THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
CONSTITUENCIES BEGINNING WITH "C"
               Last updated 21/02/2014
Date   Name Born Died  Age
Dates in italics in the first column denote that the election held on that
date was a by-election. Dates shown in normal type were general elections,
or, in some instances, the date of a successful petition against a 
previous election result.
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the MP was baptised on
that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate that the MP was
buried on that date
  CAMELFORD (CORNWALL)
14 Apr 1660 Peter Killigrew,later [1665] 2nd baronet c 1634 8 Jan 1705
Samuel Trelawny 31 Mar 1630 26 Apr 1666 36
Thomas Vivian 10 Aug 1617 3 Sep 1691 74
Henry Nicoll
Double return. Killigrew and Trelawny seated
5 May 1660,but election subsequently
declared void 12 Jun 1660
30 Jun 1660 Thomas Vivian 10 Aug 1617 3 Sep 1691 74
Henry Nicoll
William Cotton c 1608 25 Dec 1673
Double return between Nicoll and Cotton.
Cotton declared elected 3 Aug 1660
30 Apr 1661 Bernard Granville
Thomas Coventry,later [1687] 5th Baron
Coventry and [1697] 1st Earl of Coventry 1637 15 Jul 1699 62
(to 1679)
Charles Roscarrock 23 Jul 1616 10 Oct 1665 49
Double return. Coventry and Roscarrock
seated 16 May 1661
27 Oct 1665 William Godolphin 2 Feb 1635 11 Jul 1696 61
20 Feb 1679 Sir James Smyth  (to 1681) c 1621 18 Nov 1681
William Harbord  [he was also returned for 25 Apr 1635 31 Jul 1692 57
Thetford,for which he chose to sit]
 1 Apr 1679 Robert Russell  (Lord Robert from 1694) c 1644 27 Jul 1703
26 Feb 1681 Sir James Smyth   c 1621 18 Nov 1681
Robert Russell  (Lord Robert from 1694) c 1644 27 Jul 1703
28 Apr 1685 Humphrey Langford c 1636 24 Jun 1685
Nicholas Courtney  (to 1689) c 1630 26 Oct 1722
11 Sep 1685 Sir Charles Scarburgh 29 Dec 1615 26 Feb 1694 74
11 Jan 1689 Ambrose Manaton  (to 1696)  [at the general 17 Jan 1648 1 Jun 1696 48
election in Nov 1695,Manaton was also
returned for Tavistock,for which he chose 
to sit]
Henry Manaton 17 Sep 1650 c May 1716 65
11 Nov 1695 Robert Molesworth,later [1716] 1st Viscount 
Molesworth  [I]   (to 1698) 7 Sep 1656 23 May 1725 68
1 Apr 1696 Sidney Wortley Montagu 28 Jul 1650 11 Nov 1727 77
3 Aug 1698 Henry Manaton  [at the general election in 17 Sep 1650 c May 1716 65
Jul 1702,Manaton was also returned for
Tavistock,for which he chose to sit]
Dennys Glynn  (to 1705) 4 Aug 1668 14 Apr 1705 36
17 Jan 1704 William Pole,later [1708] 4th baronet 17 Aug 1678 31 Dec 1741 63
(to 1708)
21 May 1705 Henry Pinnell 13 Sep 1670 by Apr 1721
17 May 1708 Richard Munden c 1680 19 Sep 1725
John Manley 23 Mar 1655 16 Dec 1713 58
19 Oct 1710 Bernard Granville  (to 1712) c 1670 8 Dec 1723
Jasper Radcliffe 1 Jul 1683 1 Mar 1711 27
26 Mar 1711 Henry Manaton  [he was unseated on petition 17 Sep 1650 c May 1716 65
in favour of Paul Orchard 8 May 1711]
8 May 1711 Paul Orchard  (to 1713) c 1682 6 Jun 1740
20 Feb 1712 Sir Bourchier Wrey,5th baronet  (to 1715) c 1683 12 Nov 1726
7 Sep 1713 James Nicholls 9 Mar 1684 after 1715
17 Jan 1715 James Montagu     c 1687 30 Oct 1748
Richard Coffin 23 Jul 1684  3 Dec 1766 82
13 Apr 1722 Henry Moore,4th Earl of Drogheda [I]  7 Oct 1700 29 May 1727 26
William Sloper     c 1658 14 Jan 1743
23 Aug 1727 Thomas Hales,later [1748] 3rd baronet     c 1694  6 Oct 1762
John Pitt     c 1698  9 Feb 1754
 2 May 1734 Sir Thomas Lyttelton,4th baronet        1686 14 Sep 1751 65
James Cholmondeley 18 Apr 1708 13 Oct 1775 67
12 May 1741 William O'Brien,4th Earl of Inchiquin [I]     c 1700 18 Jul 1777
Charles Montagu  after 1695 29 May 1759
 1 Jul 1747 Ridgeway Pitt,3rd Earl of Londonderry [I] 1722  8 Jan 1765 42
Samuel Martin  (to 1768)  1 Sep 1714 20 Nov 1788 74
17 Apr 1754 Sir John Lade,1st baronet     c 1731 21 Apr 1759
25 May 1759 Bartholomew Burton     c 1695    May 1770
19 Mar 1768 Charles Phillips     c 1720 16 Oct 1774
William Wilson     c 1720 12 Dec 1796
10 Oct 1774 John Amyand  (to 1780)  6 Nov 1751  5 Jun 1780 28
Francis Herne     c 1702 26 Sep 1776
 4 Nov 1776 Sir Ralph Payne,later [1795] 1st Baron 
Lavington [I] 19 Mar 1739  3 Aug 1807 68
11 Sep 1780 John Pardoe     c 1756 26 Apr 1796
James Macpherson  (to Mar 1796) 27 Oct 1736 17 Feb 1796 59
 6 Apr 1784 Jonathan Phillips     c 1724 12 Sep 1798
 5 Jul 1784 Sir Samuel Hannay     c 1742 11 Dec 1790
 8 Jan 1791 William Smith  (to May 1796) 22 Sep 1756 31 May 1835 78
19 Mar 1796 Lord William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 14 Sep 1774 17 Jun 1839 64
30 May 1796 William Joseph Denison May 1770 2 Aug 1849 79
John Angerstein     c 1774  8 Apr 1858
 7 Jul 1802 Robert Adair  (to 1812) 24 May 1763  3 Oct 1855 92
John Fonblanque 1759 4 Jan 1837 77
 1 Nov 1806 James Maitland,styled Viscount Maitland,
later [1839] 9th Earl of Lauderdale [S] 12 Feb 1784 22 Aug 1860 76
11 May 1807 Lord Henry Petty,later [1809] 3rd Marquess
of Lansdowne  2 Jul 1780 31 Jan 1863 82
 2 Feb 1810 Henry Peter Brougham,later [1830] 1st
Baron Brougham and Vaux 19 Sep 1778  7 May 1868 89
10 Oct 1812 William Leader 19 Oct 1767 18 Jan 1828 60
Samuel Scott,later [1830] 2nd baronet 29 Apr 1772 30 Sep 1849 77
17 Jun 1818 Mark Milbank  2 May 1795 21 Oct 1881 86
John Bushby-Maitland     c 1765  9 Mar 1822
Election declared void 8 Apr 1819
17 Apr 1819 John Stewart c 1755 21 Jul 1826
Lewis Allsopp  after 1763 18 Jul 1835
  Election declared void 16 Jun 1819, and no new
writ issued before the 1820 General Election
9 Mar 1820 Mark Milbank  (to 1832)  2 May 1795 21 Oct 1881 86
Francis Charles Seymour,styled Earl of
Yarmouth,later [1822] 3rd Marquess of Hertford 11 Mar 1777  1 Mar 1842 64
26 Jun 1822 Sheldon Cradock 27 Sep 1777 19 Feb 1852 74
For an illustration of how electioneering was
conducted in Camelford during the 1820s,
see the note at the foot of this page
 CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1832 
  CAMLACHIE (GLASGOW)
27 Nov 1885 Hugh Watt        1848 16 Mar 1921 72
For further information on this MP, see
the note at the foot of this page
   Jul 1892 Alexander Cross,later [1912] 1st baronet 4 Nov 1847 13 Feb 1914 66
19 Jan 1910 Halford John Mackinder  [kt 1920] 15 Feb 1861  6 Mar 1947 86
15 Nov 1922 Campbell Stephen 29 Mar 1884 25 Oct 1947 63
27 Oct 1931 James Stevenson  2 Feb 1883  3 Mar 1963 80
14 Nov 1935 Campbell Stephen 29 Mar 1884 25 Oct 1947 63
28 Jan 1948 Charles Stuart McFarlane 10 Oct 1895  4 Feb 1958 62
23 Feb 1950 William Reid  6 Nov 1889 16 Jul 1965 75
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1955
  CANNOCK (STAFFORDSHIRE)
14 Dec 1918 James Parker        1863 11 Feb 1948 84
15 Nov 1922 William Murdoch Adamson 12 Apr 1881 25 Oct 1945 64
27 Oct 1931 Sarah Adelaide Ward 25 Dec 1895  9 Apr 1969 73
14 Nov 1935 William Murdoch Adamson 12 Apr 1881 25 Oct 1945 64
26 Jul 1945 Jennie Lee,later [1970] Baroness Lee of
Asheridge [L]  3 Nov 1904 16 Nov 1988 84
18 Jun 1970 Patrick Thomas Cormack [kt 1995],later [2010]
Baron Cormack [L] 18 May 1939
28 Feb 1974 Gwilym Edffrwd Roberts  7 Aug 1928
NAME ALTERED TO "CANNOCK &
BURNTWOOD" 1983
CANNOCK & BURNTWOOD
 9 Jun 1983 James Gerald Douglas Howarth  [kt 2012] 12 Sep 1947
9 Apr 1992 Anthony Wayland Wright 11 Mar 1948
NAME ALTERED TO "CANNOCK CHASE" 1997
CANNOCK CHASE
1 May 1997 Anthony Wayland Wright 11 Mar 1948
6 May 2010 Aidan Burley 22 Jan 1979
  CANTERBURY (KENT)
   Mar 1660 Sir Anthony Aucher     c 1614 31 May 1692
Sir Heneage Finch,1st baronet,later [1681] 1st 
Earl of Nottingham   23 Dec 1621 18 Dec 1682 60
28 Mar 1661 Francis Lovelace 22 May 1594  1 Mar 1664 69
Sir Edward Master  (to Feb 1679)  2 Aug 1610 22 Jan 1691 80
21 Apr 1664 Thomas Hardres  [kt 1676]     c 1610 18 Dec 1681
24 Feb 1679 Edward Hales  (to 1681) 28 Sep 1645    Oct 1695 50
William Jacob     c 1623  early 1692
 7 Aug 1679 Sir Thomas Hardres     c 1610 18 Dec 1681
17 Feb 1681 Lewis Watson 29 Dec 1655        1724 68
Vincent Denne     c 1628  8 Oct 1693
12 Mar 1685 Sir William Honywood,2nd baronet  (to 1698)     c 1654 8 Jun 1748
Henry Lee     c 1657  6 Sep 1734
14 Nov 1695 George Sayer  (to 1705) c 1655 21 May 1718
25 Jul 1698 Henry Lee  (to 1708)     c 1657  6 Sep 1734
31 May 1705 John Hardres  2 Oct 1675 14 Jan 1758 82
6 May 1708 Edward Watson,styled Viscount Sondes
from 1714 3 Jul 1686 20 Mar 1722 35
Thomas D'Aeth,later [1716] 1st baronet 4 Dec 1678 3 Jan 1745 66
5 Oct 1710 John Hardres  (to 1722)  2 Oct 1675 14 Jan 1758 82
Henry Lee     c 1657  6 Sep 1734
 3 Feb 1715 Sir Thomas Hales,2nd baronet  (to 1734)  1 Mar 1666  7 Jan 1748 81
22 Mar 1722 Samuel Milles     c 1669 10 Dec 1727
31 Aug 1727 Sir William Hardres,4th baronet  (to 1735) 25 Jul 1686  8 Jul 1736 49
[After the general election in May 1734,he
was unseated on petition in favour of Sir
Thomas Hales 11 Apr 1735]
 2 May 1734 Thomas May  (Knight from 1738)  (to 1741)     c 1701 26 Feb 1781
11 Apr 1735 Sir Thomas Hales,2nd baronet  1 Mar 1666  7 Jan 1748 81
21 May 1741 Thomas Watson,later [1745] 3rd Earl of
Rockingham 30 Dec 1715 26 Feb 1746 30
Thomas Best  (to 1754)     c 1713 26 Mar 1795
23 Jan 1746 Sir Thomas Hales,2nd baronet  1 Mar 1666  7 Jan 1748
 1 Jul 1747 Matthew Robinson-Morris,later [1794] 2nd   6 Apr 1713 30 Nov 1800
Baron Rokeby  (to 1761)
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of the page containing details
of the Rokeby barony
15 Apr 1754 Sir James Creed     c 1695  7 Feb 1762
27 Mar 1761 Richard Milles  (to 1780)     c 1735 14 Sep 1820
Thomas Best     c 1713 26 Mar 1795
17 Mar 1768 William Lynch     c 1730 25 Aug 1785
 7 Oct 1774 Sir William Mayne,later [1776] 1st Baron
Newhaven [I]        1722 28 May 1794 71
 6 Sep 1780 George Gipps  (to 1796)     c 1728 13 Feb 1800
Charles Robinson     c 1732 31 Mar 1807
19 Jun 1790 Sir John Honywood,4th baronet     c 1757 29 Mar 1806
28 May 1796 John Baker     c 1754 20 Jan 1831
Samuel Elias Sawbridge  7 Jan 1769 27 May 1850 81
Election declared void 2 Mar 1797
10 Mar 1797 John Baker     c 1754 20 Jan 1831
Samuel Elias Sawbridge  7 Jan 1769 27 May 1850 81
[Both members were unseated on petition in
favour of Sir John Honywood and George
Gipps 12 May 1797]
12 May 1797 Sir John Honywood,4th baronet  (to 1802)     c 1757 29 Mar 1806
George Gipps      c 1728 13 Feb 1800
27 Feb 1800 George Watson  (to 1806) 20 Feb 1768 17 Jun 1824 56
 5 Jul 1802 John Baker  (to 1818)     c 1754 20 Jan 1831
29 Oct 1806 James Simmons 22 Jan 1741 22 Jan 1807 66
 2 Feb 1807 Samuel Elias Sawbridge  7 Jan 1769 27 May 1850 81
12 May 1807 Edward Taylor 24 Jun 1774 22 Jun 1843 68
 9 Oct 1812 Stephen Rumbold Lushington  (to 1830)  6 May 1776  5 Aug 1868 92
19 Jun 1818 Edward Bligh,styled Baron Clifton,later [1831]
5th Earl of Darnley [I] 25 Feb 1795 11 Feb 1835 39
31 Jul 1830 Richard Watson  6 Jan 1800 24 Jul 1852 52
George Augustus Frederick Cowper,styled
Viscount Fordwich,later [1837] 6th Earl Cowper 26 Jun 1806 15 Apr 1856 49
Both members were returned at the 1832
general election. For information on the 
unsuccessful candidate at that election, see 
the note regarding John Nichols Thom at the
foot of this page
10 Jan 1835 Lord Albert Denison Conyngham,later [1850]
1st Baron Londesborough  (to 1841) 21 Oct 1805 15 Jan 1860 54
Frederick Villiers   [he was unseated on c 1801 c 1871
petition in favour of Stephen Rumbold
Lushington 26 Mar 1835]
26 Mar 1835 Stephen Rumbold Lushington    May 1776  5 Aug 1868 92
26 Jul 1837 James Bradshaw  (to 1847)   4 Mar 1847 60
 3 Feb 1841 George Augustus Frederick Percy Sydney
Smythe,later [1855] 7th Viscount Strangford
(to 1852) 16 Apr 1818 23 Nov 1857 39
15 Mar 1847 Lord Albert Denison Conyngham,later [1850]
1st Baron Londesborough  21 Oct 1805 15 Jan 1860 54
 
 4 Mar 1850 Frederick Romilly 21 Mar 1810  6 Apr 1867 57
 8 Jul 1852 Henry Plumptre Gipps        1813 by 1871
Henry Butler-Johnstone 28 Aug 1809  1 Apr 1879 69
Election declared void 21 Feb 1853. Writ
  suspended until Aug 1854
18 Aug 1854 Charles Manners Lushington        1819 27 Nov 1864 45
Sir William Meredyth Somerville,5th baronet
later [1863] 1st Baron Athlumney [I]  (to 1865) 1802  7 Dec 1873 71
28 Mar 1857 Henry Butler-Johnstone 28 Aug 1809  1 Apr 1879 69
 6 Mar 1862 Henry Alexander Munro Butler-
Johnstone  (to 1878)  7 Dec 1837 17 Oct 1902 64
12 Jul 1865 John Walter Huddleston  [kt 1875] 8 Sep 1815  5 Dec 1890 75
18 Nov 1868 Theodore Henry Brinckman,later [1880]
2nd baronet 12 Sep 1830  7 May 1905 74
 5 Feb 1874 Lewis Ashurst Majendie  (to 1879) 1835 22 Oct 1885 50
 2 Mar 1878 Alfred Erskine Gathorne-Hardy 
(to 1880) 27 Feb 1845 11 Nov 1918 73
 8 May 1879 Robert Peter Laurie   [following the general 24 Oct 1835 29 Jul 1905 69
election in Apr 1880, the election of both
sitting members (Gathorne-Hardy and Laurie)
was declared void 16 Jun 1880. The writ
remained suspended until Nov 1885]
 REPRESENTATION SUSPENDED 1880 BUT
RESUMED IN 1885 AS A ONE-MEMBER SEAT
25 Nov 1885 John Henniker Heaton,later [1912] 1st 
baronet 18 May 1848  8 Sep 1914 66
   Dec 1910 Francis Bennett-Goldney        1865 27 Jul 1918 53
For further information on this MP,see the
note at the foot of this page
9 Aug 1918 George Knox Anderson        1854 19 Mar 1941 86
14 Dec 1918 Ronald McNeill,later [1927] 1st Baron Cushenden 30 Apr 1861 12 Oct 1934 73
24 Nov 1927 Sir William Abraham Edward Wayland   1 Sep 1869 15 Jul 1950 80
26 Jul 1945 John Baker White 12 Aug 1902 10 Dec 1988 86
12 Feb 1953 Leslie Montagu Thomas  [kt 1963] 24 Apr 1906 27 Nov 1971 65
31 Mar 1966 David Lance Crouch  [kt 1987] 23 Jun 1919 18 Feb 1998 78
11 Jun 1987 Julian William Hendy Brazier 24 Jul 1953
  CARDIFF (GLAMORGANSHIRE)
20 Apr 1660 Bussy Mansel 22 Nov 1623 25 May 1699 75
Herbert Evans
Double return. Mansel declared elected
27 Jun 1660
   Apr 1661 Sir Richard Lloyd  [he was also returned for 23 Feb 1606  6 Nov 1676 70
Radnorshire,for which he chose to sit]
   May 1661 William Bassett  [he was unseated on petition  6 Jan 1627  8 Sep 1667 40
in favour of Robert Thomas 15 Jun 1661]
15 Jun 1661 Robert Thomas,later [1673] 2nd baronet     c 1622  after 1684
16 Mar 1681 Bussy Mansel 22 Nov 1623 25 May 1699 75
24 Mar 1685 Francis Gwyn     c 1648 14 Jun 1734
15 Jan 1689 Thomas Mansel,later [1706] 5th baronet
and [1712] 1st Baron Mansell  9 Nov 1667 10 Dec 1723 56
29 Jul 1698 Sir Edward Stradling,5th baronet 11 Apr 1672  5 Apr 1735 62
19 Dec 1701 Thomas Mansel 4 May 1678 7 Jan 1706 27
1 Feb 1706 Sir John Aubrey,3rd baronet 20 Jun 1680 16 Apr 1743 62
20 Oct 1710 Sir Edward Stradling,5th baronet 11 Apr 1672  5 Apr 1735 62
29 Mar 1722 Edward Stradling 30 Mar 1699  3 Oct 1726 27
31 Jan 1727 Bussy Mansell,later [1744] 4th Baron Mansell     c 1701 29 Nov 1750
10 May 1734 Herbert Windsor,later [1738] 2nd Viscount
Windsor of Blackcastle  1 May 1707 25 Jan 1758 50
16 Feb 1739 Herbert Mackworth  7 Sep 1687 20 Aug 1765 77
 2 Jan 1766 Sir Herbert Mackworth,1st baronet  1 Jan 1737 25 Oct 1791 54
19 Jun 1790 John Stuart 25 Sep 1767 22 Jan 1794 26
 4 Feb 1794 Evelyn James Stuart [styled Lord Evelyn
James Stuart from 1796]  7 May 1773 16 Aug 1842 69
10 Jul 1802 Lord William Stuart 18 Nov 1778 25 Jul 1814 35
 7 Nov 1814 Lord Evelyn James Stuart  7 May 1773 16 Aug 1842 69
23 Jun 1818 Lord Patrick James Herbert Crichton-
Stuart 25 Aug 1794  7 Sep 1859 65
15 Mar 1820 Wyndham Lewis 1780 21 Mar 1838 57
12 Jun 1826 Lord Patrick James Herbert Crichton-
Stuart 25 Aug 1794  7 Sep 1859 65
13 Dec 1832 John Iltyd Nicholl 21 Aug 1797 27 Jan 1853 55
 8 Jul 1852 Walter Coffin 1784 15 Feb 1867 82
27 Mar 1857 James Frederick Dudley Crichton-Stuart 17 Feb 1824 24 Oct 1891 67
7 Apr 1880 Sir Edward James Reed 20 Sep 1830 30 Nov 1906 76
18 Jul 1895 James Mackenzie Maclean 13 Aug 1835 22 Apr 1906 70
10 Oct 1900 Sir Edward James Reed 20 Sep 1830 30 Nov 1906 76
17 Jan 1906 Ivor Churchill Guest,later [1910] 1st Baron
Ashby St.Legers and [1918] 1st 
Viscount Wimborne 16 Jan 1873 14 Jun 1939 66
19 Jan 1910 David Alfred Thomas,later [1918] 1st Viscount
Rhondda 26 Mar 1856  3 Jul 1918 62
   Dec 1910 Lord Ninian Edward Crichton-Stuart 15 May 1883 2 Oct 1915 32
12 Nov 1915 James Herbert Cory,later [1919] 1st baronet  7 Feb 1857  7 Feb 1933 76
 SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1918 
SEE "CARDIFF CENTRAL","CARDIFF EAST",
AND "CARDIFF SOUTH"
  CARDIFF CENTRAL
14 Dec 1918 James Childs Gould        1882  2 Jul 1944 62
29 Oct 1924 Lewis Lougher  [kt 1929]  1 Oct 1871 28 Aug 1955 83
30 May 1929 Ernest Nathaniel Bennett  [kt 1930] 12 Dec 1868  2 Feb 1947 78
26 Jul 1945 Thomas George Thomas,later [1983] Viscount
Tonypandy 29 Jan 1909 22 Sep 1997 88
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950,
BUT REVIVED 1983
 9 Jun 1983 Ian Grist  5 Dec 1938 2 Jan 2002 63
9 Apr 1992 Jonathan Owen Jones 19 Apr 1954
5 May 2005 Jennifer Nancy Willott 29 May 1974
  CARDIFF EAST
14 Dec 1918 William Henry Seager  [kt 1922]        1862 10 Mar 1941 78
15 Nov 1922 Lewis Lougher  [kt 1929]  1 Oct 1871 28 Aug 1955 83
 6 Dec 1923 Sir Henry Webb,1st baronet 28 Jul 1866 29 Oct 1940 74
29 Oct 1924 Sir Clement Kinloch-Cooke,1st baronet 1854 4 Sep 1944 90
30 May 1929 James Ewart Edmunds  5 May 1882 18 Jun 1962 80
27 Oct 1931 Owen Temple Morris (Temple-Morris 
from 1948)  [kt 1967] 18 Sep 1896 21 Apr 1985 88
13 Apr 1942 Sir Percy James Grigg 16 Dec 1890  5 May 1964 73
26 Jul 1945 Hilary Adair Marquand 24 Dec 1901  6 Nov 1972 70
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  CARDIFF NORTH
23 Feb 1950 David Treharne Llewellyn  [kt 1960] 17 Jan 1916 9 Aug 1992 76
 8 Oct 1959 Donald Stewart Box 22 Nov 1917 12 Jul 1993 75
31 Mar 1966 Edward Rowlands,later [2004] Baron 
Rowlands [L] 23 Jan 1940
18 Jun 1970 Michael Hilary Arthur Roberts  6 May 1927 10 Feb 1983 55
28 Feb 1974 Ian Grist  5 Dec 1938 2 Jan 2002 63
 9 Jun 1983 Gwilym Haydn Jones 19 Jan 1947
1 May 1997 Julie Morgan 2 Nov 1944
6 May 2010 Jonathan Peter Evans 2 Jun 1950
  CARDIFF NORTHWEST
28 Feb 1974 Michael Hilary Arthur Roberts  6 May 1927 10 Feb 1983 55
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  CARDIFF SOUTH
14 Dec 1918 James Herbert Cory,later [1919] 1st baronet  7 Feb 1857  7 Feb 1933 76
 6 Dec 1923 Arthur Henderson,later [1966] Baron Rowley [L] 27 Aug 1893 28 Aug 1968 75
29 Oct 1924 Henry Arthur Evans  [kt 1944] 24 Sep 1898 25 Sep 1958 60
30 May 1929 Arthur Henderson,later [1966] Baron Rowley [L] 27 Aug 1893 28 Aug 1968 75
27 Oct 1931 Henry Arthur Evans  [kt 1944] 24 Sep 1898 25 Sep 1958 60
26 Jul 1945 Leonard James Callaghan,later [1987] Baron
Callaghan of Cardiff  [L] 27 Mar 1912 26 Mar 2005 92
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
CARDIFF SOUTH & PENARTH
 9 Jun 1983 Leonard James Callaghan,later [1987] Baron
Callaghan of Cardiff  [L] 27 Mar 1912 26 Mar 2005 92
11 Jun 1987 Alun Edward Michael 22 Aug 1943
15 Nov 2012 Stephen Doughty
  CARDIFF SOUTHEAST
23 Feb 1950 Leonard James Callaghan,later [1987] Baron
Callaghan of Cardiff  [L] 27 Mar 1912 26 Mar 2005 92
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  CARDIFF WEST
23 Feb 1950 Thomas George Thomas,later [1983] Viscount
Tonypandy 29 Jan 1909 22 Sep 1997 88
 9 Jun 1983 Stefan Terlezki 29 Oct 1927 21 Feb 2006 78
11 Jun 1987 Hywel Rhodri Morgan 29 Sep 1939
7 Jun 2001 Kevin Denis Brennan 16 Oct 1959
  CARDIGAN  (CARDIGANSHIRE)
c Jul 1660 James Philipps  [Philipps was re-elected at     c 1624  2 May 1674
the general election in Apr 1661,but this
election was declared to be void 30 Apr 1662]
 6 Apr 1663 Sir Charles Cotterell 16 Apr 1615  7 Jun 1701 86
24 Feb 1679 Hector Philipps 18 Mar 1693
11 Dec 1693 John Lewis c 1660 26 Jan 1720
3 Aug 1698 Sir Charles Lloyd,later [1708] 1st baronet c 1662 28 Dec 1723
23 Jan 1701 John Lewis c 1660 26 Jan 1720
15 Dec 1701 Henry Lloyd by 1666 4 May 1721
22 May 1705 Lewis Pryse [at the general election in 1708,he     c 1683 11 Aug 1720
was also returned for Cardiganshire,for which he
chose to sit]
 22 Feb 1710 Sir Simon Harcourt,later [1721] 1st Viscount
Harcourt c Dec 1661 29 Jul 1727 65
23 Oct 1710 John Meyrick c 1673 by May 1735
17 Mar 1712 Owen Brigstocke 3 Apr 1679 4 May 1746 67
9 Sep 1713 Sir George Barlow,2nd baronet c 1680 by Mar 1726
15 Feb 1715 Stephen Parry        1675 15 Dec 1724 49
 1 Apr 1725 Thomas Powell     c 1701 17 Nov 1752
 7 Sep 1727 Francis Cornwallis     c 1692 19 Aug 1728
 1 May 1729 Richard Lloyd     c 1703 16 Jul 1757
Thomas Powell     c 1701 17 Nov 1752
Double return. Lloyd declared elected 
7 May 1730
29 May 1741 Thomas Pryse     c 1716 21 May 1745
20 Mar 1746 John Symmons 12 Sep 1701    Sep 1764 63
20 Apr 1761 Herbert Lloyd,later [1763] 1st baronet     c 1719 19 Aug 1769
24 Mar 1768 Pryse Campbell        1727 14 Dec 1768 41
13 Jan 1769 Ralph Congreve     c 1721    Dec 1775
31 Oct 1774 Sir Robert Smyth,5th baronet   [he was  10 Jan 1744 12 Apr 1802 58
unseated on petition in favour of Thomas 
Johnes 7 Dec 1775]
 7 Dec 1775 Thomas Johnes 20 Aug 1748 23 Apr 1816 67
12 Jun 1780 John Campbell,later [1796] 1st Baron Cawdor 24 Apr 1755  1 Jun 1821 66
 4 Jun 1796 John Vaughan,later [1820] 3rd Earl of Lisburne [I]  3 Mar 1769 18 May 1831 62
23 Jun 1818 Pryse Pryse   (to 1849)  1 Jun 1774  4 Jan 1849 74
 
6 Jul 1841 Pryse Pryse     1 Jun 1774  4 Jan 1849 74
John Scandrett Harford 1784 23 Apr 1866 81
Following the loss of one of the poll-books,
a double return was made. On petition the
seat was awarded to Pryse Pryse 18 Apr 1842
12 Feb 1849 Pryse Loveden        1815 c Feb 1855 39
24 Feb 1855 John Lloyd Davies  1 Nov 1801 21 Mar 1860 58
27 Mar 1857 Edward Lewis Pryse        1817 29 May 1888 70
26 Nov 1868 Sir Thomas Davies Lloyd,1st baronet 23 May 1820 21 Jul 1877 57
 4 Feb 1874 David Davies 18 Dec 1818 28 Feb 1893 74
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1885 
  CARDIGANSHIRE
11 Jul 1660 Sir Richard Pryse,2nd baronet     c 1630     c 1675
17 Apr 1661 John Vaughan 14 Sep 1603 10 Dec 1674 71
25 Aug 1669 Edward Vaughan     c 1635 15 Feb 1684
 1 Apr 1685 John Lewis     c 1660 26 Jan 1720
10 Mar 1690 Sir Carbery Pryse,4th baronet 20 May 1694
19 Dec 1694 John Vaughan,later [1695] 1st Viscount
Lisburne [I] 7 Dec 1667 20 Mar 1721 53
27 Jul 1698 John Lewis     c 1660 26 Jan 1720
5 Feb 1701 Sir Humphrey Mackworth Jan 1657 25 Aug 1727 70
10 Dec 1701 Lewis Pryse     c 1683 11 Aug 1720
5 Aug 1702 Sir Humphrey Mackworth Jan 1657 25 Aug 1727 70
6 Jun 1705 John Pugh c 1675 30 Nov 1737
2 Jun 1708 Lewis Pryse     c 1683 11 Aug 1720
31 Oct 1710 Sir Humphrey Mackworth Jan 1657 25 Aug 1727 70
16 Sep 1713 Thomas Johnes by Sep 1734
 2 Mar 1715 Lewis Pryse  [expelled 23 Mar 1716]     c 1683 11 Aug 1720
29 Jan 1717 Owen Brigstocke  3 Apr 1679  4 May 1746 67
12 Apr 1722 Francis Cornwallis     c 1692 19 Aug 1728
27 Sep 1727 John Vaughan,2nd Viscount Lisburne [I]     c 1695 15 Jan 1741
29 May 1734 Walter Lloyd   [he was unseated on petition     c 1678    Feb 1747
in favour of Thomas Powell 22 Mar 1742]
22 Mar 1742 Thomas Powell     c 1701 17 Nov 1752
23 Jul 1747 John Lloyd     c 1717  3 Jun 1755
 3 Dec 1755 Wilmot Vaughan, later [1766] 4th Viscount
Lisburne and [1776] 1st Earl of Lisburne [I]     c 1730  6 Jan 1800
20 Apr 1761 John Pugh Pryse        1739 13 Jan 1774 34
30 Mar 1768 Wilmot Vaughan, 4th Viscount Lisburne, later
[1776] 1st Earl of Lisburne [I]     c 1730  6 Jan 1800
 8 Jun 1796 Thomas Johnes 20 Aug 1748 23 Apr 1816 67
27 May 1816 William Edward Powell 16 Feb 1788 10 Apr 1854 66
22 Feb 1854 Ernest Augustus Vaughan,4th Earl of
Lisburne [I] 30 Oct 1800  8 Nov 1873 73
 7 May 1859 William Thomas Rowland Powell        1815 May 1878 62
20 Jul 1865 Sir Thomas Davies Lloyd,1st baronet 23 May 1820 21 Jul 1877 57
28 Nov 1868 Evan Matthew Richards        1821 21 Aug 1880 59
13 Feb 1874 Thomas Edward Lloyd        1820 1909 89
12 Apr 1880 Lewis Pugh Pugh  3 Aug 1837  6 Jan 1908 70
28 Nov 1885 David Davies        1818 28 Feb 1893 74
10 Jul 1886 William Bowen Rowlands c Jan 1836  4 Sep 1906 70
18 Jul 1895 Matthew Lewis Vaughan-Davies,later [1921]
1st Baron Ystwyth 17 Dec 1840 21 Aug 1935 94
18 Feb 1921 Ernest Evans        1885 18 Jan 1965 79
 6 Dec 1923 Rhys Hopkin Morris  [kt 1954] 5 Sep 1888 22 Nov 1956 68
22 Sep 1932 David Owen Evans 5 Feb 1876 11 Jun 1945 69
26 Jul 1945 Evan Roderic Bowen  6 Aug 1913 18 Jun 2001 87
31 Mar 1966 Dafydd Elystan Morgan,later [1981] Baron 
Elystan-Morgan [L]  7 Dec 1932
28 Feb 1974 Geraint Wyn Howells,later [1992] Baron 
Geraint [L] 15 Apr 1925 17 Apr 2004 79
NAME ALTERED TO "CEREDIGION &
PEMBROKE NORTH" 1983
 
 
 
  CARLISLE (CUMBERLAND)
 9 Apr 1660 William Briscoe     c 1606 25 Feb 1688
Jeremiah Tolhurst  3 Nov 1615 c Oct 1671 55
 8 Apr 1661 Sir Philip Howard      c 1631    Apr 1686
Christopher Musgrave [kt 1671],later [1687] 
4th baronet  (to 1690)     c 1631 29 Jul 1704
28 Feb 1681 Edward Howard,styled Viscount Morpeth,later
[1685] 2nd Earl of Carlisle 27 Nov 1646 23 Apr 1692 45
19 Mar 1685 James Grahme 3 Apr 1650 26 Jan 1730 79
15 Jan 1689 Jeremiah Bubb  (to 1692) 27 Feb 1692
3 Mar 1690 Christopher Musgrave  (to 1695) 2 Jul 1664 10 Sep 1718 54
23 May 1692 William Lowther 17 Jun 1668 28 Jul 1694 26
26 Nov 1694 James Lowther,later [1731] 4th baronet 5 Aug 1673 2 Jan 1755 81
(to 1702)
4 Nov 1695 William Howard c 1674 18 Jul 1701
24 Jan 1701 Philip Howard 1669 by May 1711
27 Jul 1702 Christopher Musgrave 2 Jul 1664 10 Sep 1718 54
Thomas Stanwix  (to 1721) 24 Sep 1667 14 Mar 1725 57
18 May 1705 Sir James Montagu 2 Feb 1666 30 Oct 1723 57
7 Sep 1713 Sir Christopher Musgrave,5th baronet 25 Dec 1688 3 Jan 1736 47
29 Jan 1715 William Strickland,later [1724] 4th baronet     c 1686  1 Sep 1735
(to 1722)
12 Apr 1721 Henry Aglionby  (to 1727)    May 1684  7 Aug 1759 75
27 Mar 1722 James Bateman  9 Apr 1758
28 Aug 1727 Charles Howard  [kt 1749]   (to 1761)     c 1696 26 Aug 1765
John Hylton 27 Apr 1699 25 Sep 1746 47
13 May 1741 John Stanwix  [he was unseated on petition 19 Mar 1693 29 Oct 1766 73
in favour of John Hylton 26 Jan 1742]
26 Jan 1742 John Hylton 27 Apr 1699 25 Sep 1746 47
26 Nov 1746 John Stanwix  19 Mar 1693 29 Oct 1766 73
31 Mar 1761 Raby Vane  2 Jan 1736 23 Oct 1769 33
Henry Curwen 25 Nov 1728 23 Jun 1778 49
23 Mar 1768 Lord Edward Charles Bentinck  3 Mar 1744  8 Oct 1819 75
George Musgrave     c 1740 27 Mar 1824
 7 Oct 1774 Fletcher Norton 16 Nov 1744 19 Jun 1820 75
Anthony Morris Storer  (to 1780) 12 Mar 1746  5 Jul 1799 53
31 May 1775 Walter Spencer Stanhope  4 Feb 1749 10 Apr 1822 73
18 Sep 1780 Charles Howard,styled Earl of Surrey,later
[1786] 11th Duke of Norfolk  (to Nov 1786) 15 Mar 1746 16 Dec 1815 69
William Lowther,later [1807] 1st Earl of
Lonsdale 29 Dec 1757 19 Mar 1844 86
10 Apr 1784 Edward Norton 11 Mar 1750    Mar 1786 36
10 Apr 1786 John Lowther,later [1824] 1st baronet   [he was  1 Apr 1759 19 Mar 1844 84
unseated on petition in favour of John Christian 
31 May 1786]
31 May 1786 John Christian  (John Christian Curwen from
1790)  (to 1790) 12 Jul 1756 11 Dec 1828 72
29 Nov 1786 Edward Knubley   [he was unseated on petition  after 1749 22 Apr 1815
in favour of Rowland Stephenson 26 Feb 1787]
26 Feb 1787 Rowland Stephenson     c 1728 30 Sep 1807
 3 Jul 1790 James Clarke Satterthwaite     c 1746     c 1818
Edward Knubley  after 1749 22 Apr 1815
[Both members were unseated on petition in
favour of John Christian Curwen and Wilson
Braddyll 3 Mar 1791]
 3 Mar 1791 John Christian Curwen  (to 1812) 12 Jul 1756 11 Dec 1828 72
Wilson Braddyll 24 Feb 1756 20 Nov 1818 62
27 Jun 1796 Sir Frederick Fletcher-Vane,2nd baronet 27 Feb 1760    Mar 1832 72
 6 Jul 1802 Walter Spencer Stanhope  4 Feb 1749 10 Apr 1822 73
 7 Oct 1812 Sir James Graham,1st baronet  (to 1825) 18 Nov 1753 21 Mar 1825 71
Henry Fawcett 26 May 1762 15 Feb 1816 53
 8 Mar 1816 John Christian Curwen   12 Jul 1756 11 Dec 1828 72
[at the general election in Mar 1820,he was
also returned for Cumberland,for which he
chose to sit]
31 May 1820 William James  (to 1826) 29 Mar 1791  4 May 1861 70
2 Apr 1825 Sir Philip Musgrave,8th baronet  (to 1827) 12 Jul 1794 16 Jul 1827 33
 
12 Jun 1826 Sir James Robert George Graham,2nd baronet
(to 1829)  1 Jun 1792 25 Oct 1861 69
16 Aug 1827 James Law Lushington  (to 1831) 24 Jul 1780 29 May 1859 78
 18 Feb 1829 Sir William Scott,6th baronet 26 Jul 1803 12 Oct 1871 68
30 Jul 1830 Philip Henry Howard  (to 1847) 22 Apr 1801  1 Jan 1883 81
3 May 1831 William James 29 Mar 1791 4 May 1861 70
 8 Jan 1835 William Marshall 26 May 1796 16 May 1872 75
30 Jul 1847 John Dixon        1785
William Nicholson Hodgson  14 Aug 1801  2 Apr 1876 74
Election declared void 6 Mar 1848
14 Mar 1848 Philip Henry Howard 22 Apr 1801  1 Jan 1883 81
William Nicholson Hodgson  14 Aug 1801  2 Apr 1876 74
 8 Jul 1852 Sir James Robert George Graham,2nd baronet
(to 1861)  1 Jun 1792 25 Oct 1861 69
Joseph Ferguson        1788 17 Feb 1863 74
27 Mar 1857 William Nicholson Hodgson   14 Aug 1801  2 Apr 1876 74
29 Apr 1859 Wilfrid Lawson,later [1867] 2nd baronet    4 Sep 1829  1 Jul 1906 76
(to 1865)
26 Nov 1861 Edmund Potter  (to 1874)        1802 26 Oct 1883 81
12 Jul 1865 William Nicholson Hodgson   14 Aug 1801  2 Apr 1876 74
18 Nov 1868 Sir Wilfrid Lawson,2nd baronet  (to 1885)  4 Sep 1829  1 Jul 1906 76
 6 Feb 1874 Robert Ferguson        1817  1 Sep 1898 81
REPRESENTATION REDUCED 
TO ONE MEMBER 1885
 2 Jul 1886 William Court Gully,later [1905] 1st Viscount
Selby 29 Aug 1835  6 Nov 1909 74
14 Jul 1905 Frederick William Chance  [kt 1920] 26 Dec 1852 31 Aug 1932 79
17 Jan 1910 Richard Douglas Denman,later [1945] 1st 
baronet 24 Aug 1876 22 Dec 1957 81
14 Dec 1918 William Theodore Carr 30 Jul 1866 31 Jan 1931 64
15 Nov 1922 George Middleton  [kt 1935]        1876 25 Oct 1938 62
29 Oct 1924 William Watson,later [1929] Baron 
Thankerton [L]  8 Dec 1873 13 Jun 1948 74
30 May 1929 George Middleton  [kt 1935]        1876 25 Oct 1938 62
27 Oct 1931 Edward Louis Spears [kt 1942],later [1953] 1st
baronet  7 Aug 1886 27 Jan 1974 87
26 Jul 1945 Edgar Grierson  6 Nov 1884  1 Mar 1959 74
23 Feb 1950 Alfred Hargreaves 15 Feb 1899 c Feb 1978 79
26 May 1955 Donald McIntosh Johnson 17 Feb 1903  5 Nov 1978 75
15 Oct 1964 Ronald Howard Lewis 16 Jul 1909 18 Jun 1990 80
11 Jun 1987 Eric Anthony Martlew 3 Jan 1949  
6 May 2010 Andrew John Stevenson 1963
    CARLOW
       1801 Henry Sadlier Prittie,later [Jan 1801] 2nd Baron
Dunalley  3 Mar 1775 19 Oct 1854 79
21 Mar 1801 Francis Aldborough Prittie  4 Jun 1779 8 Mar 1853 73
30 Jul 1801 Charles Montagu Ormsby,later [1812] 1st
baronet 23 Apr 1767  3 Mar 1818 50
 9 Jun 1806 Michael Symes     c 1762 22 Jan 1809
13 Nov 1806 Frederick John Robinson,later [1833] 1st
Earl of Ripon  1 Nov 1782 28 Jan 1859 76
26 May 1807 Andrew Strahan     c 1749 25 Aug 1831
24 Oct 1812 Sir Frederick John Falkiner,1st baronet  8 Apr 1768 14 Sep 1824 56
26 Jun 1818 Charles Harvey (Savill-Onley from 1822)        1756 31 Aug 1843 87
15 Jun 1826 Charles William Bury,styled Baron Tullamore,
later [1835] 2nd Earl of Charleville 29 Apr 1801 14 Jul 1851 50
15 Dec 1832 Nicholas Aylward Vigors 1786 26 Oct 1840 54
16 Jan 1835 Francis Bruen 15 Dec 1867
 5 Aug 1837 William Henry Maule  [kt 1839] 25 Apr 1788 16 Jan 1858 69
For further information on this MP,see the
note at the foot of this page
27 Feb 1839 Francis Bruen   [he was unseated on petition 15 Dec 1867
in favour of Thomas Gisborne 12 Jul 1839]
12 Jul 1839 Thomas Gisborne c 1790 20 Jul 1852
 5 Jul 1841 Brownlow Villiers Layard 14 Jul 1804 27 Dec 1853 49
 5 Aug 1847 John Sadleir 1813 17 Feb 1856 42
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
20 Jan 1853 John Alexander        1802    Oct 1885 83
 6 May 1859 Sir John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton,8th
baronet,later [1869] 1st Baron Acton 10 Jan 1834 19 Jun 1902 68
15 Jul 1865 Thomas Osborne Stock 17 Nov 1875
20 Nov 1868 William Addis Fagan        1832
 3 Feb 1874 Henry Owen-Lewis        1842 5 Aug 1913 71
3 Apr 1880 Charles Dawson        1842
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1885 
  CARLOW COUNTY
       1801 William Henry Burton 16 Jul 1739  7 Jan 1818 78
Sir Richard Butler,7th baronet 14 Jul 1761 16 Jan 1817 55
26 Jul 1802 David Latouche  (to 1816)  5 May 1769 15 Mar 1816 46
Walter Bagenal     c 1762 18 Jun 1814
30 Oct 1812 Henry Bruen  (to 1831)  3 Oct 1789  5 Nov 1852 63
18 Apr 1816 Robert Anthony Latouche     c 1781 19 Nov 1849
29 Jun 1818 Sir Ulysses Bagenal Burgh,later [1826] 2nd
Baron Downes [I] 15 Aug 1788 26 Jul 1863 74
6 Apr 1826 Thomas Kavanagh 10 Mar 1767 20 Jan 1837 69
11 May 1831 Walter Blackney  (to 1835) 1 Aug 1775 14 Sep 1842 67
Sir John Milley Doyle 1781 9 Aug 1856 75
22 Dec 1832 Thomas Wallace c 1766
13 Jan 1835 Henry Bruen  3 Oct 1789  5 Nov 1852 63
Thomas Kavanagh 1767 23 Jan 1837 69
Election declared void 27 May 1835
15 Jun 1835 Nicholas Aylward Vigors 1786 26 Oct 1840 54
Alexander Raphael 17 Nov 1850
[Both members were unseated on petition in
favour of Henry Bruen and Thomas
Kavanagh 19 Aug 1835]
19 Aug 1835 Henry Bruen  (to Aug 1837)  3 Oct 1789  5 Nov 1852 63
Thomas Kavanagh 1767 23 Jan 1837 69
18 Feb 1837 Nicholas Aylward Vigors  (to 1840) 28 Oct 1840
11 Aug 1837 John Ashton Yates  (to 1841) 1782 1 Nov 1863 81
 5 Dec 1840 Henry Bruen  (to 1853)  3 Oct 1789  5 Nov 1852 63
11 Jul 1841 Thomas Bunbury c 1775 28 May 1846
1 Jul 1846 William Bunbury McClintock-Bunbury        1800  2 Jun 1866 65
26 Jul 1852 John Ball  (to 1857) 20 Aug 1818 21 Oct 1889 71
25 Apr 1853 William Bunbury McClintock-Bunbury
(to 1862)        1800  2 Jun 1866 65
 4 Apr 1857 Henry Bruen  (to 1880) 16 Jun 1828  8 Mar 1912 83
 7 Aug 1862 Denis William Pack Beresford        1818 28 Dec 1881 63
18 Nov 1868 Arthur MacMurrough Kavanagh 25 Mar 1831 25 Dec 1889 58
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
13 Apr 1880 Edmund Dwyer Gray  (to 1886)   [at the 29 Dec 1845 27 Mar 1888 42
general election in Dec 1885, he was also
returned for St.Stephen's Green, for which he
chose to sit]
For further information on this MP,see
the note at the foot of this page
Donald Horne Macfarlane  [kt 1894] 18 Jul 1830  2 Jun 1904 73
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1885
29 Jan 1886 John Aloysius Blake        1826 22 May 1887 60
24 Aug 1887 Charles James Patrick O'Gorman Mahon 17 Mar 1800 15 Jun 1891 91
 7 Jul 1891 John Hammond        1842 17 Nov 1907 65
3 Feb 1908 Walter MacMurrough Kavanagh Jan 1856 18 Jul 1922 66
20 Jan 1910 Michael Molloy        1850 12 Jan 1926 75
14 Dec 1918 James Lennon 13 Jul 1958
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  CARLTON (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE)
23 Feb 1950 Kenneth William Murray Pickthorn,later [1959]
1st baronet 23 Apr 1892 12 Nov 1975 83
31 Mar 1966 Philip Welsby Holland  [kt 1983] 14 Mar 1917 2 Jun 2011 94
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  CARMARTHEN  (CARMARTHENSHIRE)
23 Apr 1660 Arthur Annesley,later [Nov 1660] 2nd Viscount
Valentia and [1661] 1st Earl of Anglesey 10 Jul 1614  6 Apr 1686 71
25 Mar 1661 John Vaughan,later [1687] 3rd Earl of Carbery 18 Jul 1639 16 Jan 1713 73
17 Feb 1679 Altham Vaughan     c 1642 16 Feb 1682
 6 Apr 1685 Richard Vaughan     c 1655 27 Oct 1724
 4 Jan 1725 James Phillips 11 Jul 1672 28 Nov 1730 58
11 Sep 1727 Arthur Bevan     c 1687  6 Mar 1742  
18 May 1741 Sir John Philipps,6th baronet  8 Nov 1700 23 Jun 1764 63
 3 Jul 1747 Thomas Mathews    Oct 1676  2 Oct 1751 74
22 Nov 1751 Griffith Philipps     c 1715 27 Feb 1781
 2 Apr 1761 Ralph Verney,2nd Earl Verney [I]  1 Feb 1714 31 Mar 1791 77
28 Mar 1768 Griffith Philipps     c 1715 27 Feb 1781
 7 Oct 1774 John Adams     c 1746  2 Jun 1817
11 Sep 1780 George Philipps     c 1742 17 Apr 1784
 5 Apr 1784 John George Philipps     c 1761    Jun 1816
27 May 1796 Magens Dorrien-Magens   [he was unseated on     c 1761 30 May 1849
petition in favour of John George Philipps
7 Nov 1796]
 7 Nov 1796 John George Philipps     c 1761    Jun 1816
27 Dec 1803 Sir William Paxton     c 1744 10 Feb 1824
 3 Nov 1806 George Campbell  [kt 1815] 14 Aug 1759 23 Jan 1821 61
For information on the death of this MP,see
the note at the foot of this page
20 Dec 1813 John Frederick Campbell,later [1821] 2nd Baron
Cawdor and [1827] 1st Earl Cawdor  8 Nov 1790  7 Nov 1860 69
5 Jul 1821 John Jones 15 Sep 1777 10 Nov 1842 65
14 Dec 1832 William Henry Yelverton  5 Mar 1791 28 Apr 1884 93
 6 Jan 1835 David Lewis
24 Jul 1837 David Morris 30 Sep 1864
31 Oct 1864 William Morris        1811        1877 66
18 Nov 1868 John Stepney Cowell-Stepney,later [1871]
1st baronet 23 Feb 1791 15 May 1877 86
 9 Feb 1874 Charles William Nevill        1816  7 Jun 1888 71
14 Aug 1876 Sir Emile Algernon Arthur Keppel
Cowell-Stepney,later [1877] 2nd baronet 26 Dec 1834 2 Jul 1909 74
11 May 1878 Benjamin Thomas Williams        1832 21 Mar 1890 57
 4 Jan 1882 Sir John Jones Jenkins,later [1906] 1st
Baron Glantawe 10 May 1835 27 Jul 1915 80
 7 Jul 1886 Sir Emile Algernon Arthur Keppel
Cowell-Stepney,2nd baronet 26 Dec 1834 2 Jul 1909 74
   Jul 1892 Evan Rowland Jones        1840 16 Jan 1920 79
17 Jul 1895 Sir John Jones Jenkins,later [1906] 1st
Baron Glantawe 10 May 1835 27 Jul 1915 80
 8 Oct 1900 Alfred Davies        1848 27 Sep 1907 59
17 Jan 1906 William Llewelyn Williams 10 Mar 1867 22 Apr 1922 55
14 Dec 1918 John Hinds 26 Jul 1862 23 Jul 1928 65
 6 Dec 1923 Sir Ellis Jones Ellis-Griffith,1st baronet 23 May 1860 30 Nov 1926 66
14 Aug 1924 Sir Alfred Moritz Mond,1st baronet,later [1928]
1st Baron Melchett 23 Oct 1868 27 Dec 1930 62
28 Jun 1928 William Nathaniel Jones 20 Mar 1858 24 May 1934 76
30 May 1929 Daniel Hopkin Jul 1886 30 Aug 1951 65
27 Oct 1931 Richard Thomas Evans        1890 20 Jul 1946 56
14 Nov 1935 Daniel Hopkin Jul 1886 30 Aug 1951 65
26 Mar 1941 Ronw Moelwyn Hughes  6 Oct 1897  1 Nov 1955 58
26 Jul 1945 Rhys Hopkin Morris  [kt 1954] 5 Sep 1888 22 Nov 1956 68
28 Feb 1957 Lady Megan Arfon Lloyd-George 22 Apr 1902 14 May 1966 64
14 Jul 1966 Gwynfor Richard Evans 1 Sep 1912 21 Apr 2005 92
18 Jun 1970 Gwynoro Glyndwr Jones 21 Nov 1942
10 Oct 1974 Gwynfor Richard Evans 1 Sep 1912 21 Apr 2005 92
 3 May 1979 Roger Gareth Thomas 14 Nov 1925 1 Sep 1994 68
11 Jun 1987 Alan Wynne Williams 21 Dec 1945
SPLIT INTO "CARMARTHEN EAST AND DINEFWR"
AND "CARMARTHEN WEST AND SOUTH
PEMBROKESHIRE" 1997
Electioneering, Camelford style
During the period leading up to the Reform Act of 1832, which abolished 56 of England's 
"rotten boroughs" (including Camelford), the patronage of this borough was vigorously 
contested between the Whig 3rd Earl of Darlington and the Tory 3rd Marquess of Hertford. 
The contest was quite robust, as is illustrated by two examples.
In 1822 a dispute arose regarding a plot of land called "Culloden," of which Darlington, Hertford
and a third party held equal parts. Hertford wished to sub-divide this land in order that he 
might build a number of houses on it for the benefit of his 'friends' who would then presumably
vote for his party in upcoming elections. However, in December of that year, "Culloden's"
tenant surrendered the land to Darlington's agents. Hertford's supporters were less than happy
with this event, and what followed is described in a report which appeared in the 'Royal 
Cornwall Gazette, Falmouth Packet & Plymouth Journal' of 29 March 1823:-
'Culloden was held by Mr. John Rosevear, on lease for 18 years, ending Lady-day [25 March]
1822, since which time he has it as a tenant at will. At Midsummer last, Mr. Rosevear let the
house, and as is asserted, the fields of which there are five, to a surgeon named Staveley, 
who again let three of the fields to the defendant Cock, in November last. On the 23rd of 
December, Staveley quitted the premises, and by some unexplained means the friends of Lord
Darlington obtained possession, which they determined to hold. The defendants and other
supporters of the Noble Marquis being apprised that their opponents had "stolen a march" upon
them assembled in great force, laid siege to the house, and after various successful attempts
to force open the gate, in which they were manfully resisted by the garrison, they were
preparing for a more vigorous assault, when the friends of the Noble Earl gallantly made a sally,
and a furious conflict ensued, which was terminated by the appearance of the Mayor at the
head of his constables, who immediately proceeded to read the Riot Act, and after taking
several of the Hertfordians into custody, left his friends, the Darlingtonians, in quiet 
possession. Mr. Cock, the leader of the Hertfordian forces and his fellow defendants, were
held to bail for an assault, and several others were held to bail for a riot, and about a dozen
for a conspiracy.
'The trial lasted the greater part of the day, to the great amusement of the auditory; but in
which the learned Judge did not appear to participate, as he conceived that the time of the
Court was very improperly occupied by these miserable party broils in a pitiful borough, which
should have been heard at the Quarter Sessions, if it was expedient that they should be heard
at all. The Jury acquitted the defendants.'
The second incident occurred in October 1825 and is described in "The Age" [London] of the
16th of that month:-
"Blow Up Between the Marquis of Hertford and Lord Darlington"
'The annals of borough electioneering in this county have seldom produced an instance of more
violent party feeling than now exists in the borough of Camelford. THE EARL OF DARLINGTON
possesses the fee-simple of most of the lands in the borough, and is, of course, the patron.
He has been for several years opposed by the MARQUIS OF HERTFORD, who has got 
possession of some houses in the place, which are held by his friends: amongst these houses
is one of which a partisan of the MARQUIS has a lease for three lives, and to which a garden
is attached. In this garden a house was erected for the purpose of accommodating certain of
the Hertfordians, who are electors, and who, there was reason to believe, would be ejected
from their present residences by the NOBLE EARL. The progress of this building was carefully
watched, and as soon as it was covered in, a party of miners entered the gardens and
commenced sinking a shaft in search of ore near the newly-erected house. After they had
sunk the shaft to some depth, they found it expedient to commence an adit [a horizontal
passage], which they drove under the building, and where they experienced any difficulty in
their progress, they resorted to the usual mode of blasting. This last measure was fatal to the 
project of the Hertfordians: a few explosions of GUNPOWDER in the subterranean passage
underneath, shook the house to the foundations, and it is now a heap of ruins!'
Hugh Watt, MP for Camlachie 1885-1892
Both during and after his time as a member of Parliament, Hugh Watt was no stranger to the 
Courts. In June 1888, he was busily engaged in suing his fellow MP, Charles Cameron, 
member for the College division of Glasgow and proprietor of the 'North British Daily Mail.' 
Cameron's paper had claimed that an address given by Watt regarding the Northern Territory
of Australia had been plagiarized from a book whose author had, unknown to Watt, been 
present in the audience during the address and had recognised his words as being her own.
In July 1892, Watt lost a libel action against him and was forced to pay damages to the 
plaintiff. In May 1896, his wife, Mrs. Julia Watt petitioned the Courts for a divorce on the
grounds of Watt's adultery and cruelty, and in May 1901, Watt was named as co-respondent
in a divorce action brought by Sir Reginald Proctor-Beauchamp, 5th baronet, against his wife,
Lady Violet Proctor-Beauchamp, daughter of the 5th Earl of Roden. Watt's relationship with
Lady Violet was to have far-reaching consequences.
After Sir Reginald obtained his divorce, Watt's wife was also successful in obtaining a divorce
from Watt. According to contemporary newspapers, Watt then married Lady Violet. Burke's 
Peerage gives a date of 12 December 1906 as being the date of their marriage, but the 
newspapers throughout 1905 all state that Watt and Lady Violet were already married at
that time. 
In August 1905, Watt was arrested and charged with attempting to procure the murder of 
his first wife. According to the evidence given at his subsequent trial in December 1905, on
10 August 1905, Watt approached a man named Herbert Augustus Marshall, an inquiry agent 
[i.e. a private detective] and gave instructions to have his ex-wife watched. A few days 
later, Marshall stated that he had called on Watt at his home. Watt had produced a bottle
containing a liquid, which he told Marshall was chloroform. Watt had then said to Marshall;
"You get Mrs. Watt to come here, and get her downstairs, where I have a room prepared;
I will give her a push and chloroform her, and when it is all over, you must go to Dr. Blake
of Putney, and he will certify death from heart disease and I will have her cremated within
48 hours." Marshall declined Watt's suggested course of action and went straight to the
police.
On 21 December 1905, Watt was found guilty of attempting to procure the murder of his 
wife and was sentenced to five years' penal servitude. He served only one year of the 
five, being released on 10 December 1906. This date fits in well with Burke's date for his
marriage to Lady Violet two days after his release, notwithstanding the unanimous reports
in contemporary papers that the two were already married. On the other hand, his death
notice in March 1921 states that he had married Lady Violet in 1906, thus agreeing with
the date shown in Burke.
However, a contrary and apologist view of the whole affair was published in 'The 
Washington Post' of 18 July 1910:-
'It was the daughter of the fifth Earl of Roden, namely, Lady Violet Jocelyn, who, after
her divorce from Sir Reginald [Proctor-] Beauchamp, underwent such extraordinary 
experiences in connection with her present and perfectly happy marriage with Hugh Watt,
formerly member of Parliament for Glasgow [Camlachie], and head of the great mercantile
house bearing his name in that city.
'Watt had been named by Sir Reginald as co-respondent. Shortly afterward Mrs. Watt
secured a divorce from her husband, on the ground of his infatuation for Lady Violet,
but purposely abstained from taking the necessary steps to render the decree absolute
and complete, with the object of depriving him of the liberty of wedding Lady Violet. In
fact, Mrs. Watt, imbued with sentiments of resentment and revenge, did everything in
her power to persecute both Lady Violet and Hugh Watt, and wound up by charging him
with inciting certain persons to murder her. [Despite the fact that the evidence in the
trial goes to show that Marshall had informed on Watt directly to the police, and that it
was the police who commenced the action against Watt.]
'Evidence was furnished by men of infamous character, who swore that they had been
employed by Hugh Watt to murder his former wife; and although the tale which they told
was on the face of it of the most improbable description, since no sane man could have
proposed murder in such a casual fashion to agents so untrustworthy, and to be carried
out by means so ludicrous, yet the story, idiotic as it appeared, seemed to appeal to the
jury, who, composed of petty tradesmen, apparently thought that because Hugh Watt
had been divorced by his own wife, and had figured as co-respondent in another case,
he was capable of every other crime. They rendered a verdict against him, and the judge,
Sir William Phillimore, who had but little experience in criminal cases, instead of attempting
to guide them, allowed himself to be swayed by them and sentenced Watt to five years'
penal servitude. [The judge was Sir Walter Phillimore, not Sir William - it's errors such as
these that undermine, in my view, the force of the argument expressed by the author of 
the article.]
'Both the conviction and the sentence were denounced by the press, and by all sensible
people, and had the court of criminal appeal, since inaugurated, been then in existence,
it would undoubtedly quashed the case at once. As it was, the indignation on the part of
the public, of high and low degree, assumed such proportions with regard to the sentence
that the secretary of state for home affairs, after a few months had elapsed, recommended
to the crown its reduction to such an extent that Watt was immediately set at liberty.
'It was only after this, and after Mrs. Watt had still further vented her animosity upon Lady
Violet, by suing her for libel, and by endeavoring to bankrupt her in connection with the
enormous legal costs of her divorce suit, that she was practically forced by popular clamor
to consent to the final legal steps necessary to complete her divorce from Hugh Watt so
as to permit him to wed Lady Violet.
'It is only fair to add that since then the path of Lady Violet Watt and of her husband has
been rendered heavier by the knowledge that not only society, but also the public at large,
without altogether condoning their indiscretion, nevertheless regard them as having been
the particularly cruelly treated victims of gross misdirection of justice and of feminine 
revenge, and as such worthy of sympathy and good will.'
John Nichols Thom (or Tom) alias Sir William Percy Honywood Courtenay, candidate
for the seat of Canterbury at the 1832 general election
John Nichols Thom was born in the Cornish village of Columb Major on 10 November 1799.
His father, William Thom, kept the local public house, the 'Joiner's Arms.' His mother, Charity,
died in an insane asylum when he was a child. From her, he appears to have inherited the
streak of insanity which shaped the remainder of his life.
Thom left home after his mother died and took a job as a cellarman to a wine merchant in
Truro. Within five years he had saved enough to marry and set himself up in business as a
maltster. However, his extravagance kept him in constant debt. He built a fine house and
business premises and liked to dress in expensive, flamboyant clothes and sport an ever-
increasing collection of jewellery. In 1829, fire demolished part of his warehouse and netted
him £3,000 in insurance. Rumours that he knew something of the blaze caused the under-
writers to investigate further, but they could find no evidence and the claim had to be paid.
Using the money received from the fire claim, Thom plunged into extensive speculation,
which apparently was successful.
By this time, Thom's mind was becoming unhinged. In 1832, or so he claimed - grave doubts
have been cast upon his story - Thom travelled to Beirut to meet a woman whose exploits
had long fired his imagination. This was Lady Hester Stanhope, daughter of Earl Stanhope,
who had left England to settle in Syria, where she lived in oriental splendour. Lady Hester
believed that a messiah was destined to appear before her in her desert retreat and that 
she was to become his bride. Thom seems to have thought that he would make as good a
messiah as any, but when he presented himself at her desert retreat, she ridiculed his claims
and refused to see him.
Thom therefore returned to England, where he threw himself into political agitation. At that
time, England was seething with agitation over the Reform Bill, which proposed greater
representation of the middle class in Parliament and the abolition of 'rotten boroughs' which
were controlled by the aristocracy. Thom descended upon Canterbury in Kent in the guise of
Count Moses Rothschild, dressed in crimson velvet, trimmed with gold. Within a week, 
however, he changed his alias to that of Sir William Percy Honeywood Courtenay, airily
explaining that Rothschild had been merely his incognito. 
He stumped the country preaching a new deal for the common people, in which they took
over the great estates and earned wealth beyond their wildest dreams. To spread his views,
he started a newspaper, 'The Lion.'  His popularity became so widespread that he stood as
a candidate in the general election of 1832 in the seat of Canterbury, where, although
unsuccessful, he gained a respectable share of the vote.
Undeterred by his defeat, he plunged into a new fight, in which he defended a gang of 
alcohol smugglers who had been captured off the Kentish coast. He spoke so wildly that he
was indicted for perjury and sentenced to seven years' transportation, which he escaped
only by pleading insanity and was locked up in a lunatic asylum. Through the efforts of his
father, he obtained a pardon and was released.
He immediately resumed his masquerade as Sir William Courtenay, but this time with the
added titles of Earl of Devon, Prince of Abyssinia and King of Jerusalem. Over the next five
years, more and more followers rallied to him. After Queen Victoria succeeded to the throne
he told his followers that he would undoubtedly enjoy considerable influence at Court. Soon,
he was aiming even higher, when he proclaimed himself a saviour with supernatural powers
to resist arrest. His ignorant supporters fell at his feet and worshipped him when he exhibited
supposed stigmata proving his divinity.
Discarding his rich Oriental costume, he rode from village to village on a white horse, dressed
in a plain brown shirt, trousers and a broad-brimmed hat. In his belt he wore two pistols and
he carried a long sword which he called Excalibur. A trumpet was slung over his shoulder, and
he was preceded by two aides - one carried his standard, a white banner with blue borders
and a red lion in the centre, while the other held aloft a long pole with a loaf of bread stuck
on it as an emblem of the plenty he promised his followers. At his meetings, Thom climaxed
his sermons by drawing his two pistols and firing them into the air. The pistols were loaded
with a mixture of powder and steel filings. Firing them caused a cloud of iridescent sparks to
shoot into the air and fall to the ground, thus fulfilling Thom's boast that he had powers to
"make the stars fall from their spheres."
On 28 May 1838 Thom began to gather his faithful for a grand march to London, where they
would force the government to repeal the Poor Law and institute other reforms. Gathering
fresh supporters along the way, he expected that by the time they reached London, he 
would head an army of thousands. He promised his followers that no human power could 
harm either him or his followers. Even if confronted by 10,000 soldiers, he could kill them all
by hitting his left hand with his right. In the extremely unlikely event that he himself was
killed, he would rise from the dead after three days.
On 31 May 1838, Thom and his followers were camped in a wood near the small town of
Bossenden. By this time, the local authorities were becoming alarmed, and a magistrate 
issued a warrant for Thom's arrest on a charge of breach of the peace. Three constables
were sent to execute the warrant. When they arrived at the wood, Thom pulled out a
pistol and shot Constable Nicholas Mears dead, after which he hacked at his body with his
sword and threw the body into a ditch. A clergyman, the Rev. William Handley, tried to talk
with Thom, but he had to flee for his life in a hail of bullets. 
Later that day 100 troops of the 45th Regiment of Foot were despatched from Canterbury to
arrest Thom and his followers. Arriving at the camp, Lieutenant Henry Boswell Bennett 
advanced and called upon Thom to surrender. In reply, Thom shot the Lieutenant dead, thus
making Bennett the first soldier to die on active duty during the reign of Queen Victoria. The
shooting of their officer was the signal for a general charge by the soldiers, leading within a
few minutes to the deaths of ten men, including Thom. The remainder of Thom's followers 
fled, but 25 were rounded up and thrown in gaol. Of these captured followers, ten were later
sentenced to death, but all were later reprieved.
Mindful of Thom's prediction that he would rise in three days, the coroner caused his heart 
to be removed before he was buried in an unmarked grave, over which constables stood
guard until it became obvious that Thom was not going to be resurrected. The "Battle of
Bossenden Wood" has now gone into history as the last battle fought on English soil.
Francis Bennett-Goldney, MP for Canterbury 1910-1918
Before being elected in the December 1910 general election, Bennett-Goldney had been an
unsuccessful candidate at the January 1910 general election. In that earlier election, he
apparently received an offer of assistance from an Elizabeth Skinner. When Bennett-Goldney
was unable to offer her employment, she saw herself as "a woman scorned," and wrote a 
series of virulent letters to him and to others, in which she alleged that Bennett-Goldney had
spread reports that there had been immoral relations between himself and Skinner.
Bennett-Goldney sued Skinner for publishing a malicious libel. Skinner was brought before the
courts on 25 February 1911, where she was found guilty and bound over on bail of £100 until
the next assizes, and to be of good behaviour in the meantime. After she left the court, she
went to the railway station where she created a scene. The following report appeared in 'The
Observer' of 26 February 1911:-
'There was an unexpected sequel at Canterbury yesterday to the trial of Elizabeth Skinner,
better known as "Sister Bessie," who was bound over on the previous day at the Assizes for
having libelled Mr. F. Bennett Goldney, M.P. for Canterbury.
'After the trial she was arrested by order of the Judge for having molested, at the railway
station, some of the witnesses who had given evidence against her, and she was brought 
before his Lordship yesterday morning.
Mrs. Marshall, one of the witnesses for the prosecution, said that at the railway station the
defendant caught hold of her by the shoulder, declared that she would have a new trial and
get her revenge. The witness was very much frightened by her conduct.
'Mr. Shea, Mr. Goldney's solicitor, said that the defendant's behaviour towards Mrs. Floyd,
another witness, was such that the lady almost collapsed. Subsequently the defendant went 
up to Mr. Goldney at the slope of the platform and reviled him. As she became very 
threatening, Mr. Shea got between them, and told her that if she continued to be violent he
would have to bring her conduct under the notice of the Judge, but this had no effect.
'In reply to the Judge, the defendant stated that she had no intention of frightening the
witnesses or causing a breach of the peace. All she said to them was that she should have a
new trial. She promised not to molest Mr. Goldney or his witnesses in future.'
On 15 May 1911, Skinner was again in court seeking leave to appeal against her conviction,
but her application was refused. She was subsequently sentenced to six months' imprisonment.
Bennett-Goldney had, in 1907, been appointed as Athlone Puirsuivant of the Order of St. 
Patrick in Ireland. Not long after his appointment the Irish Crown Jewels were stolen and they
have never been recovered. For further information on this theft see Sean Murphy's interesting
web-page at http://homepage.eircom.net/~seanjmurphy/irhismys/jewels.htm
Bennett-Goldney was killed in a car accident at Brest in France in July 1918. Following his 
death his estate was fought over in the Probate Division - he had left eight wills and codicils.
William Henry Maule, MP for Carlow 1837-1839
Maule sat for Carlow from the general election of 1837 until he was appointed a Baron of the 
Court of Exchequer in 1839. Later that same year he was transferred to the Court of Common 
Pleas where he remained until his retirement in 1855. He was noted for his sense of humour,
examples of which are shown in the following article published in 'The Washington Post' on 11
November 1920 as part of a series called "Famous Wits of History":-
'When William Maule was on the bench of the court of common pleas of London there was
scarcely a day when some witty saying did not instruct was well as amuse the court. The 
value of many of these witty flashes lay in the context of the case then being tried; else,
hinged upon some point of law, therefore we cannot appreciate all of them. There are some 
of Maule's sayings, however, still remembered which everyone can appreciate.
'Maule was just. He never permitted his court in any way to work a hardship upon a man. To
accomplish this he sometimes stretched legal points until they almost disappeared. He is one 
of Maule's sentences:
"Prisoner at the bar, your counsel thinks you innocent: the counsel for the prosecution thinks
you innocent: I think you innocent. But a jury of your countrymen, in the exercise of such 
common sense as they possess, which does not seem much, have found you guilty, and it
remains for me to pass on you the sentence of the law. That sentence is that you kept in
imprisonment for one day, and, as that day was yesterday, you may go about your business."
One day a little girl was ushered into the witness box. As is usual before she was allowed to
be sworn she was examined by the judge as to her understanding of the nature of an oath,
and her belief in a future state.
"Do you know what an oath is, my child?" Maule asked.
"Yes, sir, I am obliged to tell the truth."
"And if you do tell the truth, where will you go when you die?"
"Up to heaven."
"And what will become of you if you tell lies?"
"I shall go down to the naughty place, sir."
"Are you quite sure of that?"
"Yes, sir. Quite sure."
"Let her be sworn," said Maule with a wistful smile. "It is quite clear that she knows a good 
deal more than I do."
'A prisoner was found guilty of a sensational murder, and, being asked in the usual way why
sentence should not be passed upon him, exclaimed dramatically:
"May God strike me dead, my lord, if I did it!"
'There was a hushed silence throughout the crowded court. The spectators gazed at the 
prisoner in horror. Maule looked steadily in front of him and waited without a movement. After
a pause of several minutes, Maule coughed, and began to address the prisoner in his dry,
asthmatic voice, as if dealing with some legal point that had been raised in the case:
"Prisoner at the bar, as Providence has not seen fit to interfere in your case, it now becomes
my duty to pronounce upon you the sentence of death."
John Sadleir, MP for Carlow 1847-1853 and Sligo 1853-1856
Sadlier was born in 1813 at Shrove Hill, Tipperary in Ireland, the son of Clement William 
Sadlier, who was described as having the occupation of 'Irish gentleman.' Young Sadleir
established a legal practice in Dublin and, as his practice grew, became a director with a
local stock company, frequently visiting England where he encouraged financiers to invest
in Irish enterprises.
By his early thirties, he realised that his business ambitions could never mature in Ireland,
so he sold his practice and moved to London, where he established himself as agent for
several Irish companies. He made a big impression on the London business world; personable
and brimming with aggressive efficiency, he soon established himself as an important
financier.
In 1847, he entered Parliament as the Liberal member for Carlow in southern Ireland. With his
reputation growing continually, he next turned his attention to railway investment.
Unaccustomed to doing things by halves, he quickly invested in the Royal Swedish, the East
Kent, the Swiss, the Grand Junction and the Rome Line railways. Nor did he neglect to make
his mark in the House of Commons. His fluency of speech and grasp of economics won him
many admirers and there were those who believed that he would one day become Chancellor 
of the Exchequer.
His next large venture was the foundation of joint stock bank in Tipperary, which he put
under the direction of his younger brother James (qv under Tipperary). In 1848, he reached
the summit of acceptance in London's financial circles when he was appointed chairman of 
the London and County Bank, one of Britain's leading financial institutions.
Meanwhile, in Parliament, despite the unpopularity of the cause in England, he was vigorously
defending Roman Catholic interests against the onslaughts made against them. To this end,
he co-founded, in 1851, the Catholic Defence Association. Sadleir was one of the leading
defenders when the Prime Minister, Lord John Russell, introduced the Ecclesiastical Titles Bill,
which was aimed against the Catholic clergy in England. Sadleir was amongst those who,
because of their vigorous opposition to the Bill, won the collective title of 'the Pope's Brass
Band.'
When Russell's government fell in 1852, he was offered the post of a Lord of the Treasury by
the new Prime Minister, Lord Aberdeen, who was a notorious anti-Catholic. Sadleir accepted
this offer, which incurred the immediate animosity of the Catholic clergy, as well as his
electoral supporters in Ireland. Realising that he would never retain his seat of Carlow after
having aligned himself with an anti-Catholic Prime Minister, he successfully contested Sligo,
a seat with a small Catholic population.
Sadleir was now at the peak of his career; there was talk of an impending knighthood. Then,
slowly, his façade of financial and political solidity began to crumble. It began when rumours
seeped through the stock exchange which suggested that Sadleir's business methods were
not entirely orthodox. Sadleir, at the Prime Minister's suggestion, resigned his post of Lord of
the Treasury on 6 March 1854.
This resignation caused uneasiness among the thousands of shareholders in his string of
companies; nor was the staid board of the London and County Bank happy about its 
chairman's dwindling reputation. He was called before the Bank's board and asked to resign.
There was good reason for all this fear, for, at the time, the rumours began, Sadleir had
already cheated the investors in his businesses of hundreds of thousands of pounds. For 
years he had been issuing spurious shares, forging title deeds to estates and property and
circulating worthless securities. 
In February 1856, the Tipperary Bank's London agents, Glyn & Co., refused to pay on 
draughts of the bank. Sadleir tried to raise money from other finance houses, but all refused
to help him. As a last resort, he called on an old acquaintance, Josiah Wilkinson, head of a
firm of solicitors who had often loaned money to Sadleir in the past. Sadleir begged his old
friend to help him, but Sadleir's agitation only confirmed to Wilkinson the truth of the rumours
he had been hearing, and Wilkinson declined to lend any more money to Sadleir.
Around 9 o'clock on the evening of 16 February 1856 Sadleir instructed a housemaid to post
a letter to the wife of his brother James. He also told the girl that, on the way back, she was
to go to a chemist and buy some prussic acid. An hour or so later, after the housemaid had
returned, he gave his butler some letters to post and then quietly left the house. 
Next morning, a Hampstead Heath donkey-driver named Joseph Bates went looking on the
Heath for a strayed animal. There he found the body of a well-dressed man lying on the wet
grass, an empty bottle marked 'Poison' by his side. Sadleir's butler identified the body and, at 
the subsequent inquest, the coroner found that Sadleir had committed suicide. One of the
letters that Sadleir had written before leaving his house was to his friend Robert Keating [MP
for co. Waterford 1847-1852 and Waterford City 1852-1857] in which he admitted having
swindled and deceived and said that he alone was responsible for the embezzlements. The
letter to his sister-in-law contained this passage: 'My death will prove that I am not callous
to the agony of the people I have robbed.'
Investigations made into Sadleir's companies showed that he had embezzled £200,000 from
the Tipperary Bank and had issued £150,000 worth of valueless securities in one of his
railway companies.
For years rumours circulated that Sadleir was not dead and that the body found on
Hampstead Heath was that of another person. It was pointed out that he would have good
reason to fake his own death. It was also contended that, because no cab-driver could be
found to say he had driven a man from Hyde Park to Hampstead Heath on the night in
question, Sadleir must have walked there, yet, despite the wet conditions on that night,
the dead man's shoes were perfectly clean. As far as I am aware, very little, if any, of the
stolen £350,000 was ever recovered.
See also the note regarding John Sadleir's brother, James Sadleir, at the foot of the page
containing details of the members for Tipperary. For further reading on John Sadleir, I
recommend 'Prince of Swindlers' by James O'Shea (Geography Publications, Dublin, 1999).
Arthur MacMurrough Kavanagh, MP for co. Wexford 1866-1868 
and co. Carlow 1868-1880
Kavanagh was the son of Thomas Kavanagh, who was on three occasions MP for co. Carlow
before and after the passing of the Reform Bill. Arthur, who could trace his descent from the
ancient kings of Leinster, was born with only vestigial arms and legs, but this did not
stop him from having a successful political career. He learnt to ride in the most fearless way,
strapped in a special saddle, and was also a yachtsman, a crack shot with a rifle, a keen
fisherman, an artist, an author and an early amateur photographer.
The story has it that when Arthur's mother first married Thomas Kavanagh, she insisted that 
two religious statues be removed from the family's private chapel. In this way, she wished to
prove that she had denounced her Catholicism. The local peasant population was, however,
not pleased with this action and, according to legend, they put a curse on the Kavanaghs
that one day they would be led by a cripple.
Despite his physical handicaps, Arthur was an inveterate traveller in his younger days. He
spent a large portion of his youth in foreign travel, especially to Egypt and the Middle East.
His major journey occurred in 1852, when, with two companions, he rode overland from
Norway to India, via Russia and Persia.
When his older brother Charles was killed in a fire in 1853, Arthur became head of the family,
and proved himself to be a natural leader. In 1855, he married his cousin, Frances Mary
Leathley, the marriage producing six children. He was a model landlord, something of a 
rarity in mid nineteenth-century Ireland. He rebuilt the villages of Borris and Ballyragget,
using plans drawn by himself and which won the Royal Dublin Society's Medal. To provide
timber for his tenants to build their houses, he organized a free sawmill. His wife instructed
the villagers in floriculture and lace-making.
He was first elected to the House of Commons in 1866, making him the first limbless man ever
to sit in that House. Whilst a member, he travelled from his home to London in his two-
masted schooner, which he moored directly below the Houses of Parliament, thus 
re-establishing an ancient right of members of Parliament which had fallen out of disuse over 
the centuries.
After failing to be re-elected in 1880, Arthur was appointed Lord Lieutenant of co. Carlow 
and was sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland in 1886. He died of pneumonia on Christmas 
Day morning of 1889. It was said of him at his death that 'he did not equal any man, but few
men equalled him.'
Edmund Dwyer Gray, MP for co.Carlow 1880-1885 and St.Stephen's Green 1885-1888
Gray first came to the attention of the public in 1868, when he won a bravery award from 
the Royal Humane Society following his rescue of five people off a wrecked schooner off
the Irish coast. After completing his education, Gray in 1875 succeeded his father as the
proprietor of a number of newspapers, including 'Freeman's Journal', the leading nationalist
newspaper in Ireland during this period. He was also, at the time of the events outlined in
this note, the High Sheriff of Dublin.
In August 1882, a man named Francis Hynes was found guilty of murdering a caretaker in
co.Clare. After his trial had concluded, the following letter appeared in the 'Freeman's
Journal' :-
                                                                 Imperial Hotel, Dublin
                                                                         Saturday, August 12
'Dear Sir, - I think that the public ought to be made aware of the following facts: The jury in
the murder case of 'The Queen v. Hynes,' were last night 'locked up,' as it is termed, for the 
night, at the Imperial Hotel, where I was also staying. I was awakened from sleep shortly
after midnight by the sounds of a drunken chorus, succeeded after a time by scuffling, 
rushing, coarse laughter, and horse play along the corridor on which my bedroom opens. A
number of men, it seemed to me, were falling about the passage in a maudlin state of
drunkenness, playing ribald jokes. I listened with patience for a considerable time, when the
door of my bedroom was burst open and a man, whom I can identify (for he carried a candle
unsteadily in his hand), staggered in, plainly under the influence of drink, hiccupping, "Hallo, 
old fellow, all alone?" My answer was of a character that induced him to bolt out of the room
in as disordered a manner as he had entered. Having rung the bell, I ascertained that these
disorderly persons were jurors in the case of 'The Queen v. Hynes,' and that the servants of
the hotel had been endeavouring in vain to bring them to a sense of their misconduct. I
thought it right to convey to them a warning that the public would hear of their proceedings. 
The disturbance then ceased. It is fair to add that no more than three or four men appeared
to be engaged in the roaring, and in the tipsy horseplay that followed. I leave the public to
judge the loathsomeness of such a scene upon the night when these men held the issues of
life and death for a young man in the flower of youth when they had already heard evidence
which, if unrebutted, they must have well known would send him to a felon's grave. The 
facts I am ready to support upon oath. 
                                                                             WILLIAM O'BRIEN'                
When the letter was published, the newspaper added these words:-
'The Freeman asks: Can the Executive refuse to act upon this evidence if proved to be 
true? It has heard of men hanging that a jury might dine; but what of a man hanging 
because jurymen have dined not wisely but too well?'
On 16 August 1882, Gray was charged with contempt of court, as reported by the 'Aberdeen 
Weekly Journal' of 17 August 1882:-
'At the Dublin Commission yesterday the Solicitor-General for Ireland applied to Judge Lawson
for an attachment against Mr. Edmund Dwyer Gray, M.P., High Sheriff, and proprietor of the
Freeman's Journal, and that he should be committed to prison forthwith for contempt of
Court, or be punished by such other order as his lordship may think fit to make. The
application was founded on the affidavit of Mr. Alexander Crew, solicitor. The contempt of 
Court consisted of a number of articles in the Freeman's Journal commenting on the
proceedings of the Commission, and also of a letter from Mr. Wm. O'Brien, of the United
Ireland, attributing misconduct to a jury who convicted a young man named Hynes, from
Ennis, of wilful murder.
'The Solicitor-General pointed out that comments in the newspapers on the conduct of jurors
was a matter which could not for a moment be permitted. If the jurors misconducted
themselves it was for the Court to reprove them. In this instance the conduct of the jurors
was only brought before the public for the purpose of throwing discredit upon their verdict
so as to defeat justice. Mr. Gray, as High Sheriff, was responsible for any misconduct on the
part of the jury.
'Mr. Gray emphatically disclaimed any imputation whatever on his lordship or the Court. It 
was, in his opinion, a question whether the articles were contempt of Court. He considered 
his duties as a journalist far higher than those of High Sheriff, and if the latter interfered 
with his profession he would relieve himself of it. He believed it part of his duty to comment 
without fear or favour on cases of public interest. The writer of the letter was ready to 
justify himself on oath as to the conduct of the jury in question. Mr. Gray concluded by 
asking for an adjournment in order that he might have benefit of legal assistance.
'Judge Lawson said this was no case for adjournment. Each and every one of the articles
constituted a grave contempt of Court. The earlier ones, containing atrocious allegations of
excluding Roman Catholics from juries, were an especial contempt of Court, and were written
for the purpose of exciting a persuasion in the minds of Roman Catholics that they were 
ostracised. Jurors of all persuasions required to be protected, and he should, therefore, 
sentence the defendant to three months' imprisonment, to pay a fine of £500; and, further,
to find security for himself in £5,000, and two sureties in £2,500 each, or in default to 
undergo another three months' imprisonment. His lordship stated he would similarly punish
all other offenders.
'The sentence produced a vast amount of sensation in Court. The City Coroner at first 
refused to take the defendant into custody, but ultimately did so, and he was subsequently
conveyed to Richmond Prison in his own carriage, accompanied by his wife, and escorted by 
a detachment of hussars.'
                                               ******************
Gray had two important associations with Australia. Firstly, his wife (who while still unknown
to him had witnessed the rescue for which he received the Royal Humane Society Medal) 
was the daughter of Caroline Chisholm, one of Australia's most famous early pioneers and the 
first woman (other than royalty) whose portrait appeared on an Australian banknote (the $5
note between 1967 and 1988). Secondly, his son, also Edmund, was Premier of Tasmania for
six months in 1939.
  Sir George Campbell, MP for Carmarthen 1806-1813
Sir George committed suicide in January 1821. The following report appeared in the 'Royal 
Cornwall Gazette, Falmouth Packet and Plymouth Journal' on 17 January 1821:-
'This morning at about 10 minutes before 7, Admiral Sir George Campbell, G.C.B., Commander
in Chief at [Portsmouth], was found dead in his dressing-room by his valet, who had left him
only a few minutes previous. He was lying on the floor, with a pistol by his side.  This 
melancholy event has astonished the whole town, and caused the deepest concern, Sir 
George being of the most humane and charitable disposition, and of exemplary domestic habits. 
He had the honour of being highly esteemed by his present Majesty; indeed they were early 
friends. The last season but one that his Majesty was cruising in his yacht, he came on shore
purposely  to visit Sir George Campbell; and last year on his going on board the yacht to pay 
his respects to his Majesty on his arrival here, the King observed that he did intend to go out
of the yacht during his stay, and turning to Sir George, added, in the familiar tone which he
always used with this gallant Admiral, "I shall not even go on shore to see you, George." The
poor will feel a great loss. Sir George was charitable in the extreme, and highly esteemed by
all the navy. We are entirely at a loss to account for this fatal catastrophe. A coroner's
inquest has been held, and it has returned a verdict of Lunacy.'
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