which challenged in the years 1901, 1903,
1920 and finally in 1930, one year before his death at the age of 81. The Shamrocks sailed
with both professional and amateur crews; one of them had three captains, a case of divided
command which resulted, as usual, in failure. Certainly, all the technique and talent that money
could buy was poured into the Shamrocks, but without avail.
'Lipton developed into a not unlikeable eccentric - vain, domineering, but usually genial - a tall,
rather doggy figure distinguished by the tiny goatee and the rather large bow-ties of identical
white-spotted dark blue foulard. He never married, nor is there any record of any love affair.
He lived plainly but well at Osidge, cared for by two Cingalese servants who cooked him plain,
abundant meals, every dinner topped off with a rice pudding made to his own recipe. When the
Royal Yacht Squadron at Cowes finally did elect him, Lipton acknowledged the honour, but, with
some dignity, declined to set foot in the clubhouse.'
 
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