BARONETAGE
Last updated 18/09/2017
Names of baronets shown in blue
have not yet proved succession and, as a
result, their name has not yet been placed on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage.
Date Type Order Name Born Died Age
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the baronet was
baptised on that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate
that the baronet was buried on that date
MEYER of Shortgrove,Berks
18 Jul 1910 UK 1 Carl Meyer 23 Dec 1851 18 Dec 1922 70
18 Dec 1922 2 Frank Cecil Meyer 7 May 1886 19 Oct 1935 49
MP for Great Yarmouth 1924-1929
For information on the death of this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
19 Oct 1935 3 Anthony John Charles Meyer 27 Oct 1920 24 Dec 2004 84
MP for Eton and Slough 1964-1966,
Flintshire West 1970-1983 and Clwyd NW
1983-1992
24 Dec 2004 4 Anthony Ashley Frank Meyer 23 Aug 1944
MEYRICK of Hinton Admiral,Hants
28 Jul 1791 GB See "Tapps-Gervis-Meyrick"
MEYRICK of Bush House,Pembroke
5 May 1880 UK 1 Thomas Charlton Meyrick 14 Mar 1837 30 Jul 1921 84
MP for Pembroke 1868-1874
30 Jul 1921 2 Frederick Charlton Meyrick 7 Jul 1862 23 Feb 1932 69
23 Feb 1932 3 Thomas Frederick Meyrick 28 Nov 1899 23 Dec 1983 84
23 Dec 1983 4 David John Charlton Meyrick 2 Dec 1926 6 Feb 2004 77
6 Feb 2004 5 Timothy Thomas Charlton Meyrick 5 Nov 1963
MEYSEY-THOMPSON of Kirkby Hall,Yorks
26 Mar 1874 UK 1 Harry Stephen Meysey-Thompson 11 Aug 1809 17 May 1874 64
MP for Whitby 1859-1865
17 May 1874 2 Henry Meysey Meysey-Thompson,later
[1905] 1st Baron Knaresborough 30 Aug 1845 3 Mar 1929 83
3 Mar 1929 3 Algar de Clifford Charles Meysey-Thompson 9 Nov 1885 11 Jan 1967 81
11 Jan 1967 4 Humphrey Simon Meysey-Thompson 31 Mar 1935 10 Sep 2002 67
to Extinct on his death
10 Sep 2002
MICKLETHWAIT of Iridge Place,Sussex
27 Jul 1838 UK 1 Sotherton Branthwayt Peckham
to Micklethwait 30 May 1786 3 Sep 1853 67
3 Sep 1853 Extinct on his death
MIDDLEBROOK of Oakwell,Yorks
4 Feb 1930 UK 1 Sir William Middlebrook 22 Feb 1851 30 Jun 1936 85
MP for Leeds South 1908-1922
30 Jun 1936 2 Harold Middlebrook 5 Oct 1887 27 Feb 1971 83
to Extinct on his death
27 Feb 1971
MIDDLEMORE of Selly Oak,Worcs
27 May 1919 UK 1 John Throgmorton Middlemore 9 Jun 1844 17 Oct 1925 81
MP for Birmingham North 1899-1918
17 Oct 1925 2 William Hawkslow Middlemore 10 Apr 1908 1 Jun 1987 79
to Extinct on his death
1 Jun 1987
MIDDLETON of Ruthyn,Denbigh
22 Oct 1622 E 1 Hugh Middleton c 1555 7 Dec 1631
MP for Denbigh 1604-1611,1614,1621-1622,
1624-1625,1625,1626 and 1628-1629
7 Dec 1631 2 William Middleton 10 Apr 1603 c 1652
MP for Denbigh 1630 and 1647
c 1652 3 Hugh Middleton c 1633 11 Dec 1675
Dec 1675 4 Hugh Middleton 6 Apr 1653 2 Feb 1701 47
Feb 1701 5 Hugh Middleton 16 Nov 1756
Nov 1756 6 Hugh Middleton 1 Dec 1723 c 1757
to On his death the baronetcy became dormant
c 1757
MIDDLETON of Leighton Hall,Lancs
24 Jun 1642 E 1 George Middleton 1600 27 Feb 1673 72
to Extinct on his death
27 Feb 1673
MIDDLETON of Belsay Castle,Northumberland
24 Oct 1662 E 1 William Middleton c 1625 22 Mar 1690
Mar 1690 2 John Middleton 17 Mar 1678 17 Oct 1717 39
17 Oct 1717 3 William Middleton c 1700 29 Sep 1757
MP for Northumberland 1722-1757
29 Sep 1757 4 John Lambert Middleton 14 Jun 1705 2 Mar 1768 62
2 Mar 1768 5 William Middleton 6 Jun 1738 7 Jul 1795 57
MP for Northumberland 1774-1795
7 Jul 1795 6 Charles Miles Lambert Middleton (Monck from
11 Feb 1799) 7 Apr 1779 20 Jul 1867 88
MP for Northumberland 1812-1820
20 Jul 1867 7 Arthur Edward Monck (Middleton from
12 Feb 1876) 12 Jan 1838 1 Apr 1933 95
MP for Durham 1874-1880
1 Apr 1933 8 Charles Arthur Middleton 22 Oct 1873 22 Feb 1942 68
22 Feb 1942 9 Stephen Hugh Middleton 20 Jun 1909 4 Jan 1993 83
4 Jan 1993 10 Lawrence Monck Middleton 23 Oct 1912 16 Mar 1999 86
to Extinct on his death
16 Mar 1999
MIDDLETON of Hackney,Middlesex
6 Dec 1681 E 1 Hugh Middleton c 1658 10 Mar 1702
to Extinct on his death
10 Mar 1702
MIDDLETON of the Navy
23 Oct 1781 GB 1 Charles Middleton,later [1805] 1st Baron Barham 14 Oct 1726 17 Jun 1813 86
For information on the special remainder
included in this creation, see the note at
the foot of this page
17 Jun 1813 2 Gerard Noel Noel (Edwardes until 1798) 17 Jul 1759 25 Feb 1838 78
MP for Maidstone 1784-1788 and Rutland
1788-1808 and 1814-1838
25 Feb 1838 3 Charles Noel,3rd Baron Barham 2 Oct 1781 10 Jun 1866 84
He was subsequently created Earl of
Gainsborough (qv) in 1841 with which title
the baronetcy remains merged
MIDDLETON of Crowfield
12 May 1804 UK 1 William Fowle Middleton 8 Nov 1748 26 Dec 1829 81
MP for Ipswich 1784-1790 and 1803-1806 and
Hastings 1806-1807
26 Dec 1829 2 William Fowle Middleton 19 Aug 1784 2 May 1860 74
to Extinct on his death
2 May 1860
MIDDLETON of Broke Hall,Suffolk
2 Nov 1813 UK See "Broke-Middleton"
MILBANK of Well,Yorks and Hart,co.Durham
16 May 1882 UK 1 Frederick Acclom Milbank 21 Apr 1820 28 Apr 1898 78
MP for Yorkshire North 1865-1885 and Richmond
1885-1886
28 Apr 1898 2 Powlett Charles John Milbank 1 May 1852 30 Jan 1918 65
MP for Radnorshire 1895-1900. Lord Lieutenant
Radnor 1895-1918
30 Jan 1918 3 Frederick Richard Powlett Milbank 7 Sep 1881 29 Apr 1964 82
29 Apr 1964 4 Mark Vane Milbank 11 Jan 1907 4 Apr 1984 77
4 Apr 1984 5 Anthony Frederick Milbank 16 Aug 1939 3 Jul 2016 76
3 Jul 2016 6 Edward Mark Somerset Milbank 9 Apr 1973
MILBANKE of Halnaby,Yorks
7 Aug 1661 E 1 Mark Milbanke 1680
1680 2 Mark Milbanke by 1660 May 1698
MP for Richmond 1690-1695
May 1698 3 Mark Milbanke 1705
1705 4 Ralph Milbanke 9 May 1748
9 May 1748 5 Ralph Milbanke c 1721 8 Jan 1798
MP for Scarborough 1754-1761 and Richmond
1761-1768
8 Jan 1798 6 Ralph Milbanke (Noel from 1815) 28 Jul 1747 19 Mar 1825 77
MP for Durham County 1790-1812
19 Mar 1825 7 John Peniston Milbanke 20 Aug 1776 27 Jul 1850 73
For further information on this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
27 Jul 1850 8 John Ralph Milbanke (Milbanke-Huskisson 5 Nov 1800 30 Dec 1868 68
from 5 Mar 1866)
30 Dec 1868 9 Peniston Milbanke 14 Feb 1847 30 Nov 1899 52
30 Nov 1899 10 John Peniston Milbanke VC 9 Oct 1872 21 Aug 1915 42
For further information on this baronet and VC
winner, see the note at the foot of this page
21 Aug 1915 11 John Charles Peniston Milbanke 9 Jan 1902 1 Jun 1947 45
1 Jun 1947 12 Ralph Mark Milbanke 11 Apr 1907 24 Nov 1949 42
to For further information on this baronet,
24 Nov 1949 see the note at the foot of this page
Extinct on his death
MILBORNE-SWINNERTON-PILKINGTON
of Stanley,Yorks
29 Jun 1635 NS 1 Arthur Pilkington 5 Sep 1650
Sep 1650 2 Lyon Pilkington 14 Nov 1613 5 Nov 1684 70
Nov 1684 3 Lyon Pilkington c 1660 7 Aug 1714
Aug 1714 4 Lyon Pilkington 5 Jun 1683 26 Jun 1716 33
Jun 1716 5 Lionel Pilkington 20 Jan 1707 11 Aug 1778 71
MP for Horsham 1748-1768
11 Aug 1778 6 Michael Pilkington 25 May 1715 6 Feb 1788 72
6 Feb 1788 7 Thomas Pilkington 7 Dec 1773 9 Jul 1811 37
9 Jul 1811 8 William Pilkington 14 Nov 1775 30 Sep 1850 74
30 Sep 1850 9 Thomas Edward Pilkington 19 Mar 1829 7 Jan 1854 24
7 Jan 1854 10 William Pilkington (Milborne-Swinnerton from
1837 and Milborne-Swinnerton-Pilkington from
1854) 8 Jun 1831 12 Nov 1855 24
12 Nov 1855 11 Lionel Milborne-Swinnerton-Pilkington 7 Jul 1835 25 Jun 1901 65
25 Jun 1901 12 Thomas Edward Milborne-Swinnerton-
Pilkington 9 Dec 1857 17 Feb 1944 86
17 Feb 1944 13 Arthur William Milborne-Swinnerton-
Pilkington 7 Apr 1898 24 Jul 1952 54
24 Jul 1952 14 Thomas Henry Milborne-Swinnerton-
Pilkington 10 Mar 1934
MILBURN of Guyzance,Northumberland
30 Dec 1905 UK 1 John Davison Milburn 4 Aug 1851 10 Aug 1907 56
10 Aug 1907 2 Charles Stamp Milburn 5 Dec 1878 16 Jul 1917 38
16 Jul 1917 3 Leonard John Milburn 14 Feb 1884 17 Sep 1957 73
17 Sep 1957 4 John Nigel Milburn 22 Apr 1918 14 Jul 1985 67
14 Jul 1985 5 Anthony Rupert Milburn 17 Apr 1947
MILDMAY of Moulsham,Essex
29 Jun 1611 E 1 Thomas Mildmay 13 Feb 1626
to MP for Maldon 1593
13 Feb 1626 Extinct on his death
MILDMAY of Moulsham,Essex
5 Feb 1765 GB 1 William Mildmay c 1706 8 Aug 1771
to Extinct on his death
8 Aug 1771
MILDMAY of Moulsham,Essex
9 Oct 1772 GB See "St.John-Mildmay"
MILES of Leigh Court,Somerset
19 Apr 1859 UK 1 William Miles 18 May 1797 17 Jun 1878 81
MP for Chippenham 1818-1820,New Romney
1830-1832 and Somerset East 1834-1865
17 Jun 1878 2 Philip John William Miles 2 Sep 1825 5 Jun 1888 62
MP for Somerset East 1878-1885
5 Jun 1888 3 Cecil Leopold Miles 7 Aug 1873 25 Oct 1898 25
25 Oct 1898 4 Henry Robert William Miles 6 Jan 1843 7 Feb 1915 72
7 Feb 1915 5 Charles William Miles 7 Jul 1883 28 Dec 1966 83
28 Dec 1966 6 William Napier Maurice Miles 19 Oct 1913 29 Dec 2010 97
29 Dec 2010 7 Philip John Miles 10 Aug 1953
MILL of Camois Court,Sussex
31 Dec 1619 E 1 John Mill Jul 1648
MP for Southampton 1624-1625,1625,1626
and 1640
Jul 1648 2 John Mill 1670
1670 3 John Mill 1 Jun 1661 c 1687
c 1687 4 John Mill 9 Jul 1681 c 1706
c 1706 5 Richard Mill 1690 16 May 1760 69
MP for Midhurst 1721-1722 and 1729-1734,
Penrhyn 1734-1741 and Horsham 1741-1747
16 May 1760 6 Richard Mill c 1717 17 Mar 1770
MP for Hampshire 1765-1768
17 Mar 1770 7 John Hoby Mill-Hoby 20 May 1719 Jul 1780 61
Jul 1780 8 Henry Mill Nov 1781
Nov 1781 9 Charles Mill 19 Jul 1792 70
19 Jul 1792 10 Charles Mill 1765 25 Feb 1835 69
to Extinct on his death
25 Feb 1835
MILL of Mottisfont,Hants
16 Mar 1836 UK See "Barker-Mill"
MILLAIS of Palace Gate,Middlesex
and St.Ouen,Jersey
16 Jul 1885 UK 1 John Everett Millais 8 Jun 1829 13 Aug 1896 67
13 Aug 1896 2 Everett Millais 30 May 1856 7 Sep 1897 41
7 Sep 1897 3 John Everett Millais 28 Nov 1888 30 Sep 1920 31
30 Sep 1920 4 Geoffroy William Millais 18 Sep 1863 7 Nov 1941 78
7 Nov 1941 5 Ralph Regnault Millais 4 Mar 1905 14 May 1992 87
14 May 1992 6 Geoffroy Richard Everett Millais 27 Dec 1941
MILLER of Oxenhoath,Kent
13 Oct 1660 E 1 Humphrey Miller Aug 1709
Aug 1709 2 Borlase Miller 1714
to Extinct on his death
1714
MILLER of Chichester,Sussex
29 Oct 1705 E 1 Thomas Miller c 1635 2 Dec 1705
MP for Chichester 1689-1695
2 Dec 1705 2 John Miller 21 Nov 1665 29 Nov 1721 56
MP for Chichester 1698-1700,1701-1705
and 1710-1713 and Sussex 1701
29 Nov 1721 3 Thomas Miller c 1689 Nov 1733
MP for Chichester 1715-1727
Nov 1733 4 John Miller 19 Apr 1772
19 Apr 1772 5 Thomas Miller 5 May 1731 4 Sep 1816 85
MP for Lewes 1774-1778 and Portsmouth
1806-1816
4 Sep 1816 6 Thomas Combe Miller 1780 29 Jun 1864 83
29 Jun 1864 7 Charles Hayes Miller 6 Feb 1829 12 Jan 1868 38
12 Jan 1868 8 Charles John Hubert Miller 12 Sep 1858 4 Oct 1940 82
4 Oct 1940 9 Henry Holmes Miller 15 Dec 1865 13 Nov 1952 86
13 Nov 1952 10 Ernest Henry John Miller 8 May 1897 22 Apr 1960 62
22 Apr 1960 11 John Holmes Miller 1925 27 Dec 1995 70
27 Dec 1995 12 Harry Holmes Miller 15 Jan 1927 28 Dec 2007 80
28 Dec 2007 13 Anthony Thomas Miller 4 May 1955
MILLER of Ballicasey,Clare
24 Aug 1778 I See "Riggs-Miller"
MILLER of Glenlee,Kirkcudbright
3 Mar 1788 GB 1 Thomas Miller 3 Nov 1717 27 Sep 1789 71
MP for Dumfries 1761-1766. Solicitor
General [S] 1759.
27 Sep 1789 2 William Miller 12 Aug 1755 9 May 1846 90
MP for Edinburgh 1780-1781
9 May 1846 3 William Miller 12 Sep 1815 30 Oct 1861 46
30 Oct 1861 4 Thomas Macdonald Miller 1 Jan 1846 4 Sep 1875 29
4 Sep 1875 5 William Frederick Miller 7 Apr 1868 20 Dec 1948 80
20 Dec 1948 6 Alastair George Lionel Joseph Miller 5 Mar 1893 1 Apr 1964 71
For further information on this baronet, see
the note at the foot of this page
1 Apr 1964 7 Frederick William Macdonald Miller 21 Mar 1920 19 Jun 1991 71
19 Jun 1991 8 Stephen William Macdonald Miller 20 Jun 1953
MILLER of Manderston,Berwick
24 Mar 1874 UK 1 William Miller 25 Mar 1809 10 Oct 1887 78
MP for Leith 1859-1868 and Berwickshire
1873-1874
10 Oct 1887 2 James Percy Miller 22 Oct 1864 22 Jan 1906 41
22 Jan 1906 3 John Alexander Miller 27 Sep 1867 16 Feb 1918 50
to Extinct on his death
16 Feb 1918
MILLER of Cleeve,Perth
7 Feb 1936 UK See "Norie-Miller"
MILLIKIN-NAPIER of Merchistoun,Midlothian
2 Mar 1627 NS See "Napier"
MILLS of Hillingdon Court and
Camelford House,Park Lane,Middlesex
17 Nov 1868 UK 1 Charles Mills 23 Jan 1792 4 Oct 1872 80
4 Oct 1872 2 Charles Henry Mills 26 Apr 1830 3 Apr 1898 67
He was subsequently created Baron
Hillingdon (qv) in 1886 with which title
the baronetcy then merged until its
extinction in 1982
MILLS of Ebbw Vale,Monmouth
31 Jan 1921 UK 1 Frederick Mills 23 Apr 1865 22 Dec 1953 88
MP for Leyton East 1931-1945
31 Dec 1953 2 Frederick Leighton Victor Mills 14 Mar 1893 21 Apr 1955 62
21 Apr 1955 3 Peter Frederick Leighton Mills 9 Jul 1924
MILLS of Alcester,Warwicks
1 Jul 1953 UK 1 Sir Percy Herbert Mills 4 Jan 1890 10 Sep 1968 78
He was subsequently created Baron Mills
(qv) in 1957 with which title the
baronetcy then merged
MILMAN of Levaton-in-Woodland,Devon
28 Nov 1800 GB 1 Francis Milman 31 Aug 1746 24 Jun 1821 74
24 Jun 1821 2 William George Milman 10 Apr 1781 21 Aug 1857 76
21 Aug 1857 3 William Milman 21 Nov 1813 17 Jun 1885 71
17 Jun 1885 4 Francis John Milman 10 Aug 1842 2 Jun 1922 79
2 Jun 1922 5 Francis Milman 27 Oct 1872 10 Oct 1946 73
10 Oct 1946 6 William Ernest Milman 11 Aug 1875 30 Aug 1962 87
30 Aug 1962 7 Lionel Charles Patrick Milman 23 Feb 1877 2 Nov 1962 85
2 Nov 1962 8 Dermot Lionel Kennedy Milman 24 Oct 1912 13 Jan 1990 77
13 Jan 1990 9 Derek Milman 23 Jun 1918 12 May 1999 80
12 May 1999 10 David Patrick Milman 24 Aug 1945
MILNE of Barnton,Dumfries
19 Mar 1686 NS 1 Robert Milne c 1730
c 1730 2 John Milne c 1701 11 May 1791
to On his death the baronetcy became either
11 May 1791 extinct or dormant
MILNE of Inveresk,Midlothian
1 Nov 1876 UK 1 Sir Alexander Milne 10 Nov 1806 29 Dec 1896 90
29 Dec 1896 2 Archibald Berkeley Milne 2 Jun 1855 5 Jul 1938 83
to Extinct on his death
5 Jul 1938
MILNE-WATSON of Ashley,Dorset
11 Jun 1937 UK 1 Sir David Milne-Watson 10 Mar 1869 3 Oct 1945 76
3 Oct 1945 2 David Ronald Milne-Watson 15 Jul 1904 15 Jun 1982 77
15 Jun 1982 3 Michael Milne-Watson 16 Feb 1910 27 Apr 1999 89
27 Apr 1999 4 Andrew Michael Milne-Watson 10 Nov 1944
MILNER of Nun Appleton Hall,Yorks
26 Feb 1717 GB 1 William Milner c 1696 23 Nov 1745
MP for York 1722-1734
23 Nov 1745 2 William Milner c 1725 8 Nov 1774
8 Nov 1774 3 William Mordaunt Milner 6 Oct 1754 9 Sep 1811 56
MP for York 1790-1811
9 Sep 1811 4 William Mordaunt Sturt Milner 1 Oct 1779 25 Mar 1855 75
25 Mar 1855 5 William Mordaunt Edward Milner 20 Jun 1820 12 Feb 1867 46
MP for York 1848-1857
12 Feb 1867 6 William Mordaunt Milner 10 May 1848 14 Apr 1880 31
14 Apr 1880 7 Frederick George Milner 7 Nov 1849 8 Jun 1931 81
MP for York 1883-1885 and Bassetlaw
1890-1906. PC 1900
8 Jun 1931 8 William Frederick Victor Mordaunt Milner 2 Oct 1893 29 Mar 1960 66
29 Mar 1960 9 George Edward Mordaunt Milner 7 Feb 1911 18 Dec 1995 84
18 Dec 1995 10 Timothy William Lycett Milner 11 Oct 1936
MILNES of Gauley,Leics
21 Mar 1801 UK 1 Robert Shore Milnes 1747 2 Dec 1837 90
2 Dec 1837 2 John Bentinck Milnes 19 Sep 1786 1841 54
to Extinct on his death
1841
MILNES-COATES of Helperby Hall,Yorks
29 Jun 1911 UK 1 Edward Feetham Coates 28 Feb 1853 14 Aug 1921 68
MP for Lewisham 1903-1918 and Lewisham
West 1918-1921
14 Aug 1921 2 Clive Coates (Milnes-Coates from Mar 1946) 21 May 1879 4 Sep 1971 92
4 Sep 1971 3 Robert Edward James Clive Milnes-Coates 27 Sep 1907 9 May 1982 74
9 May 1982 4 Anthony Robert Milnes-Coates 8 Dec 1948
MITCHELL of West Shore,Shetland Islands
19 Jun 1724 NS 1 John Mitchell 31 May 1739
31 May 1739 2 Andrew Mitchell c 1706 29 Jun 1764
29 Jun 1764 3 John Mitchell 24 Sep 1734 5 Dec 1783 49
to On his death the baronetcy is generally thought
5 Dec 1783 to have become either extinct or dormant,but a
descendant of the 1st baronet was able to prove
his descent in 1895. For further information,
see the note at the foot of this page
MITCHELL of Tulliallan,Fife
6 Sep 1945 UK 1 Harold Paton Mitchell 21 May 1900 8 Apr 1983 82
to MP for Brentford and Chiswick 1931-1945
8 Apr 1983 Extinct on his death
MITCHELL COTTS of Coldharbour,Sussex
15 Jun 1921 UK 1 Sir William Dingwall Mitchell Cotts 15 Jul 1871 20 Jan 1932 60
MP for Western Isles 1922-1923
20 Jan 1932 2 William Campbell Cotts (Mitchell-Cotts from
9 Feb 1932) 12 Apr 1902 20 Feb 1964 61
20 Feb 1964 3 Robert Crichton Mitchell Cotts 22 Oct 1903 17 Jan 1995 91
17 Jan 1995 4 Richard Crichton Mitchell Cotts 26 Jul 1946
MITCHELL-THOMSON of Polmood,Peebles
26 Sep 1900 UK 1 Mitchell Mitchell-Thomson 15 Dec 1846 15 Nov 1918 71
15 Nov 1918 2 William Lowson Mitchell-Thomson 15 Apr 1877 24 Dec 1938 61
He was subsequently created Baron Selsdon
(qv) in 1932 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged
MITCHELSON of Rotherfield,Sussex
24 Jun 1920 UK 1 Archibald Mitchelson 1 Apr 1878 30 Dec 1945 67
to Extinct on his death
30 Dec 1945
MODYFORD of London
16 Feb 1661 E 1 James Modyford c 1625 13 Jan 1673
Jan 1673 2 Thomas Modyford 5 Nov 1678
to Extinct on his death
Nov 1678
MODYFORD of Lincolns Inn,London
1 Mar 1664 E 1 Thomas Modyford c 1618 2 Sep 1679
Governor of Jamaica 1664-1670
2 Sep 1679 2 Thomas Modyford 19 Oct 1679
19 Oct 1679 3 Charles Modyford 22 Jul 1687
Jul 1687 4 Norton Modyford 25 Jan 1674 14 Oct 1690 16
Oct 1690 5 Thomas Modyford 10 Mar 1679 30 Jul 1702 23
to Extinct on his death
30 Jul 1702
MOHUN of Boconnoc,Cornwall
25 Nov 1611 E 1 Reginald Mohun c 1564 26 Dec 1639
MP for East Looe 1614 and Lostwithiel 1625
26 Dec 1639 2 John Mohun 1595 28 Nov 1640 45
He had previously been created Baron Mohun
(qv) in 1628 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
in 1712
MOIR of Longford,Notts
18 Jun 1636 NS 1 Edward Moir c 1610 1 Aug 1644
to On his death the baronetcy became either
Aug 1644 extinct or dormant
MOIR of Whitehanger,Sussex
11 Jul 1916 UK 1 Ernest William Moir 9 Jun 1862 14 Jun 1933 71
14 Jun 1933 2 Arrol Moir 16 Sep 1894 8 Aug 1957 62
8 Aug 1957 3 Ernest Ian Royds Moir 9 Jun 1925 5 Aug 1998 73
5 Aug 1998 4 Christopher Ernest Moir 22 May 1955
MOLESWORTH-ST.AUBYN
of Pencarrow,Cornwall
19 Jul 1689 E 1 Hender Molesworth c 1638 27 Jul 1689
Governor of Jamaica 1688-1689
27 Jul 1689 2 John Molesworth 27 May 1635 18 Oct 1716 81
MP for Lostwithiel 1701-1705
and Bossiney 1701-1702
Oct 1716 3 John Molesworth 23 Jun 1668 20 Jun 1723 54
Jun 1723 4 John Molesworth 28 Feb 1705 4 Apr 1766 61
MP for Newport 1734-1741 and Cornwall
1744-1761
4 Apr 1766 5 John Molesworth 12 Mar 1729 20 Oct 1775 46
MP for Cornwall 1765-1775
20 Oct 1775 6 William Molesworth 30 Jun 1758 22 Feb 1798 39
MP for Cornwall 1784-1790
22 Feb 1798 7 Arscott Ourry Molesworth 1789 26 Dec 1823 34
26 Dec 1823 8 William Molesworth 23 May 1810 22 Oct 1855 45
MP for Cornwall East 1832-1837, Leeds
1837-1841 and Southwark 1845-1855.
Colonial Secretary 1855. PC 1852
22 Oct 1855 9 Hugh Henry Molesworth 13 Oct 1818 6 Jan 1862 43
6 Jan 1862 10 Paul William Molesworth 13 Jan 1821 23 Dec 1889 68
23 Dec 1889 11 Lewis William Molesworth 31 Oct 1853 29 May 1912 58
MP for Bodmin 1900-1906
For information on the death of his widow, see
the note at the foot of this page
29 May 1912 12 St.Aubyn Hender Molesworth-St.Aubyn 27 Dec 1833 18 May 1913 79
18 May 1913 13 Hugh Molesworth-St.Aubyn 3 Jan 1865 5 Jan 1942 77
5 Jan 1942 14 John Molesworth-St.Aubyn 12 Jan 1899 15 Nov 1985 86
15 Nov 1985 15 John Arscott Molesworth-St.Aubyn 15 Dec 1926 22 Apr 1998 71
22 Apr 1998 16 William Molesworth-St.Aubyn 23 Nov 1958
MOLONY of Dublin
21 Jan 1925 UK 1 Thomas Francis Molony 31 Jan 1865 3 Sep 1949 84
Solicitor General [I] 1912-1913. Attorney
General [I] 1913. Lord Chief Justice [I]
1918-1924. PC [I] 1913
3 Sep 1949 2 Hugh Francis Molony 2 Sep 1900 31 Mar 1976 75
31 Mar 1976 3 Thomas Desmond Molony 13 Mar 1937 3 Oct 2014 77
3 Oct 2014 4 Peter John Molony 17 Aug 1937
MOLYNEUX of Sefton,Lancs
22 May 1611 E 1 Richard Molyneux c 1560 8 Feb 1622
MP for Lancashire 1584-1585,1593 and
1604-1611
Feb 1622 2 Richard Molyneux 21 Feb 1594 8 May 1636 42
He was subsequently created Viscount
Molyneux (qv) in 1628 with which title the
baronetcy then merged. The ninth Viscount
was created Earl of Sefton (qv) in 1771.
The baronetcy continued united with the
Earldom until its extinction in 1972
MOLYNEUX of Teversall,Notts
29 Jun 1611 E 1 John Molyneux before 1618
before 1618 2 Francis Molyneux 1602 12 Oct 1674 72
12 Oct 1674 3 John Molyneux 1625 Oct 1691 66
Oct 1691 4 Francis Molyneux c 1656 12 Mar 1742
MP for Newark 1693-1700 and
Nottinghamshire 1701-1705
12 Mar 1742 5 Charles Molyneux 28 Jul 1764
28 Jul 1764 6 William Molyneux May 1781
May 1781 7 Francis Molyneux before 1737 9 Jun 1812
to Extinct on his death
9 Jun 1812
MOLYNEUX of Castle Dillon,Armagh
4 Jul 1730 I 1 Thomas Molyneux 14 Apr 1661 19 Oct 1733 72
19 Oct 1733 2 Daniel Molyneux 1708 1738 30
1738 3 Capel Molyneux 1717 Aug 1797 80
PC [I] 1776
Aug 1797 4 Capel Molyneux 30 Mar 1750 3 Dec 1832 82
3 Dec 1832 5 Thomas Molyneux 26 Dec 1767 26 Nov 1841 73
26 Nov 1841 6 George King Adlercron Molyneux 17 Oct 1813 25 Jan 1848 34
25 Jan 1848 7 Capel Molyneux 1841 24 Jan 1879 37
24 Jan 1879 8 John William Henry Molyneux 28 Jan 1819 5 Mar 1879 60
5 Mar 1879 9 John Charles Molyneux 27 Jun 1843 26 Aug 1928 85
26 Aug 1928 10 Ernest Molyneux 15 Jul 1865 26 Dec 1940 75
to Extinct on his death
26 Dec 1940
MONCREIFF of Moncreiff,Perth
22 Apr 1626 NS 1 John Moncreiff c 1651
c 1651 2 John Moncreiff 1674
1674 3 David Moncreiff c 1690
c 1690 4 James Moncreiff 1698
1698 5 John Moncreiff c 1628 27 Apr 1714
27 Apr 1714 6 Hugh Moncreiff 1744
1744 7 William Moncreiff 9 Dec 1767
9 Dec 1767 8 Henry Moncreiff-Wellwood 7 Feb 1750 9 Aug 1827 77
9 Aug 1827 9 James Wellwood-Moncreiff c 1776 4 Apr 1851
4 Apr 1851 10 Henry Wellwood-Moncreiff 12 May 1809 3 Nov 1883 74
3 Nov 1883 11 James Moncreiff 29 Nov 1811 27 Apr 1895 83
He had previously been created Baron
Moncreiff (qv) in 1874 with which title
the baronetcy remains merged,although,as at
30/06/2014,the baronetcy does not appear on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage
MONCREIFF of Tullibole,Perth
23 May 1871 UK 1 James Moncreiff 29 Nov 1811 27 Apr 1895 83
He was subsequently created Baron
Moncreiff (qv) in 1874 with which title
the baronetcy remains merged,although,as at
30/06/2014,the baronetcy does not appear on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage
MONCREIFFE of that Ilk
30 Nov 1685 NS 1 Thomas Moncreiffe c 1627 15 Jan 1715
15 Jan 1715 2 Thomas Moncreiffe May 1738
May 1738 3 Thomas Moncreiffe 31 Dec 1704 8 May 1739 34
May 1739 4 Thomas Moncreiffe 11 Feb 1732 28 Sep 1784 52
28 Sep 1784 5 Thomas Moncreiffe 7 Jun 1758 26 Mar 1818 59
26 Mar 1818 6 David Moncreiffe 31 Dec 1788 20 Nov 1830 41
20 Nov 1830 7 Thomas Moncreiffe 9 Jan 1822 15 Aug 1879 57
15 Aug 1879 8 Robert Drummond Moncreiffe 3 Nov 1856 8 Jun 1931 74
8 Jun 1931 9 John Robert Guy Moncreiffe 30 Jun 1884 7 Sep 1934 50
7 Sep 1934 10 David Gerald Moncreiffe 29 Jul 1922 17 Nov 1957 35
For information on the death of this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
17 Nov 1957 11 Rupert Iain Kay Moncreiffe 9 Apr 1919 27 Feb 1985 65
27 Feb 1985 12 Merlin Sereld Victor Gilbert Hay 20 Apr 1948
He had previously succeeded to the
Earldom of Erroll (qv) in 1978 with which
title the baronetcy then merged
MOND of Hartford Hill,Cheshire
8 Jul 1910 UK 1 Alfred Moritz Mond 23 Oct 1868 27 Dec 1930 62
He was subsequently created Baron
Melchett (qv) in 1928 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged
MONEY of Horn House,Hereford
1838 UK See "Kyrle-Money"
MONINS of Waldershare,Kent
29 Jun 1611 E 1 William Monins 24 Feb 1643
24 Feb 1643 2 Edward Monins c 1600 1663
1663 3 Thomas Monins c 1604 1678
to Extinct on his death
1678
MONOUX of Wotton,Beds
4 Dec 1660 E 1 Humphrey Monoux 4 Feb 1676
Feb 1676 2 Humphrey Monoux 10 Dec 1640 31 Jul 1685 44
MP for Bedfordshire 1679-1685
31 Jul 1685 3 Philip Monoux 25 Jan 1679 25 Nov 1707 28
MP for Bedford 1705-1707
25 Nov 1707 4 Humphrey Monoux c 1702 3 Dec 1757
MP for Tavistock 1728-1734 and
Stockbridge 1734-1741
3 Dec 1757 5 Philip Monoux c 1739 17 Apr 1805
17 Apr 1805 6 Philip Monoux 27 Feb 1809
27 Feb 1809 7 Philip Monoux 3 Feb 1814
to Extinct on his death
3 Feb 1814
MONRO of Bearcrofts,Stirling
30 Dec 1920 UK 1 Charles Carmichael Monro 15 Jun 1860 7 Dec 1929 69
to Governor of Gibraltar 1923-1928
7 Dec 1929 Extinct on his death
MONSON of Carleton,Lincs
29 Jun 1611 E 1 Thomas Monson c 1565 29 May 1641
MP for Lincolnshire 1597-1598, Castle
Rising 1604-1611 and Cricklade 1614
May 1641 2 John Monson 1599 29 Dec 1683 84
MP for Lincoln 1625 and Lincolnshire 1626
Dec 1683 3 Henry Monson 17 Sep 1653 6 Apr 1718 64
MP for Lincoln 1675-1681
6 Apr 1718 4 William Monson c 1653 7 Mar 1727
MP for Lincoln 1695-1698, Heytesbury
1702-1708, Hertford 1708-1710 and
Aldborough 1715-1722
7 Mar 1727 5 John Monson c 1693 18 Jul 1748
He was subsequently created Baron Monson
(qv) in 1728 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged
MONSON of Thatched House Lodge,Surrey
23 Feb 1905 UK 1 Sir Edmund John Monson 6 Oct 1834 28 Oct 1909 75
PC 1893
28 Oct 1909 2 Maxwell William Edmund John Monson 21 Sep 1882 11 Jan 1936 53
11 Jan 1936 3 Edmund St.John Debonnaire John Monson 9 Sep 1883 16 Apr 1969 85
16 Apr 1969 4 George Louis Esme John Monson 28 Oct 1888 21 Nov 1969 81
to Extinct on his death
21 Nov 1969
MONTAGU of South Stoneham House,Hants
and Kensington Palace Gardens,London
23 Jun 1894 UK 1 Montagu Samuel-Montagu 21 Dec 1832 12 Jan 1911 78
He was subsequently created Baron
Swaythling (qv) in 1907 with which title
the baronetcy remains merged
MONTAGU-POLLOCK of the Khyber Pass
26 Mar 1872 UK 1 Sir George Pollock 4 Jun 1786 6 Oct 1872 86
6 Oct 1872 2 Frederick Pollock (Montagu-Pollock from 1873) 27 Feb 1815 17 Jun 1874 59
17 Jun 1874 3 Montagu Frederick Montagu-Pollock 31 Jan 1864 14 Aug 1938 74
14 Aug 1938 4 George Seymour Montagu-Pollock 14 Sep 1900 21 Feb 1985 84
21 Feb 1985 5 Giles Hampden Montagu-Pollock 19 Oct 1928 4 Feb 2017 88
4 Feb 2017 6 Guy Maximilian Montagu-Pollock 27 Aug 1966
MONTAGUE-BARLOW of Westminster
24 May 1924 UK 1 Sir Clement Anderson Montague-Barlow 28 Feb 1868 31 May 1951 83
to MP for Salford South 1910-1923. Minister
31 May 1951 of Labour 1922-1924. PC 1922
Extinct on his death
MONTEFIORE of Isle of Thanet,Kent
23 Jul 1846 UK 1 Sir Moses Montefiore 24 Oct 1784 28 Jul 1885 100
to Extinct on his death
28 Jul 1885
MONTEFIORE of Worth Park,Sussex
16 Feb 1886 UK 1 Francis Abraham Montefiore 10 Oct 1860 1 Jul 1935 74
to Extinct on his death
1 Jul 1935
MONTGOMERY of Skelmorly
Jan 1628 NS 1 Robert Montgomery Nov 1651
Nov 1651 2 Robert Montgomery early 1654
early 1654 3 Robert Montgomery 7 Feb 1684
7 Feb 1684 4 James Montgomery Sep 1694
Sep 1694 5 Robert Montgomery 15 Aug 1731
15 Aug 1731 6 Hugh Montgomery c 1663 14 Jan 1735
to MP for Scotland 1707-1708
14 Jan 1735 On his death the baronetcy became dormant
MONTGOMERY of Magbie Hill,Peebles
28 May 1774 GB 1 William Montgomery 19 Nov 1717 25 Dec 1788 71
25 Dec 1788 2 George Montgomery 1765 10 Jul 1831 66
to MP for Peebles 1831
10 Jul 1831 Extinct on his death
MONTGOMERY of Stanhope,Peebles
16 Jul 1801 UK 1 James Montgomery Oct 1721 2 Apr 1803 81
MP for Dumfries 1766-1768 and Peebles
1768-1775. Lord Advocate 1766
2 Apr 1803 2 James Montgomery 9 Oct 1766 27 May 1839 72
MP for Peebles 1800-1831
27 May 1839 3 Graham Montgomery (later Graham-Montgomery) 9 Jul 1823 2 Jun 1901 77
MP for Peebles 1852-1868 and Peebles and
Selkirk 1868-1880. Lord Lieutenant
Kinross 1854-1901
2 Jun 1901 4 James Graham-Montgomery 6 Feb 1850 7 Nov 1902 52
For information on the death of this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
7 Nov 1902 5 Basil Templer Graham-Montgomery 1 Mar 1852 4 Oct 1928 76
4 Oct 1928 6 Charles Percy Graham-Montgomery 6 Sep 1855 1 Apr 1930 74
1 Apr 1930 7 Henry James Montgomery (Purvis-Russell-
Montgomery from 1906 and Purvis-Russell- 6 Sep 1859 6 Aug 1947 87
Hamilton-Montgomery from 1933)
Lord Lieutenant Kinross 1934-1937
6 Aug 1947 8 Basil Purvis Russell Montgomery 25 Sep 1884 28 Jan 1964 79
28 Jan 1964 9 Basil Henry David Montgomery 20 Mar 1931
Lord Lieutenant Perth & Kinross 1995-2006
MONTGOMERY of The Hall,Donegal
3 Oct 1808 UK 1 Henry Conyngham Montgomery 15 Mar 1765 21 Jan 1830 64
MP for Mitchell 1807,Donegal 1808-1812 and
Yarmouth IOW 1812-1816
21 Jan 1830 2 Henry Conyngham Montgomery 10 Mar 1803 24 Jun 1878 75
PC 1876
24 Jun 1878 3 Alexander Leslie Montgomery 14 Mar 1807 13 Jun 1888 81
13 Jun 1888 4 Hugh Conyngham Gaston Montgomery 18 Oct 1847 3 Nov 1915 68
3 Nov 1915 5 Alexander Montgomery 2 Aug 1859 13 Nov 1939 80
to Extinct on his death
13 Nov 1939
MONTGOMERY-CUNINGHAME of Corsehill,Ayr
26 Feb 1672 NS 1 Alexander Cuninghame c 1643 Mar 1685
Mar 1685 2 Alexander Cuninghame 1730
1730 3 David Cuninghame 4 Jul 1770
4 Jul 1770 4 Walter Montgomery-Cuninghame Mar 1814
Mar 1814 5 David Montgomery-Cuninghame Nov 1814
Nov 1814 6 James Montgomery-Cuninghame Mar 1837
Mar 1837 7 Alexander David Montgomery-Cuninghame 8 Jun 1846
8 Jun 1846 8 Thomas Montgomery-Cuninghame 30 Aug 1870
30 Aug 1870 9 William James Montgomery-Cuninghame VC 20 May 1834 11 Nov 1897 63
MP for Ayr 1874-1880
For further information on this baronet and VC
winner, see the note at the foot of this page
11 Nov 1897 10 Thomas Andrew Alexander Montgomery-
Cuninghame 30 Mar 1877 5 Jan 1945 67
5 Jan 1945 11 Andrew Malcolm Martin Oliphant
Montgomery Cuninghame 14 Jul 1929 18 Feb 1959 29
18 Feb 1959 12 John Christopher Foggo Montgomery
Cuninghame 24 Jul 1935
MOODY of Garesdon,Wilts
11 Mar 1622 E 1 Henry Moody c 1582 22 Apr 1629
MP for Malmesbury 1625,1626 and 1628-1629
22 Apr 1629 2 Henry Moody c 1607 c Oct 1661
to Extinct on his death
c Oct 1661
Sir Frank Cecil Meyer, 2nd baronet
Sir Frank died from injuries received in a riding accident. In its edition of 21 October 1935, 'The
Times' reported that:-
'Sir Frank Meyer, deputy chairman of De Beers Consolidated Mines, who was injured in a riding
accident recently, died at his home at Ayot St.Lawrence, Hertfordshire, on Saturday at the age
of 49.
'At an inquest held on Saturday Captain Harry Hulbert, of Ivor Court, Upper Gloucester Place,
said that Sir Frank was his brother-in-law. On Wednesday morning they went riding to Bloweys
fields, where Sir Frank suggested that they should have a good gallop. They had been riding
for a moment or two, and Sir Frank was nearly level with him when he heard an unusual noise,
and, looking round, saw Sir Frank's horse in the act of falling. Sir Frank was pitched into the air
and fell heavily to the ground. Captain Hulbert said that after fetching assistance he examined
the field and discovered that Sir Frank's horse had trodden in a large rabbit hole. In his opinion
this was the cause of the accident. Medical evidence was to the effect that Sir Frank's back
was broken. The coroner recorded a verdict of "Accidental death."
The special remainder to the baronetcy of Middleton created in 1781
From the "London Gazette" of 1 September 1781 (issue 12221, page 1):-
'The King has been pleased to grant the Dignity of a Baronet of the Kingdom of Great Britain to
Charles Middleton, Esq, Comptroller of His Majesty's Navy, and his Heirs Male, with Remainder to
Gerrard Edwards, of Ketten in the County of Rutland, and his Issue Male by Diana his Wife,
Duaghter of the said Charles Middleton.'
Sir John Peniston Milbanke, 7th baronet
Sir John appears to be a good example of the old saying that there is "one law for the rich and
another law for the poor." The following report appeared in "The Observer" of 21 January 1839,
reprinted from "The Salisbury Journal":-
'The Twenty-fifth Anniversary Ball of the Loyal United Craven and Nelson Lodge of Odd Fellows
took place on Tuesday last, at the Rose and Crown Inn, Salisbury. The room was very tastefully
fitted up for the occasion, and dancing was kept up with untiring spirit until a late hour, when
the harmony of the evening was broken in upon by a quarrel between Sir John Milbanke, Bart.,
and a Mr. Pocock. The former gentleman wished to have a country dance, while the latter
wanted a quadrille. A few words passed between them, when Sir John Milbanke stepped back a
few paces, drew a dagger from his pocket, and stabbed Mr. Pocock in the neck. Fortunately
the weapon did not reach the carotid artery, or death must have instantly ensued. Mr. Mackay,
surgeon, proceeded to examine Mr. Pocock, and discovered a desperate wound in the neck,
about an inch and a half in length, in an oblique direction, and bleeding profusely. He arrested
the haemorrhage as soon as possible, and put the wounded man to bed. Immediately after this
Sir John Milbanke made a similar attack upon the son of Dr. Wheeler, who was another of the
guests, when a policeman was procured, who wrested the dagger from him, but refused to take
him into custody, assigning as his reason, that "he was a gentleman!" - another striking
instance of the intelligence and efficiency of our police force. On the following morning, a
warrant having been issued against Sir John, he was taken into custody and brought before the
magistrates, when a very lengthy investigation took place, which lasted from 11 o'clock till 5.
Mr. Sharp appeared on behalf of Sir John Milbanke, whose case he very ably advocated, and
strongly urged the magistrates to accept of bail, which he offered to any amount; but, as the
surgeon would not pronounce Mr. Pocock out of danger, he was remanded until Friday, on
which day Sir John was brought up again, when the court was crowded to excess. It being the
wish of the prisoner that some other medical gentlemen, in conjunction with Mr. Mackay, should
visit Mr. Pocock, Dr. Clarke and Mr. G.B. Corfe complied with his request, when the gentlemen
were decidedly of opinion that the wound was going on favourably, but that he was not out of
danger. The magistrates stated that they should not be justified, under existing circumstances,
in accepting bail. The prisoner was then remanded until Monday.'
Milbanke's trial took place on 4 March 1839, and was reported in "The Scotsman" of 13 March
1839:- "Sir John Penistone Milbanke was tried at Winchester on Monday, on the charge of
maliciously stabbing Mr Pocock at a ball-room, Southampton. The evidence of evil intent being
defective, he was acquitted. The Examiner, in an able article on this subject, showing that
there is one law for the rich and another for the poor, observes that:- "According to the logic
of the learned judge, innocent intentions must be argued from any utterly unprovoked outrage.
No bad intention is, in Mr Baron Maule's view, to be inferred from the act of aiming a knife
against a man's throat. The character of the prisoner, forsooth, forms the best clue to the
intention. Thus a man of good character and connexions, backed by troops of friends, may cut
a throat, provided he does not cut it very much, and preserve credit for the best intentions.
The legal doctrine, that the intention was to be inferred from the act, we have seen carried
very far in other cases; but Mr Baron Maule, in considering the intention, leaves the act out
of view altogether!"
Another newspaper, The Satirist; or, the Censor of the Times, commented that "The jury who
acquitted Sir John Milbanke have declared by their verdict that they did not think the intention
of Sir John, in attacking another with a dagger, was to do any harm. We so far coincide as to
be of opinion that Sir John Milbanke was not a man likely to stick at anything. There are,
however, some persons ill-natured enough to remark that the Penitentiary ought to contain
Milbanke as certainly as Millbank contains the Penitentiary." [Millbank Prison, in Pimlico in
London was originally constructed as the National Penitentiary and was used as such between
1816 and 1890].
Sir John Peniston Milbanke VC, 10th baronet
Sir John was awarded a Victoria Cross for his bravery during the 2nd Boer War in 1900. The
citation, published on 7 July 1900, reads:-
'Lieutenant (now Captain) Sir John P. Milbanke, Bart., 10th Hussars, on the 5th January,1900,
during a reconnaissance near Colesberg. Sir John Milbanke, when retiring under fire with a
small patrol of the 10th Hussars, notwithstanding the fact that he had just been severely
wounded in the thigh, rode back to the assistance of one of the men whose pony was
exhausted, and who was under fire from some Boers who had dismounted. Sir John Milbanke
took the man up on his own horse under a most galling fire and brought him safely back to
camp.'
Sir Ralph Mark Milbanke, 12th baronet [E 1661]
Following Sir Ralph's death, the following article appeared in the London "Daily Mail" on 25
November 1949:-
'Portly, debonair Sir Ralph Milbanke, 42-year-old baronet who lived the life of a Regency buck
in 20th-century Mayfair, was found shot yesterday in his Down-street, W., service-flat.
'It was 8 a.m. Sir Ralph's steward, Mr. Pope, entered the bedroom to draw the curtains for
breakfast. Sir Ralph was dead. A gun lay near him.
'A week ago Sir Ralph, London representative of the Sugar Manufacturer's Association of
Jamaica, was told that the firm was closing down its London offices.
'Friends - they called him "Toby" - said last night that he was undecided about his future;
that he was planning to spend a few weeks in Scotland. And they discussed the future of the
Milbanke baronetcy, created 300 years ago. For Sir Ralph was unmarried. There are no close
relatives in the male line.
'Sir Ralph was the son of a V.C. [winner]. He himself carried on the family tradition by winning
the M.C. In the last war. He was jovial and unorthodox and a man who acted on impulse and
without fear.
During fighting in Yugoslavia he was dropped by parachute among the guerrillas. Later he had
the parachute made into handkerchiefs and pyjamas. During [the] civil war in Spain he heard
that his friend Mr. Rupert Bellville* had been captured by the Republicans. Immediately he flew
to Hendaye, on the French frontier, and tried to enter Spain to the rescue. He was told that
the only way to get into Republican territory was to arrive in a British food ship. He flew to
Antwerp and signed on as a deck-hand in a blockade-running cargo-boat. But his friend had
already been released.
'Sir Ralph knew, too, how to play. In 1939, before the outbreak of the war, he bet a friend, Mr.
Richard Sutton, that he could not play a golf ball from Tower Bridge to the steps of White's
Club in St. James's-street, S.W., in under 2,000 strokes. Crowds watched the players tee-up
for the first "hole." "Toby" Milbanke wore a fur coat and carried a bag of golf clubs. The "match"
lasted for two and half hours. Mr. Sutton won the bet by going round the course in 240.
'Twice Sir Ralph escaped death in aircraft crashes. For most of his life he was in bad health,
due to his adventures abroad. Last year he had a serious stroke, and was warned not to
over-exert himself.
'He had held the title for only two years. He succeeded his brother, Sir John Milbanke, known
as the "Boxing Baronet" in 1947.'
* Bellfield [1905-1962] joined the Spanish Falange militia as a pilot in the early days of the civil
war. His best known exploit was flying into Santander in order to congratulate the victorious
Nationalist troops before he realised that the town was still in the hands of the Republicans. He
was lucky to escape execution.
Sir Alastair George Lionel Joseph Miller, 6th baronet [GB 1788]
Sir Alastair spent virtually his whole adult life in one form of trouble or another. If asked to
nominate the archetypal "wicked baronet" of the 20th century, Sir Alastair would be a good
candidate.
The London "Daily Telegraph" of 13 September 1914:-
'Alastair George Miller, son of Sir William Miller, a lieutenant on probation in the Irish Guards,
who has been staying at Southwold [a small town on the North Sea coast in Suffolk]; George
Banks Price, an aviator, also visiting Southwold; Noel Cooper, solicitor, of Southwold; and
Maurice Dukes, farmer, of Henham, were dealt with by court-martial yesterday on a charge of
having circulated false information, in contravention of the recent Order in Council.
'According to police information, the defendants were concerned in circulating a story to the
effect that a German aeroplane had fallen at Shading Field, and that a wounded German had
been captured. One lady, whose husband is serving with the Suffolk Yeomanry, was so alarmed
that she aroused a neighbouring farmer, who stood guard in the road with a loaded gun until
three a.m.
'The court-martial decided to hand Lieutenant Miller to a military escort, by whom he is to be
taken back to his regiment. The Court declined to deal with the three civilians, who were
subsequently charged before the Mayor of Beccles, and discharged by him with a warning,
after the police explanation that they had been locked up since Thursday.'
The London "Daily Telegraph" of 30 March 1922:-
'In the Divorce Division yesterday, Mrs. Miller, who was married at 17, gave evidence in her suit
against her husband for a judicial separation on the grounds of cruelty. Captain Alastair Miller,
the respondent, petitions for a decree of restitution of conjugal rights. Mrs. Miller is the daughter
of Major Stephen Howard, M.P. for Newmarket [Sudbury?]. It appeared that her husband gave
her age as 21 at the secret marriage at the registrar's office. Afterwards they were publicly
married at the Brompton Oratory. Petitioner gave evidence, and described how she met her
husband. After misconduct she consented to a secret marriage. She complained of her
husband's cruelty, and of his bringing two actresses to see her at Bournemouth. He said he
preferred the society of these ladies to hers.'
The London "Daily Telegraph" of 15 February 1923:-
'A meeting of the creditors of Mr. Alastair George Lionel Joseph Miller was held yesterday at
Bankruptcy Buildings, Carey-street, Lincoln's Inn, W.C. Debtor was described as of Ennismore-
gardens, W., motor racing-car driver, and the statement of his affairs showed liabilities 4,339,
while the assets consist of cash 58; gold cigarette case and chain, 10; stand camera, 5:
and microscope, 4.
'The debtor figured in Divorce Court proceedings during last year. The trustees of his parents'
marriage settlement have come to his assistance to make a proposal of payment of a cash
composition of 5s in the to the creditors, such composition to be paid directly the approval
of the Court is obtained.
'The debtor attributes his position to the costs of the Divorce Court proceedings, which were
instituted by his wife: and he also includes in the causes of his financial trouble liability in
respect of guarantees given on behalf of a motor company.
'By a statutory majority the meeting accepted the proposal.'
"The Times" of 18 January 1924:-
'The jury found for the plaintiffs in this action, which was brought by Messrs. Trower, Still, and
Keeling, solicitors, of 5, New-square, Lincoln's Inn, to recover from Sir William Frederic Miller,
Bt., 2,369, the balance of bills of costs for work done by them. The claim included a bill of
charges amounting to 2,424 in relation to the matrimonial affairs of Captain A.G. Miller, son of
the defendant.
'The defendant denied that he instructed the plaintiffs, or that he agreed to pay their costs.
Alternatively, he pleaded that he instructed the plaintiffs to act only as his solicitors in relation
to his own affairs, and that agreed to guarantee the costs incurred in his son's affairs up to a
sum which, together with his own costs, would not exceed 1,000.
'Captain Alastair George Miller, son of the defendant, said that he was present when his father
had an interview with Captain Trower on September 19, 1921. They discussed the probable
costs in his (the witness's) case, and his father asked whether 200 would cover them. Captain
Trower replied that he did not think so, and Sir William Miller then asked whether 400 would be
sufficient. Captain Trower shrugged his shoulders, and said he thought it would. When the case
was nearly over Captain Trower said to him (the witness) in Court that he was afraid the costs
would be a good deal more than was expected.
'In summing up [Mr Justice Lush] said that he could not conceive of a more foolish or improper
bargain for solicitors to make than that which Sir William Miller suggested had been made by the
plaintiffs. The difficulty was increased by the fact that the defendant in the witness-box had
thrown over the alleged bargain and had sought to say that the limit of 400 was the real bargain
bargain made. The jury, without leaving the box, returned a verdict for the plaintiffs, for whom
judgment was entered for the amount claimed, with costs.'
After divorcing his first wife in 1926, Miller was remarried on 1 December 1927, to an 18-year-
old actress named Margaret (or Peggy) Shotter, who, in February 1928, was fined 25 at the
Clerkenwell Police Court after being found guilty of the allegation "that she did, for the purpose
of procuring a marriage license, unlawfully and knowingly make a false declaration" - i.e. she
said she was 21, and not 18.
In "The London Gazette" of 8 May 1931 (issue 33714, page 3041) a bankruptcy petition was
filed against Miller. Shortly thereafter, in July of that year, Miller was before the Haywards
Heath Police Court in answer to a summons granted to Mrs Miller and her two sisters, Miss
Winifred Shotter and Miss Eva Shotter, alleging that they were assaulted by him at his home,
together with a further summons brought by Mrs Miller against her husband, alleging the use of
threats. According to a report in the Grafton NSW "Daily Examiner" of 14 September 1931:-
'It was stated that Mrs Miller was married to the defendant about four years ago, and on April
13 left him and went to live with her parents in Regent's Park road, London, the two children of
the marriage being sent to the home of the defendant's mother at Hurstpierpoint. It was alleged
that, as Mrs Miller refused to return to her husband, he conceived the idea of obtaining
possession of his wife by a subterfuge. Mrs Miller stated that he arranged to meet her on June
27 for the ostensible purpose of taking her to sign some papers in connection with the sale of
some furniture, that after lunch at Richmond he told her he was not going to let her go back,
took her forcibly into a motor car, drove her to Hurstpierpoint, where he forced her to spend
the night with him, and threatened to kill her if anyone came to take her away. The other
plaintiffs [i.e. her two sisters] followed Mrs Miller to Hurstpierpoint in a motor car at 4.30 a.m.
and, it was alleged, were assaulted by the defendant before finally he allowed his wife to go
away with them. Captain Miller denied that he used any force towards his wife or threatened
her or assaulted her sisters, and maintained that Mrs Miller went with him to Hurstpierpoint
voluntarily. His counsel submitted that the proceedings were simply part and parcel of an
unwarrantable attempt by the Shotter family to interfere between Captain Miller and his wife.
After a short retirement the Bench bound Captain Miller over in 10 to keep the peace towards
his wife and the other complainants.'
Miller and his second wife were subsequently divorced in 1933. Reports of the hearing were
published in contemporary newspapers, but these are too lengthy for inclusion here. I will
therefore content myself with two observations made by the judge: firstly the judge observed
that the co-respondent was an actress "who is little more than a child." [Any reader seeing a
pattern emerging here?]; secondly, the judge remarked that "Captain Miller is now 39. He is a
most undesirable person so far as I can gather, an unsavoury pest of young women." It is also
worth noting that, while the petition for divorce was being heard, Miller had again been bank-
rupted, with net debts of around 11,000.
For the next 17 years, Miller appears to have stayed out of trouble, but in June 1950 he was
back in court charged with obtaining credit to purchase groceries, wine, spirits and car hire
without disclosing that he was an undischarged bankrupt. Further proceedings were adjourned
after Miller collapsed in court, but in January 1951 he was sentenced to nine months' imprison-
ment on these charges. This sentence does not appear to have had any effect upon Miller,
since, in April 1953, he was again charged with exactly the same offence of obtaining credit
while an undischarged bankrupt, as well as four charges of fraudulent conversion. On this
occasion, Miller received a sentence of three years.
Matters became quite a few degrees more serious in October 1958, when Sir Alastair received
another gaol sentence, again of three years, after pleading guilty to four charges of indecent
assaults against young girls. As reported in the London "Daily Telegraph" of 4 October 1958:-
'Sir Alastair George Lionel Joseph Miller, 65, sixth baronet, was sentenced to three years'
imprisonment yesterday at Hampshire Quarter Sessions, Winchester. He pleaded guilty to two
charges of indecent assault against a girl of 13 and two against a girl of nine.
'For the defence, it was submitted that Sir Alastair was not a criminal to be punished, but a
sick man to be pitied and, if possible, treated. As a racing motorist, he had a number of severe
accidents.
'Mr. Eustace Roskill, Q.C. [later Baron Roskill], the Deputy Chairman, said in passing sentence:
"It may be that you are deeply to be pitied because of your mental condition, but anxious as we
are to enable you to have medical treatment which will enable you to lead a normal life we
cannot see our way to make an order. Young children have to be protected from assaults of
this kind."
'Pleas of not guilty to six other charges involving indecent and common assault were accepted
by Mr. Guy Willett, prosecuting. Mr. Willett said that the parents of the girl of 13, who had
known Sir Alastair for some time, agreed that she could spend a few days with him, and he took
her to his house at Silchester.
'The girl woke up to find him in her bed and she jumped out. Later, at an hotel at Frinton, Essex,
he again got into bed with her. She wrote asking her parents to get her home. Mr. Willett added
that Sir Alastair later put an advertisement in a local newspaper saying a family "would welcome
a bright little girl, aged nine to 12, as companion to small son." It was signed "Miss Miller." He
collected a girl of nine and offences against her at an hotel at Newport, Mon[mouth], and
Frinton, were admitted.
'Mr. Dudley Collard, defending, suggested that medical reports substantiated the view that Sir
Alastair's faculties were deteriorating and decaying through physical causes which were no fault
of his. He was separated from his third wife and divorce proceedings were pending.'
In January 1959, while he was serving the three-year sentence outlined above, he was charged,
convicted and sentenced to a further three years, to run concurrently, for fraud. The "Daily
Telegraph" of 6 January 1959 reported:-
'Sir Alastair Miller, 65, sixth baronet, was sent to prison for three years at Hampshire Quarter
Sessions, Winchester, yesterday, after admitting frauds arising from transactions in cars. The
sentence was ordered to be concurrent with a similar term he received at the court in October
for indecent assault on young girls.
He pleaded guilty to: stealing a Bentley car, obtaining a Rolls-Royce car by false pretences,
obtaining an 888 cheque from Col. R. A. Hermon by false pretences, obtaining cheques for 500
and 362 from the Rev. A. R. Duncan Jones by false pretences, and obtaining 44 credit from
Basingstoke wine and spirit merchants without disclosing he was an undischarged bankrupt.
'Mr. A. C. Munro Kerr, prosecuting, said that for several months last summer Sir Alastair main-
tained himself at Impstone Manor, Silchester, entirely by the proceeds of fraudulent activities.
It was reckoned he had obtained a total of just over 2,200 by these methods.
'Mr. Ewen Montagu, Q.C., chairman, described the offences as "clever and ingenious frauds."
He referred to letters which Sir Alastair had sent out "of exactly the type which would tempt
people to trust him with their money."
Finally, from the "Daily Telegraph" of 5 October 1961:-
'Two mothers of 11-year-old girls answered an advertisement put in a newspaper by Sir Alastair
George Miller, the sixth baronet, said Mr. D. Prys Jones, prosecuting at Stoke-on-Trent
yesterday.
'Subsequently the Williams family, of Greenway Place, Abbey Hulton, Stoke-on-Trent, agreed to
their daughter, Penelope, going on holiday to Scotland as companion to Sir Alastair's "young
son."
'A Mrs. Gunnell, of Birmingham, with her daughter, Jennifer, in mind, also answered the advert-
isement. But when she thought it over she was not happy about the proposed holiday trip. So
she went to the police.
The prosecution's case was that Sir Alastair took Penelope to the Cheltenham home of Mr.
Peter Manners, an osteopath, who gave him hospitality, though their acquaintance four years
previously was slight: and that there Sir Alastair assaulted Penelope.
'Sir Alastair also photographed the girl nude at Cheltenham, said Mr. Prys Jones. Later he wrote
to her parents saying he would pay for her private education and alter his will in her favour.
'Penelope, giving evidence for an hour, referred to Sir Alastair as "Uncle George." Asked by Mr.
J. Ellison, for Sir Alastair, if she enjoyed her holiday, she replied: "It was a bit of a bore."
'The court was told that Sir Alastair had totally denied the charges. He was charged with taking
Penelope, a bus conductor's daughter, out of her parents' possession by fraud, and with three
assaults on her.'
On 30 November 1961 Miller was found guilty of taking away Penelope Mary Williams, then aged
11, by fraud with intent to deprive her father of possession, but he was found not guilty on three
charges of indecent assault. He was sentenced to 12 months' imprisonment.
Sir Alastair died in April 1964, apparently unlamented, inasmuch as I can find no obituaries in the
major newspapers of the day. However, the following article which appeared in "The Times" of
16 January 1969 is instructive:-
'Mr. Macdonald Miller, Conservative agent for Lowestoft, disclosed yesterday that he had found
out during an after-dinner chat on holiday in Spain that he had become a baronet. But for a
series of coincidences he might never have known of his father's death.
'He will be known as Sir Donald Miller of Glenlee, Kirkcudbrightshire, seventh holder of a title
created in 1788.
'Reference books show Sir Alastair Miller, the sixth baronet, to be still alive, but Sir Donald said
yesterday that he was responsible for keeping the records, and he did not know his father had
died five years ago until he learnt it from an English solicitor in Algeciras at Christmas.
'He said he was inheriting nothing but the title, which would make no difference to his work as
agent. His parents were divorced when he was a child. He had not seen his father for 40 years.'
The baronetcy of Mitchell of West Shore
Between the years of 1783 and 1895 this baronetcy was considered to be extinct or dormant.
In 1895, however, James William Mitchell was served by the Scottish Sheriff of Chancery as
being the heir male of the 3rd baronet, and is therefore considered by some reference works to
be the 9th baronet. Assuming this to be the case, the descent between 1783 and 1895 was as
follows:-
4th baronet (succeeded 5 Dec 1783) - John Charles Mitchell (c Feb 1709-25 Nov 1790). He
was the 7th and youngest son of the 1st baronet
5th baronet - Edward Charles Mitchell (10 Jul 1749-1 Oct 1818), 2nd son but 1st surviving son
of the 4th baronet
6th baronet - John Warburton Mitchell (4 Nov 1756-12 Jul 1831), next surviving brother of the
5th baronet
7th baronet - Joseph Mitchell (27 Nov 1762-13 Mar 1833), next surviving brother of the 6th
baronet
8th baronet - Joseph Theophilus Mitchell (20 Feb 1793-14 Mar 1849), nephew and heir male of
the 7th baronet. He was the son of Benjamin Mitchell, who was a deceased brother of the three
previous baronets.
9th baronet - James William Mitchell (7 Nov 1836-3 Sep 1898), son of the 8th baronet
10th baronet - Hugh Sykes Mitchell (born 1 Nov 1880), 1st surviving son of the 9th baronet.
He appears in 'Dod's Peerage' for 1899 as the 10th baronet, where his entry reads "SIR HUGH
SYKES MITCHELL, s. of Sir James, 9th baronet, who did not assume the title, by Annie Tilburn,
d. of Thomas Sykes, of Ackworth, Yorks. [Annie Tilburn is also listed as being a baronet's
widow]. B 1880; succeeded his father 1898. The title has not been assumed since the death
the 3rd bart. in 1783, though the father of the present bart., who was Rothesay Herald and
Lyon Clerk, proved his descent in the Lyon Office." However, by the time of the 1916 edition of
'Dod's Peerage,' his name has disappeared, and I have been unable to discover any further
information.
*************
The following [edited] article appeared in the 'Chicago Daily Tribune' of 25 November 1899:-
'August Cliff, better known as "Horseradish Jack," is, if his claim proves true, a British Baronet.
His mother, Mrs, Isabella Boyd-Cliff, he says, was the daughter of Joseph Theophilus Mitchell,
heir to the baronetcy of Westshore, and, according to the evidence now in the hands of British
attorneys, "Horseradish Jack," who for years has been a familiar character in Chicago, is Sir
August Cliff of Westshore. The English attorneys and Campbell Cummings, Mr. Cliff's lawyer at
St. Louis, declare the claims of "Horseradish Jack" will be reported upon favourably at this
session of Parliament.
'Instead of a jackass rampant on an advertising card in Chicago street cars, with the motto,
Fresh Horseradish,' Sir August Cliff's motto will be 'Sapiens qui assiduous' [He is wise who is
industrious].
'The Mitchell family is well known in the British Empire. The first Baron[et] of Westshore was
Sir John Mitchell, made Baron[et] by recommendation of the throne on June 19, 1724. The
second Baron[et] was Sir Andrew Mitchell, who died on June 29, 1764, leaving two sons by his
first wife. His son, John Mitchell, succeeded to the title and died without issue in 1783. After
his death the estate reverted to the throne.
'The line of descent traced to August Cliff is through the assumption of the title by the third
son of Sir John Mitchell, the grantee of the first Baronetcy. He was next in the line of
succession and died leaving eight children, seven of whom died without issue. The fourth son
and successor to the title was Benjamin Ware Mitchell, who died leaving one son, Joseph
Theophilus Mitchell, who was an East India merchant. This Mitchell married Isabella, daughter
of Captain James Young of Lee, Kent, England. He died in 1849, leaving two children, one of
whom was Isabella Boyd-Cliff, mother of the present claimant. She came to America and
August Cliff, the father of the present claimant.'
Unfortunately for Horseradish Jack, the other child of the marriage between Joseph Theophilus
Mitchell and Isabella Young was a son, James William Mitchell, who would automatically have
inherited the title on the death of his father. In any event, it is a fair assumption that the
remainder of the baronetcy would have been to "heirs male" which would have precluded the
descent of the baronetcy through August Cliff's mother.
Jane, Lady Molesworth, widow of Sir Lewis William Molesworth, 11th baronet [E 1689]
Lady Molesworth was the second daughter of Daniel Marsh Frost [1823-1900], a Brigadier-
General in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. She married Sir Lewis in
1875. Her husband was the 11th baronet and sat for Bodmin the House of Commons between
1900 and 1906, before dying in May 1912.
Lady Molesworth died in September 1913. The subsequent inquest into her death was reported
in "The Times" on 27 September 1913:-
'An inquest was held yesterday at Trewarthenick, near Truro, on the body of Lady Molesworth,
who died on Thursday evening. Miss Frost, Lady Molesworth's sister, said that Lady Molesworth
was sitting by an open window on Thursday afternoon when a wasp entered the room and
stung her on the neck. She went upstairs for ammonia to put on the sting and on returning
complained of palpitation of the heart. The witness went for some brandy and when she came
back found that her sister hyad fainted. A doctor was sent for, but before he arrived Lady
Molesworth was dead.
'Dr. Sharp attributed death to the sting of the wasp, which set up palpitation of the heart. She
had been stung on a large vein. The exertion of running upstairs for the ammonia probably
caused the poison to diffuse itself more rapidly in the system.
'A verdict of "Death from heart failure caused by the sting of a wasp" was returned.'
Sir David Gerald Moncreiffe, 10th baronet
Sir David died when a fire destroyed his home. The following report appeared in 'The Times'
of 18 November 1957:-
'Sir David Moncreiffe, tenth baronet and twenty-third feudal baron of Moncreiffe, is presumed
to have died to-day in a fire which gutted his home, seventeenth-century Moncreiffe, Bridge
of Earn, Perthshire.
'Throughout the day firemen searched unsuccessfully among the debris for a trace of him.
Bones uncovered were established by a police surgeon to be those of 12 dogs which died in
the fire.
'Sir David Moncreiffe's sister, Miss Elisabeth Moncreiffe, escaped through her third-floor
bedroom window by knotting sheets together and tying them to a radiator. She lowered
herself down the face of the building, but lost her grip on the sheets and fell the last 10 feet
on to a concrete path. She was taken to Bridge of Earn hospital. It was stated there that she
was suffering from shock, but after an X-ray examination it was ascertained that no bones
were broken.
Miss Moncreiffe threw her jewellery from the window before leaving. "She showed great sense
and nerve," said William Farquharson, a gardener, who shouted up to her bedroom window to
wake her up. "She came to the window after about three minutes. She wanted to leap out, but
I told her she had time to tie the sheets together. I lifted her clear of the building. Sparks and
blazing pieces of timber were falling all around."
'Dwellers at the Stables, about 100 yards from the mansion, saw the fire shortly after 2 a.m.,
by which time the lower part of the building was burning fiercely. Miss Moncreiffe last saw her
brother about midnight in the library on the second floor.
'A soldier on leave, Jack King, aged 22, climbed up a drain pipe and got into the house through
a bathroom window. He entered two bedrooms used by Sir David Moncreiffe, but found that
neither had been slept in. It was accepted by the authorities this afternoon that Sir David
Moncreiffe had died in the fire.
'The flames, which lit up the countryside for miles around, were fought by six fire brigades.
Two firemen received facial injuries when a diesel tank exploded. They were able to go home
after hospital treatment.
'One dog escaped. It was rescued from an upper window by Hugh Cameron, son of the estate
gamekeeper.
'Sir David Moncreiffe, who was 35, served in the Scots Guards in Italy during the war and was
awarded the M.C. He was twice wounded. He was a member of the Queen's Bodyguard for
Scotland. His heir is his cousin, Captain Iain Kay Moncreiffe, of Easter Moncreiffe, who with
his wife, the Countess of Erroll, motored to the scene of the fire about 3 a.m. Police vainly
searched the estate surroundings in the hope that Sir David Moncreiffe might have run out
in a shocked condition.'
Sir James Graham-Montgomery, 4th baronet
Sir James was killed after he fell from a train, as reported in 'The Sunday Times' of 9
November 1902:-
'The Press Association's Stamford correspondent telegraphs: - The death of Sir James Gordon
[sic] Montgomery, Bart., of Stanhope, was reported to the coroner for the Uppingham district
of Rutland at Stamford yesterday. It appears that the body of Sir James was found on the
railway near Seaton, whence the remains have been removed to await the inquest on Monday.
It is surmised that the deceased fell out of a train and was instantly killed. The deceased, who
was 52 years of age, was formerly a Lieut.-Colonel in the Coldstream Guards. He was
unmarried.
'Later details show that the body was found by a ganger about 7 p.m. at the mouth of the
Manton Tunnel, near Seaton Viaduct, on the Midland Railway main line. The permanent way
bore blood marks for about 50 yards, and deceased's head was found badly injured. One foot
was cut off and lying within the down permanent way. It is thought that deceased was
travelling by the express from the north due at St. Pancras at 7.50, and that his body lay
across the permanent way when the 6 o'clock train from Kettering passed, and severed his
foot. He had no ticket in his possession, but this may be due to the fact that tickets would
be collected at Nottingham. Sir James was identified by papers in his possession and a letter
addressed to a friend in the south of England indicating that he intended going south the next
day.'
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