BARONETAGE
Last updated 07/07/2014
Names of baronets shown in blue
have not yet proved succession and, as a
result, their name has not yet been placed on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage.
Date Type Order Name Born Died Age
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the baronet was
baptised on that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate
that the baronet was buried on that date
MOON of Portman Square,London
4 May 1855 UK 1 Francis Graham Moon 28 Oct 1796 13 Oct 1871 74
For information on the death of his son Frederick
Graves Moon,see the note at the foot of this page
13 Oct 1871 2 Edward Graham Moon 25 Mar 1825 21 Feb 1904 78
21 Feb 1904 3 Francis Sidney Graham Moon 4 May 1855 30 Jan 1911 55
30 Jan 1911 4 Arthur Wilfred Graham Moon 24 Jun 1905 25 Feb 1954 48
25 Feb 1954 5 Peter Wilfred Giles Graham Moon 24 Oct 1942
MOON of Copsewood Grange,Warwicks
22 Jul 1887 UK 1 Richard Moon 23 Sep 1814 17 Nov 1899 85
17 Nov 1899 2 Cecil Ernest Moon 2 Sep 1867 22 Feb 1951 83
For further information on this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
22 Feb 1951 3 Richard Moon 12 Apr 1901 23 Feb 1961 59
23 Feb 1961 4 John Arthur Moon 27 Oct 1905 22 Feb 1979 73
22 Feb 1979 5 Edward Moon 23 Feb 1911 14 Sep 1988 77
14 Sep 1988 6 Roger Moon 17 Nov 1914
MOORE of Fawley,Berks
21 May 1627 E 1 Henry Moore c 1633
c 1633 2 Henry Moore c 1685
c 1685 3 Richard Moore 10 Dec 1737
10 Dec 1737 4 Richard Moore 15 Jun 1738
15 Jun 1738 5 John Moore 25 Aug 1790
25 Aug 1790 6 Thomas Moore 10 Apr 1807
to Extinct on his death
10 Apr 1807
MOORE of Mayds Morton,Bucks
26 Jul 1665 E 1 George Moore c 1636 1678
to Extinct on his death
1678
MOORE of Ross Carberry,Cork
29 Jun 1681 I 1 Emanuel Moore c 1692
c 1692 2 William Moore 1663 28 Aug 1693 30
28 Aug 1693 3 Emanuel Moore 1685 1733 48
1733 4 Charles Moore 6 Oct 1754
6 Oct 1754 5 Robert Moore c 1758
c 1758 6 William Moore c 1783
c 1783 7 Emanuel Moore 17 Mar 1722 Aug 1793 71
Aug 1793 8 Richard Moore 7 Apr 1744 c 1815
c 1815 9 Emanuel Moore 1786 1849 63
1849 10 Richard Emanuel Moore 1810 24 Jun 1882 71
For further information on this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
24 Jun 1882 11 Thomas O'Connor Moore 5 Nov 1845 Jan 1926 80
to Extinct or dormant on his death
Jan 1926
MOORE of Jamaica,West Indies
28 Jan 1764 GB 1 Henry Moore 1713 11 Sep 1769 56
Lieutenant Governor of Jamaica 1756-1762
11 Sep 1769 2 John Henry Moore 1756 16 Jan 1780 23
to Extinct on his death
16 Jan 1780
MOORE of the Navy
4 Mar 1766 GB 1 John Moore 24 Mar 1718 2 Feb 1779 60
to Extinct on his death
2 Feb 1779
MOORE of Hancox,Sussex
28 May 1919 UK 1 Norman Moore 8 Jan 1847 30 Nov 1922 75
30 Nov 1922 2 Alan Hilary Moore 23 Jan 1882 13 Jun 1959 77
13 Jun 1959 3 Norman Winfrid Moore 24 Feb 1923
MOORE of Colchester,Essex
25 Oct 1923 UK 1 Edward Cecil Moore 22 Nov 1851 7 Dec 1923 72
7 Dec 1923 2 Edward Stanton Moore 28 Dec 1910 3 Nov 1992 81
to Extinct on his death
3 Nov 1992
MOORE of Moore Lodge,co.Antrim
20 Jun 1932 UK 1 William Moore 22 Nov 1864 28 Nov 1944 80
Lord Chief Justice [NI] 1925-1937. PC [NI]
1922. MP for Antrim North 1899-1906
28 Nov 1944 2 William Samson Moore 17 Apr 1891 27 Jul 1978 87
27 Jul 1978 3 William Roger Clotworthy Moore 17 May 1927
MOORE of Kyleburn,Ayr
20 Sep 1956 UK 1 Thomas Cecil Russell Moore 16 Sep 1886 9 Apr 1971 84
to MP for Ayr 1925-1964
9 Apr 1971 Extinct on his death
MORDAUNT of Massingham Parva,Norfolk
29 Jun 1611 E 1 Le Straunge Mordaunt 1572 1627 55
1627 2 Robert Mordaunt 23 Aug 1638
23 Aug 1638 3 Charles Mordaunt c 1615 10 Jul 1648
10 Jul 1648 4 Charles Mordaunt c 1638 24 Apr 1665
24 Apr 1665 5 John Mordaunt by 1649 6 Sep 1721
MP for Warwickshire 1698-1715
6 Sep 1721 6 Charles Mordaunt c 1697 11 Mar 1778
MP for Warwickshire 1734-1774
11 Mar 1778 7 John Mordaunt 9 May 1734 18 Nov 1806 72
MP for Warwickshire 1793-1802
18 Nov 1806 8 Charles Mordaunt 5 Jan 1771 30 May 1823 52
MP for Warwickshire 1804-1820
30 May 1823 9 John Mordaunt 24 Aug 1808 27 Sep 1845 37
MP for Warwickshire South 1835-1845
27 Sep 1845 10 Charles Mordaunt 28 Apr 1836 15 Oct 1897 61
MP for Warwickshire South 1859-1868
For further information about this baronet and
the celebrated Mordaunt divorce case, see the
note at the foot of this page.
15 Oct 1897 11 Osbert L'Estrange Mordaunt 27 Jan 1884 23 Feb 1934 50
23 Feb 1934 12 Henry Mordaunt 12 Jul 1867 15 Jan 1939 71
15 Jan 1939 13 Nigel John Mordaunt 9 May 1907 4 Aug 1979 72
4 Aug 1979 14 Richard Nigel Charles Mordaunt 12 May 1940
MORDEN of Wricklemarsh,Kent
20 Sep 1688 E 1 John Morden 13 Aug 1623 6 Sep 1708 85
to MP for Colchester 1695-1698
6 Sep 1708 Extinct on his death
MORE of Loseley,Surrey
18 May 1642 E 1 Poynings More 13 Feb 1606 11 Apr 1649 43
MP for Haslemere 1624-1625,1625,1626
and 1640 and Guildford 1628-1629
11 Apr 1649 2 William More 1644 24 Jul 1684 40
to MP for Haslemere 1675-1680 and 1681-1685
24 Jul 1684 Extinct on his death
MORE of More Hall,Lancs
22 Nov 1675 E 1 Edward More Oct 1678
Oct 1678 2 Cleave More 5 Mar 1664 3 Mar 1730
MP for Bramber 1709-1710
3 Mar 1730 3 Joseph Edmonds Moore c 1690 14 Mar 1732
14 Mar 1732 4 Joseph Edmonds Moore c 1715 29 Mar 1741
29 Mar 1741 5 William More 3 Oct 1738 21 May 1810 71
to Extinct on his death
21 May 1810
MORGAN of Llanternam,Monmouth
12 May 1642 E 1 Edward Morgan c 1604 24 Jun 1653
24 Jun 1653 2 Edward Morgan c 1675
c 1675 3 Edward Morgan 9 May 1682
MP for Monmouthshire 1680-1682
9 May 1682 4 James Morgan 1728
to Extinct on his death
1728
MORGAN of Langattock,Monmouth
7 Feb 1661 E 1 Thomas Morgan c 1607 13 Apr 1679
13 Apr 1679 2 John Morgan c 1650 10 Jan 1693
MP for Radnor 1681-1685 and Herefordshire
1685-1693
10 Jan 1693 3 Thomas Morgan 28 Aug 1684 14 Dec 1716
MP for Herefordshire 1712-1716
14 Dec 1716 4 John Morgan 11 Jul 1710 29 Apr 1767 56
to MP for Hereford 1734-1741 and
29 Apr 1767 Herefordshire 1755-1767
Extinct on his death
MORGAN of Tredegar,Monmouth
15 Nov 1792 GB 1 Charles Gould (Morgan from 16 Nov 1792) 25 Apr 1726 6 Dec 1806 80
MP for Brecon 1778-1787 and
Breconshire 1787-1806. PC 1802
6 Dec 1806 2 Charles Morgan 4 Feb 1760 5 Dec 1846 86
MP for Brecon 1787-1796 and
Monmouthshire 1796-1831
5 Dec 1846 3 Charles Morgan Robinson Morgan 10 Apr 1792 16 Apr 1875 83
He was subsequently created Baron
Tredegar (qv) in 1859 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
in 1962
MORGAN of Green Street,London
13 Oct 1892 UK 1 George Osborne Morgan 8 May 1826 25 Aug 1897 71
to Mp for Denbighshire 1868-1885 and
25 Aug 1897 Denbighshire East 1885-1897. Judge
Advocate General 1880-1885. PC 1880
Extinct on his death
MORGAN of Whitehall Court,London
28 Jul 1906 UK 1 Walter Vaughan Morgan 8 May 1831 12 Nov 1916 85
to Extinct on his death
12 Nov 1916
MORGAN of Manascin,Pencelly,Brecon
27 Jun 1925 UK See "Hughes-Morgan"
MORGAN of Outwood,Surrey
29 Jan 1960 UK See "Vaughan-Morgan"
MORICE of Werrington,Devon
20 Apr 1661 E 1 William Morice c 1628 7 Feb 1690
MP for Newport 1689-1690
Feb 1690 2 Nicholas Morice 1681 27 Jan 1726 44
MP for Newport 1702-1726
27 Jan 1726 3 William Morice c 1707 24 Jan 1750
to MP for Newport 1727-1734 and Launceston
24 Jan 1750 1734-1750
Extinct on his death
MORLAND of Sulhamstead,Berks
18 Jul 1660 E 1 Samuel Morland 1625 26 Dec 1695 70
26 Dec 1695 2 Samuel Morland Nov 1716
to Extinct on his death
Nov 1716
MORLAND of Nettleham,Lincs
5 Apr 1769 GB See "Bernard"
MORRES of Knockagh,Tipperary
28 Mar 1631 I See "de Montmorency"
MORRES of Upper Wood,Kilkenny
24 Apr 1758 I See "de Montmorency"
MORRIS of Clasemont,Glamorgan
12 May 1806 UK 1 John Morris 15 Jul 1745 25 Jun 1819 73
25 Jun 1819 2 John Morris 14 Jul 1775 24 Feb 1855 79
24 Feb 1855 3 John Armine Morris 13 Jul 1818 8 Feb 1893 74
8 Feb 1893 4 Robert Armine Morris 27 Jul 1848 20 Feb 1927 78
20 Feb 1927 5 Tankerville Robert Armine Morris 9 Jun 1892 29 Sep 1937 45
29 Sep 1937 6 George Cecil Morris 10 Apr 1852 17 Jul 1940 88
17 Jul 1940 7 Herbert Edward Morris 4 Jul 1884 15 Aug 1947 63
15 Aug 1947 8 George Lockwood Morris 29 Jan 1859 23 Nov 1947 88
23 Nov 1947 9 Cedric Lockwood Morris 11 Dec 1889 8 Feb 1982 92
8 Feb 1982 10 Robert Byng Morris 25 Feb 1913 21 Jan 1999 85
21 Jan 1999 11 Allan Lindsay Morris 27 Nov 1961
MORRIS of Spiddal
14 Sep 1885 UK 1 Michael Morris 14 Nov 1826 8 Sep 1901 74
He was subsequently created Baron
Killanin (qv) in 1900 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged,although,as at
30/06/2014,the baronetcy does not appear
on the Official Roll of the Baronetage
MORRIS of Cavendish Square,London
24 Jul 1909 UK 1 Henry Morris 7 Jan 1844 14 Jun 1926 82
to Extinct on his death
14 Jun 1926
MORRIS of Nuffield,Oxon
27 Mar 1929 UK 1 William Richard Morris 10 Oct 1877 22 Aug 1963 85
He was subsequently created Baron
Nuffield (qv) in 1934 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
in 1963
MORRISON of Cashiobury,Herts
29 Jun 1611 E 1 Charles Morrison 18 Apr 1587 20 Aug 1628 41
to MP for Hertfordshire 1621-1622, St.Albans
20 Aug 1628 1625-1626 and Hertford 1628
Extinct on his death
MORRISON-BELL of Otterburn Hall,
Northumberland
18 Dec 1905 UK 1 Charles William Morrison-Bell 18 Mar 1833 20 Oct 1914 81
20 Oct 1914 2 Claude William Hedley Morrison-Bell 5 May 1867 22 Nov 1943 76
22 Nov 1943 3 Charles Reginald Francis Morrison-Bell 26 Jun 1915 22 Dec 1967 52
22 Dec 1967 4 William Hollin Dayrell Morrison-Bell 21 Jun 1956
MORRISON-BELL of Harpford,Devon
18 Jul 1923 UK 1 Arthur Clive Morrison-Bell 19 Apr 1871 16 Apr 1956 84
to MP for Honiton 1910-1931
16 Apr 1956 Extinct on his death
MORRISON-LOW of Kilmaron,Fife
27 Nov 1908 UK 1 James Low 10 Feb 1849 30 Jun 1923 74
30 Jun 1923 2 Walter John Low (Morrison-Low from 1 Sep 1924) 27 May 1899 19 Jul 1955 56
19 Jul 1955 3 James Richard Morrison-Low 3 Aug 1925 14 Oct 2012 87
14 Oct 2012 4 Richard Walter Morrison-Low 4 Aug 1959
MORSHEAD of Trenant Park,Cornwall
22 Jan 1784 GB 1 John Morshead 4 Aug 1747 10 Apr 1813 65
MP for Callington 1780-1784 and
Bodmin 1784-1802
10 Apr 1813 2 Frederick Treise Morshead 1 Jan 1783 8 Jul 1828 45
8 Jul 1828 3 Warwick Charles Morshead 26 Nov 1824 17 Mar 1905 80
to Extinct on his death
17 Mar 1905
MORTON of Milbourne St Andrew,Dorset
1 Mar 1619 E 1 George Morton 28 Feb 1662
MP for Dorset 1626
28 Feb 1662 2 John Morton c 1627 8 Jan 1699
to MP for Poole 1661-1679 and Weymouth and
8 Jan 1699 Melcombe Regis 1679-1695
Extinct on his death
MOSLEY of Rolleston,Staffs
10 Jul 1640 E 1 Edward Mosley Sep 1616 4 Dec 1657
4 Dec 1657 2 Edward Mosley c 1639 14 Oct 1665
to MP for Mitchell 1661-1665
14 Oct 1665 Extinct on his death
MOSLEY of Rolleston,Staffs
18 Jun 1720 GB 1 Oswald Mosley 11 Aug 1674 2 Jun 1751 76
2 Jun 1751 2 Oswald Mosley 21 Apr 1705 26 Feb 1757 51
26 Feb 1757 3 John Mosley 22 Sep 1779
to Extinct on his death
22 Sep 1779
MOSLEY of Ancoats,Lancs
8 Jun 1781 GB 1 John Mosley 1732 29 Sep 1798 66
29 Sep 1798 2 Oswald Mosley 17 Mar 1785 24 May 1871 86
MP for Portarlington 1806-1807,
Winchelsea 1807-1812, Midhurst 1817-1818
and Staffordshire North 1832-1837
24 May 1871 3 Tonman Mosley 9 Jul 1813 28 Apr 1890 76
28 Apr 1890 4 Oswald Mosley 25 Sep 1848 10 Oct 1915 67
10 Oct 1915 5 Oswald Mosley 29 Dec 1873 21 Sep 1928 54
21 Sep 1928 6 Oswald Ernald Mosley 16 Nov 1896 3 Dec 1980 84
MP for Harrow 1918-1924 and Smethwick
1926-1931. Chancellor of the Duchy of
Lancaster 1929-1930
3 Dec 1980 7 Nicholas Mosley 25 Jun 1923
He had previously succeeded to the Barony
of Ravensdale (qv) in 1966 with which
title the baronetcy then merged,although,as at
30/06/2014,the baronetcy does not appear on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage
MOSS of Chiddingfold,Surrey
23 Dec 1868 UK See "Edwards-Moss"
MOSTYN of Mostyn,Flint
3 Aug 1660 E 1 Roger Mostyn c 1620 4 Oct 1690
4 Oct 1690 2 Thomas Mostyn 27 May 1651 14 Jun 1692 41
MP for Carnarvon 1679-1681
14 Jun 1692 3 Roger Mostyn 31 Jul 1673 5 May 1739 65
MP for Flintshire 1701-1702,1708-1713 and
1715-1734,Flint 1702,1705-1708 and 1713-1715
and Cheshire 1702-1705.
5 May 1739 4 Thomas Mostyn 26 Apr 1704 24 Mar 1758 53
MP for Flintshire 1734-1741 and 1747-1758
24 Mar 1758 5 Roger Mostyn 13 Nov 1734 26 Jul 1796 61
MP for Flintshire 1758-1796. Lord
Lieutenant Flintshire 1761-1796
26 Jul 1796 6 Thomas Mostyn 20 Oct 1776 17 Apr 1831 54
to MP for Flintshire 1796-1797 and 1799-1831
17 Apr 1831 Extinct on his death
MOSTYN of Talacre,Flint
28 Apr 1670 E 1 Edward Mostyn c 1700
c 1700 2 Pyers Mostyn 15 Nov 1720
15 Nov 1720 3 Pyers Mostyn 1735
1735 4 George Mostyn 30 Sep 1746
30 Sep 1746 5 Edward Mostyn 27 Apr 1725 13 Mar 1755 29
Mar 1755 6 Pyers Mostyn 23 Dec 1749 29 Oct 1823 73
29 Oct 1823 7 Edward Mostyn 10 Apr 1785 18 Jul 1841 56
18 Jul 1841 8 Pyers Mostyn 27 Sep 1811 14 May 1882 70
14 May 1882 9 Pyers William Mostyn 14 May 1846 10 May 1912 65
10 May 1912 10 Pyers Charles Mostyn 13 Aug 1895 16 Jan 1917 21
16 Jan 1917 11 Pyers George Joseph Mostyn 28 Sep 1893 28 Feb 1937 43
For further information on this baronet,see the
note at the foot of this page
28 Feb 1937 12 Pyers Edward Mostyn 12 Jul 1928 11 Feb 1955 26
For further information on this baronet,see the
note at the foot of this page
11 Feb 1955 13 Basil Anthony Trevor Mostyn 6 Feb 1902 19 Mar 1956 54
19 Mar 1956 14 Jeremy John Anthony Mostyn 24 Nov 1933 8 Nov 1988 54
8 Nov 1988 15 William Basil John Mostyn 15 Oct 1975
MOTT of Ditchling,Sussex
25 Jun 1930 UK 1 Basil Mott 16 Sep 1859 7 Sep 1938 78
7 Sep 1938 2 Adrain Spear Mott 5 Oct 1889 23 May 1964 74
23 May 1964 3 John Harmar Mott 21 Jul 1922
MOTTET of Liege,Flanders
16 Nov 1660 E 1 Giles Mottet
Nothing further is known of this baronetcy
MOUNT of Wasing,Berks
21 Jun 1921 UK 1 William Arthur Mount 3 Aug 1866 8 Dec 1930 64
MP for Newbury 1900-1906 and 1910-1922
8 Dec 1930 2 William Malcolm Mount 28 Dec 1904 22 Jun 1993 88
22 Jun 1993 3 William Robert Ferdinand Mount 2 Jul 1939
MOUNTAIN of Oare Manor,Somerset
and Brendon,Devon
23 Jan 1922 UK 1 Edward Mortimer Mountain 24 Nov 1872 22 Jun 1948 75
22 Jun 1948 2 Brian Edward Stanley Mountain 22 Aug 1899 17 Feb 1977 77
17 Feb 1977 3 Denis Mortimer Mountain 2 Jun 1929 24 Oct 2005 76
24 Oct 2005 4 Edward Brian Stanford Mountain 19 Mar 1961
MOWAT of Inglestoun
2 Jun 1664 NS 1 George Mowat Sep 1666
Sep 1666 2 Roger Mowat c Feb 1683
c Feb 1683 3 William Mowat c 1690
c 1690 4 Alexander Mowat
Nothing further is known of this baronetcy
MOWAT of Cleckheaton,Yorks
25 Jun 1932 UK 1 John Gunn Mowat 22 Jan 1859 1 Jan 1935 75
1 Jan 1935 2 Alfred Law Mowat 1890 20 Oct 1968 78
to Extinct on his death
20 Oct 1968
MOWBRAY of Warennes Wood,Berks
and Bishopwearmouth,co.Durham
3 May 1880 UK 1 John Robert Mowbray 3 Jun 1815 22 Apr 1899 83
MP for Durham 1853-1868 and Oxford
University 1868-1899. PC 1858
22 Apr 1899 2 Robert Gray Cornish Mowbray 21 May 1850 23 Jul 1916 66
MP for Prestwich 1886-1895 and
Brixton 1900-1906
23 Jul 1916 3 Reginald Ambrose Mowbray 5 Apr 1852 30 Dec 1916 64
30 Dec 1916 4 Edmund George Lionel Mowbray 26 Jun 1859 2 Feb 1919 59
2 Feb 1919 5 George Robert Mowbray 15 Jul 1899 9 Nov 1969 70
9 Nov 1969 6 John Robert Mowbray 1 Mar 1932
MOYER of Petsey Hall,Essex
25 Mar 1701 E 1 Samuel Moyer c 1643 17 Apr 1716
to Extinct on his death
17 Apr 1716
MOYNIHAN of Carr Manor
26 Jun 1922 UK 1 Berkeley George Andrew Moynihan 2 Oct 1865 7 Sep 1936 70
He was subsequently created Baron
Moynihan (qv) in 1929 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged
MUIR of Deanston,Perth
and Park Gardens,Glasgow
20 Oct 1892 UK 1 John Muir 8 Dec 1828 6 Aug 1903 74
6 Aug 1903 2 Alexander Kay Muir 20 Apr 1868 4 Jun 1951 83
4 Jun 1951 3 John Harling Muir 7 Nov 1910 31 May 1994 83
31 May 1994 4 Richard James Kay Muir 25 May 1939
MUIR-MACKENZIE of Delvine,Perth
9 Nov 1805 UK 1 Alexander Muir-Mackenzie 2 Mar 1764 11 Mar 1835 71
11 Mar 1835 2 John William Pitt Muir-Mackenzie 1806 1 Feb 1885 78
1 Feb 1885 3 Alexander Muir-Mackenzie 6 Jul 1840 26 Jun 1909 68
26 Jun 1909 4 Robert Smythe Muir-Mackenzie 27 Nov 1842 2 Feb 1918 75
2 Feb 1918 5 Robert Cecil Muir-Mackenzie 17 Oct 1893 12 Apr 1918 24
12 Apr 1918 6 Robert Henry Muir-Mackenzie 6 Jan 1917 4 Dec 1970 53
4 Dec 1970 7 Alexander Alwyne Henry Charles Brinton
Muir-Mackenzie 8 Dec 1955
MULHOLLAND
of Ballyscullion Park,Londonderry
3 Jul 1945 UK 1 Henry George Hill Mulholland 20 Dec 1888 5 Mar 1971 82
PC [NI] 1930. Lord Lieutenant Londonderry
1960-1965
5 Mar 1971 2 Michael Henry Mulholland 15 Oct 1915 3 May 1997 81
He succeeded to the Barony of Dunleath
(qv) in 1993 with which title the baronetcy
remains merged
MULLINS of Burnham,co.Kerry
7 Dec 1797 I 1 Thomas Mullins 25 Oct 1736 11 Jan 1824 87
He was subsequently created Baron Ventry
(qv) in 1800 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged
MUNRO of Foulis,Ross
7 Jun 1634 NS 1 Hector Monro Apr 1635
Apr 1635 2 Hector Munro c 1635 Dec 1651
Dec 1651 3 Robert Munro 14 Jan 1668
14 Jan 1668 4 John Munro c Sep 1697
c Sep 1697 5 Robert Munro 11 Sep 1729
11 Sep 1729 6 Robert Munro 24 Aug 1684 17 Jan 1746 61
MP for Tain Burghs 1710-1741
17 Jan 1746 7 Harry Munro 12 Jun 1781
MP for Ross-shire 1746-1747 and Tain
Burghs 1747-1761
12 Jun 1781 8 Hugh Munro 1763 2 May 1848 84
2 May 1848 9 Charles Munro 20 May 1795 22 Jul 1886 91
22 Jul 1886 10 Charles Munro 20 Oct 1824 29 Feb 1888 63
29 Feb 1888 11 Hector Munro 13 Sep 1849 15 Dec 1935 86
Lord Lieutenant Ross & Cromarty 1899-1935
15 Dec 1935 12 George Hamilton Munro 10 May 1864 2 May 1945 80
2 May 1945 13 Arthur Talbot Munro 26 Jul 1866 16 Feb 1953 86
16 Feb 1953 14 Arthur Herman Munro 10 Sep 1893 27 Mar 1972 78
27 Mar 1972 15 Ian Talbot Munro 28 Dec 1929 15 Dec 1996 67
15 Dec 1996 16 Kenneth Arnold William Munro 26 Jun 1910 3 Apr 2004 93
3 Apr 2004 17 Ian Kenneth Munro 4 Apr 1940
MUNRO of Lindertis
6 Aug 1825 UK 1 Thomas Munro 6 Jul 1827
6 Jul 1827 2 Thomas Munro 30 May 1819 28 Oct 1901 82
28 Oct 1901 3 Campbell Munro 7 Sep 1823 13 Jun 1913 89
13 Jun 1913 4 Hugh Thomas Munro 16 Oct 1856 19 Mar 1919 62
19 Mar 1919 5 Thomas Torquil Alfonso Munro 7 Feb 1901 10 Jul 1985 84
10 Jul 1985 6 Alasdair Thomas Ian Munro 6 Jul 1927 13 Mar 2014 86
13 Mar 2014 7 Keith Gordon Munro 3 May 1959
MUNRO-LUCAS-TOOTH
of Bught,Inverness
1 Dec 1920 UK See "Lucas-Tooth"
MUNTZ of Clifton-on-Dunsmore
7 Aug 1902 UK 1 Philip Albert Muntz 5 Jan 1839 21 Dec 1908 69
MP for Warwickshire North 1884-1885
and Tamworth 1885-1908
21 Dec 1908 2 Gerard Albert Muntz 27 Nov 1864 22 Oct 1927 62
22 Oct 1927 3 Gerard Philip Graves Muntz 13 Jun 1917 6 Dec 1940 23
to Extinct on his death
6 Dec 1940
MURCHISON of London
22 Jan 1866 UK 1 Roderick Impey Murchison 19 Feb 1792 22 Oct 1871 79
to Extinct on his death
22 Oct 1871
MURE of Rowallen
4 May 1662 NS 1 Patrick Mure c 1700
to On his death the baronetcy is presumed to
c 1700 have become either dormant or extinct
MURPHY of Altadore,Booterstown,Dublin
9 Oct 1903 UK 1 James Joseph Murphy 24 Jan 1843 16 Feb 1922 79
to Extinct on his death
16 Feb 1922
MURPHY of Wyckham,Dublin
3 Feb 1912 UK 1 Michael Murphy 9 Mar 1845 10 Apr 1925 80
10 Apr 1925 2 George Francis Murphy 31 Mar 1881 4 Jul 1963 82
to Extinct on his death
4 Jul 1963
MURRAY of Cockpool
19 Jul 1625 NS 1 Richard Murray 1636
1636 2 John Murray 13 Oct 1640
He had previously succeeded to the Viscountcy
of Annand (qv) with which title the baronetcy
then merged until it became dormant in 1658
MURRAY of Clermont,Fife
1 Jul 1626 NS 1 William Murray c 1645
c 1645 2 Mungo Murray c 1670
c 1670 3 Mungo Murray c 1700
to On his death the baronetcy became dormant
c 1700
MURRAY of Blackbarony,Peebles
15 May 1628 NS 1 Archibald Murray c 1634
c 1634 2 Alexander Murray c 1668
c 1668 3 Archibald Murray c 1700
c 1700 4 Alexander Murray 31 Dec 1741
31 Dec 1741 5 William Murray c 1760
c 1760 6 Richard Murray 4 Oct 1781
4 Oct 1781 7 Archibald Murray c 1726 23 Jun 1794
23 Jun 1794 8 John Murray 27 Jan 1766 30 Aug 1809 43
30 Aug 1809 9 Archibald Murray 3 Aug 1792 22 May 1860 67
22 May 1860 10 John Digby Murray 17 Apr 1798 8 May 1881 83
8 May 1881 11 Digby Murray 31 Oct 1829 5 Jan 1906 76
5 Jan 1906 12 John Digby Murray 12 Jan 1867 15 Sep 1938 71
15 Sep 1938 13 Kenelm Bold Murray 26 May 1898 16 Aug 1959 61
16 Aug 1959 14 Alan John Digby Murray 22 Jun 1909 9 May 1978 68
9 May 1978 15 Nigel Andrew Digby Murray 15 Aug 1944
MURRAY of Elibank,Selkirk
16 May 1628 NS 1 Patrick Murray 12 Nov 1649
He was subsequently created Lord Elibank
(qv) in 1643 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged
MURRAY of Dunerne,Fife
20 Apr 1630 NS 1 William Murray c 1641
c 1641 2 William Murray c 1670
c 1670 3 William Murray c 1700
c 1700 4 William Murray c 1730
c 1730 5 James Murray 14 Feb 1769
14 Feb 1769 6 Robert Murray 21 Sep 1771
21 Sep 1771 7 James Murray (Murray-Pulteney from 1794) c 1755 26 Apr 1811
MP for Weymouth 1790-1811. Secretary at
War 1807-1809. PC 1807
26 Apr 1811 8 John Murray c 1768 15 Oct 1827
MP for Wootton Bassett 1807-1811 and
Weymouth & Melcombe Regis 1811-1818
15 Oct 1827 9 William Murray c 1769 14 May 1842
14 May 1842 10 James Pulteney Murray c 1814 20 Feb 1843
20 Feb 1843 11 Robert Murray 1 Feb 1815 15 Apr 1894 79
15 Apr 1894 12 William Robert Murray 19 Oct 1840 21 Jan 1904 63
21 Jan 1904 13 Edward Robert Murray 22 Jun 1875 14 Jan 1958 82
14 Jan 1958 14 Rowland William Patrick Murray 26 Oct 1910 1994 83
1994 15 Rowland William Murray 22 Sep 1947
MURRAY of Stanhope,Peebles
13 Feb 1664 NS 1 William Murray c 1690
c 1690 2 David Murray 14 Feb 1729
14 Feb 1729 3 Alexander Murray after 1684 18 May 1743
MP for Peebles 1710-1713
18 May 1743 4 David Murray c 1769
to He was attainted and the baronetcy
1746 forfeited
MURRAY of Ochertyre,Perth
7 Jun 1673 NS 1 William Murray 30 Oct 1615 18 Feb 1681 65
18 Feb 1681 2 Patrick Murray 21 Jan 1656 25 Dec 1735 79
25 Dec 1735 3 William Murray 22 Feb 1682 20 Oct 1739 57
20 Oct 1739 4 Patrick Murray 21 Aug 1707 9 Sep 1764 57
9 Sep 1764 5 William Murray 23 Oct 1746 6 Dec 1800 54
6 Dec 1800 6 Patrick Murray 3 Feb 1771 1 Jun 1837 66
MP for Edinburgh 1806-1812
1 Jun 1837 7 William Keith-Murray 19 Jul 1801 16 Oct 1861 60
16 Oct 1861 8 Patrick Keith-Murray 27 Jan 1835 10 Jan 1921 85
10 Jan 1921 9 William Keith Murray 8 Apr 1872 4 Feb 1956 83
4 Feb 1956 10 Patrick Ian Keith Murray 28 Aug 1904 18 Jun 1962 57
18 Jun 1962 11 William Patrick Keith Murray 7 Sep 1939 2 Nov 1977 38
For information on the death of this baronet,
see the note at the foot of this page
2 Nov 1977 12 Patrick Ian Keith Murray 22 Mar 1965
MURRAY of Glendoich,Perth
2 Jul 1676 NS See "Hepburn-Murray"
MURRAY of Melgund,Forfar
29 Jan 1704 NS 1 Alexander Murray 2 Aug 1682 1713 30
1713 2 Alexander Murray c 1708 11 Mar 1736
Mar 1736 3 Joseph Murray 6 Aug 1718 8 Jun 1802 83
8 Jun 1802 4 Albert Joseph Ghislain Murray 26 Aug 1774 6 Feb 1848 73
to On his death the baronetcy became dormant
6 Feb 1848
MURRAY-MacGREGOR of MacGregor,Perth
3 Jul 1795 GB See "MacGregor"
MUSGRAVE of Hartley Castle,Westmorland
29 Jun 1611 E 1 Richard Musgrave c 1585 6 Nov 1615
MP for Westmorland 1604-1611
6 Nov 1615 2 Philip Musgrave 21 May 1607 7 Feb 1678 70
MP for Westmorland 1640 and 1640-1642
7 Feb 1678 3 Richard Musgrave 27 Dec 1687
27 Dec 1687 4 Christopher Musgrave c 1631 29 Jul 1704
MP for Carlisle 1661-1690, Westmorland
1690-1695,1701 and 1702-1704,
Appleby 1695-1698 Oxford University 1698-
1700 and Totnes 1701-1702
29 Jul 1704 5 Christopher Musgrave 25 Dec 1688 20 Jan 1736 47
MP for Carlisle 1713-1715 and
Cumberland 1722-1727
20 Jan 1736 6 Philip Musgrave c 1712 5 Jul 1795
MP for Westmorland 1741-1747
5 Jul 1795 7 John Chardin Musgrave 15 Jan 1757 24 Jul 1806 49
24 Jul 1806 8 Philip Musgrave 12 Jul 1794 16 Jul 1827 33
MP for Petersfield 1820-1825 and Carlisle
1825-1827
16 Jul 1827 9 Christopher John Musgrave c 1797 11 May 1834
11 May 1834 10 George Musgrave 14 Jun 1799 29 Dec 1872 73
29 Dec 1872 11 Richard Courtenay Musgrave 21 Aug 1838 13 Feb 1881 42
MP for Cumberland East 1880-1881. Lord
Lieutenant Westmorland 1876-1881
13 Feb 1881 12 Richard George Musgrave 11 Oct 1872 21 May 1926 53
21 May 1926 13 Nigel Courtenay Musgrave 11 Feb 1896 19 Feb 1957 61
19 Feb 1957 14 Charles Musgrave 9 Nov 1913 26 Jul 1970 56
26 Jul 1970 15 Christopher Patrick Charles Musgrave 14 Apr 1949
MUSGRAVE of Hayton Castle,Cumberland
20 Oct 1638 NS 1 Edward Musgrave c 1621 22 Nov 1673
Nov 1673 2 Richard Musgrave c 1650 10 May 1710
10 May 1710 3 Richard Musgrave c 1675 11 Oct 1711
MP for Cumberland 1701 and 1702-1708
Oct 1711 4 Richard Musgrave c 1701 5 Oct 1739
5 Oct 1739 5 Richard Hylton 13 Oct 1724 16 Jun 1755 30
16 Jun 1755 6 William Musgrave 8 Oct 1735 3 Jan 1800 64
3 Jan 1800 7 Thomas Musgrave 1737 31 Dec 1812 75
31 Dec 1812 8 James Musgrave c 1752 27 Apr 1814
27 Apr 1814 9 James Musgrave 24 May 1785 6 Dec 1858 73
6 Dec 1858 10 William Augustus Musgrave 1792 30 Sep 1875 83
to Extinct on his death
30 Sep 1875
MUSGRAVE of Tourin,co.Waterford
2 Dec 1782 I 1 Richard Musgrave 1746 6 Apr 1818 71
6 Apr 1818 2 Christopher Frederick Musgrave 11 Sep 1738 Sep 1826 88
Sep 1826 3 Richard Musgrave 6 Jan 1790 7 Jul 1859 69
MP for co.Waterford 1831-1832 and
1835-1837
7 Jul 1859 4 Richard Musgrave 24 Aug 1820 8 Jul 1874 53
Lord Lieutenant Waterford Mar-Jul 1874
8 Jul 1874 5 Richard John Musgrave 10 Dec 1850 4 Mar 1930 79
4 Mar 1930 6 Christopher Norman Musgrave 19 Oct 1892 12 May 1956 63
12 May 1956 7 Richard James Musgrave 10 Feb 1922 2 Dec 2000 78
2 Dec 2000 8 Christopher John Shane Musgrave 23 Oct 1959
MUSGRAVE of Drumglass,Antrim
4 Mar 1897 UK 1 James Musgrave 1829 22 Feb 1904 74
to Extinct on his death
22 Feb 1904
MUSGROVE of Speldhurst,Kent
2 Aug 1851 UK 1 John Musgrove 21 Jan 1793 5 Oct 1881 88
to Extinct on his death
5 Oct 1881
MUSPRATT of Merseyside,Lancs
30 Nov 1922 UK 1 Max Muspratt 3 Feb 1872 20 Apr 1934 62
to MP for Exchange (Liverpool) 1910
20 Apr 1934 Extinct on his death
MYDDELTON of Chirke,Denbigh
4 Jul 1660 E 1 Thomas Myddelton 2 Nov 1624 13 Jul 1663 38
MP for Flint 1646-1648, Montgomery 1660
and Denbighshire 1661-1663
13 Jul 1663 2 Thomas Myddelton c 1651 5 Feb 1684
MP for Denbighshire 1679-1681
5 Feb 1684 3 Richard Myddelton 23 Mar 1655 29 Apr 1716 61
MP for Denbighshire 1685-1716
29 Apr 1716 4 William Myddelton 26 Feb 1694 5 Jan 1718 23
to Extinct on his death
5 Jan 1718
MYERS
3 Jul 1804 UK 1 William Myers 1 Mar 1751 29 Jul 1805 54
Governor of Tobago
29 Jul 1805 2 William James Myers 16 May 1811
to Extinct on his death
16 May 1811
MYNORS of Treago,Hereford
24 Jan 1964 UK 1 Humphrey Charles Baskerville Mynors 28 Jul 1903 25 May 1989 85
25 May 1989 2 Richard Baskerville Mynors 5 May 1947
MYRTON of Gogar,Edinburgh
28 Jun 1701 NS 1 Andrew Myrton c Aug 1720
c Aug 1720 2 Robert Myrton 5 Dec 1774
to Extinct on his death
5 Dec 1774
Frederick Graves Moon, son of Sir Francis Moon, 1st baronet (15 Nov 1829-24 May 1871)
Moon died after being stabbed by his lover in May 1871. The following summary of the
subsequent trial appeared in "Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper" on 23 July 1871:-
'At the Central Criminal Court, on Thursday, Hannah Newington, otherwise Flora Davey, 37,
was indicted for the manslaughter of Frederick Moon. The prisoner was committed to take her
trial for wilful murder, but the grand jury returned a true bill for the less serious crime of man-
slaughter only.
'Mr. Giffard [later 1st Earl of Halsbury], in opening the case, described the circumstances under
which the charge against the prisoner arose, as they were afterwards given in evidence, and
said the question for the jury to consider was, whether the death of Mr. Moon was the result
of an accident according to her own statement, or whether it was the consequence of an
unlawful act on the part of the prisoner.
'William Fewtrill: I am a police-constable, and was on duty in Bayswater on the night of the
24th May. About a quarter-past 12 a communication was made to me by Police-constable
Rowe, and I went with him to 23, Newton-road. I was met at the kitchen door by Mr. Phillips,
senior. I followed him upstairs, into the dining room. There I saw the deceased, lying dead, near
the fireplace. There was a table in the room with several bottles on it. On the floor, close to
the body, was a bowl with bloody water. I went from the dining-room to the drawing-room,
which is on the same floor. There I saw the prisoner sitting on the sofa behind the door. She
was in the act of pulling off her jacket. The inside was lined with white, and was saturated with
blood. The upper part of her clothing was also covered with blood, and her hair was disarranged.
Mr. Phillips, jun., was in the room with her. I went into the dining-room again, and found the
knife (produced) in the fender. There was blood on one side of the blade. Shortly after a person
came to the house of the name of Captain Davey. Serjeant Woolton also came. The knife-
basket was on the table when I entered the room.
'Adelaide Matthews, parlour-maid in the prisoner's service, next gave evidence, and stated,
amongst other details in connection with the fatal occurrence, that the prisoner called for a
doctor, wrung her hands, and was in great distress. She did everything she could to save the
deceased.
'Mary Ann Hale: I was housemaid in the service of the prisoner. Between half-past nine and 10
o'clock on the night of the 24th May I was in the kitchen, which is immediately below the dining-
room. The first thing that attracted my attention was a fall. Then, a few minutes afterwards, I
heard a scream. I went up to the dining-room and saw Mr. Moon lying on the floor close to the
fireplace. His head was toward the sofa, and near the coal-scuttle. Mrs. Davey was kneeling
down by his side, trying to undo his clothes, and, as she said, "trying to save him." She asked
me to unfasten his things. I saw blood by the side of the body. I had heard no loud talking or
struggling before I heard the fall.
'Catherine Beulin: I am the daughter of Madame Beulin, of 2, Burlington-street, and Miss Pook is
my cousin. On the 24th of May I was staying at 23, Newton-street. I took my meals there, but
slept at Mrs. Toynbee's, because there was no room for me to sleep at Mrs. Davey's. I
remember Mr. Moon coming on the 24th of May. Miss Pook and Mrs. Toynbee were there. We
had been out for a ride on horseback that day. At half-past eight Miss Pook and I went into the
dining-room. Miss Pook brought up a bottle of Burgundy. I had some claret. Mr. Moon was sitting
near the door opposite the window, and Mrs. Davey was sitting by the side of the window. I
remained there half-an-hour, and then went into the drawing-room and played the piano. I
continued playing until Mr. Phillips came, and then went to the billiard-room, leaving Mrs. Davey
and Mr. Phillips. In about a quarter of an hour I went up to the dressing-room, which is over the
dining-room, with some linen. I was there with Mrs. Toynbee about five minutes, when I heard
the scream of a woman. Before that I had heard no loud talking or scuffling. I went downstairs
and found the dining-room door open. I saw Mr. Moon lying on the floor, and Mrs. Davey on her
knees bending over him. She said, "Fetch a doctor, fetch a doctor! I fear I did it!" I went at
once for a doctor, and was absent about 20 minutes. When I came back Mrs. Davey was in the
drawing-room. She said, "Oh, save him, save him! Pray for him, pray for him!" I went downstairs,
and saw nothing more of her until she was taken to the police-station.
'Flora Pook corroborated the evidence of the last witness.
'Mrs. Toynbee was next examined, and she said she was present on the evening of the 24th
May. The prisoner and Mr. Moon were generally on affectionate terms. She had heard them
quarrel. The last occasion on which they had quarrelled was some months ago, about the
prisoner's daughter. Mrs. Davey was very much annoyed and cried. - In cross-examination she
said that on one occasion Mr. Moon threw a decanter containing sherry at the prisoner. The
decanter was broken. Mr. Moon apologised for his conduct, and asked the prisoner to forgive
him. On the Monday before the 24th May, Mr. Moon gave the prisoner two cheques for 100
each. She was going to Homburg on the 25th. Mr. Moon was depressed, and the prisoner
coaxed him.
'Mr. Phillips, junior, gave evidence at considerable length as to the nature of the wound, which
he said was six inches in depth. In cross-examination he said it was not impossible that the
blow might have been caused by the deceased falling upon the knife.
'Mr. Savory, M.R.C.S., said that he had known Mrs. Davey for some time. When he told her that
Mr. Moon was dead, she said, "Impossible!" She fell into a swoon, and on recovering she said,
"I am afraid, doctor, that I did it." She afterwards said, "I suppose it must be so, but I really
don't know how." She said, "While at dinner Mr. Moon said something which annoyed me, and I
told him not to repeat it. He said, 'I will, and if you are not silent I will throw a bottle at your
head.' I jumped up with a knife in my hand; we struggled and fell. I saw the blood poring. I
don't know how." His opinion was that the wound was done by a stab. - The court then
adjourned.
'On Friday Mr. Baker, F.R.C.S., surgeon at Bartholomew's hospital, was called, and said the
wound was one most likely to be caused by the hand of another person; it could hardly be
accidental.
'Mr. Charles Royston, M.R.C.S., St. Stephen's-crescent, Westbourne-park, said it was not
impossible that the wound could have been the result of an accident, but it was highly
improbable.
'Dr. Westmacott said he agreed with Mr. Royston and the other witnesses that it was highly
improbable that the wound was caused accidentally.
'William Henry Pickford said: I knew the deceased intimately. I had known him 12 years. I had
also known the prisoner. About a month before the 24th of May last, at Newton-road, I was
present when there was a quarrel between them. He asked her if she had paid certain bills.
She said, "Yes." During the quarrel, she said, "By Heavens! I'll have your life some day." This
was during dinner. About six weeks before this, at lunch, she said to him, "By Jove, I'll stab
you some day."
'The evidence of Superintendent Eccles, who took the prisoner into custody, closed the case
for the prosecution.
'Mr. Edwin Canton, surgeon at Charing-cross hospital, was then examined for the defence, and
gave it as his opinion that it was probable that the wound was accidental. - Mr. Walton,
surgeon, of St. Mary's hospital, and Mr. Guy, chief surgeon at the Great Northern hospital,
concurred in this view.
'At the conclusion of the evidence for the defence the court adjourned.
'On Saturday morning Mr. Serjeant Parry made an earnest address to the jury on behalf of the
prisoner.
'The learned Judge then summed up. He said: No fair or sound view would warrant the jury in
coming to the conclusion that the wound was caused by the premeditated act of the prisoner;
but if it was the consequence of an infirmity of temper, she must bear the consequence of the
act she had committed.
'The jury retired at four o'clock. After an absence of half-an-hour, the jury returned into court,
and gave a verdict of "Guilty."
'The prisoner, upon being asked if she had anything to say, asserted her innocence, remarking
that, loving Mr. Moon as she did, it was impossible that she could have done what was imputed
to her. The wound, she said, was caused accidentally in the struggle.
'The Judge sentenced her to eight years' penal servitude. On hearing the sentence the prisoner
fainted, and was carried from the dock by the warders.'
Although sentenced to eight years, she served less than half of that period, as reported in "The
Sunday Times" of 27 September 1874:-
'In July, 1871, Hannah Newington, who had also gone by the name of Flora Davey, was tried at
the Central Criminal Court for the murder of Mr. Frederick Graves Moon, and sentenced to eight
years' penal servitude. In the ordinary course of events she would have been released on a
ticket-of-leave at the expiration of six years of that time. Since her conviction her solicitors
had memorialised the Home Secretary on her behalf, urging that Mr. Moon's death was really
the result of an accident, as the medical evidence upon her trial went to show, and that during
almost the whole of her confinement in Woking Prison, now over three years, she had been an
inmate of the infirmary. A week or so since the convict received the intelligence of the death
of her only daughter, and the effect of the news was an alarming and dangerous illness. In the
end she was recently removed to Millbank, and on Tuesday was released upon a ticket-of-
leave, having served less than half the term of penal servitude to which she was sentenced.'
Sir Cecil Ernest Moon, 2nd baronet
From the 'Washington Post' of 28 January 1900, reprinted from the 'Chicago Journal':-
'Mr. Cecil Moon, Bart., and Lady Moon were at the Auditorium Annex yesterday. They came
from Denver, Colorado, and are on their way to England, where the baronet will take charge
of a million dollar estate.
'No longer than two weeks ago the distinguished Briton was plain Cecil Moon, with no greater
title than that of "cowboy." Several years ago he came from England and went to Colorado,
where he hired out as a "rustler" or "cattle puncher." He saved his money, married an English
girl who lived in Denver [although Burke's Peerage states her to be of Irish descent, which
is confirmed by the report below], and finally got a small ranch of his own and a small number
of cattle, so that he had the right to be known as a cowboy.
'The title to the family estates in Surrey, England, was in the name of his grandfather, Sir
Richard Moon, and as Cecil's father was still alive and yet a young man, the cattle business
gave the only promise for a future to the grandson. About two years ago Cecil Moon's father
died [he actually died in April 1893] and two weeks ago, Sir Richard, the grandfather, passed
away. The Colorado cowboy, being the next in line, the title and estates descended to him,
and he is now on his way to take possession of them.
"I shall never regret my experience in America," he said yesterday to a reporter. "It was rather
hard rustling at times, and I saw some trouble at one time or another, but it did me good in a
way. I shall have much to tell my friends back home, once I get settled. I don't look to see
things much changed over there. England is a very old country, you know, and her people go
slowly. They are not like Americans. There have been more changes in Colorado in the last ten
years than in England, I imagine, has known in a century. Shall I come back to this country to
live? Probably not. I shall have plenty to look after at home. But I have grown very fond of
America, especially of Colorado, and hope to see it again frequently."
'The baronet wears his new honors simply. He does not look to be above thirty years of age,
and is browned and tanned with the winds of the range. He left his ranch in charge of one of
his men, and said he had not decided yet whether he should sell it or hold it.
'The Surrey estate which has fallen to the Colorado cowboy is said to be among the best in
England. It has been in the family for several hundred years. Sir Richard was an old man when
he died, and his grandson is the sole heir to the property, which is valued at more than a
million.'
We meet with Sir Cecil again in 1909, when the 'Washington Post,' on 20 October 1909,
reported that:-
'Sir Cecil Ernest Moon, baronet, of Copswood Grange, County Warwick, England, and of
Coldstream ranch, northern Colorado, today [19 October] filed suit against his wife [in Denver],
demanding and accounting for $6,000, which he says he put in her care in 1900. They were
going to England for a visit, and Lady Moon suggested that there would be no extravagance
if she held the purse.
'Since then, Sir Cecil complains bitterly, it has been impossible for him to be extravagant. His
wife has allowed him only a paltry $560; and of this, $300 in the last two years. Meanwhile, he
says, his wife, daughter of F. Grattan Lawder, of The Grove, County Wicklow, Ireland, has
been touring several Western States with a string of horses, which she enters in the races at
many tracks. The baronet complains that he has been compelled to do menial labor on the
ranch, which is their home.
'At times, according to his testimony, he has done the cooking and other kitchen work. His
allowance has been less than his wife paid the manager of the ranch.'
It is hardly surprising that, according to Burke's Peerage, the couple were divorced in 1910.
Sir Richard Emanuel Moore, 10th baronet
The following article appeared in 'The Illustrated Police News' on 2 February 1867:-
'The following romance of the aristocracy appears in one of the Dublin papers: - One of those
cases which have afforded Sir Barnard [sic] Burke material for some of his deeply interesting
works, in which the vicissitudes of noble houses are set forth, has recently been brought to
light by certain proceedings in Capel-street Police-office. On the 19th of October [presumably
1866] a young lad, aged about 16, was brought up before Mr. J.C. O'Donel, charged with
having stolen from Mr. Alfred Nelson, photographer, a mahogany glass-case containing a
number of photographs. The prisoner, who gave his name as Emanuel Moore, had been
employed by Mr. Nelson as a porter, and while in his employment had taken away the articles
and sold them. So far there is nothing more in the case that what occurs in the daily record
of crime in all our police-offices; but subsequent inquiries led to a revelation at once strange
and painful, if young Moore's statements be true. As an explanation of his committing the
offence he stated that his father, who is an Irish baronet of one of the oldest creations, had
been reduced to a condition of such abject poverty as to be now under the necessity of selling
matches in the streets of Dublin to obtain a wretched subsistence, and that he had sold the
articles which he had stolen to furnish them with some of the ordinary necessities of life. The
criminal - if such he can be called - was, in accordance with the law which he had violated,
not the less that the doing so was an act of filial duty, sentenced to two months'
imprisonment, which he is now undergoing. The mother of the unfortunate lad was sister to
an Irishman who for many years sat in Parliament for an English seat, and who at one time
was a great popular leader of the English working classes. We understand that an effort is
being made to obtain a commutation of young Moore's sentence, and to provide for his father
and himself some employment which will release them from actual pauperism.'
Based on the facts contained in the above report, Sir Richard Emanuel Moore is the only
possible candidate for the match-selling baronet. This is confirmed by the fact that he did
have a son, Emanuel, who was born in 1853 and who died before his father. As to the boy's
mother, she was the 10th baronet's second wife, Margaret Matilda O'Connor. The brother
referred to as being in Parliament must therefore have been Feargus Edward O'Connor, MP for
co. Cork 1832-1835 and Nottingham 1847-1852. He was a leading figure in the Chartist
movement during the 1830s and 1840s.
The baronetcy became either extinct or dormant in 1926; more likely the latter, since the
entry under this baronetcy in Dod's Peerage for 1916 contains a note stating that the heir
to the baronetcy would be the eldest male descendant of Charles, son of the 9th baronet,
who died in the United States, leaving several sons.
Sir Charles Mordaunt,10th baronet
In December 1866, Sir Charles married Harriet Sarah Moncreiffe, daughter of Sir Thomas
Moncreiffe of that Ilk and 7th baronet of the creation of 1685. She was only 18 and thus
12 years younger than her husband.
Sir Charles was MP for Warwickshire South and so was required to spend a good deal of his
time at Westminster. The marriage was only a few months old when he began to mildly protest
to his wife about the number of men friends his wife received at his home and, in particular,
about the frequent calls during his absence that were being made by Viscount Cole (later Earl
of Enniskillen), Sir Frederick Johnstone and a Captain Farquhar, an officer in the Guards. Most
of all, however, he objected to her friendship with the Prince of Wales whom, curiously, he had
never met, notwithstanding that the Prince was a frequent visitor to his house. Sir Charles
hinted to his wife that he would be pleased if his wife saw no more of these men, but she
laughed off his protests, telling him not to be silly.
In February 1869, Lady Mordaunt gave birth to a daughter. When Sir Charles stood by his wife's
bedside after the birth, his wife, with tears streaming down her face and seemingly in a state
of repentance and self-abasement, told him that he was not the child's father. Even worse,
she could not say who was the father of the child - it could have been any of a number of men,
naming Lord Cole, Sir Frederick Johnstone and the Prince of Wales as possibilities.
Sir Charles could not bring himself to believe her, until he found bundles of letters in her desk
from two peers, some hotel bills bearing the name of Sir Frederick Johnstone and a valentine
from the Prince of Wales, together with one of the Prince's handkerchiefs. He also learned that,
while he had been on a fishing holiday in Norway, Lord Cole had stayed at the family home.
He immediately launched divorce proceedings, citing Lord Cole, Sir Frederick Johnstone and, so
rumour had it, a third and more illustrious name. In the meantime, Lady Mordaunt's father, on
hearing the news, had assumed his daughter must be insane and had some mental specialists
examine her. They declared that the rigors of confinement had induced puerperal fever, as a
result of which she was undoubtedly insane and suffering from delusions.
The legal effect of this was that Sir Charles was debarred from proceeding with his suit for
divorce, since legally an insane person is not fit to testify against another or to defend
themselves. But Sir Charles took the view that his wife was shamming insanity as a means of
negating her confession to him and, accordingly, he brought suit to have a court adjudge her
as being sane, as a preliminary to his divorce petition.
The hearing began on 16 February 1870 before Lord Penzance. It was asserted that while
under observation, Lady Mordaunt had walked about dressed only in a pair of stockings and
a short opera cloak, had to be washed like a baby, had destroyed her clothes and had tried
to jump from a moving carriage. She was said to suffer from what the 'experts' described as
hysterical catalepsy, which, it was said, obsessed her with delusions, violent outbursts of
temper and the fear that she was being poisoned.
On the other side, Sir Charles called several witnesses to prove she was perfectly sane. One,
Elizabeth Hancox, nurse at the confinement, alleged that Lady Mordaunt and her mother
offered her a reward to 'take the child as her own, teach it to work for its living, and when it
was old enough, tell it it was an unfortunate.' Mrs Cadogan, wife of the local vicar and present
at the confinement, said that Lady Mordaunt had never displayed any signs of insanity; and she
testified that she had later excused her waywardness to her by saying, 'Everybody does it, so
why shouldn't I?'
Evidence was given by the servants of the frequent visits of the Prince of Wales, who
sometimes arrived incognito in a hansom. Lady Mordaunt, they declared, always received the
Prince in the drawing room and gave strict instructions that no one else was to be admitted
during these visits, which varied from half an hour to two hours. As a result of this evidence
the Prince decided to go into the witness box, even though, legally, he could not be compelled
to give evidence or to answer questions. In doing so, he ignored the advice of the government
and defied the orders of his mother, Queen Victoria. His interrogation was brief and his answers
likewise -
'I believe Your Royal Highness has for some time been acquainted with the Moncreiffe family?' -
'I have.' 'On her marriage did Your Royal Highness write to Lady Mordaunt and send her a
wedding present?' - 'I did.' 'Previous to her marriage, had she visited Your Royal Highness at
Marlborough House? '- 'She had.' 'And has she ever gone to the theatre with both Your Royal
Highnesses?' - 'She has.' 'In the year 1867 did you see much of her?' - 'I did.' 'And in the year
1868?' - ''I did also,' 'Were you acquainted with Sir Charles Mordaunt?' - 'I was.' 'I have only
one more question with which to trouble Your Royal Highness. Has there ever been any
improper familiarity or criminal act between yourself and Lady Mordaunt?' - 'There has not.'
The Prince was not cross-examined and Sir Charles' legal team admitted that there was not an
atom of proof against the Prince. Eventually the Court took only five minutes to deliver its
judgment that Lady Mordaunt was of unsound mind and had been so when the citation for
divorce had been served upon her. As a consequence, Sir Charles was unable to proceed with
his divorce petition, the judge ruling that no further action could be taken in the matter unless
and until Lady Mordaunt had recovered her sanity.
Sir Charles unsuccessfully appealed against this ruling, but in March 1875, he succeeded in
obtaining a verdict to the contrary that enabled him to proceed. This time, only Lord Cole was
named as co-respondent; the action was undefended and he gained his divorce, with costs
against Lord Cole.
Sir Pyers George Joseph Mostyn, 11th baronet and his son, Sir Pyers Edward
Mostyn, 12th baronet
After the death of 11th baronet, the following appreciation [one might almost say adulation] of
his life, written by a friend in Kenya, appeared in 'The Times' of 8 May 1937:-
'Major Sir Pyers Mostyn, M.C., eleventh baronet, died at his farm on the higher slopes of Mount
Kenya on February 28 as the result of a fall from a horse. His next farm neighbour and pig-
sticking companion, Captain Eric Gooch, one of the fast diminishing band of Kenya's earliest
settlers, was killed a few days before by a fall from the same horse.
'In England, except in a select sporting circle and more especially among those who watch such
international happenings as may affect the strategic security of the British peoples, Sir Pyers
Mostyn was little known. Constitutionally intolerant of the conventional round of many born to
easy estate, he sold the family domain and found his satisfaction among the high passes of the
Himalaya; in Africa's desert fringe, equatorial forests, vast scrubland wastes and highland oases
of the white man's homing; in unpublished recesses of the East; and in the immense never-
never land of Australia. He loved the he-men of the untamed remnants of the early world, and
they loved him. In such places, and even in the sophisticated milieu of his small coterie of
personal intimates, Pyers, at the early age of 43, had become almost a mythical being.
'His spiritual home, however, was the air. His flying technique was superb. During the last 10
years, while pilots have been contriving well-advertised flights across the African continent, he
had explored every possible route from Kenya to England and between the focal points of
Africa. His one besetting fear was notoriety. The full tale of his life of crowded adventure
would provide an epic unbelievable in this trite time. It can never be written because the
details only emerged casually on chance conversational occasions. Fantastic adventure was to
him the merest commonplace. To the majority he appeared to have an insatiable and at times
lust for danger as such, but those of us who knew him best realised his high purpose -
determination to fit himself in every possible way to play an emphatic part in the future of our
race. His constant theme was for the accumulating dangers which menace our Imperial position,
and the seeming nonchalance with which they have been recognised by the controls. His bones
rest in the aerodrome which he made on the verge of the forests of Mount Kenya.'
His son, the 12th baronet, died in a motor vehicle accident in February 1955, as reported in
The Times' of 12 February 1955:-
'Our Nairobi Correspondent reports that Sir Pyers Mostyn, Bt., was killed when his car over-
turned while he was driving from Mombasa to Malindi. He was 26.
'Pyers Edward Mostyn was the only son of Sir Pyers George Joseph Mostyn, eleventh baronet,
and was born on Jul 12, 1928. He succeeded as twelfth baronet at the age of nine, his father
having been killed while riding near Nairobi in 1937. Before he went to Kenya at the age of 21
to farm the estate his father had bought there he had been a promising swimmer, holding the
Middlesex 100 yards title. He was also a keen boxer. He had worked for some time in the
locust control organization and was spending a period of leave at Malindi when he met his
death. He was a bachelor, and the baronetcy devolves upon his uncle.'
Sir William Patrick Keith Murray, 11th baronet [NS 1673]
Sir William committed suicide in November 1977, after losing an estimated 130,000 in failed
film and theatre projects. 'The Guardian,' in its edition of 3 November 1977, stated that "Sir
William Murray died in a shotgun blast yesterday, aged 38. His body was found in the tiny
theatre at Ochtertyre, Perthshire, which cost him much of his fortune.......He inherited a
14,500-acre estate and Ochtertyre mansion house when he was 21, but sold 11,000 acres
of the land in 1966. A number of his business ventures were unsuccessful but he realised his
greatest ambition in 1972 when he converted a gymnasium at the mansion into a theatre. It
proved a financial failure and he spent tens of thousands of pounds to keep it going, selling
family heirlooms and most of the rest of the estate to pay his debts."
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