THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
    CONSTITUENCIES BEGINNING WITH "A"
Last updated 12/09/2014
Date   Name Born Died Age
Dates in italics in the first column denote that the election held on that
date was a by-election. Dates shown in normal type were general elections,
or, in some instances, the date of a successful petition against a
previous election result.
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the MP was baptised on
that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate that the MP was
buried on that date
ANDOVER (HAMPSHIRE)
20 Apr 1660 Sir John Trott,1st baronet c 1615 14 Jul 1672
John Collins [kt 1681] (to Feb 1679) 11 Jul 1624 1711 86
31 Jan 1673 Sir Kingsmill Lucy,2nd baronet c 1650 19 Sep 1678
Election declared void 6 Feb 1673. At the
subsequent by-election held on 10 Feb 1673,
Lucy was again elected
29 Oct 1678 Charles West 16 Jun 1645 22 Jun 1684 39
11 Feb 1679 Francis Powlett (to 1681) 24 Jan 1640 by Aug 1695 55
William Wither c 1647 25 Apr 1679
14 Aug 1679 Sir Robert Henley c 1624 15 Dec 1692
4 Mar 1681 Charles West 16 Jun 1645 22 Jun 1684 39
Sir John Collins (to 1689) 11 Jul 1624 1711 86
16 Mar 1685 Robert Phelips 1 Feb 1619 21 Jun 1707 88
14 Jan 1689 Francis Powlett 24 Jan 1640 by Aug 1695 55
John Pollen c 1642 2 Feb 1719
30 Oct 1695 John Smith (to 1713) c 1655 2 Oct 1723
Sir Robert Smyth,3rd baronet c 1659 27 Jan 1745
21 Jul 1698 Anthony Henley 1667 Aug 1711 44
14 Jan 1701 Francis Shepheard 18 Oct 1676 23 Oct 1739 63
6 May 1708 William Guidott (to 1727) 25 Jan 1672 30 Aug 1745 73
25 Aug 1713 Sir Ambrose Crowley 1 Feb 1658 7 Oct 1713 55
30 Mar 1714 Gilbert Searle c 1687 1720
29 Jan 1715 John Wallop,later [1720] 1st Viscount
Lymington and [1743] 1st Earl of Portsmouth 15 Apr 1690 22 Nov 1762 72
[he was also retuned for Hampshire,for
which he chose to sit]
1 Apr 1715 James Brudenell (to 1734) c 1687 9 Aug 1746
23 Aug 1727 Charles Colyear,styled Viscount Milsington
later [1730] 2nd Earl of Portmore 27 Aug 1700 5 Jul 1785 84
20 Jan 1730 William Guidott (to 1741) 25 Jan 1672 30 Aug 1745 73
25 Apr 1734 John Pollen (to 1754) c 1702 24 Jul 1775
5 May 1741 John Wallop,later [1743] styled Viscount
Lymington 3 Aug 1718 19 Nov 1749 31
28 Nov 1749 John Griffin Griffin [kt 1761],later [1784] 4th
Baron Howard de Walden and [1788] 1st
Baron Braybrooke (to 1784) 13 Mar 1719 25 May 1797 78
16 Apr 1754 Francis Blake Delaval 16 Mar 1727 7 Aug 1771 44
21 Mar 1768 Benjamin Lethieullier (to 1797) 1729 5 Dec 1797 68
11 Aug 1784 William Fellowes c 1726 4 Feb 1804
25 May 1796 Coulson Wallop (to 1802) 19 Sep 1774 31 Aug 1807 32
14 Dec 1797 Thomas Assheton-Smith (to 1821) c 1750 12 May 1828
5 Jul 1802 Newton Fellowes,later [1853] 4th Earl of
Portsmouth 26 Jun 1772 9 Jan 1854 81
8 Mar 1820 Sir John Walter Pollen,2nd baronet (to 1831) 6 Apr 1784 2 May 1863 79
11 May 1821 Thomas Assheton-Smith 2 Aug 1776 9 Sep 1858 82
2 May 1831 Henry Arthur Wallop Fellowes 29 Oct 1799 17 Feb 1847 47
Ralph Etwall (to 1847) 30 May 1804 15 Dec 1882 78
8 Jan 1835 Sir John Walter Pollen,2nd baronet 6 Apr 1784 2 May 1863 79
29 Jun 1841 Lord William Paget 1 Mar 1803 17 May 1873 70
29 Jul 1847 Henry Beaumont Coles 1794 23 Nov 1862 68
William Cubitt (to 1861) 1791 28 Oct 1863 72
28 Mar 1857 Dudley Francis Fortescue (to 1874) 4 Aug 1820 2 Mar 1909 88
29 Jul 1861 Henry Beaumont Coles 1794 23 Nov 1862 68
17 Dec 1862 William Cubitt 1791 28 Oct 1863 72
18 Nov 1863 William John Humphery,later [1868] 1st
baronet 25 Mar 1827 31 Mar 1909 82
11 Feb 1867 Sir John Burgess Karslake 13 Dec 1821 4 Oct 1881 59
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1868
9 Feb 1874 Henry Wellesley,later [1884] 3rd Duke of
Wellington 5 Apr 1846 8 Jun 1900 54
1 Apr 1880 Francis William Buxton 5 Aug 1847 14 Nov 1911 64
1 Dec 1885 William Withey Bramston Beach 25 Dec 1826 3 Aug 1901 74
28 Aug 1901 Edmund Beckett Faber,later [1905]
1st Baron Faber 9 Feb 1847 17 Sep 1920 73
23 Jan 1906 Walter Vavasour Faber 11 Feb 1857 2 Apr 1928 71
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918
ANGLESEY
c Apr 1660 Robert Bulkeley,2nd Viscount Bulkeley [I] c 1630 18 Oct 1688
4 Apr 1661 Nicholas Bagenall 9 Aug 1629 1712 82
13 Feb 1679 Henry Bulkeley c 1641 1698
28 Aug 1679 Richard Bulkeley,later [1688] 3rd Viscount
Bulkeley [I] c 1658 9 Aug 1704
2 Apr 1685 Robert Bulkeley,2nd Viscount Bulkeley [I] c 1630 18 Oct 1688
16 Jan 1689 Thomas Bulkeley c 1633 23 Mar 1708
13 Mar 1690 Richard Bulkeley,3rd Viscount Bulkeley [I] c 1658 9 Aug 1704
30 Nov 1704 Richard Bulkeley,4th Viscount Bulkeley [I] 19 Sep 1682 4 Jun 1724 41
10 Feb 1715 Owen Meyrick 1682 8 Apr 1759 76
11 Apr 1722 Richard Bulkeley,4th Viscount Bulkeley [I] 19 Sep 1682 4 Jun 1724 41
10 Apr 1725 Hugh Williams c 1694 14 Jan 1742
9 May 1734 Nicholas Bayly,later [1741] 2nd baronet 1709 9 Dec 1782 73
28 May 1741 John Owen c 1702 20 Feb 1754
16 Jul 1747 Sir Nicholas Bayly,1st baronet 1709 9 Dec 1782 73
16 Apr 1761 Owen Meyrick 1705 Mar 1770 64
12 Apr 1770 Sir Nicholas Bayly,1st baronet 1709 9 Dec 1782 73
20 Oct 1774 Thomas James Bulkeley,7th Viscount
Bulkeley [I] 12 Dec 1752 3 Jun 1822 69
22 Apr 1784 Nicholas Bayly 1749 7 Jun 1814 64
28 Jun 1790 William Paget 22 Dec 1769 Sep 1794 24
22 Nov 1794 Arthur Paget [kt 1804] 15 Jan 1771 26 Jul 1840 69
12 May 1807 Berkeley Thomas Paget 2 Jan 1780 26 Oct 1842 62
16 Mar 1820 Henry Paget,styled Earl of Uxbridge,later [1854]
2nd Marquess of Anglesey 6 Jul 1797 7 Feb 1869 71
19 Dec 1832 Sir Richard Bulkeley Williams-Bulkeley,10th
baronet 23 Sep 1801 28 Aug 1875 73
23 Feb 1837 William Owen Stanley 13 Nov 1802 24 Feb 1884 81
7 Aug 1847 Sir Richard Bulkeley Williams-Bulkeley,10th
baronet 23 Sep 1801 28 Aug 1875 73
20 Nov 1868 Richard Davies 1818 27 Oct 1896 78
12 Jul 1886 Thomas Lewis 1821 2 Dec 1897 76
19 Jul 1895 Ellis Jones Ellis-Griffith,later [1918] 1st
baronet 23 May 1860 30 Nov 1926 66
14 Dec 1918 Sir Owen Thomas 18 Dec 1858 6 Mar 1923 64
7 Apr 1923 Sir Robert John Thomas,1st baronet 23 Apr 1873 27 Sep 1951 78
30 May 1929 Megan Arfon Lloyd-George [Lady Megan
from 1945] 22 Apr 1902 14 May 1966 64
25 Oct 1951 Cledwyn Hughes,later [1979] Baron Cledwyn
of Penrhos [L] 14 Sep 1916 22 Feb 2001 84
3 May 1979 Keith Lander Best 10 Jun 1949
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
ANGUS
See also "Forfarshire"
1 May 1997 Andrew Paton Welsh 19 Apr 1944
7 Jun 2001 Michael Fraser Weir 24 Mar 1957
ANGUS EAST
9 Jun 1983 Peter Lovat Fraser,later [1989] Baron
Fraser of Carmyllie [L] 29 May 1945 23 Jun 2013 68
11 Jun 1987 Andrew Paton Welsh 19 Apr 1944
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1997
ANGUS NORTH & MEARNS
23 Feb 1950 Colin Norman Thornton-Kemsley [kt 1958] 2 Sep 1903 17 Jul 1977 73
15 Oct 1964 Alick Laidlaw Buchanan-Smith 8 Apr 1932 29 Aug 1991 59
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
ANGUS SOUTH
23 Feb 1950 Sir James Alexander Lawson Duncan,1st
baronet 1899 30 Sep 1974 75
15 Oct 1964 John Bruce-Gardyne,later [1983] Baron
Bruce-Gardyne [L] 12 Apr 1930 15 Apr 1990 60
10 Oct 1974 Andrew Paton Welsh 19 Apr 1944
3 May 1979 Peter Lovat Fraser,later [1989] Baron
Fraser of Carmyllie [L] 29 May 1945 23 Jun 2013 68
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
ANNIESLAND (GLASGOW)
1 May 1997 Donald Campbell Dewar 21 Aug 1937 11 Oct 2000 63
23 Nov 2000 John Robertson 17 Apr 1952
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 2005
ANSTRUTHER EASTER BURGHS (FIFESHIRE)
comprising Anstruther Easter,Pittenweem,
Anstruther Wester,Crail and Kilrenny
26 May 1708 Sir John Anstruther,1st baronet c 1678 27 Sep 1753
10 Apr 1712 George Hamilton after 1658 after 1728
18 Sep 1713 Sir John Anstruther,1st baronet c 1678 27 Sep 1753
16 Feb 1715 Philip Anstruther (to 1741) c 1680 11 Nov 1760
13 Apr 1722 Philip Anstruther c 1680 11 Nov 1760
David Scott
Double return. Anstruther declared elected
27 Oct 1722
29 May 1741 John Stewart c 1709 13 Aug 1796
23 Jul 1747 Philip Anstruther c 1680 11 Nov 1760
10 May 1754 Sir Henry Erskine,5th baronet 23 Dec 1710 9 Aug 1765 54
17 Jan 1766 Sir John Anstruther,2nd baronet 27 Dec 1718 4 Jul 1799 80
1 Nov 1774 Philip Anstruther,later [1799] 3rd baronet 13 Jan 1752 5 Jan 1808 55
9 Jan 1778 George Damer,later [1798] 2nd Earl 28 Mar 1746 7 Mar 1808 61
of Dorchester
6 Oct 1780 Sir John Anstruther,2nd baronet 27 Dec 1718 4 Jul 1799 80
21 Jan 1783 John Anstruther,later [1798] 1st baronet 27 Mar 1753 26 Jun 1811 58
12 Jul 1790 Sir John Anstruther,2nd baronet 27 Dec 1718 4 Jul 1799 80
20 Mar 1793 Robert Anstruther 31 Dec 1757 7 Mar 1831 73
1 Jul 1794 William Dundas 1762 14 Nov 1845 83
21 Jun 1796 John Anstruther,later [1798] 1st baronet 27 Mar 1753 26 Jun 1811 58
19 Aug 1797 Alexander Campbell c 1750 24 Feb 1832
25 Nov 1806 Sir John Anstruther,1st baronet 27 Mar 1753 26 Jun 1811 58
20 Aug 1811 Sir John Anstruther (Carmichael-Anstruther
from 1817), 2nd baronet 1 Jun 1785 28 Jan 1818 32
14 Mar 1818 Alexander Maconochie 2 Mar 1777 30 Nov 1861 84
26 Jul 1819 Sir William Rae,3rd baronet 14 Apr 1769 19 Oct 1842 73
4 Jul 1826 James Balfour c 1775 19 Apr 1845
24 May 1831 Andrew Johnston 1798 22 Aug 1862 64
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1832
ANTRIM
1801 John Staples 1 Mar 1734 22 Dec 1820 86
Edmund Alexander Macnaghten (to 1812) 2 Aug 1762 15 Mar 1832 69
19 Jul 1802 John Bruce Richard O'Neill,later [1841] 3rd
Viscount O'Neill (to 1841) 30 Dec 1780 12 Feb 1855 74
21 Oct 1812 Francis Charles Seymour-Conway,styled Earl
of Yarmouth,later [1822] 3rd Marquess
of Hertford 11 Mar 1777 1 Mar 1842 64
27 Jun 1818 Hugh Henry John Seymour 25 Sep 1790 2 Dec 1821 31
12 Jan 1822 Richard Seymour-Conway,styled Earl of
Yarmouth,later [1842] 4th Marquess
of Hertford 22 Feb 1800 25 Aug 1870 70
20 Jun 1826 Edmund Alexander Macnaghten 2 Aug 1762 15 Mar 1832 69
13 Aug 1830 George Hamilton Chichester,styled Earl of
Belfast,later [1844] 3rd Marquess of Donegall 10 Feb 1797 20 Oct 1883 86
5 Aug 1837 John Irving (to 1845) 5 Oct 1766 10 Nov 1845 79
14 Apr 1841 Nathaniel Alexander (to 1852) Aug 1815 5 Jan 1853 37
22 Dec 1845 Sir Horace Beauchamp Seymour 22 Nov 1791 21 Nov 1851 59
11 Aug 1847 Sir Edward Charles Workman-Macnaghten,
2nd baronet 1 Apr 1790 6 Jan 1876 85
23 Jul 1852 Edward William Pakenham Sep 1819 5 Nov 1854 35
George Macartney (to 1859) 1793
27 Dec 1854 Thomas Henry Pakenham (to 1865) 28 Jun 1826 20 Feb 1913 86
10 May 1859 George Frederick Upton,later [1863] 3rd
Viscount Templetown 5 Aug 1802 4 Jan 1890 87
6 May 1863 Edward O'Neill,later [1883] 2nd Baron O'Neill
(to 1880) 31 Dec 1839 19 Nov 1928 88
22 Jul 1865 George Henry Seymour 20 Mar 1818 25 Jul 1869 51
21 Aug 1869 Hugh de Grey Seymour,styled Earl of Yarmouth,
later [1884] 6th Marquess of Hertford 22 Oct 1843 23 Mar 1912 68
16 Feb 1874 James Chaine (to May 1885) 1841 4 May 1885 43
9 Apr 1880 Edward Macnaghten,later [1887] Baron
Macnaghten [L] (to 1885) 3 Feb 1830 17 Feb 1913 83
21 May 1885 William Pirrie Sinclair 1837 1 Nov 1900 63
SPLIT INTO 4 DIVISIONS 1885
SEE "ANTRIM EAST","ANTRIM MID",
"ANTRIM NORTH" AND "ANTRIM SOUTH".
CONSTITUENCIES REUNITED 1922
15 Nov 1922 Robert William Hugh O'Neill,later [1953] 1st
Baron Rathcavan (to 1950) 8 Jun 1883 28 Nov 1982 99
Charles Curtis Craig 18 Feb 1869 28 Jan 1960 90
30 May 1929 Sir Joseph McConnell,2nd baronet 17 Sep 1877 27 Aug 1942 64
11 Feb 1943 John Dermot Campbell 20 Jan 1898 23 Jan 1945 47
26 Jul 1945 Samuel Gillmor Haughton 1 Dec 1889 19 May 1959 69
CONSTITUENCY SPLIT INTO "ANTRIM
NORTH" & "ANTRIM SOUTH" 1950
ANTRIM EAST
5 Dec 1885 James Martin McCalmont 23 May 1847 2 Feb 1913 65
19 Feb 1913 Robert Chaine Alexander McCalmont [kt 1952] 29 Aug 1881 4 Nov 1953 72
27 May 1919 George Boyle Hanna 17 Dec 1877 30 Oct 1938 60
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922,
BUT REVIVED 1983
9 Jun 1983 Roy Beggs 20 Feb 1936
5 May 2005 Sammy Wilson 4 Apr 1953
ANTRIM MID
3 Dec 1885 Robert Torrens O'Neill 10 Jan 1845 25 Jul 1910 65
18 Jan 1910 Arthur Edward Bruce O'Neill 19 Sep 1876 6 Nov 1914 38
17 Feb 1915 Robert William Hugh O'Neill,later [1953] 1st
Baron Rathcavan 8 Jun 1883 28 Nov 1982 99
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922
ANTRIM NORTH
30 Nov 1885 Edward Macnaghten,later [1887] Baron
Macnaghten [L] 3 Feb 1830 17 Feb 1913 83
11 Feb 1887 Sir Charles Edward Lewis,1st baronet 25 Dec 1825 10 Feb 1893 67
Jul 1892 Charles Cunningham Connor 1842 10 Feb 1914 71
20 Jul 1895 Hugh McCalmont 1845 2 May 1924 78
25 Feb 1899 William Moore,later [1932] 1st baronet 22 Nov 1864 28 Nov 1944 80
26 Jan 1906 Robert Graham Glendinning 5 Apr 1844 8 Jun 1928 84
21 Jan 1910 Peter Kerr-Smiley 22 Feb 1879 23 Jun 1943 64
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922,
BUT REVIVED 1950
23 Feb 1950 Robert William Hugh O'Neill,later [1953] 1st
Baron Rathcavan 8 Jun 1883 28 Nov 1982 99
27 Oct 1952 Phelim Robert Hugh O'Neill,later [1982] 2nd
Baron Rathcavan 2 Nov 1909 20 Dec 1994 85
25 Oct 1959 Henry Maitland Clark 11 Apr 1929 24 Mar 2012 82
18 Jun 1970 Ian Richard Kyle Paisley,later [2010] Baron
Bannside [L] 6 Apr 1926 12 Sep 2014 88
6 May 2010 Ian Paisley 12 Dec 1966
ANTRIM SOUTH
8 Dec 1885 William Grey Ellison Macartney [kt 1912] 7 Jun 1852 4 Dec 1924 72
5 Feb 1903 Charles Curtis Craig 18 Feb 1869 28 Jan 1960 90
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922,
BUT REVIVED 1950
23 Feb 1950 Douglas Lloyd Savory [kt 1952] 17 Aug 1878 5 Oct 1969 91
26 May 1955 Samuel Knox Cunningham,later [1963]
1st baronet 3 Apr 1909 29 Jul 1976 67
18 Jun 1970 James Henry Molyneaux [kt 1996],later [1997]
Baron Molyneaux of Killead [L] 27 Aug 1920
9 Jun 1983 Clifford Forsythe 24 Aug 1929 27 Apr 2000 70
21 Sep 2000 Robert Thomas William McCrea 6 Aug 1948
7 Jun 2001 David Wilson Boyd Burnside 24 Aug 1951
5 May 2005 Robert Thomas William McCrea 6 Aug 1948
APPLEBY (WESTMORLAND)
c Apr 1660 Sir Henry Cholmley 2 Apr 1609 30 Jun 1666 57
Christopher Clapham c 1608 16 Aug 1686
5 Apr 1661 John Lowther c 1628 8 Jan 1668
John Dalston (to 1679) 15 Oct 1611 13 Apr 1692 80
2 Mar 1668 Thomas Tufton,later [1684] 6th Earl
of Thanet 30 Aug 1644 30 Jul 1729 84
25 Feb 1679 Richard Tufton,later [1680] 5th Earl
of Thanet 30 May 1641 8 Mar 1684 42
Anthony Lowther (to Feb 1681) 15 May 1641 27 Jan 1693 51
3 Jan 1681 Sackville Tufton (to Jan 1689) 11 Jun 1646 30 Mar 1721 74
28 Feb 1681 Sir John Bland,4th baronet 2 Nov 1663 25 Oct 1715 51
27 Mar 1685 Philip Musgrave (to Jul 1689) 21 Mar 1661 2 Jul 1689 28
11 Jan 1689 Richard Lowther (to 1690) 15 Nov 1638 20 Nov 1703 65
25 Jul 1689 William Cheyne,later [1698] 2nd Viscount
Newhaven [S] (to 1695) 14 Jul 1657 26 May 1728 70
25 Feb 1690 Charles Boyle,later [1694] Baron Clifford of
Lanesborough and [1698] 2nd Earl of Burlington 30 Oct 1660 9 Feb 1704 43
13 Dec 1694 Sir John Walter,3rd baronet c 1674 11 Jun 1722
1 Nov 1695 Sir William Twysden,3rd baronet 11 Dec 1635 27 Nov 1697 61
Sir Christopher Musgrave,4th baronet c 1631 29 Jul 1704
(to 1698)
23 Dec 1697 Sir John Walter,3rd baronet (to 1701) c 1674 11 Jun 1722
9 Aug 1698 Gervase Pierrepont,later [1702] 1st
Baron Pierrepont [I] (to 1705) 1649 22 May 1715 65
8 Jan 1701 Wharton Dunch by 1679 c Sep 1705
29 Jul 1702 James Grahme (to 1708) 3 Apr 1650 26 Jan 1730 79
19 May 1705 William Harvey 18 Dec 1663 31 Oct 1731 67
20 May 1708 Edward Duncombe (to 1713) 5 Sep 1675 by Jan 1744
Nicholas Lechmere,later [1721] 1st
Baron Lechmere 5 Aug 1675 18 Jun 1727 51
5 Oct 1710 Thomas Lutwyche (to 1722) 21 Sep 1674 13 Nov 1734 60
27 Aug 1713 Sir Richard Sandford,3rd baronet (to 1723) 8 Sep 1675 2 Apr 1723 47
26 Mar 1722 Sackville Tufton,later [1729] 7th Earl 11 May 1688 4 Dec 1753 65
of Thanet (to 1730)
2 May 1723 James Lowther,later [1731] 4th baronet 5 Aug 1673 2 Jan 1755 81
8 Sep 1727 Sir John Ramsden,3rd baronet (to 1754) 21 Mar 1699 10 Apr 1769 70
24 Jan 1730 Walter Plumer c 1682 2 Mar 1746
11 May 1741 George Bubb Dodington,later [1761] 1st
Baron Melcombe [he was also returned c 1691 28 Jul 1762
for Bridgwater,for which he chose to sit]
1 Jan 1742 Sir Charles Wyndham,4th baronet,later [1750]
2nd Earl of Egremont 19 Aug 1710 21 Aug 1763 53
5 Jul 1747 Randle Wilbraham c 1695 3 Dec 1770
15 May 1754 Philip Honywood (to 1784) c 1710 21 Feb 1785
William Lee c 1726 Aug 1778
Election declared void 10 Feb 1756
4 Mar 1756 Fletcher Norton,later [1782] 1st
Baron Grantley 23 Jun 1716 1 Jan 1789 72
8 Apr 1761 John Stanwix 19 Mar 1693 c Nov 1766 73
20 Jan 1767 Charles Jenkinson,later [1796] 1st Earl of
Liverpool 26 Apr 1727 17 Dec 1808 81
1 Jan 1773 Fletcher Norton 16 Nov 1744 19 Jun 1820 75
15 Oct 1774 George Johnstone 1730 24 May 1787 56
18 Sep 1780 William Lowther,later [1807] 1st Earl of
Lonsdale [he was also returned for 29 Dec 1757 19 Mar 1844 86
Carlisle,for which he chose to sit]
8 Jan 1781 William Pitt 28 May 1759 23 Jan 1806 46
9 Apr 1784 John Leveson-Gower 11 Jul 1740 15 Aug 1792 52
Richard Penn c 1734 27 May 1811
5 Jul 1790 Richard Ford (to May 1791) 1758 3 May 1806 47
Robert Banks Jenkinson,later [1808] 2nd
Earl of Liverpool [he was also returned for 7 Jun 1770 4 Dec 1828 58
Rye,for which he chose to sit]
21 Jan 1791 William Grimston (to 1796) 23 Jun 1750 25 Apr 1814 63
18 May 1791 John Theophilus Rawdon 19 Nov 1756 5 May 1808 51
30 May 1796 John Tufton 22 Nov 1773 28 May 1799 25
John Courtenay (to 1807) 22 Aug 1738 24 Mar 1816 77
18 Jun 1799 Robert Adair 24 May 1763 3 Oct 1855 92
6 Jul 1802 Philip Francis [kt 1806] 22 Oct 1740 23 Dec 1818 78
25 May 1807 Charles Grey,styled Viscount Howick,
later [1807] 2nd Earl Grey 13 May 1764 17 Jul 1845 81
James Ramsay Cuthbert (to 1812) after 1771 29 Mar 1821
30 Jul 1807 Nicholas William Ridley-Colborne,later [1839]
1st Baron Colborne 14 Apr 1779 3 May 1854 75
9 Oct 1812 John Courtenay 22 Aug 1738 24 Mar 1816 77
James Lowther (to 1818) 23 Feb 1753 1837 84
29 Dec 1812 George Tierney 20 Mar 1761 25 Jan 1830 68
23 Jun 1818 George Fludyer Sep 1761 15 Apr 1837 75
Lucius Concannon (to 1820) c 1764 29 Jan 1823
5 Apr 1819 Adolphus John Dalrymple,later [1830] 2nd
baronet (to 1826) 3 Feb 1784 3 Mar 1866 82
13 Mar 1820 George Tierney [he was also returned for 20 Mar 1761 25 Jan 1830 68
Knaresborough,for which he chose to sit]
23 May 1820 Thomas Creevey 5 Mar 1768 5 Jun 1838 70
12 Jun 1826 James Maitland,styled Viscount Maitland,
later [1839] 9th Earl of Lauderdale (to 1832) 12 Feb 1784 22 Aug 1860 76
Henry Tufton,later [1832] 11th Earl
of Thanet 2 Jan 1775 12 Jun 1849 74
24 May 1832 Charles Henry Foster-Barham 16 May 1808 15 Aug 1878 70
CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1832,
BUT REVIVED 1885
4 Dec 1885 William Lowther 14 Dec 1821 23 Jan 1912 90
Jul 1892 Sir Joseph Savory,1st baronet 23 Jul 1843 1 Oct 1921 78
5 Oct 1900 Richard Rigg 22 Aug 1877 29 Aug 1942 65
3 Mar 1905 Leifchild Stratten Jones,later [1932] 1st
Baron Rhayader 16 Jan 1862 26 Sep 1939 77
19 Jan 1910 Lancelot Sanderson [kt 1915] 24 Oct 1863 9 Mar 1944 80
27 Oct 1915 Henry Cecil Lowther [kt 1918] 1 Jan 1869 1 Nov 1940 71
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918
ARDWICK (MANCHESTER)
14 Dec 1918 Augustine Hailwood 11 Dec 1875 1 Dec 1939 63
15 Nov 1922 Thomas Louth 1858 26 May 1931 72
22 Jun 1931 Joseph Henderson,later [1950] 1st
Baron Henderson of Ardwick 1884 26 Feb 1950 65
27 Oct 1931 Albert George Hubert Fuller 10 Dec 1894 27 Jul 1969 74
14 Nov 1935 Joseph Henderson,later [1950] 1st
Baron Henderson of Ardwick 1884 26 Feb 1950 65
23 Feb 1950 Leslie Maurice Lever [kt 1970],later [1975]
Baron Lever [L] 29 Apr 1905 26 Jul 1977 72
18 Jun 1970 Gerald Bernard Kaufman [kt 2004] 21 Jun 1930
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
ARFON (CARNARVONSHIRE)
4 Dec 1885 William Rathbone 11 Feb 1819 6 Mar 1902 83
20 Jul 1895 William Jones 1860 9 May 1915 54
6 Jul 1915 Griffith Caradoc Rees 1868 20 Sep 1924 56
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918
BUT RE-CREATED 2010
6 May 2010 Hywel Williams 14 May 1953
ARGYLL
23 Feb 1950 Duncan McCallum [kt 1955] 24 Nov 1888 10 May 1958 69
12 Jun 1958 Michael Antony Christobal Noble,later [1974]
Baron Glenkinglas [L] 13 Mar 1913 15 May 1984 71
28 Feb 1974 Iain Somerled MacDonald Maccormick 28 Sep 1938
3 May 1979 John Jackson Mackay,later [1991] Baron
Mackay of Ardbrecknish [L] 15 Nov 1938 21 Feb 2001 62
NAME ALTERED TO "ARGYLL & BUTE" 1983
ARGYLL & BUTE
9 Jun 1983 John Jackson Mackay,later [1991] Baron
Mackay of Ardbrecknish [L] 15 Nov 1938 21 Feb 2001 62
11 Jun 1987 Janet Ray Michie,later [2001] Baroness
Michie of Gallanach [L] 4 Feb 1934 6 May 2008 74
7 Jun 2001 Alan Reid 7 Aug 1954
ARGYLLSHIRE
10 Jun 1708 Sir James Campbell,2nd baronet c 1666 5 Jul 1752
[At the general election in May 1734,he
was also returned for Stirlingshire,for
which he chose to sit]
27 Apr 1736 Charles Campbell c 1695 8 Oct 1741
5 Feb 1742 James Stuart-Mackenzie c 1719 8 Apr 1800
1 Aug 1747 Sir Duncan Campbell c 1682 10 Mar 1765
20 May 1754 Dugald Campbell c 1710 30 Dec 1764
17 Jan 1764 Lord William Campbell c 1732 4 Sep 1778
12 Dec 1766 Robert Campbell c 1721 7 Apr 1790
20 Feb 1772 Adam Livingston c 1723 16 Jun 1795
9 Oct 1780 Lord Frederick Campbell 20 Jun 1729 8 Jun 1816 86
3 Oct 1799 Lord John Douglas Edward Henry
Campbell,later [1839] 7th Duke of Argyll 21 Dec 1777 25 Apr 1847 69
14 Mar 1822 Walter Frederick Campbell 10 Apr 1798 8 Feb 1855 56
21 Dec 1832 James Henry Callander 18 Aug 1803 31 Jan 1851 47
13 Jan 1835 Walter Frederick Campbell 10 Apr 1798 8 Feb 1855 56
9 Jul 1841 Alexander Cameron Campbell 30 Dec 1812 5 Jan 1869 56
8 Sep 1843 Duncan McNeill Aug 1793 31 Jan 1874 80
6 Jun 1851 Sir Archibald Islay Campbell,3rd baronet 15 May 1825 11 Sep 1866 41
3 Apr 1857 Alexander Struthers Finlay 21 Jul 1807 9 Jun 1886 78
3 Mar 1868 John George Edward Henry Douglas
Sutherland Campbell,styled Marquess of
Lorne,later [1900] 9th Duke of Argyll 6 Aug 1845 2 May 1914 68
31 Aug 1878 Lord Colin Campbell 9 Mar 1853 18 Jun 1895 42
For further information on this MP,see the
note at the foot of this page
5 Dec 1885 Donald Horne Macfarlane [kt 1894] 18 Jul 1830 2 Jun 1904 73
16 Jul 1886 John Wingfield Malcolm,later [1896] 1st
Baron Malcolm 16 Apr 1833 6 Mar 1902 68
Jul 1892 Donald Horne Macfarlane [kt 1894] 18 Jul 1830 2 Jun 1904 73
24 Jul 1895 Donald Ninian Nicol 8 Oct 1843 27 Jul 1903 59
26 Aug 1903 John Stirling Ainsworth,later [1917] 1st baronet 30 Jan 1844 24 May 1923 79
14 Dec 1918 William Sutherland [kt 1919] 4 Mar 1880 19 Sep 1949 69
29 Oct 1924 Frederick Alexander Macquisten 23 Jul 1870 29 Feb 1940 69
10 Apr 1940 Duncan McCallum [kt 1955] 24 Nov 1888 10 May 1958 69
NAME ALTERED TO "ARGYLL" 1950
ARMAGH (CO.ARMAGH)
1801 Patrick Duigenan c 1737 11 Apr 1816
8 May 1816 Daniel Webb Webber c 1757 18 Jul 1847
26 Jun 1818 John Leslie Foster c 1781 10 Jul 1842
10 Mar 1820 William Stuart 31 Oct 1798 7 Jul 1874 75
19 Jun 1826 Henry Goulburn 19 Mar 1784 12 Jan 1856 71
10 May 1831 Henry John Chetwynd-Talbot,styled Viscount
Ingestre,later [1856] 18th Earl of Shrewsbury 8 Nov 1803 4 Jun 1868 64
25 Aug 1831 Sir John William Head Brydges 5 Jul 1764 4 Sep 1839 75
15 Dec 1832 Leonard Dobbin 1775 19 Feb 1844 68
2 Aug 1837 William Curry 16 Aug 1784 19 Sep 1842 58
22 May 1840 John Dawson Rawdon 1804 5 May 1866 61
9 Jul 1852 Ross Stephenson Moore 1809 5 Oct 1855 46
6 Dec 1855 Joshua Walter McGeough Bond 1831 29 Aug 1905 74
2 Apr 1857 Stearnhall Miller 1813 2 May 1897 83
5 May 1859 Joshua Walter McGeough Bond 1831 29 Aug 1905 74
17 Jul 1865 Stearnhall Miller 1813 2 May 1897 83
30 Jan 1867 John Vance c 1817 21 Sep 1875
20 Oct 1875 George de la Poer Beresford 1831 3 Aug 1906 75
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1885
ARMAGH COUNTY
1801 Archibald Acheson,later [1807] 2nd Earl of
Gosford (to Mar 1807) 1 Aug 1776 27 Mar 1849 72
Robert Camden Cope c 1771 5 Dec 1818
17 Jul 1802 Henry Caulfeild (to May 1807) 29 Jul 1779 4 Mar 1862 82
13 Mar 1807 William Brownlow (to 1815) 1 Sep 1755 10 Jul 1815 59
23 May 1807 William Richardson (to 1820) 1749 23 Mar 1822 72
23 Sep 1815 Henry Caulfeild 29 Jul 1779 4 Mar 1862 82
10 Jul 1818 Charles Brownlow,later [1839] 1st Baron
Lurgan (to 1832) 17 Apr 1795 30 Apr 1847 52
22 Mar 1820 Henry Caulfeild 29 Jul 1779 4 Mar 1862 82
9 Aug 1830 Archibald Acheson,styled Viscount Acheson,
later [1849] 3rd Earl of Gosford (to 1847) 20 Aug 1806 15 Jun 1864 57
19 Dec 1832 William Verner,later [1846] 1st baronet (to 1868) 25 Oct 1782 20 Jan 1871 88
9 Aug 1847 James Molyneux Caulfeild,later [1863] 3rd
Earl of Charlemont 6 Oct 1820 12 Jan 1892 71
16 Apr 1857 Maxwell Charles Close 25 Jun 1827 25 Jan 1903 75
23 Mar 1864 Sir James Matthew Stronge,3rd baronet 25 Nov 1811 11 Mar 1885 73
(to 1874)
21 Nov 1868 William Verner,later [1871] 2nd baronet 4 Apr 1822 10 Jan 1873 50
15 Feb 1873 Edward Wingfield Verner,later [1886] 4th
baronet (to 1880) 1 Oct 1830 21 Jun 1899 68
12 Feb 1874 Maxwell Charles Close (to 1885) 25 Jun 1827 25 Jan 1903 75
13 Apr 1880 James Nicholson Richardson 7 Feb 1846 11 Oct 1921 75
SPLIT INTO "ARMAGH MID","ARMAGH
NORTH" AND "ARMAGH SOUTH" 1885
RE-UNITED 1922
15 Nov 1922 Sir William James Allen 15 Oct 1866 20 Dec 1947 81
5 Mar 1948 James Richard Edwards Harden 12 Dec 1916 22 Oct 2000 83
20 Nov 1954 Christopher Wyborne Armstrong 9 May 1899 8 Jul 1986 87
8 Oct 1959 John Edward Maginnis 7 Mar 1919 7 Jul 2001 82
28 Feb 1974 James Harold McCusker 7 Feb 1940 12 Feb 1990 50
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
ARMAGH MID
3 Dec 1885 John McKane 11 Jan 1886
1 Feb 1886 Sir James Porter Corry,1st baronet 8 Sep 1826 28 Nov 1891 65
17 Dec 1891 Dunbar Plunket Barton,later [1918] 1st baronet 29 Oct 1853 11 Sep 1937 83
12 Feb 1900 John Brownlee Lonsdale,later [1911] 1st baronet
and [1918] 1st Baron Armaghdale 23 Mar 1850 8 Jun 1924 74
23 Jan 1918 James Rolston Lonsdale 31 May 1865 23 May 1921 55
23 Jun 1921 Henry Bruce Armstrong 27 Jul 1844 4 Dec 1943 99
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922
ARMAGH NORTH
1 Dec 1885 Edward James Saunderson 1 Oct 1837 21 Oct 1906 69
14 Nov 1906 William Moore,later [1932] 1st baronet 22 Nov 1864 28 Nov 1944 80
22 Nov 1917 William James Allen [kt 1921] 15 Oct 1866 20 Dec 1947 81
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922
ARMAGH SOUTH
27 Nov 1885 Alexander Blane 1856 7 Feb 1917 60
Jul 1892 Edward McHugh 1846 28 Aug 1900 54
9 Oct 1900 John Campbell 1870
19 Jan 1906 William McKillop 1860 25 Aug 1909 49
4 Nov 1909 Charles O'Neill 1849 14 Jan 1918 68
2 Feb 1918 Patrick Donnelly 1878 13 Aug 1947 69
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922
Lord Colin Campbell, MP for Argyllshire 1878-1885 and his wife, Lady Colin Campbell,
formerly Gertrude Elizabeth Blood (3 May 1857-1 Nov 1911)
Lord Colin and Miss Blood were married in July 1881. At the time of their marriage, Lord Colin
was suffering from a venereal disease (generally assumed to have been syphilis), with the
result that the marriage was not consummated for several months after the marriage had
taken place. Lady Colin sought and was granted a judicial separation in 1884, on the grounds
of her husband's cruelty in that he had knowingly infected her with his disease. Lord Colin
unsuccessfully appealed the decision. Later that year, both parties filed for a divorce, but
the case was not heard until December 1886. Each party accused the other of adultery,
Lord Colin naming four co-respondents and Lady Colin one. The case ended with Lady Colin
being denied a divorce. Lord Colin was bankrupted the following year, and subsequently
went out to India where he practised as a barrister until his death in 1895.
The divorce trial dragged on for three weeks, and filled a huge number of column inches in
the contemporary newspapers. To attempt to summarise these reports would be extremely
difficult, so I have contented myself with the following summary which appeared in the "New
Zealand Herald" of 10 January 1887:-
'The English papers are full of this cause celebre, the hearing of which lasted nearly three
weeks, and resulted.....in the dismissal of both Lord [Colin] Campbell's petition against his wife
and Lady [Colin] Campbell's against her husband. We take the following extracts from an over-
whelming mass of printed matter:-
'The following statement shows how the case stands:- Two years ago, in March, 1884, Lady
Colin Campbell sought a divorce from her husband, Lord Colin Campbell, and the suit was tried
in camera before a special jury, who in the result returned a verdict, the effect of which was
that the petitioner was granted a decree of judicial separation on the ground of her husband's
cruelty. Further legal proceedings were instituted by Lord Colin Campbell, and inquiries were
afterwards made by both sides, which resulted in Lord Colin Campbell presenting a petition
praying for the dissolution of his marriage, which [the marriage] took place on the 21st of July,
1881, on the ground of the adultery of Lady Colin Campbell with the co-respondents -
allegations which they all deny; and Lady [Colin] Campbell, on her part, filed a further petition,
in which she, too, prayed to have the marriage dissolved, on the ground of misconduct on the
part of Lord Colin Campbell with Mary Watson, which he denied. These two suits have been
consolidated by order of the Court. Lord Colin Campbell is the fifth son of his Grace the Duke of
Argyll, an officer in the Argyllshire Volunteers, and barrister-at-law, and Lady Gertrude
Elizabeth Campbell is the youngest daughter of Edmond Maghlin Blood, Esq., of Birckhill, County
Clare.
'Sir Charles Russell said he had to open to them [the jury] a remarkable and a painful case. The
petitioner in the first suit was Lady Colin Campbell, now judicially separated from Lord Colin
Campbell, and she was the respondent in the second suit, the two being consolidated. Lady
Colin Campbell was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Blood, a family of respectability and good
position. Lord Colin was one of several sons of the Duke of Argyll, and it appeared that in
September, 1880, Lady Colin, who was then Miss Blood, was staying with some friends in
Scotland, not far from the seat of the Duke of Argyll. On that occasion Miss Blood met Lord
Colin, who was then enjoying the sports of the season, and apparently in good health. He
appeared to have been greatly attracted by Miss Blood, whose acquaintance he then made for
the first time. She was a lady of no inconsiderable gifts, and there was little doubt that he
speedily fell in love with her; and there was equally little doubt she returned sincerely and truly
the affection he had conceived for her. There was no reason to suggest that the marriage
which ultimately took place was based on other than sincere and mutual affection. She was
bringing her husband no fortune, but she brought considerable gifts and accomplishments.
Upon his part, as his father's son, he occupied a good social position. He was a man of
circumscribed means, and upon his marriage he had settled upon him a sum of 10,000.
'The marriage took place on the 21st July, 1881, when they went on a "melancholy" honey-
moon trip to the Isle of Wight, Lord Colin Campbell being attended by a hospital nurse. In
fact, from the time of the engagement in September, 1880, down to the end of their married
life in 1883, he was never without such an attendant. Owing to the disease from which Lord
Colin was suffering [syphilis] the marriage was not consummated until October, 1881. The
case was a very horrible one, and counsel said he would as far as possible refrain from going
into details. He proceeded to state that Dr. Bird, who was attending Lord Colin, also attended
Lady Colin, whose life at that time was almost unbearable. She desired to remain a companion
and even a nurse to her husband, and hide her misery from the world, but she could not any
longer submit to enforced cohabitation. She wrote to that effect to her husband, who replied
that she was mistaken about him, and added a statement which it is difficult to suppose Lord
Colin Campbell believed to be true when he made it. In April, 1883, after Lady Colin had had a
miscarriage, Lord Colin suggested there had been improper intercourse with Dr. Bird, who
insisted upon a withdrawal of the accusation. Lord Colin did thereupon withdraw the
accusation, and requested Dr. Bird to continue his attendance upon Lady Colin. Lady Colin
persisted in refusing to cohabit, where upon Lord Colin said if she persisted she must leave
his house. This she refused to do. But all money supplies having been stopped she filed a
petition for judicial separation. The condition of Lady Colin became so serious that in
September, 1883, a surgical operation had to be performed, and it was during this period of
almost uninterrupted illness and suffering that the charges of adultery with various persons
were made against her. In March, 1884, the petition for judicial separation was heard, and
Lady Colin obtained a decree. She then went in company with her father to stay with her
father and mother at Florence. In June, 1884, returning from Italy, they stopped at an hotel
in Paris, where the Duke of Marlborough called upon them.
'That was made the occasion of a charge of adultery. Lord Colin Campbell actually made a
formal demand in writing to the criminal authorities in Paris to have his wife arrested and
lodged in a prison for prostitutes in Paris. It was difficult to believe that any man with the
ordinary instincts of a man could act thus towards a wife whom he had so injured. But his
pride had been lowered in the dust. Counsel then detailed the grounds for the charge of
adultery against Lord Colin Campbell, which is said to have taken place on the 17th of June,
1882, at Cadogan Place, with one Mary Watson. Sir C. Russell, proceeding, said Lady Colin
Campbell was in a position to meet all the charges made against her. The Duke of Marlborough
was an old friend of the family, so was Captain [Eyre Massey] Shaw [1828-1908], and to this
day Lady Colin Campbell was on terms of intimacy with Mrs. Shaw. Then there was General
[William Francis] Butler [1838-1910], a celebrated man, who had married a celebrated woman,
Miss [Elizabeth Southerden] Thompson [1846-1933], the painter of "The Roll Call." General
Butler was old enough to be Lady Colin's father, and Mrs. Butler was one of Lady Colin's
dearest friends. Then came Dr. Bird, the medical attendant, who had taken steps to protect
his character by bringing an action in that court. Sir C. Russell concluded by saying that Lady
Colin Campbell would be able to refute every one of the foul charges made against her.
'Mr. Finlay [later Viscount Finlay], in opening the case for the respondent, said: It was a
matter of irrepressible relief to Lord Colin to at last have the opportunity of defending himself
in open court from the gross and cruel imputations which had been so long hanging over him.
The jury now knew what evidence it was on which this trumped-up charge was made against
Lord Colin Campbell, and their eyes had been opened to its character. The parties were
engaged in 1880, and after that Lord Colin took a sea voyage to get rid of an Eastern fever
he had caught while in the East with Mr. Goschen. On his return from the voyage the marriage
was brought on the tapis [i.e. under consideration]. With regard to Lord Colin's health, he was
suffering from a stricture, but his illness was in no sense of the term a venereal one. It was
quite true that the stricture was the result of indiscretion many years previously at Cambridge.
The state of Lord Colin's health was an obstacle to the marriage, and both his surgeons
advised him not to marry, not on account of any possible danger to his wife, but on account
of danger to himself. These facts were communicated to Mrs. Blood, but she continued to urge
on the marriage, saying that Lord Colin's state of health need be no obstacle, as her daughter
would be perfectly satisfied to be his nurse only. Mrs. Blood wrote to the Duke of Argyll, who
did not approve of the engagement, and had not at that time called on the Bloods or
recognised Miss Blood in any way. The way Mrs. Blood urged on the marriage was inconsistent
with the most elementary sense of decency or propriety, and in an evil hour the marriage took
place on the 21st of July, 1881. It was for them to consider whether such a marriage was
likely to be a happy one. The marriage was not consummated until nearly the end of November
or the beginning of December, 1881, and for that Sir Charles Russell had denounced Lord Colin
and held up to execration as the basest of men for not being wiser than the two surgeons who
had made these matters their special study. After that, marital intercourse between Lord and
Lady Colin Campbell was only very occasional, and it ceased altogether after the 19th of June,
1882.
'He [Finlay] would give a brief summary of the charges against the four co-respondents. The
Duke of Marlborough (then Lord Blandford) was first introduced to Miss Blood in 1881. Lord
Colin expressed to his wife his objection to her acquaintanceship with Lord Blandford. At Easter,
1882, Lord Blandford was a visitor at Leigh Court, and so was Lady Colin. There Lady Miles's
arrangement was to put Lord Blandford's bedroom on the same floor as Lady Colin's. Lady
Colin's maid, Rose Baer, the one who was sent off without the slightest warning to Switzer-
land, would give evidence that Lady Colin certainly did not occupy her bed alone. When Lord
Blandford wanted to come into the room, Lady Colin coughed loudly to signify she was not
alone, and he returned to his room. It would also be given in evidence that at Purfleet they
passed as man and wife from Saturday to Monday. He would not weary them [the jury] by
giving them over again the story of the cabman and the note, but he would appeal to them as
men with some knowledge of the world whether there was any reason but a culpable one for
Lady Colin calling up the blushing cabman to her bedside to give him the note for Lord
Blandford into his own hands. And now he came to the case against Mr. Tom Bird. He was a
surgeon, a young unmarried man. Together they went away to a concert at New Cross, and
together they were driven back. On the way the cabman's attention was attracted by noisy
laughing inside the cab. With a curiosity not altogether inexcusable he opened the little
window, and saw Lady Colin's head reclining on Mr. Tom Bird's shoulder, while both of them
were caressing one another and behaving as only lovers could. He drove them to Brook-
street, where not only Mr. Bird but also Lady Colin got out. They went into the house and
discharged the cabman; but he, knowing that Lady Colin did not live there (having driven her
from Cadogan Place), loitered about in the hopes of getting another job. He went into a public
house to get a drink, and gave a man 2d to watch the door. Lady Colin, however, stayed so
long that the cabman went away in disgust. Mr. Tom Bird's devotion to his fair patient on the
occasion of her illness, too, was extraordinary. He was not like a doctor. He was more than a
doctor, and his attentions were altogether different to those of a medical man. The next co-
respondent on the record was Captain Shaw. He had, it seemed, known Miss Blood before her
marriage, and the first occasion on which suspicion was excited between them was in October,
1881. At this time the house at 79 Cadogan Place was not furnished, and Lady Colin was
staying with her husband at Argyle Lodge and in Sloane-street. Lady Colin often went to 79
Cadogan Place for the purpose of seeing how the furnishing arrangements were proceeding,
and it was during one of these visits that Captain Shaw called upon her and remained in the
unfurnished drawing room alone with her for a very long time. When the house was furnished
he continued his calls, and he generally stayed with her for about three-quarters of an hour
or a full hour. On one of these occasions they were alone in the dining room, and one of the
servants hearing a noise proceeding from the floor of the room took upon himself to look
through the keyhole, and he saw them under undoubtedly suspicious circumstances. The last
co-respondent was Colonel Butler, and the evidence in regard to him was confined to the
13th of April. On the afternoon of that day Colonel Butler called upon Lady Colin and remained
in the drawing room with her for nearly two hours. While he was in the house a lady called,
and Lady Colin gave instructions to the servant to the effect that she was to inform the
visitor that she (Lady Colin) was not at home. Lord Colin returned while Colonel Butler was in
the house, but he escaped without seeing his lordship. He [Finlay] had dealt with the case
against the co-respondents, and he must deal at some length with the case against Lord Colin.
This was a matter of life and death to Lord Colin, for on its settlement depended his future
existence.
'The evidence taken would fill a volume. We need only publish two or three extracts. The first
witness called by the plaintiff's counsel was Lady Miles. She deposed substantially as follows:-
She told Lord [Colin] Campbell in 1882 that Lady [Colin] Campbell had resolved to refuse to live
with him as his wife and her reason for such decision, but would continue to maintain the
kindest friendly relations towards him and refrain from all mention of her separation in other
respects from him. Lord [Colin] Campbell was shocked at the information. He protested very
hard against his wife's decision, and said if she would recall it he would let Lady [Colin]
Campbell have her own way for a period of two years, and would treat her with affection.
Witness subsequently visited Lord and Lady [Colin] Campbell in London. She found Lady [Colin]
Campbell suffering intense pain, and Lord Colin Campbell explained by saying, "There has been
foul play upstairs, and Lady [Colin] Campbell has had a miscarriage." Lady Miles protested that
this could not be so, and the defendant reaffirmed that it was so. Witness, believing Lord Colin
Campbell, that he had kept his promise relating to the two years and had been deceived,
straightway accused Dr. Bird of having taken advantage of his position. Dr. Bird denied the
accusation, and refused to longer attend Lady [Colin] Campbell unless the accusation was
withdrawn. A family council ensued. At this Lord Colin admitted that he had not meant all that
he said, and asked Lady Miles to apologise for him to Dr. Bird. At the same time he complained
of the length of time General Butler remained when he called upon Lady [Colin] Campbell.
Witness, continuing, said that bat Lord Colin Campbell's request she had consented to be his
witness so far as to state that he had not been guilty of ill-usage of his wife, but said she
urged the defendant not to call her [as a witness], because she knew of his relations with the
girl Mary Watson, and felt sure they would transpire under cross-examination. After Lady
[Colin] Campbell had separated from defendant he complained to witness of having been badly
treated. She retorted that he ought to think himself lucky because his wife had obtained a
mere separation and not a divorce, which she would have got if witness had been called to
testify. Concerning Mary Watson, Lady Miles testified that the girl was a housemaid. Witness
found Mary Watson in Lord Colin Campbell's bedroom, in Cadogan Place. Witness, continuing,
said that when she saw Lord Colin Campbell and Mary Watson together, he said:- "Mary is a
good little thing. She is very fond of me. She has very nice hair. I often take it down and play
with it." Witness had seen letters from Mary Watson to the defendant signed "Your
affectionate Mary." Witness, being questioned, admitted she had heard Lady [Colin] Campbell
say in the presence of her husband that there were a dozen men she liked better than him.
Here a letter was produced written by the witness to the defendant advising him to get
divorced and then to take a nice little woman to be a companion and a comfort to him.
Witness admitted that she wrote the letter, and said that in reply to it Lord [Colin] Campbell
asked her whether Lady [Colin] Campbell would require alimony if he allowed her to get
divorced from him. To this witness answered that the Blood family would not ask for alimony
and would pay Lady [Colin] Campbell's costs.
'Lady Colin Campbell entered the witness box amid profound silence. She was very pale, and
testified slowly, but in a distinct voice. She said that until the family meeting at Thurles-
square, in 1883, she had exchanged letters daily with her husband when absent. Before their
marriage Lord Colin asked her if she would consent, when married, to their occupying separate
rooms. She consented, and Lord Colin asked her not to divulge the fact that he had made this
request, but she insisted upon telling her mother. The nature of his illness was unknown to her
until May, 1883. She never urged Lord Colin to marry her, but her mother disliked long
engagements. Continuing, Lady Colin said she was educated in Italy, and spoke Italian and
French before she learned the English language. She sang, painted, and wrote books. She was
also a journalist. She sang at 40 charity concerts, not one of which Lord Colin attended. She
taught night classes of factory girls; visited the poor in the daytime, and served soup for two
hours, and worked daily aiding the poor of Saffron Hill. Lord Colin knew of every engagement
and of her work among the poor, and he never objected. She went into society alone, her
husband's express wish, in order that the fact of his illness should be unknown. He wished it
understood that he was engaged in the House of Commons. Lord Colin accepted engagements
for both, and then desired her to go alone. Her husband went to Scotland in 1882 without a
nurse and she attended him. She left him there in order to visit her mother. He was better at
that time and preferred her to go. In November, 1881, she was very ill, and was never free
from symptoms of illness until 1885. In February, 1882, Lord Colin returned home. On one
occasion, while sitting beside her, he began to cry, and said that people were "very cruel" in
saying that he ought not to have married, on account of his health. She consulted Dr. Bird in
November, 1882. In April, 1883, she was seriously ill, and was attended by Dr. Bird, and Dr.
Hicks was twice summoned. She did not know the nature of her own or of her husband's
illness. Lord Colin urged her to dismiss Rose Baer, who, he said, gossiped about him in the
kitchen. She (witness) objected, because she thought Rose a good maid. Lord Colin insisted,
and she gave Rose a month's notice. She asked O'Neill what Rose had been saying, and O'Neill
replied: "She said the Duke of Marlborough visited your room at Leigh Court." It was untrue
that she (witness) said to O'Neill: It is a ------ lie!" Rose denied what she was accused of,
cried and said she was a wicked girl. Witness told Rose that as she had lied so wickedly she
(witness) would withdraw the advertisement for a situation for her and would refuse to give
her a certificate of good character. She dismissed Rose forthwith. She never told the servants
how to announce visitors. She never had the Duke of Marlborough at supper. Sir Philip Miles
occupied the room next to hers at Leigh Court. The room on the other side was empty, being
kept for her husband. She did not know that the Duke of Marlborough occupied a room there.
She was never at Purfleet. On the Saturday night on which she was accused of being there
with the Duke of Marlborough, she went to a theatre with a lady friend. On the Sunday
following she took tea with Lady Miles and dined with her mother, Mrs. Blood. Referring to her
visit to Paris in May, 1884, she said she was on her way to Italy. The meeting with the Duke
of Marlborough was purely accidental. She was once taken ill at a concert, and was in great
pain. She drove to Dr. Bird's house, and remained until the doctor prepared some medicine for
her, when she returned home, arriving there at eleven o'clock. It was untrue that she leaned
head upon Dr. Bird's shoulder while driving home. She gave an absolute denial to the evidence
of Rose Baer, Mrs. Duffy, O'Neill, and other witnesses, and declared that she was never guilty
of infidelity with the Duke of Marlborough or any other man. Lady [Colin] Campbell gave her
evidence with perfect composure and the fullest self-possession. She gave ready responses
to the questions asked. She wore a plain blue serge dress and black blouse. Her whole style
was that of simple elegance. She is tall, lithe, and shapely, and has full black eyes, with a
clear, pallid complexion. Witness said she refused to continue her relations with Lord Colin
because of the physical and moral suffering it entailed upon her. She told Lord Colin if he
endeavoured to coerce her he would find her dead on the following morning. She would, she
said, prefer death at her own hands to suffer again as she had suffered at his hands. Witness
added that she told Lord Colin that she preferred to live apart from him under the same roof to
avoid scandal, but declared that if there was to be a separation it must be an open and public
one. She would not permit Lord Colin's family to give any version of the affair that suited them.
Witness was never accused of any impropriety until the family meeting in 1883. On cross-
examination she said the book written by her was a child's book. It was illustrated by Kate
Greenaway and eight editions of it had been printed. Witness began writing for the Saturday
Review in 1880. She wrote three articles every week. Witness really meant that she would
commit suicide when she said she would be found dead next morning if Lord Colin ever attemp-
ted to force her to occupy the same apartment with him.
'Lord Colin Campbell testified that he first met his wife in the month of September, 1880, at
Inverary, the chief seat of the Argyll family and the capital of Argyll county, Scotland. The
acquaintance soon resulted in an engagement of marriage. He next saw Miss Blood in London
during October. At this time witness was suffering from fistula. An operation was performed
upon him, but it failed on account of the fever he had, and which was aggravated by anxiety
respecting his engagement. He was not suffering in any sense from an infectious disease. Miss
Blood frequently visited him. When he was sent away on a voyage Miss Blood sent him a letter
in every mail. In April, 1881, another operation was performed, and it was also a failure. His
father's opposition to his engagement was at this time causing witness constant anxiety.
Witness knew before he married that Miss Blood was acquainted with the Duke of Marlborough.
She told witness once that she had been to the theatre with her sister and several others,
including the Duke of Marlborough. Witness replied, "I do not think you were in good company."
Witness had known Chief Shaw a long time, but not General Butler or Dr. Bird. Witness was
married to Miss Blood in July, 1881. In the October following his doctors released him from the
prohibition he had been under because of his malady. Lord Colin, continuing, said he heard
while staying at Argyll Lodge, his father's London residence, that the Duke of Marlborough had
called at the Lodge. He then said he did not know the Duke. Witness remonstrated with the
plaintiff for riding out with Chief Shaw, and she became violent. When witness was ill at
Bournemouth Lady Colin left him without assigning any reason. She usually dined out, and
generally spent her time away. She never complained to witness that their relations had any
ill effect on her health. Witness had a long talk with his wife in Decmeber, 1881, about the
Duke of Marlborough and Chief Shaw. She then promised that they should not visit her any
more. Witness and plaintiff ceased their relations in June, 1882. In July, 1883, while staying
at Zion House, witness upbraided plaintiff for her conduct with other men, and she became
very violent, and she said to him, "If you put me in a divorce court you will get the worst of
it." '
Edward James Saunderson, MP for Cavan 1865-1874 and Armagh North 1885-1906
In the introduction to his book "Great Political Eccentrics", the author, Neil Hamilton [MP for
Tatton 1983-1997], discusses the question of members wearing hats and the rules regarding
their usage. Mr. Hamilton states that "The only method of reserving a seat is for a Member to
attend prayers, having left a card with his name written on it on the designated seat in
advance. Formerly, it was the custom to leave one's hat on a seat for this purpose but, of
course, few Members wear hats today. In Victorian times tall hats were worn at most times,
except when entering, leaving or actually addressing the House. In 1900 the hat-wearing rules
were set out as follows:
"At all times remove your hat on entering the House and put it on upon taking your seat;
remove it again on rising for whatever purpose. If the MP asks a Question he will stand with
his hat off and he may receive the Minister's answer seated and with his hat on. If, on a
Division, he should have to challenge the ruling of the Chair, he will sit and put his hat on.
If he wishes to address the Speaker on a Point of Order not connected with a Division, he will
do so standing with his hat off. When he leaves the Chamber to participate in a Division he
will take his hat off, but will vote with it on. If the Queen sends a Message to be read from
the Chair the Member will uncover. In short, how to take his seat, how to behave at Prayers
and what to do with his hat form between them the ABC of the Parliamentary scholar."
Hamilton then relates the following story. "In 1892 a scuffle occurred between the ferocious
Ulster Conservative, Col. Saunderson (MP for North Armagh 1885-1906), finding a strange hat
on his accustomed seat, absent-mindedly sat down upon it and squashed it. J.S. Wallace
(Liberal MP for Limehouse 1892-1895), the flattened hat's furious owner, then tried to drag
the colonel out of his seat. Henry Lucy, a Parliamentary sketch-writer, recalled 'the colonel
stands six feet high, is all bone and muscle and was born fighting. He gently but firmly laid
Mr. Wallace on his back and resumed his seat.' Stern action by the Speaker was avoided
only by Saunderson's agreement to replace the hat."
A somewhat different version of the event can be found in "The Derby Mercury" of 15 February
1893 [not 1892]. According to this report, a large number of members had gathered at the
doors to the chamber awaiting their opening, and, once opened, there was a furious dash for
seats, rather like a shopping crowd at a sale. The newspaper report then states that "an
unpleasant incident in connection with the rush for seats was a squabble between Mr.
Stewart, the Liberal M.P. for Limehouse, and Colonel Saunderson, the Conservative member
for North Armagh. Mr. Wallace accused the Colonel of taking his seat, with the added
aggravation of sitting on Mr. Wallace's hat. The member for Limehouse seized the Colonel by
the collar. The member for Armagh [North], nothing loth, gripped his assailant, and the two
stood glaring at each other for some seconds. Finally the Colonel, having asked Mr. Wallace
to pledge his word of honour that he had been first in the field, yielded the seat and secured
one elsewhere."
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