BARONETAGE
Last updated 22/03/2014
Names of baronets shown in blue
have not yet proved succession and, as a
result, their name has not yet been placed on
the Official Roll of the Baronetage.
Date Type Order Name Born Died Age
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the baronet was
baptised on that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate
that the baronet was buried on that date
EARDLEY (formerly GIDEON) of Spalding,Lincs
and Belvidere,Kent
21 May 1759 GB 1 Sampson Gideon (he changed his surname to 10 Oct 1744 25 Dec 1824 80
to Eardley in July 1789)
25 Dec 1824 He was subsequently created Baron Eardley
(qv) in 1789 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
in 1824
EARDLEY of Hadley,Middlesex
22 Dec 1802 UK 1 Culling Smith 20 Nov 1731 19 Oct 1812 80
19 Oct 1812 2 Culling Smith 1769 30 Jun 1829 59
30 Jun 1829 3 Culling Eardley Smith (Eardley from 1847) 21 Apr 1805 21 May 1863 58
MP for Pontefract 1830-1831
21 May 1863 4 Eardley Gideon Culling Eardley 12 Aug 1838 13 May 1875 36
to For further information on this baronet, see the
13 May 1875 note at the foot of this page
Extinct on his death
EARDLEY-WILMOT
of Berkswell Hall,Warwicks
23 Aug 1821 UK 1 John Eardley Eardley-Wilmot 21 Feb 1783 3 Feb 1847 63
Governor of Tasmania 1843-1846. MP for
Warwickshire North 1832-1843
For information on this baronet,see the note
at the foot of this page
3 Feb 1847 2 John Eardley Eardley-Wilmot 16 Nov 1810 1 Feb 1892 81
MP for Warwickshire South 1874-1885
1 Feb 1892 3 William Assheton Eardley-Wilmot 16 May 1841 12 Apr 1896 54
12 Apr 1896 4 John Eardley-Wilmot 14 Oct 1882 9 Feb 1970 87
9 Feb 1970 5 John Assheton Eardley-Wilmot 2 Jan 1917 20 Dec 1995 78
20 Dec 1995 6 Michael John Assheton Eardley-Wilmot 13 Jan 1941
EARLE of Craglethorpe,Lincs
2 Jul 1629 E 1 Richard Earle c 1606 25 Mar 1667
25 Mar 1667 2 Richard Earle c 1670
c 1670 3 Richard Earle c 1680
c 1680 4 Richard Earle c 1673 13 Aug 1697
to Extinct on his death
13 Aug 1697
EARLE of Allerton Tower,Lancs
3 Nov 1869 UK 1 Hardman Earle 11 Jul 1792 25 Jan 1877 84
25 Jan 1877 2 Thomas Earle 30 Jun 1820 13 Apr 1900 79
13 Apr 1900 3 Henry Earle 15 Aug 1854 16 Jul 1939 84
16 Jul 1939 4 Thomas Algernon Earle 16 Jul 1860 5 Sep 1945 85
5 Sep 1945 5 Hardman Alexander Mort Earle 19 Aug 1902 17 Sep 1979 77
17 Sep 1979 6 Hardman George Algernon Earle 4 Feb 1932
EAST of Marden,Surrey
13 Jan 1732 GB See "Clayton"
EAST of Hall Place,Berks
5 Jun 1766 GB 1 William East 27 Feb 1738 12 Oct 1819 81
12 Oct 1819 2 Gilbert East 17 Apr 1764 11 Dec 1828 64
to Extinct on his death
11 Dec 1828
EAST of Calcutta,India
25 Apr 1823 UK 1 Edward Hyde East 9 Sep 1764 8 Jan 1847 82
MP for Great Bedwyn 1792-1796 and Winchester
1823-1831
8 Jan 1847 2 James Buller East 1789 19 Nov 1878 89
to MP for Winchester 1831-1832 and 1835-1864
19 Nov 1878 Extinct on his death
EAST of Hall Place,Berks
17 Aug 1838 UK See "Clayton-East"
EASTHOPE of Fir Grove,Surrey
24 Aug 1841 UK 1 John Easthope 29 Oct 1784 11 Dec 1865 81
to MP for St.Albans 1826-1830, Banbury 1831-
11 Dec 1865 1832 and Leicester 1837-1847
Extinct on his death
EATON of Dunmoylin,Limerick
21 Feb 1682 I 1 Simon Eaton 16 Dec 1697
to Extinct on his death
Dec 1697
EBRAHIM of Bombay
20 Jul 1910 UK 1 Currimbhoy Ebrahim 21 Oct 1840 26 Sep 1924 83
26 Sep 1924 2 Mahomedbhoy Currimbhoy Ebrahim 11 Sep 1867 3 Mar 1928 60
3 Mar 1928 3 Huseinlali Currimbhoy Ebrahim 13 Apr 1903 4 Mar 1952 48
4 Mar 1952 4 Mahomed Currimbhoy Ebrahim 24 Jun 1935
ECHLIN of Clonagh,co.Kildare
17 Oct 1721 I 1 Henry Echlin 1652 29 Nov 1725 73
29 Nov 1725 2 Robert Echlin 13 Nov 1699 13 May 1757 57
13 May 1757 3 Henry Echlin 22 Dec 1740 1799 58
1799 4 James Echlin 1769 18 Feb 1833 63
18 Feb 1833 5 Frederick Henry Echlin 4 Mar 1795 27 May 1871 76
27 May 1871 6 Ferdinand Fenton Echlin 10 Mar 1798 4 Jul 1877 79
4 Jul 1877 7 Thomas Echlin 8 Nov 1844 1 Nov 1906 61
1 Nov 1906 8 Henry Frederick Echlin 14 Aug 1846 8 Nov 1923 77
For further information on this baronet,see
the note at the foot of this page
8 Nov 1923 9 John Frederick Echlin 18 Sep 1890 25 Sep 1932 42
25 Sep 1932 10 Norman David Fenton Echlin 1 Dec 1925 11 Apr 2007 81
to Dormant on his death
11 Apr 2007
ECKSTEIN of Fairwarp,Kent
24 Apr 1929 UK 1 Frederick Eckstein Apr 1857 10 Jun 1930 73
10 Jun 1930 2 Bernard Eckstein 2 Nov 1894 10 May 1948 53
to Extinct on his death
10 May 1948
EDEN of West Auckland,Durham
13 Nov 1672 E 1 Robert Eden c 1644 30 Mar 1721
MP for Durham County 1679, 1690-1695,
1698-1701 and 1702-1713
30 Mar 1721 2 John Eden 11 Sep 1677 2 May 1728 50
MP for Durham County 1713-1727
2 May 1728 3 Robert Eden c 1718 25 Jun 1755
25 Jun 1755 4 John Eden 16 Sep 1740 23 Aug 1812 71
MP for Durham County 1774-1790
23 Aug 1812 5 Robert Johnson-Eden 25 Oct 1774 4 Sep 1844 69
4 Sep 1844 6 William Eden 31 Jan 1803 21 Oct 1873 70
4 He had previously succeeded to the
baronetcy of Eden created 1776 (qv)
in 1814
21 Oct 1873 7 William Eden 4 Apr 1849 20 Feb 1915 65
5
20 Feb 1915 8 Timothy Calvert Eden 3 May 1893 13 May 1963 70
6
13 May 1963 9 John Benedict Eden,later [1983] Baron Eden
7 of Winton [L] 15 Sep 1925
MP for Bournemouth West 1954-1983
Minister of State,Technology 1970. Minister
for Industry 1970-1972. Minister of Posts
and Telecommunications 1972-1974. PC 1972
EDEN of Maryland,North America
19 Oct 1776 GB 1 Robert Eden c 1741 2 Sep 1784
2 Sep 1784 2 Frederick Morton Eden c 1767 14 Nov 1809
14 Nov 1809 3 Frederick Eden c 1798 24 Dec 1814
24 Dec 1814 4 William Eden 31 Jan 1803 21 Oct 1873 70
He subsequently succeeded to the baronetcy
of Eden created 1672 (qv) in 1844 when the
baronetcies merged
EDGAR of Chalfont,Bucks
17 Feb 1920 UK 1 Edward Mackay Edgar 27 Feb 1876 7 Oct 1934 58
to Extinct on his death
7 Oct 1934
EDGE of Ribble Lodge,Lancs
9 Jun 1937 UK 1 William Edge 21 Nov 1880 18 Dec 1948 68
MP for Bolton 1916-1923 and Bosworth
1927-1945
18 Dec 1948 2 Knowles Edge 31 Dec 1905 19 Mar 1984 78
19 Mar 1984 3 William Edge 5 Oct 1936
EDMONSTONE of Duntreath,Stirling
20 May 1774 GB 1 Archibald Edmonstone 10 Oct 1717 20 Jul 1807 89
MP for Dunbartonshire 1761-1780 and 1790-
1796, and Ayr Burghs 1780-1790
20 Jul 1807 2 Charles Edmonstone 10 Oct 1764 1 Apr 1821 56
MP for Dunbartonshire 1806-1807 and
Stirlingshire 1812-1821
1 Apr 1821 3 Archibald Edmonstone 12 Mar 1795 15 Mar 1871 76
15 Mar 1871 4 William Edmonstone 29 Jan 1810 18 Feb 1888 78
MP for Stirlingshire 1874-1880
18 Feb 1888 5 Archibald Edmonstone 30 May 1867 1 Apr 1954 86
1 Apr 1954 6 Archibald Charles Edmonstone 16 Jun 1898 5 Jun 1954 55
5 Jun 1954 7 Archibald Bruce Charles Edmonstone 3 Aug 1934
EDWARDES of Shrewsbury,Salop
21 Mar 1645 E 1 Thomas Edwards c 1599 27 Apr 1660
Apr 1660 2 Francis Edwards 13 May 1643 1690 47
22 Apr 1678 E 1 He obtained a fresh creation in 1678
MP for Shrewsbury 1685-1690
1690 2 Francis Edwards 23 Oct 1701
Oct 1701 3 Francis Edwards 17 Apr 1699 5 Aug 1734 35
5 Aug 1734 4 Henry Edwards 26 Mar 1767
26 Mar 1767 5 Thomas Edwards c 1730 13 Nov 1790
13 Nov 1790 6 Thomas Edwardes 7 Jan 1727 22 Sep 1797 70
22 Sep 1797 7 John Thomas Cholmondeley Edwardes c 1764 23 Feb 1816
23 Feb 1816 8 Henry Edwardes 14 Aug 1787 26 Aug 1841 54
26 Aug 1841 9 Henry Hope Edwardes 10 Apr 1829 24 Aug 1900 71
to Both creations extinct on his death
24 Aug 1900
EDWARDS of York,Yorks
7 Dec 1691 E 1 James Edwards Mar 1702
Mar 1702 2 James Edwards c 1689 1744
1744 3 Nathaniel Edwards c 1699 4 Mar 1764
to Extinct on his death
4 Mar 1764
EDWARDS of Garth,Montgomery
1838 UK 1 John Edwards 15 Jan 1770 19 Apr 1850 80
to MP for Montgomery 1833-1841
19 Apr 1850 Extinct on his death
EDWARDS of Pye Nest,Yorks
3 Aug 1866 UK 1 Henry Edwards 20 Jul 1812 23 Apr 1886 73
MP for Halifax 1847-1852 and Beverley
1857-1868
For further information on this baronet,see the
note at the foot of this page
23 Apr 1886 2 Henry Coster Lea Edwards 3 Jun 1840 5 Dec 1896 56
5 Dec 1896 3 John Henry Priestley Churchill Edwards 7 Jul 1889 13 Nov 1942 53
13 Nov 1942 4 Henry Charles Serrell Priestley Edwards 1 Mar 1893 3 Apr 1963 70
3 Apr 1963 5 Christopher John Churchill Edwards 16 Aug 1941
EDWARDS of Knighton,Radnor
25 Jul 1907 UK 1 Francis Edwards 28 Apr 1852 10 May 1927 75
to MP for Radnorshire 1892-1895, 1900-1910
10 May 1927 and 1910-1918
Extinct on his death
EDWARDS of Treforis,Glamorgan
30 Jun 1921 UK 1 John Bryn Edwards 12 Jan 1889 23 Aug 1922 33
23 Aug 1922 2 John Clive Leighton Edwards 11 Oct 1916 19 Feb 1999 82
to Extinct on his death
19 Feb 1999
EDWARDS-MOSS of Roby Hall,Lancs
23 Dec 1868 UK 1 Thomas Edwards-Moss 17 Jul,1811 26 Apr 1890 78
26 Apr 1890 2 John Edwards Edwards-Moss 25 Oct 1850 26 Jun 1935 84
26 Jun 1935 3 Thomas Edwards-Moss 17 Jan 1874 26 Jul 1960 86
26 Jul 1960 4 John Herbert Theodore Edwards-Moss 24 Jun 1913 28 Dec 1988 75
28 Dec 1988 5 David John Edwards-Moss 2 Feb 1955
EGERTON of Egerton,Cheshire
5 Apr 1617 E 1 Roland Egerton 3 Oct 1646
MP for Wootton Bassett 1624-1625
Oct 1646 2 John Egerton 1674
1674 3 John Egerton c 1658 12 Apr 1729
12 Apr 1729 4 Holland Egerton c 1689 25 Apr 1730
25 Apr 1730 5 Edward Egerton c 1719 16 Feb 1744
16 Feb 1744 6 Thomas Grey Egerton c 1721 7 Aug 1756
MP for Newton 1747-1754
7 Aug 1756 7 Thomas Egerton,later [1801] 1st Earl of Wilton 14 Aug 1749 23 Sep 1814 65
23 Sep 1814 8 John Egerton (Grey-Egerton from 17 Oct 1815) 11 Jul 1766 24 May 1825 58
MP for Chester 1807-1818
24 May 1825 9 Philip Grey-Egerton 6 Jan 1767 13 Dec 1829 62
13 Dec 1829 10 Philip de Malpas Grey-Egerton 13 Nov 1806 5 Apr 1881 74
MP for Chester 1830-1831, Cheshire South
1835-1868 and Cheshire West 1868-1881
5 Apr 1881 11 Philip le Belward Grey-Egerton 28 Mar 1833 2 Sep 1891 58
2 Sep 1891 12 Philip Henry Brian Grey-Egerton 29 Apr 1864 4 Jul 1937 73
4 Jul 1937 13 Brooke de Malpas Grey-Egerton 19 Aug 1845 5 Nov 1945 100
5 Nov 1945 14 Philip Reginald le Belward Grey-Egerton 3 Sep 1885 9 Jun 1962 76
9 Jun 1962 15 Philip John Caledon Grey-Egerton 19 Oct 1920 19 Feb 2008 87
19 Feb 2008 16 David Boswell Egerton 24 Jul 1914 17 Nov 2010 96
17 Nov 2010 17 William de Malpas Egerton 27 Apr 1949
EGERTON-BARRETT-BRYDGES
of Denton Court,Kent
27 May 1815 UK See "Brydges"
ELDRED of Saxham Magna,Suffolk
29 Jan 1642 E 1 Revett Eldred c 1653
to Extinct on his death
c 1653
ELEY of Sagamore,Oxon
14 Jan 1921 UK 1 Frederick Eley 22 Nov 1866 7 Feb 1951 84
to Extinct on his death
7 Feb 1951
ELFORD of Bickham,Devon
26 Nov 1800 GB 1 William Elford Aug 1749 30 Nov 1837 88
to MP for Plymouth 1796-1806 and Rye
30 Nov 1837 1807-1808
Extinct on his death
ELGAR of Broadheath,Worcs
23 Jun 1931 UK 1 Edward William Elgar 2 Jun 1857 23 Feb 1934 76
to OM 1911
23 Feb 1934 Extinct on his death
ELIOTT of Stobs,Roxburgh
3 Dec 1666 NS 1 Gilbert Eliott c 1680
c 1680 2 William Eliott 19 Feb 1699
19 Feb 1699 3 Gilbert Eliott c 1680 27 May 1764
MP for Roxburghshire 1708-1715 and 1726-1727
27 May 1764 4 John Eliott c 1705 31 Dec 1767
31 Dec 1767 5 Francis Eliott 20 Jun 1791
20 Jun 1791 6 William Eliott 14 May 1812
14 May 1812 7 William Francis Eliott 1792 3 Sep 1864 72
3 Sep 1864 8 William Francis Augustus Eliott 2 Feb 1827 6 Apr 1910 83
6 Apr 1910 9 Arthur Boswell Eliott 13 Jul 1856 15 Jan 1926 69
15 Jan 1926 10 Gilbert Alexander Boswell Eliott 5 May 1885 26 Jul 1958 73
26 Jul 1958 11 Arthur Francis Augustus Boswell Eliott 2 Jan 1915 6 Apr 1989 74
6 Apr 1989 12 Charles Joseph Alexander Eliott 9 Jan 1937
ELLERMAN of Connaught Square,London
11 Dec 1905 UK 1 John Reeves Ellerman 15 May 1862 16 Jul 1933 71
CH 1921
16 Jul 1933 2 John Reeves Ellerman 21 Dec 1909 17 Jul 1973 63
to Extinct on his death
17 Jul 1973
ELLIOT of Headshaw,Roxburgh
19 Apr 1700 NS 1 Gilbert Elliot c 1650 1 May 1718
1 May 1718 2 Gilbert Elliot c 1693 16 Apr 1766
MP for Roxburghshire 1722-1726
16 Apr 1766 3 Gilbert Elliot Sep 1722 11 Feb 1777 54
MP for Selkirkshire 1753-1765 and
Roxburghshire 1765-1777
11 Feb 1777 4 Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound 23 Apr 1751 21 Jun 1814 63
He was subsequently created Earl of Minto
(qv) in 1813 with which title the baronetcy
remains merged,although as at 30/06/2012 it
does not appear on the Official Roll of the
Baronetage
ELLIOT of Penshaw,Durham
15 May 1874 UK 1 George Elliot 18 Mar 1814 23 Dec 1893 79
MP for Durham County 1868-1874,1874-1880
and 1881-1885 and Monmouth 1886-1892
23 Dec 1893 2 George William Elliot 13 May 1844 15 Nov 1895 51
MP for Northallerton 1874-1885 and
Richmond 1886-1895
15 Nov 1895 3 George Elliot 30 May 1867 14 Oct 1904 37
14 Oct 1904 4 Charles Elliot 2 Apr 1873 15 Jan 1911 37
to Extinct on his death
15 Jan 1911
ELLIOTT of Peebles,Scotland
25 Jul 1778 GB 1 John Elliott 1736 7 Nov 1786 50
to Extinct on his death
7 Nov 1786
ELLIOTT of Limpsfield,Surrey
21 Jun 1917 UK 1 Thomas Henry Elliott 7 Sep 1854 4 Jun 1926 71
4 Jun 1926 2 Ivo D'Oyly Elliott 7 Mar 1882 18 Sep 1961 79
18 Sep 1961 3 Hugh Francis Ivo Elliott 10 Mar 1913 21 Dec 1989 76
21 Dec 1989 4 Clive Christopher Hugh Elliott 12 Aug 1945
ELLIS of Byfleet,Surrey
6 Jun 1882 UK 1 John Whittaker Ellis 25 Jan 1829 20 Sep 1912 83
to MP for Surrey Mid 1884-1885 and Kingston
20 Sep 1912 upon Thames 1885-1892
Extinct on his death
ELLIS of Threshfield,Yorks
24 Jun 1932 UK 1 Robert Geoffrey Ellis 4 Sep 1874 28 Jul 1956 81
to MP for Wakefield 1922-1923 and 1924-1929,
28 Jul 1956 Winchester 1931-1935 and Ecclesall 1935-
1945
Extinct on his death
ELLIS-GRIFFITH of Llanindan,Anglesey
26 Jan 1918 UK 1 Ellis Jones Ellis-Griffith 23 May 1860 30 Nov 1926 66
MP for Anglesey 1895-1918 and Carmarthen
1923-1924. PC 1914
30 Nov 1926 2 Elis Arundell Ellis-Griffith 15 Sep 1896 14 Jun 1934 37
to Extinct on his death
14 Jun 1934
ELLIS-NANNEY of Gwynfryn,Carnarvon
7 Mar 1898 UK 1 Hugh John Ellis-Nanney 16 Feb 1845 7 Jun 1920 75
to Extinct on his death
7 Jun 1920
ELLYS of Wyham,Lincs
30 Jun 1660 E 1 Thomas Ellys 8 Oct 1627 1668
1668 2 William Ellys 2 May 1654 6 Oct 1727 73
MP for Grantham 1679-1685 and 1689-1713
6 Oct 1727 3 Richard Ellys 14 Mar 1683 14 Feb 1742 58
to MP for Grantham 1701-1705 and Boston
14 Feb 1742 1719-1734
Extinct on his death
ELPHINSTONE of Elphinstone,Lanark
20 Jun 1628 NS 1 William Elphinstone 10 Dec 1645
to on his death the baronetcy became dormant
10 Dec 1645
ELPHINSTONE of Logie,Aberdeen
2 Dec 1701 NS 1 James Elphinstone c 1645 10 Mar 1722
10 Mar 1722 2 John Elphinstone 8 Aug 1675 11 Mar 1732 56
11 Mar 1732 3 James Elphinstone c 1710 Apr 1739
Apr 1739 4 John Elphinstone c 1717 Jan 1743
to on his death the baronetcy became dormant
Jan 1743
[Jan 1743] 5 John Elphinstone 1665 Sep 1758 93
[Sep 1758] 6 Alexander Elphinstone 26 Nov 1795
[26 Nov 1795] 7 John Elphinstone 15 May 1771 16 Apr 1835 63
[16 Apr 1835] 8 Alexander Elphinstone 3 Apr 1801 28 Nov 1888 87
[28 Nov 1888] 9 John Elphinstone 16 Dec 1834 30 Jun 1893 58
[30 Jun 1893] 10 Alexander Logie Elphinstone 8 Mar 1880 16 Dec 1970 90
Nov 1927 Proved his right to the baronetcy in 1927
For further information on this baronet,see the
note at the foot of this page
16 Dec 1970 11 John Elphinstone 12 Aug 1924
ELPHINSTONE of Sowerby,Cumberland
25 May 1816 UK 1 Howard Elphinstone 4 Mar 1773 28 Apr 1846 73
28 Apr 1846 2 Howard Elphinstone 9 Jun 1804 16 Mar 1893 88
MP for Hastings 1835-1837 and Lewes
1841-1847
16 Mar 1893 3 Howard Warburton Elphinstone 26 Jul 1830 3 Jan 1917 86
3 Jan 1917 4 Howard Graham Elphinstone 28 Dec 1898 18 May 1975 76
18 May 1975 5 Maurice Douglas Warburton Elphinstone 13 Apr 1909 5 Dec 1995 86
5 Dec 1995 6 John Howard Main Elphinstone 25 Feb 1949
ELPHINSTONE-DALRYMPLE
of North Berwick,Haddington
16 Jan 1828 UK 1 Robert Dalrymple-Horn-Elphinstone 27 Feb 1766 11 Oct 1848 82
11 Oct 1848 2 James Dalrymple-Horn-Elphinstone 20 Nov 1805 26 Dec 1886 81
MP for Portsmouth 1857-1865 and 1868-
1880
26 Dec 1886 3 Robert Elphinstone Dalrymple-Horn-
Elphinstone 12 Sep 1841 11 Feb 1887 45
11 Feb 1887 4 Graeme Hepburn Dalrymple-Horn-
Elphinstone 12 Sep 1841 23 May 1900 58
23 May 1900 5 Robert Graeme Elphinstone-Dalrymple 17 Jan 1844 16 Apr 1908 64
16 Apr 1908 6 Edward Arthur Elphinstone-Dalrymple 3 Oct 1877 24 Apr 1913 35
24 Apr 1913 7 Francis Napier Elphinstone-Dalrymple 17 Jul 1882 18 Dec 1956 74
to On his death the baronetcy became dormant
18 Dec 1956
ELTON of Bristol,Somerset
31 Oct 1717 GB 1 Abraham Elton 3 Jul 1654 9 Feb 1728 73
MP for Bristol 1722-1727
9 Feb 1728 2 Abraham Elton 30 Jun 1679 20 Oct 1743 64
MP for Taunton 1724-1727 and Bristol
1727-1742
20 Oct 1743 3 Abraham Elton 1703 29 Nov 1761 58
29 Nov 1761 4 Abraham Isaac Elton 1717 5 Feb 1790 72
5 Feb 1790 5 Abraham Elton 23 Mar 1755 23 Feb 1842 86
23 Feb 1842 6 Charles Abraham Elton 31 Oct 1778 1 Jun 1853 74
1 Jun 1853 7 Arthur Hallam Elton 19 Apr 1818 14 Oct 1883 65
MP for Bath 1857-1859
14 Oct 1883 8 Edmund Harry Elton 3 May 1846 17 Jul 1920 74
17 Jul 1920 9 Ambrose Elton 23 May 1869 11 Jul 1951 82
11 Jul 1951 10 Arthur Hallam Rice Elton 10 Feb 1906 1 Jan 1973 66
1 Jan 1973 11 Charles Abraham Grierson Elton 23 May 1953
ELTON of Widworthy Court,Devon
1 Aug 1838 UK See "Marwood-Elton"
ELWES of Stoke,Suffolk
22 Jun 1660 E 1 Gervase Elwes 21 Aug 1628 11 Apr 1706 77
MP for Sudbury 1677-1679, 1679-1681 and
1700-1706 and Suffolk 1679 and 1690-1698
11 Apr 1706 2 Hervey Elwes Jul 1683 22 Oct 1763 80
MP for Sudbury 1706-1710 and 1713-1722
22 Oct 1763 3 William Elwes 26 Nov 1778
Nov 1778 4 Henry Elwes 19 Jan 1787
to On his death the baronetcy became either
Jan 1787 extinct or dormant
ELWILL of Exeter,Devon
25 Aug 1709 E 1 John Elwill 24 Sep 1643 25 Apr 1717 73
MP for Beeralston 1681,1689-1690 and
1695-1698
25 Apr 1717 2 John Elwill 10 Sep 1727
10 Sep 1727 3 Edmund Elwill 2 Feb 1740
2 Feb 1740 4 John Elwill 1 Mar 1778
to MP for Guildford 1747-1768
1 Mar 1778 Extinct on his death
EMERSON-TENNENT
of Tempo Manor,Fermanagh
14 Feb 1867 UK 1 James Emerson-Tennent 7 Apr 1804 6 Mar 1869 64
MP for Belfast 1832-1837 and 1838-1845
6 Mar 1869 2 William Emerson-Tennent 14 May 1835 16 Nov 1876 41
to Extinct on his death
16 Nov 1876
ENGLEFIELD of Wotton Basset,Wilts
25 Nov 1611 E 1 Francis Englefield c 1561 26 Oct 1631
26 Oct 1631 2 Francis Englefield 1 May 1656
1 May 1656 3 Francis Englefield May 1665
May 1665 4 Thomas Englefield 1678
1678 5 Charles Englefield c 1670 21 Apr 1728
21 Apr 1728 6 Henry Englefield 25 May 1780
25 May 1780 7 Henry Charles Englefield 1752 21 Mar 1822 69
to Extinct on his death
21 Mar 1822
ENNIS of Balinahoun Court,Athlone
27 Jul 1866 UK 1 John Ennis 1809 8 Aug 1878 69
MP for Athlone 1857-1865
8 Aug 1878 2 John James Ennis 1842 28 May 1884 41
to MP for Athlone 1868-1874 and 1880-1884
28 May 1884 Extinct on his death
ENYON of Flowrie,Northants
9 Apr 1642 E 1 James Enyon c 1587 1642
to Extinct on his death
1642
ERICHSEN of Cavendish Place,London
26 Feb 1895 UK 1 John Eric Erichsen 19 Jul 1818 23 Sep 1896 77
to Extinct on his death
23 Sep 1896
ERNLE of Etchilhampton,Wilts
2 Feb 1660 E 1 Walter Ernle c 1628 25 Jul 1682
MP for Devizes 1679 and 1681-1682
25 Jul 1682 2 Walter Ernle c 1671 1690
1690 3 Edward Ernle c 1673 31 Jan 1729
MP for Devizes 1695-1698,Wiltshire 1698-
1701,Wareham 1701,1704-1705,1710-1713 and
1722-1729,Heytesbury 1701-1702,Marlborough
1708-1710 and Portsmouth 1715-1722
31 Jan 1729 4 Walter Ernle 1676 16 Jul 1732 56
16 Jul 1732 5 John Ernle c 1681 30 Mar 1734
to Extinct on his death
30 Mar 1734
ERRINGTON of Hooton,Cheshire
17 Jun 1661 E 1 William Stanley Sep 1628 30 Sep 1673 45
Sep 1673 2 Rowland Stanley Jun 1653 5 Jun 1737 83
5 Jun 1737 3 William Stanley 11 Nov 1679 Jul 1740 60
Jul 1740 4 Rowland Stanley 23 Aug 1707 9 Apr 1771 63
9 Apr 1771 5 William Stanley c 1753 29 May 1792
29 May 1792 6 John Stanley-Massey-Stanley 28 Feb 1711 24 Nov 1794 83
24 Nov 1794 7 Thomas Stanley-Massey-Stanley c 1755 19 Feb 1795
19 Feb 1795 8 William Stanley-Massey-Stanley c 1780 14 Jun 1800
14 Jun 1800 9 Thomas Stanley-Massey-Stanley 23 Jan 1782 20 Aug 1841 59
20 Aug 1841 10 William Thomas Stanley-Massey-Stanley 24 Nov 1806 29 Jun 1863 56
MP for Pontefract 1837-1841
29 Jun 1863 11 Rowland Errington 4 Apr 1809 31 Mar 1875 65
31 Mar 1875 12 John Errington 30 Apr 1810 19 Mar 1893 82
to Extinct on his death
19 Mar 1893
ERRINGTON of Lackham Manor,Wilts
18 Jul 1885 UK 1 George Errington 1839 19 Mar 1920 80
to MP for Longford 1874-1885
19 Mar 1920 Extinct on his death
ERRINGTON of Ness,Cheshire
26 Jun 1963 UK 1 Eric Errington 17 Mar 1900 3 Jun 1973 73
MP for Bootle 1935-1945 and Aldershot
1954-1970
3 Jun 1973 2 Geoffrey Frederick Errington 15 Feb 1926
ERSKINE of Alva,Fife
30 Apr 1666 NS 1 Charles Erskine 4 Jul 1643 4 Jun 1690 46
4 Jun 1690 2 James Erskine c 1670 23 Jul 1693
23 Jul 1693 3 John Erskine 1672 12 Mar 1739 66
MP for Scotland 1707-1708 and
Clackmannanshire 1713-1715
12 Mar 1739 4 Charles Erskine 2 Jul 1747
2 Jul 1747 5 Henry Erskine 23 Dec 1710 7 Aug 1765 54
MP for Ayr Burghs 1749-1754 and
Anstruther Easter Burghs 1754-1765
7 Aug 1765 6 James Erskine 6 Feb 1762 18 Jan 1837 74
He subsequently succeeded to the Earldom
of Rosslyn (qv) in 1805 with which title
the baronetcy remains merged
ERSKINE of Cambo,Fife
20 Aug 1666 NS 1 Charles Erskine c 1620 Feb 1677
Feb 1677 2 Alexander Erskine c 1663 4 Aug 1727
MP for Fifeshire 1710-1715
4 Aug 1727 3 Charles Erskine 8 Feb 1753
8 Feb 1753 4 John Erskine 20 Jul 1754
20 Jul 1754 5 William Erskine 30 Oct 1780
30 Oct 1780 6 Charles Erskine 6 Mar 1790
6 Mar 1790 7 William Erskine c 1760 2 Oct 1791
2 Oct 1791 8 Charles Erskine 1764 28 Oct 1799 35
He subsequently succeeded to the Earldom
of Kellie (qv) in 1797 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
in 1829
ERSKINE of Torrie,Fife
28 Jul 1791 GB 1 William Erskine 27 Mar 1728 19 Mar 1795 66
19 Mar 1795 2 William Erskine 30 Mar 1770 14 May 1813 43
MP for Fifeshire 1796-1806
For further information on this baronet, see the
note at the foot of this page.
14 May 1813 3 James Erskine 30 Sep 1772 3 Mar 1825 52
3 Mar 1825 4 John Drummond Erskine 5 Apr 1776 30 Jul 1836 60
to Extinct on his death
30 Jul 1836
ERSKINE of Cambo,Fife
27 Aug 1821 UK 1 David Erskine 6 Feb 1792 29 Jan 1841 48
29 Jan 1841 2 Thomas Erskine 23 Jul 1824 27 Sep 1902 78
27 Sep 1902 3 Ffolliott Williams Erskine 28 Oct 1850 9 Jan 1912 61
9 Jan 1912 4 Thomas Wilfrid Hargreaves John Erskine 27 May 1880 29 Apr 1944 63
29 Apr 1944 5 Thomas David Erskine 31 Jul 1912 21 Mar 2007 94
21 Mar 2007 6 Thomas Peter Neil Erskine 28 Mar 1950
ERSKINE of Rerrick
5 Jul 1961 UK 1 John Maxwell Erskine 14 Dec 1893 14 Dec 1980 87
He subsequently created Baron Erskine of
Rerrick (qv) in 1964 with which title the
baronetcy then merged until its extinction
in 1995
ERSKINE-HILL of Quothquhan,Lanark
22 Jun 1945 UK 1 Alexander Galloway Erskine-Hill 3 Apr 1894 6 Jun 1947 53
MP for Edinburgh North 1935-1945
6 Jun 1947 2 Robert Erskine-Hill 6 Feb 1917 10 Jul 1989 72
10 Jul 1989 3 Alexander Rodger Erskine-Hill 15 Aug 1949
ESMONDE of Ballynastragh,co.Wexford
28 Jan 1629 I 1 Thomas Esmonde c 1665
c 1665 2 Laurence Esmonde 1688
1688 3 Laurence Esmonde c 1717
c 1717 4 Laurence Esmonde 1738
1738 5 John Esmonde 30 Jun 1758
30 Jun 1758 6 Walter Esmonde Feb 1766
Feb 1766 7 James Esmonde 23 Apr 1701 Feb 1766 65
He held the baronetcy for only two days
Feb 1766 8 Thomas Esmonde 19 Dec 1803
19 Dec 1803 9 Thomas Esmonde 10 Dec 1786 31 Dec 1868 82
MP for Wexford 1841-1847. PC [I] 1846
31 Dec 1868 10 John Esmonde 16 May 1826 9 Dec 1876 50
MP for Waterford 1852-1876
For information on this baronet's brother, Thomas
Esmonde VC,see the note at the foot of this page
9 Dec 1876 11 Thomas Henry Grattan Esmonde 21 Sep 1862 15 Sep 1935 72
MP for Dublin South 1885-1892,Kerry West
1892-1900 and Wexford North 1900-1918
15 Sep 1935 12 Osmond Thomas Grattan Esmonde 4 Apr 1896 22 Jul 1936 40
22 Jul 1936 13 Laurence Grattan Esmonde 3 Nov 1863 1 Feb 1943 79
1 Feb 1943 14 John Lymbrick Esmonde 15 Dec 1893 6 Jul 1958 64
MP for Tipperary North 1915-1918
6 Jul 1958 15 Anthony Charles Esmonde 18 Jan 1899 17 Mar 1981 82
17 Mar 1981 16 John Henry Grattan Esmonde 27 Jun 1928 16 May 1987 58
16 May 1987 17 Thomas Francis Grattan Esmonde 14 Oct 1960
ESPLEN of Hardres Court,Kent
14 Jul 1921 UK 1 John Esplen 7 Apr 1863 7 Feb 1930 66
7 Feb 1930 2 William Graham Esplen 29 Dec 1899 29 Apr 1989 89
29 Apr 1989 3 John Graham Esplen 4 Aug 1932
ESSEX of Bewcot,Berks
25 Nov 1611 E 1 William Essex c 1575 c 1645
to MP for Arundel 1597-1598 and Stafford
c 1645 1601
Extinct on his death
ESTCOURT of Newton,Wilts
17 Mar 1627 E 1 Giles Estcourt c 1601 c 1650
MP for Cirencester 1628-1629
c 1650 2 Giles Estcourt c Jul 1676
c Jul 1676 3 William Estcourt c 1684
to Extinct on his death
c 1684
ETHERINGTON of Kingston-upon-Hull,Yorks
22 Nov 1775 GB 1 Henry Etherington c 1732 16 Aug 1819
to Extinct on his death
16 Aug 1819
EUSTACE of Castle Martin,Kildare
23 Dec 1685 I 1 Maurice Eustace 15 Oct 1693
to He was attainted and the baronetcy
1691 forfeited in 1691
EVANS of Kilcreene,Kilkenny
19 Feb 1683 I 1 William Evans 1662 May 1690 27
to Extinct on his death
May 1690
EVANS of Allestree Hall,Derby
18 Jul 1887 UK 1 Thomas William Evans 15 Apr 1821 4 Oct 1892 71
to MP for Derbyshire South 1857-1868 and 1874-1885
4 Oct 1892 Extinct on his death
EVANS of Tubbendeny,Kent
26 Jul 1902 UK 1 Francis Henry Evans 29 Aug 1840 22 Jan 1907 66
MP for Southampton 1896-1900 and
Maidstone 1901-1906
22 Jan 1907 2 Murland de Grasse Evans 8 Dec 1874 28 Jun 1946 71
28 Jun 1946 3 Evelyn Ward Evans 4 Mar 1883 1 Feb 1970 86
to Extinct on his death
1 Feb 1970
EVANS of Colchester,Essex
15 Nov 1916 UK See "Worthington-Evans"
EVANS of Wightwick,Staffs
31 Jan 1920 UK 1 Walter Harry Evans 19 May 1872 7 Nov 1954 82
For information on the death of this baronet's
son and heir,see the note at the foot of this page
7 Nov 1954 2 Anthony Adney Evans 5 Aug 1922
EVANS of Rottingdean,Sussex
21 Nov 1963 UK 1 Harold Evans 29 Apr 1911 21 Apr 1983 71
to Extinct on his death
21 Apr 1983
EVANS-BEVAN of Cadoxton-Juxta-
Neath,Glamorgan
9 Jul 1958 UK 1 David Martyn Evans-Bevan 4 Mar 1902 9 Sep 1973 71
9 Sep 1973 2 Martyn Evan Evans-Bevan 1 Apr 1932
EVANS-FREKE of Castle Freke,Cork
15 Jul 1768 I 1 John Freke (later Evans-Freke) 1744 20 Mar 1777 32
20 Mar 1777 2 John Evans-Freke 11 Nov 1765 12 May 1845 79
He subsequently succeeded to the Barony
of Carbery (qv) in 1807 with which title
the baronetcy remains merged, aqlthough,as at
31/12/2013,it does not appear on the Official
Roll of the Baronetage
EVANS-TIPPING of Oaklands,Gloucs
17 Jun 1913 UK 1 William Gwynne-Evans 3 Feb 1845 23 Jan 1927 81
23 Jan 1927 2 Evan Gwynne Gwynne-Evans 4 May 1877 2 Feb 1959 81
2 Feb 1959 3 Ian William Gwynne-Evans 21 Feb 1909 27 Dec 1985 76
27 Dec 1985 4 Francis Loring Gwynne-Evans 22 Feb 1914 29 Dec 1993 79
29 Dec 1993 5 David Gwynne Evans-Tipping 25 Nov 1943
EVE of Silsoe,Beds
18 Jan 1943 UK 1 Arthur Malcolm Trustram Eve 8 Apr 1894 3 Dec 1976 82
He was subsequently created Baron Silsoe
(qv) in 1963 with which title the baronetcy
then merged
EVELYN of Godstone,Surrey
29 May 1660 E 1 John Evelyn 12 Mar 1633 10 Aug 1671 38
to Extinct on his death
10 Aug 1671
EVELYN of Long Ditton,Surrey
17 Feb 1683 E 1 Edward Evelyn 25 Jan 1626 3 May 1692 66
to MP for Surrey 1685-1687
3 May 1692 Extinct on his death
EVELYN of Wotton,Surrey
6 Aug 1713 GB 1 John Evelyn 2 Mar 1682 15 Jul 1763 81
MP for Helston 1708-1710. Joint Postmaster
General 1708-1715
15 Jul 1763 2 John Evelyn 24 Aug 1706 11 Jun 1767 60
MP for Helston 1727-1741 and 1747-1767
and Penrhyn 1741-1747
11 Jun 1767 3 Frederick Evelyn 1734 1 Apr 1812 77
1 Apr 1812 4 John Evelyn c 1758 14 May 1833
14 May 1833 5 Hugh Evelyn 31 Jan 1769 28 Aug 1848 79
to Extinct on his death
28 Aug 1848
EVERARD of Ballybay,Tipperary
30 Apr 1622 I 1 Richard Everard c 1660
c 1660 2 Redmond Everard 20 Feb 1686
20 Feb 1686 3 John Everard 12 Jul 1690
12 Jul 1690 4 Redmond Everard c 1689 13 Apr 1742
to Extinct on his death
13 Apr 1742
EVERARD of Much Waltham,Essex
29 Jan 1629 E 1 Richard Everard c 1680
c 1680 2 Richard Everard c 1625 29 Aug 1694
MP for Westminster 1661-1678
29 Aug 1694 3 Hugh Everard c 1654 2 Jan 1706
2 Jan 1706 4 Richard Everard c 1683 17 Feb 1733
Governor of North Carolina 1724
17 Feb 1733 5 Richard Everard 7 Mar 1742
7 Mar 1742 6 Hugh Everard 1745
to Extinct on his death
1745
EVERARD of Randlestown,co.Meath
30 Jun 1911 UK 1 Nugent Talbot Everard 24 Oct 1849 11 Jul 1929 79
Lord Lieutenant Meath 1906-1922
11 Jul 1929 2 Richard William Everard 9 Sep 1874 22 Jul 1929 54
22 Jul 1929 3 Nugent Henry Everard 28 Feb 1905 15 Dec 1984 79
15 Dec 1984 4 Robin Charles Everard 5 Oct 1939 31 Aug 2010 70
31 Aug 2010 5 Henry Peter Charles Everard 6 Aug 1970
EVERSFIELD of Welches,Sussex
4 May 1725 GB 1 Henry Fermor 3 Jun 1734
3 Jun 1734 2 Charles Eversfield c 1708 26 Oct 1784
to Extinct on his death
26 Oct 1784
EVERY of Egginton,Derby
26 May 1641 E 1 Simon Every c 1603 c 1647
MP for Leicester 1640
c 1647 2 Henry Every 15 Nov 1629 29 Sep 1700 70
29 Sep 1700 3 Henry Every c 1653 Sep 1709
Sep 1709 4 John Every c 1654 1 Jul 1729
1 Jul 1729 5 Simon Every c 1658 12 Jan 1753
12 Jan 1753 6 Henry Every 25 Oct 1708 31 May 1755 46
31 May 1755 7 John Every 17 Oct 1709 29 Jun 1779 69
29 Jun 1779 8 Edward Every 15 Aug 1754 4 Jan 1786 31
Jan 1786 9 Henry Every 4 Jun 1777 28 Dec 1855 78
28 Dec 1855 10 Henry Flower Every 25 Dec 1830 26 Feb 1893 62
26 Feb 1893 11 Edward Oswald Every 14 Jan 1886 11 Nov 1959 73
11 Nov 1959 12 John Simon Every 24 Apr 1914 3 Nov 1988 74
3 Nov 1988 13 Henry John Michael Every 6 Apr 1947
EWART of Glenmachan House,co.Down
and Glenbank,co.Antrim
13 Sep 1887 UK 1 William Ewart 22 Nov 1817 1 Aug 1889 71
MP for Belfast 1878-1885 and Belfast North
1885-1889
1 Aug 1889 2 William Quartus Ewart 14 Jun 1844 17 Oct 1919 75
17 Oct 1919 3 Robert Heard Ewart 5 Nov 1879 12 Aug 1939 59
12 Aug 1939 4 Lavens Mathewson Algernon Ewart 6 Sep 1885 21 Sep 1939 54
21 Sep 1939 5 Talbot Ewart 2 Nov 1878 23 Oct 1959 80
23 Oct 1959 6 William Ivan Cecil Ewart 18 Jul 1919 29 Nov 1995 76
29 Nov 1995 7 William Michael Ewart 10 Jun 1953
EWART of White House,Hants
14 Jun 1910 UK Henry Peter Ewart 20 Aug 1838 16 Apr 1928 89
to Extinct on his death
16 Apr 1928
EWING of Ballikinran,Stirling
8 Mar 1886 UK See "Orr-Ewing"
EYLES of London
1 Dec 1714 GB 1 Francis Eyles 24 May 1716
24 May 1716 2 John Eyles c 1683 11 Mar 1745
MP for Chippenham 1713-1727 and London
1727-1734
11 Mar 1745 3 Francis Haskins Eyles-Stiles 29 Jan 1762
29 Jan 1762 4 John Haskins Eyles-Stiles 16 Apr 1741 1 Nov 1768 27
to Extinct on his death
1 Nov 1768
Sir Eardley Gideon Culling Eardley, 4th baronet
In January 1868, this baronet was tried on a charge of bigamy before the Central Criminal Court.
The following report is taken from 'The Hull Packet and East Riding Times" of 31 January 1868:-
'Sir Culling Eardley was placed at the bar of the Central Criminal Court on Monday, to take his
trial for feloniously intermarrying with Mary Elizabeth Allen, at the district church of
St.George's, Hanover-square, his wife Emily Florence Magee, to whom he had previously been
married at New York, in the United States of America, being alive.
'This case appeared to create considerable interest on account of the position of the defendant
and the circumstances connected with the charge. Evidence was adduced to show that on the
12th of December, 1859, the defendant, being then Mr. Eardley, married Miss Emily Florence
Magee at New York, and continued to live with that lady for some time afterwards, when a
separation took place. In the first instance Sir Culling Eardley, the father of the defendant, was
ignorant of the fact of the marriage having taken place, but when he became aware of the fact
that his son had married a lady of position and respectability, he at once acknowledged her as
his daughter, and made a settlement of 1,500 a year upon her. After the defendant came to
the title by the death of his father, he endeavoured to procure a reconciliation with his wife,
but she refused to live with him again, and in September 1867, he contracted a second
marriage with a lady named Allen, at St. George's Church, Hanover-square. The marriage was
advertised in the Times, and the father of the defendant's first wife immediately commenced
the present prosecution.
'Mr. De Tracy Gould, a member of the American bar, practising in England, proved that the
marriage in America was a perfectly legal ceremony.
'Evidence having been given of the second marriage, Mr. M. Williams addressed the jury for
the defendant.
'The Recorder, in summing up the case to the jury, said that he really did not see any real
answer to the charge, or any facts in the case that would justify them in coming to the
conclusion that the defendant had not committed the offence imputed to him.
'The jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of Guilty.
'The Recorder, in passing sentence, said that in the absence of any information as to the
circumstances connected with the second marriage, the Court must deal with the case as it
stood. The defendant had deliberately committed a very grave offence, and one that was
calculated to do very serious injury to the person who was a victim of it. There did not appear
to be any extenuation for his conduct, and the sentence he felt bound to pass upon him was
that he be imprisoned and kept to hard labour for eighteen months.'
Sir John Eardley Eardley-Wilmot, 1st baronet
Sir John was Governor of Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania) between 1843 and 1846. The
following story of his shabby treatment by the British Government appeared in the Australian
monthly magazine "Parade" in its issue for November 1963:-
On January 26, 1847, Sir William Thomas Denison, newly-appointed Governor of Van Diemen's
Land, landed in Hobart from the barque Windermere. Incoming governors were usually greeted
by the roar of cannon, but in Denison's case the artillery was dispensed with out of
consideration for his predecessor, Sir John Eardley-Wilmot. Disgraced and dismissed, Eardley-
Wilmot lay dying in a small cottage owned by his secretary and, eight days later, Denison
attended the funeral of the tragic man he had superseded.
'Officially, Eardley-Wilmot's death at 64 was due to "complete exhaustion of his frame and the
decay of nature." But as he had been in perfect health a few months before few Tasmanians
believed this. His friends knew he simply wanted to die. His career had been wrecked by the
injustice of a British politician, and his personal reputation had been sabotaged by the
envenomed pens of anonymous accusers.
'One of the most tragic figures in early Australian history, Sir John Eardley-Wilmot was born in
England on February 21, 1783, and educated at Harrow for a law career. After practising at
the bar for some years he inherited the family estates and entered the House of Commons as
a member of Warwickshire [North]. One of his weaknesses was his unusually genial
temperament. Often he carried this to extremes when he sat on the bench as chairman of the
Warwickshire Quarter Sessions and exchanged pleasantries with the accused. While the habit
gained him the sobriquet of the "joking justice," his ill-timed humour was not highly regarded in
judicial circles. Many dignified eyebrows were raised in 1843 when Lord Stanley, Colonial
Secretary in Sir Robert Peel's government, appointed the jovial humanitarian Governor of Van
Diemen's Land. The newspapers published some acid comments on what they considered an
unsuitable appointment. Their strictures, hastily reprinted in Hobart, did the new governor much
harm.
'Van Diemen's Land at that time had such a sinister reputation in Britain that when several
reputable visitors from the colony put up at a London hotel the proprietor begged them not to
reveal where they had come from, lest the other guests leave. Moreover the ratio of convicts
to free settlers was increasing rapidly. Since transportation to New South Wales had ceased,
felons of all kinds were being poured into the island. Alarmed at being swamped by prisoners,
and indignant at having to foot the bill for policing this horde, the colonists protested bitterly.
Between 1841 and Eardley-Wilmot's arrival in 1843 some 12,000 free colonists left the island,
thus throwing an additional burden on those who remained.
'To make matters worse a new system had been evolved in London. In earlier days, most
convicts were assigned as servants to settlers in various parts of the colony. This at least
distributed them widely. But under the new scheme new arrivals were herded in "probation
gangs," where they were set to hard labour. Having endured six months of this without giving
any trouble, they became "pass-holders," and were allowed to work for wages, part of their
earnings being deferred. From pass-holders they graduated to the ranks of the ticket-of-leave
men, and were finally granted conditional pardons under which they were free men provided
they remained in Van Diemen's Land.
'To those who held control in London the system appeared ideal. In practice it broke down in
the 1840s, when a depression hit the Australian colonies. As the returns from agriculture fell
below the cost of production, there was no work for the army of pass-holders. Herded in hiring
depots waiting for work, they had to be kept at the public expense.
'When Eardley-Wilmot took over there were nearly 2,000 escaped convicts at large and the
colonists were expected to foot the bill to recapturing them. To clean up this situation proved
an impossible task for an English country gentleman with a sense of humour and some vague
theories on penal reform. Already prejudiced by adverse press comments in London, Eardley-
Wilmot aroused further ire in Hobart when it was found that he had left his wife and family
behind in Warwickshire. Some of the local socialites construed this into an affront to Hobart
society.
'The new governor fell foul of the judiciary for his clemency to the bushranger Kavanagh, a
violent ruffian who had already escaped the gallows several times. Sentenced to death for
robbery and attempted murder, Kavanagh was reprieved by the Governor within 10 minutes of
being sentenced to death. This act of mercy not only offended the judge who had sentenced
Kavanagh, but angered farmers who were the chief targets of bushrangers. In any case, it
merely postponed Kavanagh's end. He was hanged at Norfolk Island in 1846.
'The well-meaning Eardley-Wilmot soon found his position hopeless. When he applied to Britain
for financial aid to help pay the ever-increasing costs of police and gaols he was ignored. But
when he floated a public loan of 70,000 he was harshly censured for extravagance and ordered
to tax the settlers. Meanwhile, William Ewart Gladstone, later celebrated as the "Grand Old Man"
of British politics, had taken over the Colonial Office. Pigeon-holing Eardley-Wilmot's requests
for money, Gladstone called for reports on the moral standards of the convict population. Most
contemporary accounts agree that their standards could scarcely have been lower, but there
was nothing the harassed governor could do about it.
'In 1845 he called the Legislative Council together to consider some way of raising money. This
body, whose members were all appointed by the Governor himself, consisted of six government
officials and eight private citizens. The official party was prepared to endorse whatever Sir John
suggested. But the private members were in a recalcitrant mood. One of them suggested that
the best way to obtain funds was to tax dogs and billiard tables. As there were only 10 billiard
tables in the colony, Eardley-Wilmot, whose sense of humour was fast waning, declared the
proposal facetious. His own suggestion was to treble the customs duties. After a long and fierce
argument this was passed on the Governor's casting vote. But when he brought in a Bill to
establish toll gates on the roads the unofficial members rebelled. Declaring that they vote for
no more taxes until the British Government paid the expenses of maintaining the convicts it
sent, six private members refused to attend any more council meetings. This meant that Sir
John could no longer get a quorum and the patriotic six, as they were called, became the
heroes of the island.
By now Eardley-Wilmot regretted ever having heard of Van Diemen's Land. Caught between the
colonists and the Colonial Office, he could make no impression on either. His reports on the
condition of the convicts under the hated probation system were ignored in London. So, too,
was his plea on behalf of a political offender named Zephania Williams, who had been exiled for
life for participating in the Chartist movement. Williams, a harmless working-class leader whose
conduct on the island had been exemplary, rushed into a burning mental hospital and rescued a
number of inmates at the risk of his life. Eardley-Wilmot brought his heroism to the notice of
Gladstone but his dispatch was not even acknowledged.
'Sir John's next attempt to raise funds was by special taxes on auctioneers, pawnbrokers,
publicans, butchers, restaurant keepers and even cabmen. This gave the wits of Hobart an
opportunity. The town was placarded with punning posters calling on butchers to show their
pluck and hotelkeepers their spirit, while cabmen were exhorted to take a stand against the
unjust imposts.
'By now the colonists were on the point of revolt and Eardley-Wilmot was at the end of his
resources. No longer the "joking justice," he battled on, weighed down with work and worry and
entirely without support from the government which had sent him there. Gladstone, however,
had already prepared the final blow. On October 13, 1846, Eardley-Wilmot received a dispatch
from the Colonial Office giving him immediate notice to resign. In the official notification
Gladstone accused him of "failure to give due attention to the pressing exigencies of convict
discipline and to impress a moral and reforming character on the convict system." But it was the
accompanying private letter which stunned the Governor. In this letter Gladstone told him he
could expect no more appointments under the Crown as his immorality had become notorious in
Van Diemen's Land. Gladstone added that he had been informed that Sir John's regime
Government House had become a place shunned by the respectable ladies of Hobart. That this
was no ordinary case was shown by the immediate arrival of C.J. Latrobe, superintendent of
Port Phillip, who had received urgent orders to assume the administration of the colony until
Sir William Denison arrived.
'Instead of returning to England immediately, the bewildered Eardley-Wilmot stayed on in Hobart
to try to vindicate his character. But when he attempted to find out who had maligned him, he
came up against a blank wall. Many locals came forward to defend the slandered Governor. The
Chief Justice, Sir John Pedder, declared that Gladstone's charges were entirely false. He added
that his wife and the wives of his friends were frequent visitors at Government House. Even
though some of them had not been on good terms with Eardley-Wilmot, 300 prominent
Tasmanians signed a memorial protesting against the way he had been treated. Eardley-Wilmot
asked to be given the privilege accorded the meanest criminal and allowed to face his accusers
in a court of law. The home government made no reply.
'Finally, his health completely shattered, Eardley-Wilmot found refuge in a small cottage owned
by his former private secretary. There he died on February 3, 1847, eight days after his
successor was sworn in.
'In June 1847 the [former] Prime Minister, Sir Robert Peel, blandly assured the House of
Commons that the allegations against Sir John Eardley-Wilmot were totally and entirely
erroneous. Sir Robert did not inform the House who had made the false charges, although many
rumours were current in Van Diemen's Land. Nor did Peel mention the 12,000 due to Eardley-
Wilmot's heirs as the balance of his salary for the remaining years of his six-year term.
'Sir John Eardley-Wilmot lies in St. David's Church, Hobart, under a monument erected by public
subscription. Gladstone survived another 50 years, to have four terms as Prime Minister and
become one of the greatest figures of Victorian Britain. By then he had long lived down what
his biographer, John Morley, dismissed as a "trivial episode."
Sir Henry Frederick Echlin, 8th baronet
The following article on Sir Henry Echlin appeared in the New Zealand 'Feilding Star,' reprinted
from the 'London Express,' on 6 February 1907:-
"Sir Henry Echlin, Bart., licensed to sell beer, wines, and spirits, to be consumed on or off the
premises. Dealer in tobacco."
'This legend, in brand new paint, will be written prominently over the door of the Rose and
Crown Inn, a small wayside hostelry half a mile out of the little Buckinghamshire township of
Wooburn Green, by the end of the present week.
'The proprietor of the Rose and Crown, who was serving out pewters of mild ale and screws
of shag to rustic customers for about fourteen years past, succeeded to the ancient baronetcy
of the Echlins on the death of his elder brother Thomas, the seventh baronet, a fortnight ago.
'Sir Henry first heard a rumour of the honour thus thrust upon him during last week. On
Saturday evening when the farm labourers and paper-mill hands of Wooburn opened the local
newspapers in the Working Men's Club they read of the sudden exaltation of their host at the
Rose and Crown.
'It dawned upon them slowly that they had "quality" in their midst. The club was almost
deserted that night. The members strolled down to the inn with newspapers in their
hands, and found that Sir Henry had already heard of his new dignity from the same source. So
they crowded on the window-seat and the old settle in the little bar and gazed and drank and
talked, putting unctuous deference into the order "Another 'arf-pint, Sir 'Enery."
'When I walked out to the Rose and Crown to-day I arrived at the same moment that the first
official intimation of his succession to the baronetcy reached the proprietor. Sergeant King, of
the Wooburn police, bore it in the shape of a letter from the head office of the Royal Irish
Constabulary, in which service Sir Henry's brother, Sir Thomas, had been since 1860.
'Sir Henry Echlin had last heard of his brother fourteen years before. That was in the present
baronet's first year as a publican. He was then proprietor of the Red Lion, at High Wycombe.
'In a chat with me Sir Henry, who is a finely built man of nearly sixty years, standing over six
feet in his stockings, straight as a die, with black hair, clean-shaven chin, and iron-grey
moustache, gave a remarkable account of his life history. [He] had been employed in the
following varied capacities:- Footman: three or four years. Royal Irish Constabulary: Four years.
2nd Life Guards: About a month. Liverpool Police: Six weeks. 2nd Life Guards: Twenty-one
years. Commissionaire: Twelve months. Prison warder: About four months. Private lunatic
attendant: Three years. Publican: About fourteen years.
"My father was poor, but a gentleman," he said. "When I was about seven years old I left home
to live with my uncle, and went to the village school until I was fourteen or fifteen. Then I
entered the service of Sir Gerald Aylmer, Bart., at Donadea Castle, C. Kildare, as a footman,
and remained with him for about four years.
"After that I served in the Royal Irish Constabulary for four years, and then left to join the 2nd
Life Guards. But I only served a month with the Guards then. The yarns of the old soldiers put
me off the Army altogether. I was only a young fellow; but all that these old hands told me
made me feel that the regiment was not up to concert pitch, so I deserted. I was a fool to
desert, as I was really getting on well.
"'As a deserter I joined the Liverpool police. That was about 1865. I used to see my name in
the ''Police Gazette' every morning as a deserter, and I had many a good laugh at it, for they
spelt it ''Ashlin,' and that was why I was never found out.
I left the Liverpool Police after six weeks, one reason being that the helmets they wore in those
days were too heavy. They made my head ache. I tried to join the Preston police, but they
were full up; so, after wandering miserably about for some weeks with nothing to do, I gave
myself up as a deserter.
"I was sent back to London for punishment; but I was only in the guardroom one day, when I
was released by the Duke of Cambridge's orders. He was a real soldier's friend, and we all loved
him. He let me go on the plea that I was only a youngster, that I did not take away any
accoutrements or equipment, and that my previous character was very good.
"So I was reinstated, and served in the 2nd Life Guards for twenty-one years, finally leaving the
regiment a non-commissioned officer. I never saw any foreign service, but I was often one of
Queen Victoria's bodyguard, and rode with her Majesty to the opening of Blackfriars Bridge and
the stonelaying of St. Thomas' Hospital.
"After that I served in the Corps of Commissionaires for a year, and then as a warder at
Wandsworth Prison for a few months. In my next employment, as private attendant to an
insane gentleman at Kingston-on-Thames, I had some really exciting experiences.
"My charge stood six feet high and weighed eighteen stone nine pounds, and was subject to
periodical attacks of violent insanity. Two days before the full moon I had to look out for
squalls. I used to see his neck swell and grow as red as a turkey cock's, and lively times
followed, for he was a tough handful to overpower.
"I remained with him for three years, and on the whole we got on very well, for we were both
Army men."
'Sir Henry Echlin's subsequent career has been spent behind the bars of country inns, he having
successively owned the following public houses:- Wheelwright's Arms, Marlow; Rupert Arms,
Reading; Criterion, Windsor; Red Lion, Wycombe; Rose and Crown, Wooburn Green.
'At Reading Sir Henry married, and his one child, a daughter, is now a pupil teacher at Wooburn
School. He is a very pretty girl of fourteen summers. Her name, Margaret Daisy, figures on five
certificates for proficiency in religious knowledge hanging in the little bar parlour at the Rose
and Crown.
'Lady Echlin was serving beer and tobacco in the bar while her husband talked with me, and
was in no way abashed at the words, "Your ladyship," now punctiliously added by every
customer at the Rose and Crown who has heard the news.
'In reply to the question whether he would now remove from the Rose and Crown, Sir Henry
said: "Funds will not let me live elsewhere. I am doing a fair wayside trade, and am under a
very good brewer. I have already given the order for a new signboard with my title on it and I
suppose I shall keep here.
"There is property in Dublin, I believe, belonging to my family; but money will be required to get
it, and I have no money. I am going to write to the Dublin office of the Royal Irish Constabulary
at once to learn more about my brother. I have a sister in Canada, and a younger brother who
is a stationmaster on an Irish railway. We are all poor now. It was the baronets who have gone
before who squandered all our estates."
'Sir Henry is a non-smoker, and, as he put it yesterday, his "strongest drink is mild beer." He did
not know whether he was the seventh or eighth baronet until I informed him.
'The Echlin baronetcy was created in 1721. The family is of ancient Scottish origin, and formerly
possessed vast estates both in Scotland and Ireland. One Echlin was Constable and Deputy
Governor of Edinburgh Castle during the siege of 1572; another - Bishop of Down and Connor -
was murdered in 1635, and Sir Henry Echlin, the first baronet, was a Baron of the Court of
Exchequer in Ireland. The second baronet sat as M.P. for Newry. The third, fourth, fifth and
sixth baronets successively dissipated the family possessions.
'The elaborate coat-of-arms of the Echlins includes a device of a hound in full chase after a
stag, and the family motto is, "Non sine praeda" (not without prey).'
Sir Henry Edwards, 1st baronet [UK 1866]
Following an incident between two of his servants, Sir Henry found himself in court charged
with assaulting his butler. The report beneath of this case appeared in the 'Glasgow Herald'
of 18 January 1870:-
'At the West Riding Court, Halifax, on Saturday, two charges of assault were heard by the
magistrates. The first charge was that of Henry Hill Hobson, second footman in the service of
Sir H. Edwards, of Pye Nest, near Halifax, against George Lovett, butler to Sir Henry, for an
assault at Pye Nest on the 6th inst.; the other being brought by the butler against Sir Henry
for an assault said to have occurred at the same place on the 7th of January. According to
priority in taking out the summons, the charge against the butler was first heard.
'Complainant said that on the day named, whilst in the pantry about two o'clock in the
afternoon, the butler went in and asked what he had been saying about him. Complainant
replied that he did not know what he meant, upon which the butler said he did know, and began
to use coarse and abusive language, ordering him out of the pantry. Complainant refused to go,
upon which the butler took off his coat, threw it upon the floor, and after using more abusive
language, seized complainant by one of his whiskers with one hand, and by the ear with the
other, but did not succeed in pulling him out. The butler then went out, but returned soon
afterwards, and continued to use abusive and coarse language. Complainant then said to the
butler that once before he had intended to give notice to Lady Edwards to leave on account of
his conduct, and this time he should do so. Defendant replied that he had better do so, and
again repeated his improper language, adding that complainant was of no use there. Defendant
again pulled off his coat, and tried to put the footman out, but did not succeed. Defendant had
previously used similar offensive language to him and others in the house. When Lady Edwards
returned home about half-past three o'clock the same afternoon, complainant gave her notice,
and on her Ladyship wishing to know the reason he told her of defendant's conduct. In
consequence of this, on the following morning, the butler, the complainant, and the other
footman were called before Sir Henry, and complainant gave a full explanation. A kitchen-maid,
named Jemima Smith, was called to prove the charge, her attention having been drawn to the
pantry by hearing a noise, and she saw the butler have hold of the footman's ear and whisker.
At the same time he was using foul language to the footman. The butler's defence was that
he had frequently had to complain of the neglect of complainant, who on the day named was
insolent, and he ordered him out of the pantry. As the footman refused to go, he got hold of
him to put him out, but not by the ear and whisker, but only by the coat. They struggled with
each other, the question being who should be put out of the pantry, but no blows were struck
by defendant.
'Before deciding upon this case, the bench decided to hear that against Sir Henry. The butler
said he had been in the service of Sir Henry for two months and seventeen days. On Friday
the 7th instant, in consequence of a message brought to him, he went into the entrance hall,
where he saw Sir Henry, who, in warm terms, demanded to know the meaning of his conduct.
In reply to this, the butler said he "demanded" to know what conduct he alluded to. Sir Henry
said it was using abusive language, taking off his coat, and threatening to fight. Complainant
said he had had frequent cause of complaint against Hobson for insubordination, and that he
might have used language which he should have been glad not to have been called to use,
but he had made no effort to strike Hobson, and that all the morning he had been complaining
of Hobson's inattention to work. At this Sir Henry made some derisive remark, and then charged
him with having insulted his son Churchill, which witness denied. Sir Henry said, "You have; a
gentleman told me so, and if I had heard it I would have kicked you out of the house." To this
complainant replied, "I am surprised you should use language as violent as mine, of which you
have complained." Previous to this Sir Henry had told him that he must leave his service that
day three months; to which complainant replied that it would be very agreeable to him. Sir
Henry then told him he must leave that day, and ordered the men to "chuck" him out of the
house. Complainant was asked if the men did so, and he replied, "I rather fancy not; the men
did not attempt to do so." Sir Henry then went towards him, and, without any intimation,
struck him violently on the left cheek. Complainant was not much intimidated by this, and
was retreating gently, when Sir Henry followed up and said, "If you don't be off I will give you
another." Complainant told him he would hear of that another day, and then (he said) "I turned
round to leave the room, but he followed me, and, like a coward, he pushed me. I say it was
cowardly."
'Henry Hill Hobson, the footman, was called, and said that what Sir Henry said to complainant
was, "You mean to say that you did not pull off your coat and want to fight?" to which
complainant replied, "I may have done so through excitement." Witness also said that when
complainant was ordered out of the hall he refused to go, and said it was not gentlemanly of
Sir Henry to order him out. He said several times he should not go. Sir Henry then called upon
them to put the butler out and to fetch a policeman. The butler then put himself up to Sir
Henry, who in pushing him away caught his ear. Sir Henry pushed the butler past witness, and
out of the door, but witness did not see Sir Henry kick the butler. The other footman, Alfred
Micklethwaite, corroborated this evidence.
'Mr. Jubb, for the defence, said that if complainant had acted to Sir Henry as his own evidence
proved, he was justified, not only in discharging him, but in kicking him out of the hall, and any
master would have done the same.
'The Magistrates having consulted together, Mr. John Waterhouse (the chairman) said the
Bench were unanimously decided as to the merits of the two cases; and with regard to the
one against the butler they were quite of opinion that the charge was proved, and he would
have 1 6s 6d penalty and costs to pay. With regard to the charge against Sir H. Edwards,
their unanimous opinion was there was not the shadow of ground to establish it, and they
therefore dismissed the case. (Hisses.) All servants should remember that when they are
ordered to leave their master's house and did not do so at once they became trespassers. In
this case the servant was frequently requested to leave, but instead of doing so he insulted
his employer, and got what he deserved.'
Sir Alexander Logie Elphinstone, 10th baronet
In November 1927, Elphinstone's claim to the baronetcy, which had been dormant since 1743,
was heard and decided in his favour. The following report appeared in 'The Scotsman' on
1 December 1927:-
'A genealogical tangle came up for unravelling before the Baronetcy Committee of the Privy
Council at London yesterday, when a claim to a Scottish title, dating back to December 1701,
in the time of King William III, and which has lain in abeyance [sic] since 1743, was made by a
military officer.
'The claimant is Alexander Elphinstone of Glack, a Major in the Reserve of Officers, living at 40
Kildare Terrace, London, and he claimed to be heir of the baronetcy of the Order of Scotland
and of Nova Scotia, which was conferred upon Mr. James Elphinstone of Logie, because, it was
stated, of his contributions to the development of Nova Scotia, where he held a grant of
16,000 acres.
'Lord Dunedin was the chairman of the Committee, and the other members were Lord Shaw of
Dunfermline, Lord Fitzalan and Sir Herbert Maxwell. As the letters patent under the Great Seal
creating the baronetcy were not in the possession of the petitioner, and as he was not aware
whether it was in existence, he was given permission to search in the Great Seal Register, and
some quaint entries were disclosed.
'There was an item of 118 4s 8d stated to have been paid for the funeral expenses of an
ancestor, Robert Elphinstone, on two days in September 1704, which drew from Lord Shaw the
remark that "it seems to take two days to perform the burial function."
'Mr. Hugh McMillan, for the petitioner, said that during the early development of Nova Scotia
each Baronet on being exalted was asked to contribute 3000 marks towards the development
of the colony, and was given 16,000 acres of land.
'Tracing the pedigree of the petitioner, counsel said Sir John Elphinstone, the fourth Baronet,
died in 1743, unmarried, and then the whole heirs male became extinct, as well as the heirs of
the patentee's father, William Elphinstone, of Ressiviot.
'The Baronetcy then devolved on Sir John's third cousin, John Elphinstone of Glack. This John
Elphinstone married Jean Achyndachy. He was the grandfather in the male line of John
Elphinstone of Glack, who was a member of the Council of Bombay, under the Honourable East
India Co., and was the great-grandfather in the male line of the petitioner.
'Major Alexander Elphinstone, said counsel, was thus the nearest heir male collateral and male
representative of the patentee. So far as the petitioner was aware the dignity had not been
assumed since the death of Sir John Elphinstone, the fourth holder.
'After a short deliberation, Lord Dunedin said - The Committee has decided to recommend the
claim.'
Unfortunately, in March 1933, Sir Alexander found himself in court to be sentenced after being
found guilty on criminal charges, as related in an article in 'The Times of India' on 9 March
1933:-
'The trial was concluded before Judge Whiteley, K.C., at the Central Criminal Court of Alfred
Laurens, 70, manager, and Sir Logie Elphinstone, Bt., 52, charged with conspiring to defraud
such persons as might be induced to invest or purchase shares in the National Match Company,
and concurring in publishing a statement which they knew to be false.
'Laurens was found guilty on these charges and with obtaining money by false pretences and
and sentenced to three years' penal servitude.
'Elphinstone was found guilty of conspiring to defraud and not guilty on the other charge.
Sentence was postponed on him until next sessions. The jury recommended him to clemency.
'Divisional Detective-inspector Young proved six previous convictions against Laurens, one
previous sentence being of three years' penal servitude. His correct name was Alfred Baker.
and he was known under other names, including that of Baron de Lussan. Altogether he had
obtained 5,841 in connexion with the National Match Company and a subsidiary company, of
which 350 was repaid.
'The witness stated that several investors who called at Laurens's offices in Abbey House,
Westminster, were unable to obtain an interview, as he had a room at the offices known as
the "bunk-hole" to which he retired.
'Elphinstone was born in America and came to this country when he was four years old. He
joined the Army in 1899 and served in the South African War. During the Great War he had
the rank of major. He established his claim to the baronetcy in November, 1927. It was a very
old title dating back to 1435 [sic]. He had twice been convicted in America for larceny and at
the London Sessions in 1910 for obtaining credit as an undischarged bankrupt. He had been
associated with a number of companies which had been wound up.
'Judge Whiteley, passing sentence on Laurens, said the evidence showed that he was an
extremely clever man and very dominating. He was a dangerous criminal. Elphinstone must feel
it a disgraceful thing for a man of his opportunities, education, and position to find himself in
the dock of the Central Criminal Court with a man convicted six times.
'Elphinstone - I knew nothing about it, I swear.
'Judge Whiteley said he had lent his name and he had had opportunity of getting out of the
company.'
Elphinstone was subsequently bound over for two years, the Judge saying that if there was
any suggestion that Elphinstone was entering into City affairs or making himself a party to
obtaining money from the public, he would be brought to the Court and sentenced for the
present offence. The Army was, however, less forgiving, since the 'London Gazette' of 2
June 1933 contained a paragraph in which it was revealed that Elphinstone had been removed
from the Army and stripped of his rank of Major.
Sir William Erskine, 2nd baronet of Torrie, Fife (created 1791)
Before his appointment as one of the Duke of Wellington's senior commanders in the Peninsular
War, Erskine had twice been confined in an insane asylum.
After obtaining a commission in the cavalry, Erskine served with the British army in Flanders.
In 1794, he fought with the 15th Light Dragoons at the Battle of Villers-en-Cauchies, where a
handful of British and Austrian cavalry routed a much larger French force.
After representing Fifeshire in the House of Commons between 1796 and 1806, he was
promoted to Major General and shipped to Portugal to assist Wellington. When Wellington heard
of this, he complained that he 'generally understood him to be a madman.' Wellington received
the far from reassuring reply that 'no doubt he is sometimes a little mad, but in his lucid
intervals he is an uncommonly clever fellow, and I trust he will have no fit during the campaign,
though he looked a little wild as he embarked.' A further concern was Erskine's eyesight, which
was particularly poor. Before the enemy could be engaged, he had to ask a subordinate to
point him in the right direction.
During the 1811 campaign in Portugal, Erskine took over the command of the Light Division. He
soon developed a reputation for rashness. Wellington wrote that 'it is impossible to trust to his
judgment in any critical case.'
At Casal Novo on 14 March 1811, Erskine advanced his men along the main road, in fog, and
with no proper scouts. When the fog suddenly cleared, he found himself facing infantry with
artillery support and lost 155 killed and wounded.
At the Battle of Sabugal on 3 April 1811, the fog and Erskine's incompetence saved the
opposing French forces from destruction. Erskine was in command of both the cavalry and the
light infantry. Each was marched off in the direction the other should have taken, the cavalry
promptly becoming lost in the fog and the French were able to escape.
At the Siege of Almeida in May 1811, Erskine's actions confounded Wellington's battle tactics,
causing the Duke to protest that 'this was the most disgraceful military event that has yet
occurred to us.' The besieged French garrison was allowed to escape because Erskine failed to
guard the bridge of Barba de Puerca. Erskine was dining with a colleague when Wellington's
order to guard the bridge arrived. Told to send some cavalry and a force of infantry, Erskine
despatched a corporal and four privates. When a fellow diner pointed out that this party would
not be insufficient, he decided to send a whole regiment. He wrote out the necessary order
and then put the order in his pocket, forgetting all about it. When he was undressing for bed
that night, he found the order and passed it on to a Colonel Bevan, who arrived at the bridge
too late; the French had already slipped away. Wellington was furious - 'I have never been so
distressed by any military event as by the escape of even a man of them.'
Aware that he could not dismiss Erskine because of his political influence, Wellington from then
on placed Erskine in positions where he could do minimal harm. Eventually, Erskine was declared
insane and dismissed. He committed suicide in Lisbon in 1813 by jumping out a window. His last
words to bystanders were 'Why did I do that?'
Thomas Esmonde (25 May 1829-14 Jan 1873), brother of Sir John Esmonde,
10th baronet
Esmonde was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry during the Crimean War. The citation,
dated 25 September 1857, reads as follows:-
'Captain Thomas Esmonde, 18th Regiment, for having (on the 18th and 20th June, 1855), after
being engaged in the attack on the Redan, repeatedly assisted, at great personal risk, under a
heavy fire of shell and grape, in rescuing wounded men from exposed positions, and also, while
in command of a covering party, two days after, for having rushed, with the most prompt and
daring gallantry, to a spot where a fire-ball from the enemy had just been lodged, which he
effectively extinguished before it had betrayed the position of the working party under his
protection - thus saving it from a murderous fire of shell and grape, which was immediately
opened upon the spot where the fire-ball had fallen.'
Walter Terence Evans (18 Sep 1911-4 Apr 1932), son and heir of Sir Walter Harry Evans,
1st baronet [UK 1920]
Walter Evans drowned in April 1932 when his canoe sank in an Irish lake. The following report
appeared in the 'Weekly Irish Times' of 16 April 1932:-
'The story of a man's attempt to fight for life in the placid waters of Lake Bollager, one of the
beauty spots in Connemara [in County Galway], was told at an inquest on 6th April on the body
of Mr. Walter Terence Evans (20), son of Sir W.Evans, baronet, Wightwick Hall, Wolverhampton,
who was drowned on Monday. The remains were recovered after extensive dragging operations
on the previous evening.
'John Anthony Tinne, Emlaughmore Lodge, Clifden, said that Mr. Evans was on a holiday in
Emlaughmore since March 27, and intended returning home on Wednesday. Witness
accompanied him to Emlaughmore on Monday. Mr. Evans and witness went to Bollager Lake,
about three miles from the lodge, and they crossed two lakes before coming to Bollager. They
were in a small Canadian canoe, and their intention was to Lough Fada in order to gather
herons' eggs.
'When they were in the middle of Lake Bollager, Mr. Evans mentioned to witness that they
appeared to be getting some water in the canoe, and suggested that witness should move up
further in the boat. Almost immediately after, the deceased man said that the water was
increasing in the boat. Witness said that they should go towards an island about 150 yards
away. They paddled towards the island, and when about 75 yards away from it the canoe
seemed to sink in the stern, and witness said to Mr. Evans: "jump out." Both did so and started
to swim towards the island, with the boat between them, each holding an end of the boat.
After swimming some distance, Mr. Evans mentioned that he wanted to take off his shoes.
'Witness held him while he tried to take them off, and they both started swimming again and got
to within thirty yards of the island. Mr. Evans said that he could not hold out much longer. He
appeared to be quite calm. Witness was becoming exhausted by this time, and told Evans that
he would swim ashore and return undressed to help him, and told him to tread water. In the
meantime witness swam to the island and left Evans, so far as he could remember, still holding
on to the canoe. Just as witness reached near the island and was able to find ground to walk
on he heard the deceased man call in his ordinary voice: "Help me, Tony." When witness got to
land he looked round and saw deceased man's head disappear under the water about fifteen
yards from the shore.
The canoe had drifted off, and witness believed that Mr. Evans left the canoe and tried to
follow him, and when witness got to land he tried to take off his clothes, but was unable to do
so owing to numbness. He was horrified for a minute or so. The deceased man did not come
over the water after witness saw him sink. Witness returned to Emlaughmore looking for help,
as he could not do anything further.
'Before the accident Evans and witness were joking and paddling extra hard, each pulling
against the other. It appeared that the result of this was that they shipped water. There was
a pretty strong wind blowing, and when they turned to the breeze they must have shipped
more water. The deceased man was about fourteen stone weight and was in the stern, and
this may have helped towards the accident.
'Dr. P.J. Maguire, medical officer, Roundstone, said that the cause of death was immersion in
the water. Sergeant Fox, Roundstone, said that when found the body was about fifteen yards
from the shore of the island. When the body was taken from the water the left shoe was
missing, and the bootlace of the right shoe was loose. The water where Mr. Evans was found
was between fifteen and twenty feet deep.
'A verdict of "Death from misadventure" was returned, and sympathy extended to the relatives.'
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