BARONETAGE
Last updated 26/03/2014
Names of baronets shown in blue
have not yet proved succession and, as a
result, their name has not yet been placed on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage.
Date Type Order Name Born Died Age
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the baronet was
baptised on that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate
that the baronet was buried on that date
TALBOT of Carton,Kildare
4 Feb 1623 I 1 William Talbot 16 Mar 1634
16 Mar 1634 2 Robert Talbot c 1610 21 Oct 1670
21 Oct 1670 3 William Talbot c 1643 18 May 1691
to He was attainted and the baronetcy
1691 forfeited in 1691
TALBOT of Belfast,Antrim
31 Mar 1790 I 1 Charles Henry Talbot 30 Oct 1720 10 Jun 1798 77
10 Jun 1798 2 Charles Talbot 8 Nov 1751 3 Nov 1812 60
MP for Weobly 1800-1802, Rye 1803-1806
and Bletchingley 1812
3 Nov 1812 3 George Talbot 14 Mar 1761 10 Jun 1850 89
to Extinct on his death
10 Jun 1850
TANCRED of Borough Bridge,Yorks
17 Nov 1662 E See "Lawson-Tancred"
TANGYE of Glendorgal,Cornwall
10 Jul 1912 UK 1 Harold Lincoln Tangye 16 Jan 1866 24 Feb 1935 69
24 Feb 1935 2 Basil Richard Gilzean Tangye 27 Jul 1895 19 Dec 1969 74
to Extinct on his death
19 Dec 1969
TAPPS-GERVIS-MEYRICK
of Hinton Admiral,Hants
28 Jul 1791 GB 1 George Ivison Tapps 5 Jan 1753 15 Mar 1835 82
15 Mar 1835 2 George William Tapps (Tapps-Gervis
from 3 Dec 1835) 24 May 1795 26 Oct 1842 47
MP for New Romney 1826-1830 and
Christchurch 1832-1837
26 Oct 1842 3 George Eliott Meyrick Tapps-Gervis (Tapps-
Gervis-Meyrick from 16 Mar 1876) 1 Sep 1827 7 Mar 1896 68
7 Mar 1896 4 George Augustus Eliott Tapps-Gervis-
Meyrick 9 Mar 1855 12 May 1928 73
12 May 1928 5 George Llewelyn Tapps-Gervis-Meyrick 23 Sep 1885 22 Apr 1960 74
22 Apr 1960 6 George David Eliott Tapps-Gervis-Meyrick 15 Apr 1915 21 Dec 1988 73
21 Dec 1988 7 George Christopher Cadafael Tapps-
Gervis-Meyrick 10 Mar 1941
TARLETON of Liverpool,Lancs
6 Nov 1818 UK 1 Banastre Tarleton 21 Aug 1754 16 Jan 1833 78
to MP for Liverpool 1790-1806 and 1807-1812
16 Jan 1833 Extinct on his death
TATE of Park Hill,Streatham
27 Jun 1898 UK 1 Henry Tate 11 Mar 1819 5 Dec 1899 80
5 Dec 1899 2 William Henry Tate 23 Jan 1842 21 Dec 1921 79
21 Dec 1921 3 Ernest William Tate 7 Jan 1867 25 Apr 1939 72
25 Apr 1939 4 Henry Tate 29 Jun 1902 11 Mar 1994 91
11 Mar 1994 5 Henry Saxon Tate 28 Nov 1931 11 Jul 2012 80
11 Jul 2012 6 Edward Nicholas Tate 2 Jul 1966
TATEM of St Fagans,Glamorgan
13 Jul 1916 UK 1 William James Tatem 6 Mar 1868 28 Jun 1942 74
He was subsequently created Baron Glanely
(qv) in 1918 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
in 1942
TAYLOR of Park House,Kent
18 Jan 1665 E 1 Thomas Taylor 1630 1665
1665 2 Thomas Taylor 19 Aug 1657 5 Feb 1696 38
MP for Maidstone 1689-1696
5 Feb 1696 3 Thomas Taylor 11 Nov 1693 Jan 1720 26
to Extinct on his death
Jan 1720
TAYLOR of Lysson Hall,Jamaica
1 Sep 1778 GB 1 John Taylor 8 May 1786
8 May 1786 2 Simon Richard Brissett Taylor 15 Oct 1783 18 May 1815 31
to Extinct on his death
18 May 1815
TAYLOR of Hollycombe,Sussex
21 Jan 1828 UK 1 Charles William Taylor 25 Apr 1770 10 Apr 1857 86
MP for Wells 1796-1830
10 Apr 1857 2 Charles Taylor 4 Jan 1817 26 Aug 1876 59
to Extinct on his death
26 Aug 1876
TAYLOR of Moreton Hall,Lancs
19 Feb 1917 UK See "Worsley-Taylor"
TAYLOR of Kennington,Surrey
11 Jul 1917 UK See "Stuart-Taylor"
TAYLOR of Cawthorne,Yorks
26 Jan 1963 UK 1 William Johnson Taylor 23 Oct 1902 26 Jul 1972 69
to MP for Bradford North 1950-1964
26 Jul 1972 Extinct on his death
TAYLOUR of Kells,Meath
12 Jun 1704 I 1 Thomas Taylour 25 Jul 1662 8 Aug 1736 74
PC [I] 1726
8 Aug 1736 2 Thomas Taylour 20 Nov 1686 19 Sep 1757 70
PC [I] 1753
19 Sep 1757 3 Thomas Taylour 20 Oct 1724 14 Dec 1795 71
He was subsequently created Baron
Headfort (qv) in 1760 with which title the
baronetcy remains merged,although,as at
31/12/2013,the baronetcy does not appear on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage
TEMPEST of Stella,Durham
23 Dec 1622 E 1 Nicholas Tempest c 1552 26 Mar 1626
26 Mar 1626 2 Thomas Tempest Aug 1641
Aug 1641 3 Richard Tempest c 1620 Jan 1662
Jan 1662 4 Thomas Tempest c 1642 Aug 1692
Aug 1692 5 Francis Tempest 1698
1698 6 Nicholas Tempest c 1664 31 May 1742
to Extinct on his death
31 May 1742
TEMPEST of Tong,Yorks
25 May 1664 E 1 John Tempest 1645 23 Jun 1693 47
23 Jun 1693 2 George Tempest 22 May 1672 11 Oct 1745 73
11 Oct 1745 3 Henry Tempest 1 Sep 1696 9 Nov 1753 57
9 Nov 1753 4 Henry Tempest 13 Jan 1753 29 Jan 1819 66
to Extinct on his death
29 Jan 1819
TEMPEST of Long Newton,Durham
13 Jul 1782 GB See "Vane-Tempest"
TEMPEST of Beaumont Lyes,Keics
15 Feb 1828 UK See "Ricketts"
TEMPEST of Broughton Hall,Yorks
1841 UK 1 Charles Robert Tempest 21 Apr 1794 8 Dec 1865 71
to Extinct on his death
8 Dec 1865
TEMPEST of Heaton,Lancs
30 Jul 1866 UK 1 Charles Henry Tempest 5 Jan 1834 1 Aug 1894 60
to Extinct on his death
1 Aug 1894
TEMPLE of Stow,Bucks
24 Sep 1611 E 1 Thomas Temple 9 Jan 1567 by 1637
MP for Andover 1588-1589
by 1637 2 Peter Temple 10 Oct 1592 12 Sep 1653 60
MP for Buckingham 1640 and 1640-1653
Sep 1653 3 Richard Temple 28 Mar 1634 8 May 1697 63
MP for Warwickshire 1654-1655,Buckingham
1659 and 1679-1697
8 May 1697 4 Richard Temple,later [1718] 1st Viscount Cobham 24 Oct 1675 14 Sep 1749 73
14 Sep 1749 5 William Temple Apr 1694 1760 66
1760 6 Peter Temple 15 Nov 1761
15 Nov 1761 7 Richard Temple 1 Jun 1731 15 Nov 1786 55
to On his death the baronetcy became dormant,
15 Nov 1786 although the title was claimed and assumed
as follows:-
15 Nov 1786 8 John Temple 16 Apr 1732 17 Nov 1798 66
17 Nov 1798 9 Grenville Temple 16 Oct 1768 18 Feb 1829 60
18 Feb 1829 10 Grenville Temple 20 Jul 1799 7 Jun 1847 47
7 Jun 1847 11 Grenville Leofric Temple 3 Feb 1830 3 Mar 1860 30
3 Mar 1860 12 Grenville Louis John Temple 5 Jan 1858 c Dec 1919 61
to For further information on this self-styled baronet,
c Dec 1919 see the note at the foot of this page
TEMPLE
7 Jul 1662 NS 1 Sir Thomas Temple Jan 1614 27 Mar 1674 60
to Extinct on his death
27 Mar 1674
TEMPLE of Sheen,Surrey
31 Jan 1666 E 1 William Temple 25 Apr 1628 27 Jan 1699 70
to MP for Cambridge University 1679 PC 1679
27 Jan 1699 Extinct on his death
TEMPLE of the Nash,Kempsey,Worcs
16 Aug 1876 UK 1 Richard Temple 8 Mar 1826 15 Mar 1902 76
MP for Evesham 1885-1892 and Kingston upon
Thames 1892-1895. Lieutenant Governor of
Bengal 1874-1876. Governor of Bombay
1877-1880
15 Mar 1902 2 Richard Carnac Temple 15 Oct 1850 3 Mar 1931 80
3 Mar 1931 3 Richard Durand Temple 27 Dec 1880 15 Sep 1962 81
15 Sep 1962 4 Richard Anthony Purbeck Temple 19 Jan 1913 5 Dec 2007 94
5 Dec 2007 5 Richard Carnac Chartier Temple 17 Aug 1937
TENCH of Low Leyton,Essex
8 Aug 1715 GB 1 Fisher Tench c 1673 31 Oct 1736
MP for Southwark 1713-1722
31 Oct 1736 2 Nathaniel Tench 30 Aug 1697 2 Jun 1737 39
to Extinct on his death
2 Jun 1737
TENNANT of The Glen,Peebles
and St.Rollox,Glasgow
17 Jul 1885 UK 1 Charles Tennant 4 Nov 1823 4 Jun 1906 82
MP for Glasgow 1879-1880 and Peebles
and Selkirk 1880-1886
For further information on this baronet, see
the note at the foot of this page.
4 Jun 1906 2 Edward Priaulx Tennant 31 May 1859 21 Nov 1920 61
He was subsequently created Baron
Glenconner (qv) in 1911 with which title
the baronetcy remains merged,although as at
31/12/2013 the baronetcy does not appear
on the Official Roll of the Baronetage
TENNENT of Tempo Manor,Fermanagh
14 Feb 1867 UK See "Emerson-Tennent"
TENNYSON-D'EYNCOURT
of Carter's Corner Farm,Sussex
3 Feb 1930 UK 1 Eustace Henry William Tennyson-d'Eyncourt 1 Apr 1868 1 Feb 1951 82
1 Feb 1951 2 Eustace Gervais Tennyson-d'Eyncourt 19 Jan 1902 21 Nov 1971 69
21 Nov 1971 3 John Jeremy Eustace Tennyson-d'Eyncourt 8 Jul 1927 12 Apr 1988 60
12 Apr 1988 4 Giles Gervais Tennyson-d'Eyncourt 16 Apr 1935 6 Jun 1989 54
6 Jun 1989 5 Mark Gervais Tennyson-d'Eyncourt 12 Mar 1967
TERRY of Strete Ralegh,Devon
2 Jul 1917 UK See "Imbert-Terry"
THATCHER of Scotney,Kent
7 Dec 1990 UK 1 Denis Thatcher 10 May 1915 26 Jun 2003 88
26 Jun 2003 2 Mark Thatcher 15 Aug 1953
THOMAS of Michaelstown,Glamorgan
3 Mar 1642 E 1 Edward Thomas 1673
1673 2 Robert Thomas c 1622 after 1684
to MP for Cardiff 1661-1681
after 1684 Extinct on his death
THOMAS of Folkington,Sussex
23 Jul 1660 E 1 William Thomas 29 Jul 1641 18 Nov 1706 65
to MP for Seaford 1661-1681,1685-1689,1701-1702
18 Nov 1706 and 1702-1706 and Sussex 1681,1689-1700
and 1701-1702
Extinct on his death
THOMAS of Wenvoe,Glamorgan
24 Dec 1694 E 1 John Thomas 17 Jan 1703
17 Jan 1703 2 Edmond Thomas 1667 1723 56
1723 3 Edmond Thomas 9 Apr 1712 10 Oct 1767 55
MP for Chippenham 1741-1754 and
Glamorganshire 1761-1767
10 Oct 1767 4 Edmond Thomas c 1742 early 1789
early 1789 5 John Thomas 6 Jul 1749 14 Dec 1828 79
14 Dec 1828 6 John Godfrey Thomas 1 Sep 1784 7 May 1841 56
7 May 1841 7 Edmond Stephen Thomas 6 Feb 1810 6 Feb 1852 42
6 Feb 1852 8 Godfrey John Thomas 16 Jun 1824 13 Jul 1861 37
13 Jul 1861 9 Godfrey Vignoles Thomas 27 Mar 1856 17 Feb 1919 62
17 Feb 1919 10 Godfrey John Vignoles Thomas 14 Apr 1889 4 Mar 1968 78
PC 1958
4 Mar 1968 11 Godfrey Michael David Thomas 10 Oct 1925 10 Jan 2003 77
10 Jan 2003 12 David John Godfrey Thomas 11 Jun 1961
THOMAS of Yapton,Sussex
6 Sep 1766 GB 1 George Thomas 31 Dec 1774
Governor of the Leeward Islands 1753-66
31 Dec 1774 2 William Thomas 28 Dec 1777
28 Dec 1777 3 George Thomas c 1748 6 May 1815
MP for Arundel 1790-1797
6 May 1815 4 William Lewis George Thomas 9 Sep 1777 23 Aug 1850 72
23 Aug 1850 5 William Sidney Thomas 1807 27 Apr 1867 59
27 Apr 1867 6 George Sidney Meade Thomas 12 Feb 1847 9 Mar 1918 71
9 Mar 1918 7 George Alan Thomas 14 Jun 1881 23 Jul 1972 91
to Extinct on his death
23 Jul 1972
THOMAS of Garreglwyd,Anglesey
5 Jul 1918 UK 1 Robert John Thomas 23 Apr 1873 27 Sep 1951 78
MP for Wrexham 1918-1922 and Anglesey
1923-1929
27 Sep 1951 2 William Eustace Rhyddlad Thomas 19 Jun 1909 27 Dec 1957 48
27 Dec 1957 3 William Michael Marsh Thomas 4 Dec 1930 2009 78
to Extinct on his death
2009
THOMAS of Ynyshir,Glamorgan
10 May 1919 UK 1 William James Thomas 10 Mar 1867 3 Jan 1945 77
3 Jan 1945 2 William James Cooper Thomas 7 May 1919 Oct 2005 86
Oct 2005 3 William Michael Marsh Thomas 5 Dec 1948
THOMAS-STANFORD of Brighton,Sussex
7 May 1929 UK 1 Charles Thomas-Stanford 3 Apr 1858 7 Mar 1932 73
to MP for Brighton 1914-1922
7 Mar 1932 Eextinct on his death
THOMPSON of Haversham,Bucks
12 Dec 1673 E 1 John Thompson 31 Aug 1648 1 Nov 1710 62
He was subsequently created Baron
Haversham (qv) in 1696 with which title
the baronetcy then merged until its
extinction in 1745
THOMPSON of Virkees,Sussex
23 Jun 1797 GB 1 Charles Thompson c 1740 17 Mar 1799
MP for Monmouth 1796-1799
17 Mar 1799 2 Norborne Thompson 23 Mar 1785 1 Jul 1826 41
1 Jul 1826 3 Henry Thompson 5 Nov 1796 1 Jul 1868 71
to Extinct on his death
1 Jul 1868
THOMPSON of Hartsbourne Manor,Herts
11 Dec 1806 UK 1 Thomas Boulden Thompson 28 Feb 1766 3 Mar 1828 62
3 Mar 1828 2 Thomas Raikes Trigge Thompson 1 Apr 1804 26 Sep 1865 61
26 Sep 1865 3 Thomas Raikes Thompson 1 Jan 1852 4 Sep 1904 52
4 Sep 1904 4 Thomas Raikes Lovett Thompson 12 May 1881 17 Sep 1964 83
17 Sep 1964 5 Thomas Lionel Tennyson Thompson 19 Jun 1921 25 Sep 1999 78
25 Sep 1999 6 Thomas d'Eyncourt John Thompson 22 Dec 1956
THOMPSON of Kirby Hall,Yorks
26 Mar 1874 UK See "Meysey-Thompson"
THOMPSON of Park Gate,Guiseley,Yorks
18 Apr 1890 UK 1 Matthew William Thompson 1 Feb 1820 1 Dec 1891 71
MP for Bradford 1867-1868
1 Dec 1891 2 Peile Thompson 19 Jul 1844 8 Apr 1918 73
8 Apr 1918 3 Matthew William Thompson 28 Jun 1872 25 Nov 1956 84
25 Nov 1956 4 Peile Beaumont Thompson 4 Feb 1874 8 Aug 1972 98
8 Aug 1972 5 Peile Thompson 11 Feb 1911 2 May 1985 74
2 May 1985 6 Christopher Peile Thompson 21 Dec 1944
THOMPSON of Wimpole Street,London
20 Feb 1899 UK 1 Henry Thompson 6 Aug 1820 18 Apr 1904 83
18 Apr 1904 2 Henry Francis Herbert Thompson 2 Apr 1859 26 May 1944 85
to Extinct on his death
26 May 1944
THOMPSON of Reculver,Kent
28 Jan 1963 UK 1 Richard Hilton Marler Thompson 5 Oct 1912 15 Jul 1999 86
MP for Croydon West 1950-1955 and
Croydon South 1955-1966 and 1970-1974
15 Jul 1999 2 Nicholas Annesley Marler Thompson 19 Mar 1947
THOMPSON of Walton-on-the-Hill,Lancs
29 Jan 1963 UK 1 Kenneth Pugh Thompson 24 Dec 1909 4 Jan 1984 74
MP for Walton 1950-1964
4 Jan 1984 2 Paul Anthony Thompson 6 Oct 1939
THOMSON of Duddingston,Edinburgh
20 Feb 1636 NS 1 Thomas Thomson by 1666
by 1666 2 Patrick Thomson 24 Dec 1637 c 1674
c 1674 3 James Thomson c Jan 1691
to On his death the baronetcy became dormant
c Jan 1691
THOMSON of Polmood,Peebles
26 Sep 1900 UK See "Mitchell-Thomson"
THOMSON of Old Nunthorpe,Yorks
3 Jul 1925 UK 1 Wilfrid Forbes Home Thomson 29 Mar 1858 29 Jan 1939 80
29 Jan 1939 2 Ivo Wilfrid Home Thomson 14 Oct 1902 6 Jan 1991 88
6 Jan 1991 3 Mark Wilfrid Home Thomson 29 Dec 1939
THOMSON of Glendarroch,Midlothian
28 Mar 1929 UK 1 Frederick Charles Thomson 27 May 1875 21 Apr 1935 59
MP for Aberdeen South 1918-1935. Solicitor
General for Scotland 1923-1924
21 Apr 1935 2 James Douglas Wishart Thomson 30 Oct 1905 3 Jan 1972 66
MP for Aberdeen South 1935-1946
3 Jan 1972 3 Frederick Douglas David Thomson 14 Feb 1940
THOMSON of Monken Hadley,Herts
15 Feb 1938 UK 1 Francis Vernon Thomson 10 Feb 1881 8 Feb 1953 71
to Extinct on his death
8 Feb 1953
THORNHILL of Barbados,West Indies
24 Dec 1682 E 1 Timothy Thornhill c Apr 1693
to Extinct on his death
c Apr 1693
THORNHILL of Riddlesworth Hall,Norfolk
11 Aug 1885 UK See "Compton-Thornhill"
THORNHURST of Agnes Court,Kent
12 Nov 1622 E 1 Gifford Thornhurst 16 Dec 1627
to Extinct on his death
16 Nov 1627
THORNYCROFT of Milcomb,Oxon
12 Aug 1701 E 1 John Thornycroft 16 Nov 1659 8 Dec 1725 66
8 Dec 1725 2 John Thornycroft 1691 23 Jun 1743 51
to Extinct on his death
23 Jun 1743
THOROLD of Marston,Lincs
24 Aug 1642 E 1 William Thorold c 1591 4 Mar 1678
MP for Grantham 1661-1678
4 Mar 1678 2 William Thorold c 1659 c 1681
c 1681 3 Anthony Thorold c 1663 c Nov 1685
c Nov 1685 4 John Thorold c 1664 14 Jan 1717
MP for Grantham 1697-1700 and 1711-1715
and Lincolnshire 1701-1705
14 Jan 1717 5 William Thorold c 1720
c 1720 6 Anthony Thorold c 1710 25 Aug 1721
25 Aug 1721 7 John Thorold 8 Dec 1675 Jan 1748 72
Jan 1748 8 John Thorold 1703 5 Jun 1775 71
5 Jun 1775 9 John Thorold 18 Dec 1734 25 Feb 1815 80
MP for Lincolnshire 1779-1796
25 Feb 1815 10 John Hayford Thorold 30 Mar 1773 7 Jul 1831 58
7 Jul 1831 11 John Charles Thorold 26 Jun 1816 26 Apr 1866 49
26 Apr 1866 12 John Henry Thorold 9 Mar 1842 4 Oct 1922 80
MP for Grantham 1865-1868
4 Oct 1922 13 John George Thorold 2 Oct 1870 25 Dec 1951 81
25 Dec 1951 14 James Ernest Thorold 27 Jan 1877 27 Jul 1965 88
27 Jul 1965 15 Anthony Henry Thorold 7 Sep 1903 1 May 1999 95
1 May 1999 16 Anthony Oliver Thorold 15 Apr 1945
THOROLD of Hawley,Lincs
14 Jun 1644 E 1 Robert Thorold c 1660
c 1660 2 Robert Thorold c 1695
c 1695 3 Robert Thorold 30 Nov 1706
to Extinct on his death
30 Nov 1706
THOROLD of Harmeston,Lincs
9 Sep 1709 GB 1 George Thorold c 1666 29 Oct 1722
29 Oct 1722 2 Samuel Thorold 1 Jan 1738
to Extinct on his death
1 Jan 1738
THOROLD of Harmeston,Lincs
24 Mar 1741 GB 1 Nathaniel Thorold Aug 1764
to Extinct on his death
Aug 1764
THREIPLAND of Fingask,Perth
10 Nov 1687 NS 1 Patrick Threipland 1689
1689 2 David Threipland 1746
to He was attainted and the baronetcy
1715 forfeited
[1746] [3] Stuart Threipland 26 May 1716 2 Feb 1805 88
[2 Feb 1805] 4 Patrick Murray Threipland Nov 1762 11 Jan 1837 74
26 May 1826 He obtained a reversal of the attainder
in 1826
11 Jan 1837 5 Patrick Murray Threipland 26 May 1800 30 Apr 1882 81
to On his death the baronetcy became either
30 Apr 1882 extinct or dormant
THROCKMORTON of Tortworth,Gloucs
29 Jun 1611 E 1 William Throckmorton c 1579 18 Jul 1628
18 Jul 1628 2 Baynham Throckmorton Jun 1606 28 May 1664 57
MP for Gloucestershire 1661-1664
28 May 1664 3 Baynham Throckmorton 11 Dec 1629 31 Jul 1681 51
MP for Gloucestershire 1656-1658 and
1664-1679, and Wootton Basset 1660
Jul 1681 4 William Throckmorton 1658 Jun 1682
to Extinct on his death
Jun 1682
THROCKMORTON of Coughton,Warwicks
1 Sep 1642 E 1 Robert Throckmorton 16 Jan 1650
16 Jan 1650 2 Francis Throckmorton c 1640 7 Nov 1680
7 Nov 1680 3 Robert Throckmorton 10 Jan 1662 8 Mar 1721 59
8 Mar 1721 4 Robert Throckmorton 21 Aug 1702 8 Dec 1791 89
8 Dec 1791 5 John Courtenay Throckmorton 27 Jul 1753 3 Jan 1819 65
For further information on this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
3 Jan 1819 6 George Courtenay-Throckmorton 15 Sep 1754 16 Jul 1826 71
16 Jul 1826 7 Charles Throckmorton 2 Nov 1757 3 Dec 1840 83
3 Dec 1840 8 Robert George Throckmorton 5 Dec 1800 28 Jun 1862 61
MP for Berkshire 1831-1835
28 Jun 1862 9 Nicholas William George Throckmorton 26 Apr 1838 21 Dec 1919 81
21 Dec 1919 10 Richard Charles Acton Throckmorton 26 Apr 1839 28 Apr 1927 88
28 Apr 1927 11 Robert George Maxwell Throckmorton 15 Feb 1908 13 Dec 1989 81
13 Dec 1989 12 Anthony John Benedict Throckmorton 9 Feb 1916 17 Oct 1994 78
to Extinct on his death
17 Oct 1994
THURSBY of Ormerod House,Lancs
26 Jul 1887 UK 1 John Hardy Thursby 31 Aug 1826 16 Mar 1901 74
16 Mar 1901 2 John Ormerod Scarlett Thursby 27 Apr 1861 26 Dec 1920 59
26 Dec 1920 3 George James Thursby 17 Nov 1869 8 Jun 1941 71
to Extinct on his death
8 Jun 1941
THYNNE of Cause Castle,Salop
15 Jul 1641 E 1 Henry Frederick Thynne 1 Mar 1615 6 Mar 1680 65
6 Mar 1680 2 Thomas Thynne 8 Sep 1640 28 Jul 1714 73
He was subsequently created Viscount
Weymouth (qv) in 1682 with which title the
baronetcy then merged. The baronetcy is
currently merged with the Marquessate
of Bath
TICHBORNE of Tichborne,Hants
For information on the annual "Tichborne Dole"
see the note at the foot of this page
8 Mar 1621 E 1 Benjamin Tichborne c 1540 6 Sep 1629
MP for Petersfield 1588-1589 and
Hampshire 1593
6 Sep 1629 2 Richard Tichborne c 1578 Apr 1652
MP for Lyme Regis 1597-1598, Hampshire
1614 and Winchester 1621-1629
Apr 1652 3 Henry Tichborne c 1623 Apr 1689
Apr 1689 4 Henry Joseph Tichborne 15 Jul 1743
15 Jul 1743 5 John Hermengild Tichborne 5 May 1748
5 May 1748 6 Henry Tichborne 14 Oct 1710 16 Jul 1785 74
16 Jul 1785 7 Henry Tichborne 6 Sep 1756 14 Jun 1821 64
14 Jun 1821 8 Henry Joseph Tichborne 8 Jan 1779 3 Jun 1845 66
3 Jun 1845 9 Edward Doughty 27 Mar 1782 5 Mar 1853 70
5 Mar 1853 10 James Francis Doughty-Tichborne 3 Oct 1784 11 Jun 1862 77
11 Jun 1862 11 Alfred Joseph Doughty-Tichborne 4 Sep 1839 22 Feb 1866 26
28 May 1866 12 Henry Alfred Joseph Doughty-Tichborne 28 May 1866 27 Jul 1910 44
27 Jul 1910 13 Joseph Henry Bernard Doughty-Tichborne 18 Jan 1890 23 Oct 1930 40
23 Oct 1930 14 Anthony Joseph Henry Doughty Doughty-
to Tichborne 29 Jun 1914 18 Jul 1968 54
18 Jul 1968 Extinct on his death
TICHBORNE of Beaulieu,Louth
12 Jul 1697 E 1 Henry Tichborne 1663 3 Nov 1731 68
He was subsequently created Baron
Ferrard of Beaulieu (qv) in 1715 with which
title the baronetcy then merged until its
extinction in 1731
TIERNEY of Brighton,Sussex
3 Oct 1818 UK 1 Matthew John Tierney 24 Nov 1776 28 Oct 1845 68
& 5 May 1834 UK
28 Oct 1845 2 Edward Tierney 1780 11 May 1856 75
11 May 1856 3 Matthew Edward Tierney 17 Jan 1818 28 Dec 1860 42
to Extinct on his death
28 Dec 1860
TIPPING of Wheatfield,Oxon
24 Mar 1698 E 1 Thomas Tipping 20 Apr 1653 1 Jul 1718 65
MP for Oxfordshire 1685-1689 and
Wallingford 1689-1690 and 1695-1701
1 Jul 1718 2 Thomas Tipping 6 Mar 1700 20 Feb 1725 24
to Extinct on his death
20 Feb 1725
Sir Grenville Louis John Temple, self-styled 12th baronet
The following article appeared in 'The Washington Post' of 12 December 1919:-
'No little American interest pertained to the pretensions of Grenville Louis Temple, who has
just died at Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, as a member of the famous Northwest Mounted
Police, to the ancient baronetcy of Temple of Stowe, one of the very first created by James I,
dating from the year 1611. A former officer of the Twentieth regiment of infantry of the British
army, he succeeded his father as twelfth baronet of his line as a 2-year-old boy in 1860, and
bore the title without any interruption until 1910 - that is to say, for exactly half a century -
when the warrant, signed by Edward VII only a few weeks before his death, came into force.
'This edict decreed that an official record of the Order of Baronets should be prepared and
kept at the home department and that no person whose name was not comprised on the roll
should be officially acknowledged or addressed as a baronet. By the same warrant the late
king appointed a royal commission for the examination of all claims to inscription on the roll,
and this resulted in the disappearance of a number of baronets with doubtful titles from the
1911 edition of Burke's, Debrett's, Lodge's, Whittaker's [sic] and other standard works of
reference, more or less semi-official, devoted to the enumeration of peerages, baronetcies
and knighthoods.
'Among the baronets who thus disappeared from the scene was 'Sir' Grenville Louis Temple, of
Stowe, to whose family three entire pages of "Burke's" were devoted in its volume for 1910
and in its previous issues. The house of Temple is a very ancient one, being descended from
Earl Leofric and his countess, the famous Lady Godiva, who is said to have ridden in the garb
of Mother Eve through the streets of Coventry, unseen by any man save Peeping Tom.
'Other descendants of Leofric and of the original Lady Godiva have been Robert Temple, lord
of the manor of Temple, in Leicestershire, in the reign of Henry III, and Peter Temple, who
obtained from Edward VI a grant of the Manor of Stowe, in Buckinghamshire, as well as his
grandson, Thomas Temple of Stowe, who was created a baronet by James I in 1611. Sir
Thomas had thirteen children, and Fuller, in his "Worthies of England," relates that Lady
Temple lived to see no less than 700 of her own descendants.
'When Sir Richard Temple, the 7th baronet, died without issue in 1786, George Temple, Marquis
of Buckingham and father of the first Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, as the member of the
Temple family highest in rank and as owner of Stowe, addressed a letter to his kinsman John
Temple, a native of Boston, Mass., and at the time British consul general for the United States
residing in New York, announcing to him formally that the Temple baronetcy had devolved
upon him (the consul general) as next in the line of succession and as a descendant of the
Rev. Dr. Thomas Temple, third son of the first baronet.
'The consul general in consequence thereof assumed the title of "Sir John Temple, bart."
Lord Buckingham further informing him that he had taken care to convey the news to Lord
Carmarthen, then secretary of state, so that the consul general should be addressed as "Sir
John " in all official communications.
'Sir John married a daughter of James Bowdoin, governor of the State of Massachusetts, and
one of his daughters, Elizabeth, married Thomas Winthrop, also governor of Massachusetts.
'Sir John was succeeded in the baronetcy by his son Grenville, a native of Boston, and who
married as his first wife a daughter of Col. George Watson of that city and secondly Maria,
daughter of Sir Thomas Rumbold. The tenth baronet married Mary Baring, niece of Lord
Ashburton and the "Sir" Grenville Temple who has just passed away at Prince Albert,
Saskatchewan, was his grandson and heir.
'Now, if the Marquis of Buckingham insisted upon Consul General John Temple assuming the
baronetcy of Temple of Stowe in 1786, it is because he believed that as a descendant of
the Rev. Dr. Thomas Temple, third son of the first baronet, the consul general was the
senior heir. This would undoubtedly have been correct had the whole issue of the baronet's
second son become extinct. This, however, was not the case.
'It was subsequently shown there were several descendants in the male line from the second
son of the first baronet, and if the royal commission on the baronetage appointed by King
Edward to investigate the rights of baronets to their dignities before placing these on the
official register turned down the late "Sir" Grenville Louis Temple, of the Northwest mounted
police, in 1910, it was because he could not furnish them with satisfactory proofs that all the
male descendants of the second son of the first baronet had become extinct. Being far from
rich, he realized it would involve far too costly expenditure to secure proof of the extinction
of these Temple descendants whose rights were prior to his own, and so he preferred to
abandon the title without any further efforts to retain it.'
During the period 'Sir' Grenville was living in Saskatchewan, an imposter, whose real name
was William Runciman, posed as Sir Grenville Temple and married at least two women
before being unmasked and sentenced to five years' imprisonment.
Sir Charles Tennant, 1st baronet
Sir Charles was the grandson of Charles Tennant (1768-1838), a Scottish chemist and
industrialist who discovered bleaching powder and built a massive industrial empire in Scotland.
Sir Charles was reputed to be the richest commoner in Scotland during the nineteenth
century. His company dominated the local economy around the St. Rollox area of Glasgow
and the huge chimney of his chemical works (known as Tennant's Stalk) was, at 455 feet,
one of the tallest structures in the world until it was struck by lightning in 1922 and had to
be demolished.
Sir Charles' virility appears to have matched his business success. He married twice; firstly in
1849 to Emma Winsloe, who died in 1895, and secondly in 1898 to Marguerite Miles. Several of
his children became successful in their own right - his eldest son was created Baron
Glenconner in 1911; another son, Harold, was a cabinet minister during WW1, a daughter,
Margot, married Herbert Asquith, later Prime Minister and Earl of Oxford and Asquith and
another daughter was created a life peeress as Baroness Elliot of Harwood in 1958. The time
period between the birth of his oldest and youngest children was 49 years, a record
that very few would have equalled. The periods between the birthdate of Sir Charles and the
date of death of his daughters, Margaret, Baroness Wakehurst of nearly 171 years (4 November
1823 to Aug 1994) and Katherine, Baroness Elliot of Harwood of 170 years (4 November 1823-
to 3 January 1994) would also be difficult to beat.
Sir John Courtenay Throckmorton, 5th baronet
Sir John won a remarkable wager in 1811. The following version of the wager is taken from the
Canterbury (New Zealand) 'Star' of 26 April 1899, reprinted from the 'Strand Magazine':-
'It is no new thing for us to see records established one day and beaten the next, the top
place nowadays being no sooner reached by one individual than challenged by another. The
record in the manufacture of cloth, however, with which this article deals, though of eighty-
eight years' standing, has never yet been eclipsed. The scene of this remarkable achievement
in the sartorial art is the village of Newbury, Berkshire, and it came about in this way. Mr. John
Coxeter, a then well-known cloth manufacturer, the owner of Greenham Mills, at the above-
named village, remarked in the course of conversation one day in the year 1811, to Sir John
Throckmorton, Bart., of Newbury, "So great are the improvements in machinery which I have
lately introduced into my mill, that I believe that in twenty-four hours I could take the coat
off your back, reduce it to wool, and turn it back into a coat again." The proverb says. "There's
many a true word spoken in jest."
'So great an impression did Mr. Coxeter's boast make upon the Baronet, that shortly afterwards
he inquired of Mr. Coxeter if it would really be possible to make a coat from sheep's wool
between the sunrise and sunset of a summer's day. That gentleman, after carefully calculating
the time required for the various processes, replied that in his opinion it could be done.
'Not long after the above conversation, which took place at a dinner party, Sir John
Throckmorton laid a wager of a thousand guineas that at eight o'clock in the evening of June 25,
1811, he would sit down to dinner in a well-woven, properly made coat, the wool of which
formed the fleeces of sheep's backs at five o'clock that same morning. Such an achievement
appearing practically impossible to his listeners, his bet was eagerly accepted. Sir John
entrusted the accomplishment of the feat to Mr. Coxeter, and shortly before five o'clock on the
morning stated, the early rising villagers of Newbury were astonished to see their worthy squire,
accompanied by his shepherd and two sheep, journeying towards Greenham Mills. Promptly at
five o'clock operations commenced, and no time was lost in getting the sheep shorn. All
implements to be used were placed in readiness on the field of action, and the smallest actual
operations in the making of the coat were performed between the hours mentioned. The sheep
being shorn, the wool was washed, stubbed, roved, spun, and woven, the weaving being
performed by Mr. Coxeter, jun., who had been found by previous competition to be the most
expert workman.
'The cloth thus manufactured was next scoured, fulled, tented, raised, sheared, dyed and
dressed, being completed by four o'clock in the afternoon, just eleven hours after the arrival of
the two sheep in the mill-yard. In the meantime, the news of the wager had spread abroad
among the neighbouring villages, bringing crowds of people eager to witness the conclusion of
this extraordinary undertaking. The cloth was now put into the hands of the tailor, Mr. James
White, who had already got all the measurements ready during the operations, so that not a
moment should be lost; and he, together with nine of his men, with needles all threaded, at
once started on it. For the next two hours and a quarter the tailors were busy cutting,
stitching, pressing, and sewing on buttons; in fact, generally converting the cloth into a "well-
woven, properly made coat," and at twenty minutes past six Mr. Coxeter presented the coat
to Sir John Throckmorton, who put the garment on before an assemblage of over five thousand
people, and sat down to dinner with it on, together with forty gentlemen, at eight o'clock in
the evening.'
The Tichborne Dole
The "Tichborne Dole" is an annual charity event which takes place on 25 March each year at
Tichborne House, when donations of flour are distributed to people living within the local parish.
The festival dates from around 1150.
The following story of the "Tichborne Dole" appeared in 'The Leisure Hour: an illustrated
magazine for home reading' on 20 March 1869. The reader will note that it was published at a
time when the "Tichborne Claimant" was a household name throughout the United Kingdom.
'The rumours which have been floating during the last few years respecting a returned
Australian emigrant claiming the ancient Baronetcy of Tichborne, which have resulted in the
present trial in the Court of Common Pleas, recalls to mind a legend which has been current in
the family for many generations; the truth of which the writer of this paper can so far vouch
for, as it came to him from a member of the family.
'This very ancient house dates the possession of its patrimony, the manor of Tichborne, near
Winchester, as far back as two centuries before the Norman Conquest. It is said to have
derived its name originally from the river Itchen, at the head of which its possessions were
situated, and thence was denominated De Itchenborne, which, in course of time, has been
abbreviated into its present appellation of Tichborne.
'About the middle of the twelfth century, the then head of the family, a gallant knight named
Sir Roger de Itchenbourne, married Mabel, only daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph de Lamerston,
of Lamerston, in the Isle of Wight, by which he acquired considerable estates in that part of
England, in addition to his own possessions in Hampshire. After many years of wedded
happiness, during which the Lady Mabel became celebrated for her kindness and care of the
poor, death now approaching, worn out with age and infirmity, she besought her loving
husband, as her last request, that he would grant her the means of leaving behind her a
charitable bequest, in the shape of a dole, or measure of bread, to be distributed annually on
the 25th of March, the Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, to all needy and
indigent people who should apply for it at the hall-door, without respect of persons or excluding
any who should make the demand. The said bread was to be the produce of a certain piece of
ground situated within the present park palings, containing an area of fifteen acres, and of
known value; but should the applicants be greater in number than the produce, the worth of
2d. in money was to be given to each person in its stead.
'The Lady Mabel's husband was induced to consent to his wife's request, only on condition of
her being able to crawl or walk round the piece of ground demanded - a condition of apparent
impracticability, from the fact of her having been bed-ridden for many years previous; and this
was to be done, too, while a certain brand, or billet of wood, was burning on the fire at the hall
at Tichborne. The venerable dame, however, nothing daunted, ordered her attendants to carry
her to the place she had selected, where, being deposited on the ground, she seemed to
receive a renovation of strength, and, to the surprise of her anxious and admiring lord - who
began to wonder where this pilgrimage might end - as well as of all who saw her, she
succeeded in crawling round several rich and goodly acres within the required time. The field
which was the scene of Lady Mabel's extraordinary feat retains the name of "Crawls" to the
present day. [Various sources agree that the area around which Lady Mabel crawled contains
23 acres].
'As soon as her task was complete she was re-conveyed to her chamber, and, summoning the
family to her bedside, in order to secure her gift to the poor, for whom it was designed, and to
render it binding upon her descendants, she proceeded in a most solemn manner to deliver a
prophecy respecting the future inheritors of Tichborne; predicting its prosperity as long as the
annual dole existed, and leaving her malediction on any of her descendants who should be so
mean or covetous as to discontinue or divert it; declaring that when such should happen, the
old house would fall, the family would become extinct, from the failure of heirs male and that,
as a final warning of their decay, a generation would appear of seven sons, followed
immediately by one with seven daughters and no sons.
'The custom thus founded in the reign of Henry II continued to be observed most regularly for
centuries. The 25th of March became the annual festive day of the family, and the friends and
different branches of the house of Tichborne came far and near to witness and assist at the
performance of Lady Mabel's legacy. In the year 1670 Sir Henry Tichborne, the third baronet of
that name, and the direct lineal heir of Sir Roger and Lady Mabel, employed Giles Tilbury,
[Gillis van Tilborch (c 1625-c 1678)] an eminent Flemish painter, to represent the ceremony
of distributing the Tichborne Dole. The picture was highly valuable as giving a faithful
representation of Old Tichborne House in the time of Charles II, which [William] Camden [in his
work "Britannia"] nearly a century previous had declared to be "a very ancient house." This
picture passed by marriage into the hands of Michael Blount, Esq., of Maple Durham, in Oxford-
shire, who had married Mary Agnes, the eldest daughter of Sir Henry Joseph Tichborne [the 4th
baronet], and it was sold by his descendants for the nominal value of 400 to the late Sir
Edward Doughty, the 9th baronet of the house of Tichborne, who assumed the name of
Doughty on succeeding to the estates of his relative, Miss Doughty, of Snarford Hall, in
Lincolnshire.
The dole continued to be given without a single omission down to the end of the eighteenth
century, when, under the pretence of attending the distribution of the Tichborne dole,
vagabonds, gypsies, and idlers of every description, assembled from all quarters, pilfering
throughout the neighbourhood, and causing many complaints amongst the magistrates and
surrounding gentry. It was abolished by Sir Henry Tichborne in 1799, partly on account of the
enormous tax it had become on the family, and partly to prevent a recurrence of the disorders
which the annual distribution produced.
'Then began the fulfilment of Lady Mabel's prediction. In 1803, four years after the cessation of
the gift, a portion of the house fell, and the remainder was pulled down, the materials were
sold, and the surrounding moat was filled up. Sir Henry, the seventh baronet of the name of
Tichborne, who had abolished the dole, had seven sons - Henry Joseph, who succeeded him in
the title and estates, and became the father of seven daughters, but without a son; Benjamin
[Edward, born 1780] who died unmarried in 1810; Edward, who became the 9th baronet, but
who left no heir as his only son died before him; James Francis, the 10th baronet, of whom
presently; John Michael, who was unmarried [born 1788], who was unmarried and slain in the
mutiny at Vellore, near Madras, in 1806; George [born 1789] who died unmarried in 1802; and
Roger Robert, the seventh and youngest son [born 1792], who married Rebecca, the daughter
of A.F. Nunez, Esq., of Belmont Park, but died childless in 1849.
'Sir Henry, the eighth baronet, and eldest of the seven sons, married Anne, daughter of Sir
Thomas Burke, Baronet, of Marble Hill, and by her had seven daughters in the following order:-
1. Eliza Anne, married to Joseph [11th] Lord Dormer; 2. Frances Catherine, to Henry Benedict,
[11th] Lord Arundell of Wardour; 3. Julia, to Charles Talbot, Esq., who became the mother of
Bertram, seventeenth Earl of Shrewsbury [she subsequently married Washington Hibbert]; 4.
Mary, who died unmarried in 1827; 5. Catherine Caroline, married to Colonel Greenwood, of the
Grenadier Guards; 6. Lucy Ellen, to John Towneley, Esq.; and Emily Blanche, the seventh and
youngest, who married John, the eldest son of John Bennett, Esq., M.P. for the county of
Wilts [and subsequently to Matthew Higgins].
'In 1826, Sir Henry's second brother, Edward, who eventually became the ninth baronet, having
inherited the extensive property of Miss Elizabeth Doughty, of Snarford Hall, was obliged by the
strict terms of her will to drop the name of Tichborne entirely, and assume that of Doughty
solely; thus fulfilling in some measure that part of Lady Mabel's prediction which foretold that
the name would become extinct. Sir Edward Doughty married, in June, 1827, Katherine,
daughter of James, ninth Lord Arundell of Wardour, and had an only son, who died before he
attained the age of six years. Sir Edward's brother, James, who eventually became the tenth
baronet, married Henrietta Felicita, daughter of Henry Seymour, Esq., of Knoyle, in Wiltshire,
and had two sons, Roger Charles, who was lost at sea off the coast of South America in 1854
(the recent claimant from Australia calls himself the said Roger), and Alfred Joseph, the
eleventh baronet, whose son Henry, a posthumous child of a few years old, is now in possession
of the title and estates.
'When the only son of Mr. Edward Doughty (subsequently the ninth baronet) died, May 30th,
1835, the hitherto singular fulfilment of the prophecy struck him so forcibly, that he besought
his elder brother, Sir Henry Joseph, to restore the ancient dole, which he agreed to do; and it
was again distributed, with certain restrictions, in flour, and confining it to the poor of the
parish of Tichborne only, instead of being promiscuously given to all comers as before, on the
25th of the following March, 1836, after a suspension of thirty-seven years, and in this manner
it continues to be distributed to the present day.
'The ancient dole measure, in which the bread was weighed out, is still preserved in the family
mansion, and has on one side the inscription "Fundatum Henrico Secundo regnante," and on
the other, "Tichborne Dole Weight, 1lb. 10oz. avoir." The custom in general every year was to
bake about 1,200 loaves, but on one occasion, when the 25th of March fell upon a Sunday, not
less than 1,225 loaves were distributed, with sums of 2d. each to the value of 8. Giles Tilbury's
fine painting, to which we have before alluded, representing the distribution of the dole in the
year 1670, in the courtyard of the old mansion, and including upwards of 100 portraits, is still
to be seen at the hall [and can be seen on-line in the Wikipedia entry for Gillis van Tilborch].
An account of Chedecke Tichborne, an ill-fated member of the family who perished on the
scaffold in the sixteenth century, may be found is Disraeli's "Curiosities of Literature." Whether
the resumption of Lady Mabel's gift may be considered sufficient to ward off the fatal prediction
which foretold the failure of the family, time alone will show. The male race may be said to be
confined to a single infant two or three years of age - for we are not disposed to give the
slightest credence to the story of the Australian claimant, without proofs that be found
satisfactory to a court of law.'
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