THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
  CONSTITUENCIES BEGINNING WITH "G"
 
             Last updated 28/03/2014
     Date                   Name Born Died  Age
Dates in italics in the first column denote that the election held on that
date was a by-election. Dates shown in normal type were general elections,
or, in some instances, the date of a successful petition against a 
previous election result.
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the MP was baptised on
that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate that the MP was
buried on that date
  GAINSBOROUGH (LINCOLNSHIRE)
 8 Dec 1885 Joseph Bennett        1829  1 Jan 1908 78
10 Jul 1886 Henry Eyre 4 Feb 1834 24 Jun 1904 70
   Jul 1892 Joseph Bennett        1829  1 Jan 1908 78
25 Jul 1895 Emerson Muschamp Bainbridge 5 Dec 1845 12 May 1911 65
12 Oct 1900 Seymour Fitzroy Ormsby-Gore 18 Jan 1863 19 Nov 1950 87
24 Jan 1906 Alexander Leslie Renton  6 Jul 1868  6 May 1947 78
27 Jan 1910 George Jackson Bentham  1 Aug 1863 31 Oct 1929 66
14 Dec 1918 John Elsdale Molson  6 Aug 1863 28 Nov 1925 62
 6 Dec 1923 Sir Richard Winfrey  8 Aug 1858 18 Apr 1944 85
29 Oct 1924 Harry Frederick Comfort Crookshank,
later [1956] 1st Viscount Crookshank 27 May 1893 17 Oct 1961 68
14 Feb 1956 Marcus Richard Kimball [kt 1981],later [1985] 
Baron Kimball [L] 18 Oct 1928 26 Mar 2014 85
NAME ALTERED TO "GAINSBOROUGH &
HORNCASTLE" 1983 BUT REVERTED TO
"GAINSBOROUGH" 1997
1 May 1997 Edward Julian Egerton Leigh  [kt 2013] 20 Jul 1950
GAINSBOROUGH & HORNCASTLE
 9 Jun 1983 Edward Julian Egerton Leigh  [kt 2013] 20 Jul 1950
NAME REVERTED TO "GAINSBOROUGH" 1997
  GALLOWAY
14 Dec 1918 Gilbert McMicking 24 Mar 1862 15 Nov 1942 80
15 Nov 1922 Cecil Randolph Dudgeon  7 Nov 1885  4 Nov 1970 84
29 Oct 1924 Sir Arthur John Henniker-Hughan,6th baronet 24 Jan 1866  4 Oct 1925 59
17 Nov 1925 Sidney Richard Streatfeild 27 Jun 1894  2 Dec 1966 72
30 May 1929 Cecil Randolph Dudgeon  7 Nov 1885  4 Nov 1970 84
27 Oct 1931 John Hamilton Mackie  8 Jan 1898 29 Dec 1958 60
 9 Apr 1959 Henry John Beverley Brewis  8 Apr 1920 25 May 1989 69
10 Oct 1974 George Henry Thompson 11 Sep 1928
 3 May 1979 Ian Bruce Lang,later [1997] Baron Lang of 
Monkton [L] 27 Jun 1940
NAME ALTERED TO "GALLOWAY & UPPER
NITHSDALE" 1983
GALLOWAY & UPPER NITHSDALE
 9 Jun 1983 Ian Bruce Lang,later [1997] Baron Lang of 
Monkton [L] 27 Jun 1940
1 May 1997 Alasdair Neil Morgan 21 Apr 1945
7 Jun 2001 Peter John Duncan 10 Jul 1965
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 2005
  GALWAY
       1801 St.George Daly 1758 22 Dec 1829 71
10 Mar 1801 John Brabazon Ponsonby,later [1806] 2nd
Baron Ponsonby and [1839] 1st Viscount
Ponsonby 1770 21 Feb 1855 84
15 Jul 1802 Denis Bowes Daly 1745 17 Dec 1821 76
29 Jun 1805 James Daly  1 Apr 1782  7 Aug 1847 65
28 Mar 1811 Frederick Ponsonby  [he was returned at the     c 1775        1849
general election in Nov 1812,but was unseated
on petition in favour of Valentine John Blake on
18 Jun 1813]
18 Jun 1813 Valentine John Blake,later [1834] 12th baronet 23 Jun 1780    Jan 1847 66
13 Apr 1820 Michael George Prendergast        1834
24 Jun 1826 James O'Hara 1796 23 Dec 1838 42
6 May 1831 John James Bodkin c 1801    Jan 1882 80
REPRESENTATION INCREASED
TO TWO MEMBERS 1832
14 Dec 1832 Andrew Henry Lynch  (to 1841) 1847
Lachlan MacLachlan   [he was unseated on after 1847
petition in favour of Martin Joseph Blake
2 May 1833]
 2 May 1833 Martin Joseph Blake  (to Apr 1857)    Mar 1861
 5 Jul 1841 Sir Valentine John Blake,12th baronet 23 Jun 1780    Jan 1847 66
17 Feb 1847 James Henry Monahan 1803  8 Dec 1878 75
 2 Aug 1847 Anthony O'Flaherty  (to Jul 1857)        1800 1866 66
[His election was declared void 13 Jul 1857.
  Writ suspended until Feb 1859]
 2 Apr 1857 Ulick Canning de Burgh,styled Baron
Dunkellin  (to 1865) 12 Jul 1827 16 Aug 1867 40
11 Feb 1859 John Orrell Lever        1824  4 Aug 1897 73
17 Jul 1865 Michael Morris,later [1889] Baron Morris
of Spiddal [L] 14 Nov 1826  8 Sep 1901 74
Sir Rowland Blennerhasset,4th baronet  5 Sep 1839 22 Mar 1909 69
(to 1874)
 1 Apr 1867 George Morris    Apr 1833 11 Sep 1912 79
21 Nov 1868 William Ulick Tristram St.Lawrence,styled
Viscount St.Lawrence,later [1874] 4th
Earl of Howth  (to Mar 1874) 25 Jun 1827  9 Mar 1909 81
 9 Feb 1874 George Morris  (to 1880)    Apr 1833 11 Sep 1912 79
26 Mar 1874 Frank Hugh O'Cahan O'Donnell 9 Oct 1846 2 Nov 1916 70
[his election was declared void 1 Jun 1874]
 2 Jul 1874 Michael Francis Ward        1845 17 Jun 1881 35
19 Apr 1880 John Orrell Lever        1824  4 Aug 1897 73
Thomas Power O'Connor  (to 1886) 5 Oct 1848 18 Nov 1929 81
[at the general election in Nov 1885, he was
also returned for the Scotland division of
Liverpool for which he chose to sit]
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1885
11 Feb 1886 William Henry O'Shea        1840 22 Apr 1905 64
 2 Jul 1886 John Pinkerton        1845  4 Nov 1908 63
 1 Oct 1900 Martin Henry Fitzpatrick Morris,later [1901]
2nd Baron Killanin 22 Jul 1867 11 Aug 1927 60
21 Nov 1901 Arthur Alfred Lynch    [he was convicted of 10 Aug 1861 26 Mar 1934 72
high treason 23 Jan 1903 and his seat 
forfeited]
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
 9 Mar 1903 Charles Ramsay Devlin 29 Oct 1858  1 Mar 1914 55
 1 Nov 1906 Stephen Lucius Gwynn 13 Feb 1864 11 Jun 1950 86
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  GALWAY COUNTY
       1801 Richard Trench,styled Viscount Dunlo from
1803,later [1805] 2nd Earl of Clancarty 18 May 1767 24 Nov 1837 70
Richard Martin  (to 1812) 15 Jan 1754  6 Jan 1834 79
For further information on this MP,see the
note at the foot of this page
 8 Jun 1805 Denis Bowes Daly  (to 1818) 1745 17 Dec 1821 76
10 Nov 1812 James Daly  (to 1830)  1 Apr 1782  7 Aug 1847 65
25 Jul 1818 Richard Martin   [following the general 15 Jan 1754  6 Jan 1834 79
election in Jul 1826,his name was erased
from the return and that of James Staunton
Lambert substituted 11 Apr 1827]
11 Apr 1827 James Staunton Lambert  (to 1832) 5 Mar 1789 1 Jul 1867 78
13 Aug 1830 Sir John Burke,2nd baronet c 1782 14 Sep 1847
31 Dec 1832 Thomas Barnewall Martin  (to Apr 1847) 1784 Apr 1847 62
James Daly  1 Apr 1782  7 Aug 1847 65
15 Jan 1835 John James Bodkin  (to Aug 1847) c 1801    Jan 1882
17 Apr 1847 Sir Thomas John Burke,3rd baronet  (to 1865)  7 Jun 1813  9 Dec 1875 62
11 Aug 1847 Christopher St.George        1812 13 Nov 1877 65
26 Jul 1852 Thomas Arthur Bellew        1820 24 Jul 1863 43
13 Apr 1857 William Henry Gregory  [kt 1875]  (to 1872) 12 Jul 1817  6 Mar 1892 74
18 Jul 1865 Ulick Canning de Burgh,styled Baron
Dunkellin 12 Jul 1827 16 Aug 1867 40
12 Sep 1867 Hubert George de Burgh-Canning,styled Viscount
Burke,later [1874] 2nd Marquess of Clanricarde 30 Nov 1832 12 Apr 1916 83
21 Feb 1871 Mitchell Henry  (to 1885)        1826 22 Nov 1910 84
 8 Feb 1872 John Philip Nolan   [he was unseated on        1838 30 Jan 1912 73
petition in favour of William le Poer Trench
13 Jun 1872]
13 Jun 1872 William le Poer Trench 17 Jun 1837 16 Sep 1920 83
19 Feb 1874 John Philip Nolan        1838 30 Jan 1912 73
 SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1885 
SEE BELOW
  GALWAY COUNTY EAST
 7 Dec 1885 Matthew Harris        1826 14 Apr 1890 63
14 May 1890 John Roche        1848 27 Aug 1914 66
 4 Dec 1914 James Cosgrave 18 Apr 1936
14 Dec 1918 William Joseph (Liam) Mellowes 25 May 1895  8 Dec 1922 27
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  GALWAY COUNTY NORTH
27 Nov 1885 John Philip Nolan        1838 30 Jan 1912 73
26 Jul 1895 Denis Kilbride Sep 1848    Oct 1924 76
 3 Oct 1900 John Philip Nolan        1838 30 Jan 1912 73
25 Jan 1906 Thomas Higgins 26 Jan 1906
For further information on this MP, see
the note at the foot of this page
28 Feb 1906 Richard Hazleton  5 Dec 1880 26 Jan 1943 62
14 Dec 1918 Bryan Cusack 2 Aug 1882 24 May 1973 90
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  GALWAY COUNTY SOUTH
27 Nov 1885 David Sheehy        1844 17 Dec 1932 88
 5 Oct 1900 William John Duffy 7 Apr 1865 1 Jan 1945 79
14 Dec 1918 Francis Patrick Fahy 12 Jan 1880 12 Jul 1953 73
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  GARSCADDEN (GLASGOW)
28 Feb 1974 William Watson Small 19 Oct 1909 18 Jan 1978 68
13 Apr 1978 Donald Campbell Dewar 21 Aug 1937 11 Oct 2000 63
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1997
  GARSTON (LIVERPOOL)
23 Feb 1950 Henry Victor Alpin MacKinnon Raikes  [kt 1953] 19 Jan 1901 18 Apr 1986 85
 5 Dec 1957 Richard Martin Bingham 26 Oct 1915 26 Jul 1992 76
31 Mar 1966 Trevor Victor Norman Fortescue 28 Aug 1916 29 Sep 2008 92
28 Feb 1974 Edward Loyden  3 May 1923 27 Apr 2003 79
 3 May 1979 George Malcolm Thornton  [kt 1992]  3 Apr 1939
 9 Jun 1983 Edward Loyden 3 May 1923 27 Apr 2003 79
1 May 1997 Maria Eagle 17 Feb 1961
NAME ALTERED TO "GARSTON AND
HALEWOOD" 2010
  GARSTON AND HALEWOOD (MERSEYSIDE)
6 May 2010 Maria Eagle 17 Feb 1961
  GATESHEAD (DURHAM)
12 Dec 1832 Cuthbert Rippon
29 Jun 1841 William Hutt  [kt 1865]  6 Oct 1801 24 Nov 1882 81
 5 Mar 1874 Walter Henry James,later [1893] 2nd Baron
Northbourne 25 Mar 1846 27 Jan 1923 76
24 Feb 1893 William Allan  [kt 1902]        1837 28 Dec 1903 66
21 Jan 1904 John Johnson  1 Oct 1850 29 Dec 1910 60
17 Jan 1910 Harold Elverston  [kt 1911] 26 Dec 1866 10 Aug 1941 74
14 Dec 1918 Herbert Conyers Surtees  [kt 1932] 13 Jan 1858 18 Apr 1933 75
15 Nov 1922 John Brotherton  7 Mar 1867  8 Mar 1941 74
 6 Dec 1923 John Purcell Dickie 14 Jul 1874 9 Mar 1963 88
29 Oct 1924 John Warburton Beckett 11 Oct 1894 28 Dec 1964 70
For further information on this MP,see the
note at the foot of this page
30 May 1929 Sir James Benjamin Melville 20 Apr 1885  1 May 1931 46
 8 Jun 1931 Herbert Evans        1868  7 Oct 1931 63
27 Oct 1931 Thomas Magnay 14 Sep 1876  3 Nov 1949 73
26 Jul 1945 Konni Zilliacus 13 Sep 1894  6 Jul 1967 72
 SPLIT INTO EAST & WEST DIVISIONS 1950 
BUT RE-UNITED 2010
6 May 2010 Ian Mearns Apr 1957
  GATESHEAD EAST
23 Feb 1950 Arthur Seymour Moody  6 Jun 1891 12 Dec 1971 80
15 Oct 1964 Bernard Conlan 24 Oct 1923
11 Jun 1987 Joyce Gwendolen Quin,later [2006] 
Baroness Quin [L] 26 Nov 1944
NAME ALTERED TO "GATESHEAD EAST AND
WASHINGTON WEST" 1997
  GATESHEAD EAST AND WASHINGTON WEST
1 May 1997 Joyce Gwendolen Quin,later [2006] 
Baroness Quin [L] 26 Nov 1944
5 May 2005 Sharon Hodgson 1 Apr 1966
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 2010
  GATESHEAD WEST
23 Feb 1950 John Thomas Hall  9 Nov 1896 11 Oct 1955 58
 7 Dec 1955 Harry Enos Randall 31 Dec 1899 28 Aug 1976 76
18 Jun 1970 John Rhodes Horam,later [2013] Baron Horam [L]  7 Mar 1939
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  GATTON (SURREY)
16 Apr 1660 Thomas Turgis 7 Oct 1623 11 Jun 1704 80
William Oldfield 1 Jul 1623 c Oct 1664
Roger James
Robert Wood
Double return. Election declared void
5 May 1660
19 Jun 1660 Sir Edmund Bowyer 28 Oct 1613 27 Jan 1681 67
Thomas Turgis  (to 1702) 7 Oct 1623 11 Jun 1704 80
 2 Apr 1661 William Oldfield 1 Jul 1623 c Oct 1664
29 Nov 1664 Sir Nicholas Carew 30 Jun 1635 9 Jan 1688 52
23 Mar 1685 Sir John Thompson,1st baronet,later [1696]
1st Baron Haversham 31 Aug 1648 1 Nov 1710 62
5 Nov 1696 George Evelyn 4 Dec 1641 19 Jun 1699 57
21 Jul 1698 Maurice Thompson  (to 1705) 1675 11 Apr 1745 69
16 Jul 1702 Thomas Onslow,later [1717] 2nd Baron Onslow 27 Nov 1679 5 Jun 1740 60
9 May 1705 George Newland  [kt 1706] c 1646 26 Mar 1714
  Paul Docminique  (to 1735) 15 Jan 1643 17 Mar 1735 92
2 Oct 1710 William Newland  (to 1738) 9 Mar 1685  4 May 1738 53
 5 May 1735 Charles Docminique  (to 1745)     c 1686 16 Jun 1745
16 May 1738 George Newland  (to 1749)     c 1692 22 Oct 1749
25 Oct 1745 Paul Humphrey  (to 1751)     c 1687 18 Apr 1751
28 Nov 1749 Charles Knowles,later [1765] 1st baronet     c 1704  9 Dec 1777
(to 1752)
27 Apr 1751 James Colebrooke,later [1759] 1st baronet  21 Jul 1722 10 May 1761 38
(to 1761)
10 Apr 1752 William Bateman  after 1721 19 Jun 1783
16 Apr 1754 Thomas Brand  (to 1768)     c 1717 23 Aug 1770
 5 Dec 1761 Edward Harvey  1 Aug 1718 27 Mar 1778 59
21 Mar 1768 John Damer 25 Jun 1744 15 Aug 1776 32
Joseph Martin 19 Jan 1726 30 Mar 1776 50
 7 Oct 1774 Sir William Mayne,later [1776] 1st Baron
Newhaven [I]   [he was also returned for        1722 28 May 1794 71
Canterbury,for which he chose to sit]
Robert Scott  [he was also returned for     c 1746  6 Feb 1808
Wootton Bassett,for which he chose to sit]
27 Dec 1774 Robert Mayne  (to 1782)        1724  5 Aug 1782 58
William Adam  2 Aug 1752 17 Feb 1839 86
 9 Sep 1780 William Mayne,1st Baron Newhaven [I]  (to 1790)        1722 28 May 1794 71
 
 9 Sep 1782 Maurice Lloyd    May 1796
26 Feb 1787 James Fraser     c 1740  after 1790
17 Jun 1790 John Nesbitt     c 1745 15 Mar 1817
William Currie 26 Feb 1756  3 Jun 1829 73
30 May 1796 John Petrie  (to 1800)     c 1742  5 Feb 1826
Sir Gilbert Heathcote   [he was also returned 6 Oct 1773 26 Mar 1851 77
for Lincolnshire,for which he chose to sit]
 1 Nov 1796 John Heathcote  [he resigned in Apr 1798 14 Nov 1767 3 May 1838 70
and no new writ was issued until April 1799]
19 Apr 1799 Walter Stirling,later [1800] 1st baronet  (to 1802) 24 Jun 1758 25 Aug 1832 74
29 Apr 1800 James Du Pre 10 Jun 1778 13 Jun 1870 92
 5 Jul 1802 Mark Wood,later [1808] 1st baronet   (to 1818) 16 Mar 1750  6 Feb 1829 78
James Dashwood c 1758 21 Nov 1840
24 Jan 1803 Philip Dundas c 1763 8 Apr 1807
22 Apr 1805 William Garrow  [kt 1812] 13 Apr 1760 24 Sep 1840 80
 4 Nov 1806 James Athol Wood        1756    Jul 1829 73
 8 May 1807 George Bellas-Greenough 18 Jan 1778  2 Apr 1855 77
 5 Oct 1812 William Congreve,later [1814] 2nd baronet  20 May 1772 16 May 1828 55
15 Jun 1816 Mark Wood,later [1829] 2nd baronet 14 Dec 1794  4 Aug 1837 42
17 Jun 1818 Abel Rous Dottin c 1769 7 Jun 1852
John Fleming 1747 17 May 1829 81
9 Mar 1820 Jesse Watts-Russell 6 May 1786 26 Mar 1875 88
Thomas Divett 3 Mar 1769 16 Jul 1828 59
9 Jun 1826 William Scott 23 Mar 1794 26 Nov 1835 41
Michael George Prendergast  (to 1830)        1834
8 Mar 1830 Joseph Neeld 13 Jan 1789 24 Mar 1856 67
30 Jul 1830 John Villiers Shelley,later [1852] 7th
baronet 18 Mar 1808 28 Jan 1867 58
John Thomas Hope 10 Jan 1807 17 Apr 1835 28
30 Apr 1831 John Charles George Savile,styled Viscount
Pollington,later [1860] 4th Earl of Mexborough  4 Jun 1810 17 Aug 1899 89
He was the last surviving member of the
unreformed House of Commons
Anthony John Ashley-Cooper 21 Dec 1808 1 Jan 1867 58
 CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1832 
GEDLING (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE)
 9 Jun 1983 Sir Philip Welsby Holland 14 Mar 1917 2 Jun 2011 94
11 Jun 1987 Andrew John Bower Mitchell 23 Mar 1956
1 May 1997 Vernon Rodney Coaker 17 Jun 1953
  GILLINGHAM (KENT)
14 Dec 1918 Gerald Fitzroy Hohler  [kt 1924]        1862 30 Jan 1934 71
30 May 1929 Robert Vaughan Gower  [kt 1935] 10 Nov 1880  6 Mar 1953 72
26 Jul 1945 Joseph Binns 19 Mar 1900 23 Apr 1975 75
23 Feb 1950 Frederick Frank Arthur Burden  [kt 1980] 27 Dec 1905 6 Jul 1987 81
 9 Jun 1983 James Randall Couchman 11 Feb 1942
1 May 1997 Paul Gordon Clark 29 Apr 1957
NAME ALTERED TO "GILLINGHAM AND
RAINHAM" 2010
  GILLINGHAM AND RAINHAM (KENT)
6 May 2010 Rehman Chishti 4 Oct 1978
  GLAMORGAN
c Apr 1660 Sir Edward Mansell,4th baronet c Oct 1637 14 Nov 1706
20 Mar 1661 William Herbert,Baron Herbert,later [1669]
6th Earl of Pembroke 14 Jul 1642  8 Jul 1674 31
 9 Mar 1670 Sir Edward Mansell,4th baronet c Oct 1637 14 Nov 1706
26 Feb 1679 Bussy Mansel 22 Nov 1623 25 May 1699 75
25 Feb 1681 Sir Edward Mansell,4th baronet c Oct 1637 14 Nov 1706
15 Jan 1689 Bussy Mansel 22 Nov 1623 25 May 1699 75
20 Dec 1699 Thomas Mansel 4 May 1678 7 Jan 1706 27
17 Dec 1701 Thomas Mansel,later [1706] 5th baronet and 
[1712] 1st Baron Mansell 9 Nov 1667 10 Dec 1723 56
30 Jan 1712 Robert Jones     c 1682 19 Dec 1715
22 Feb 1716 Sir Charles Kemys,4th baronet 27 Nov 1688 29 Jan 1735 46
23 May 1734 William Talbot,later [1737] 2nd Baron Talbot
and  [1761] 1st Earl Talbot 16 May 1710 27 Apr 1782 71
 9 Mar 1737 Bussy Mansell,later [1744] 4th Baron Mansell     c 1701 29 Nov 1750
 2 Jan 1745 Thomas Mathews    Oct 1676  2 Oct 1751 74
15 Jul 1747 Charles Edwin     c 1699 29 Jun 1756
23 Dec 1756 Thomas William Mathews        1711 25 Jun 1768 56
15 Apr 1761 Sir Edmund Thomas,3rd baronet  9 Apr 1712 10 Oct 1767 55
16 Dec 1767 Richard Turbervill        1707 25 Jan 1771 63
 6 Apr 1768 George Venables-Vernon,later [1780] 2nd
Baron Vernon  9 May 1735 18 Jun 1813 78
 4 Oct 1780 Charles Edwin 16 Jun 1801
 4 Sep 1789 Thomas Wyndham     c 1763 28 Nov 1814
28 Nov 1814 Benjamin Hall 29 Sep 1778 31 Jul 1817 38
 6 Sep 1817 Sir Christopher Cole 10 Jun 1770 24 Aug 1836 66
29 Jun 1818 John Edwards (Edwards-Vaughan from 1829) 29 Mar 1772 16 Aug 1833 61
16 Mar 1820 Sir Christopher Cole 10 Jun 1770 24 Aug 1836 66
10 Aug 1830 Christopher Rice Mansel Talbot 10 May 1803 17 Jan 1890 86
(to 1885)
REPRESENTATION INCREASED
TO TWO MEMBERS 1832
17 Dec 1832 Lewis Weston Dillwyn 21 Aug 1778 31 Aug 1855 77
 7 Aug 1837 Edward Richard William Wyndham-Quin,
styled Viscount Adare,later [1850] 3rd Earl of
Dunraven and Mount Earl [I] 19 May 1812  6 Oct 1871 59
25 Feb 1851 Sir George Tyler 28 Dec 1792  4 Jun 1862 69
 
 6 Apr 1857 Henry Hussey Vivian,later [1882] 1st baronet
and [1893] 1st Baron Swansea  6 Jul 1821 28 Nov 1894 73
 SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1885 
SEE "GLAMORGANSHIRE EAST",
"GLAMORGANSHIRE MID","GLAMORGANSHIRE
SOUTH","GOWER" AND "RHONDDA"
  GLAMORGANSHIRE EAST
 3 Dec 1885 Alfred Thomas [kt 1902],later [1912] 1st Baron 
Pontypridd 16 Sep 1840 14 Dec 1927 87
   Dec 1910 Allen Clement Edwards Jun 1869 23 Jun 1938 69
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  GLAMORGANSHIRE MID
25 Nov 1885 Christopher Rice Mansel Talbot 10 May 1803 17 Jan 1890 86
20 Feb 1890 Samuel Thomas Evans  [kt 1908] 4 May 1859 13 Sep 1918 59
31 Mar 1910 Frederick William Gibbins        1861 30 Jun 1937 75
   Dec 1910 John Hugh Edwards 9 Apr 1869 14 Jun 1945 76
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  GLAMORGANSHIRE SOUTH
 3 Dec 1885 Arthur John Williams 14 Apr 1834 12 Sep 1911 77
19 Jul 1895 Windham Henry Wyndham-Quin,later [1926]
5th Earl of Dunraven and Mount Earl [I]  7 Feb 1857 23 Oct 1952 95
23 Jan 1906 William Brace 23 Sep 1865 12 Oct 1947 82
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
GLANFORD & SCUNTHORPE
 9 Jun 1983 Richard Saladin Hickmet 1 Dec 1947
11 Jun 1987 Elliot Anthony Morley 6 Jul 1952
 NAME ALTERED TO "SCUNTHORPE" 1997
  GLASGOW
26 May 1708 Robert Rodger c 1650 after 1715
27 Oct 1710 Thomas Smith 19 Jan 1716
24 Feb 1716 Daniel Campbell        1672  8 Jun 1753 80
 9 Sep 1727 John Blackwood   [he was unseated on     c 1698 12 Nov 1777
petition in favour of Daniel Campbell
28 Mar 1728]
28 Mar 1728 Daniel Campbell        1672  8 Jun 1753 80
18 May 1734 William Campbell     c 1710  8 Sep 1787
28 May 1741 Neil Buchanan     c 1696 12 Mar 1744
26 Mar 1744 John Campbell,later [1770] 5th Duke of Argyll    Jun 1723 25 May 1806 82
20 Apr 1761 Lord Frederick Campbell 20 Jun 1729  8 Jun 1816 86
22 Oct 1780 John Craufurd     c 1742 26 May 1814
 6 Apr 1784 Ilay Campbell,later [1808] 1st baronet 25 Aug 1734 28 Mar 1823 88
26 Feb 1790 John Crauford     c 1742 26 May 1814
12 Jul 1790 William McDowall     c 1749  3 Apr 1810
30 Jul 1802 Alexander Houstoun   [he was unseated on     c 1770 22 Mar 1822
petition in favour of Boyd Alexander 
30 Mar 1803]
30 Mar 1803 Boyd Alexander    Jan 1758 15 Jul 1825 67
24 Nov 1806 Archibald Campbell     c 1763 13 Jun 1838
30 Jun 1809 Alexander Houstoun     c 1770 22 Mar 1822
30 Oct 1812 Kirkman Finlay    Apr 1773  4 Mar 1842 68
11 Jul 1818 Alexander Houstoun     c 1770 22 Mar 1822
31 Mar 1820 Archibald Campbell     c 1763 13 Jun 1838
23 May 1831 Joseph Dixon 14 Jan 1802 15 Jan 1844 42
REPRESENTATION INCREASED
TO TWO MEMBERS 1832
21 Dec 1832 James Ewing 1775  6 Dec 1853 78
James Oswald  (to 1837) 1777 3 Jun 1853 75
17 Jan 1835 Colin Dunlop        1775 27 Jul 1837 62
17 Feb 1836 Lord William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck
(to 1839) 14 Sep 1774 17 Jun 1839 64
27 May 1837 John Dennistoun  (to 1847)        1803  9 Sep 1870 67
24 Jun 1839 James Oswald 1777 3 Jun 1853 75
31 Jul 1847 John McGregor        1797 23 Apr 1857 59
Alexander Hastie  (to Apr 1857)        1805 13 Aug 1864 59
 6 Mar 1857 Walter Buchanan  (to 1865)        1797        1877 80
 1 Apr 1857 Robert Dalglish  (to 1874)        1808 20 Jun 1880 71
14 Jul 1865 William Graham  (to 1874)        1817 16 Jul 1885 68
REPRESENTATION INCREASED
TO THREE MEMBERS 1868 
18 Nov 1868 George Anderson  (to Mar 1885)        1819  4 Nov 1896 77
16 Feb 1874 Charles Cameron,later [1893] 1st baronet   18 Dec 1841  2 Oct 1924 82
(to Nov 1885)
Alexander Whitelaw        1823  1 Jul 1879 56
16 Jul 1879 Charles Tennant,later [1885] 1st baronet  4 Nov 1823  4 Jun 1906 82
5 Apr 1880 Robert Tweedie Middleton  (to Nov 1885)        1831        1891 60
12 Mar 1885 Thomas Russell
 SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1885 
SEE "BLACKFRIARS & HUTCHESONTOWN",
"BRIDGETON","CAMLACHIE","COLLEGE",
"GLASGOW CENTRAL","ST.ROLLOX" AND
"TRADESTON"
  GLASGOW CENTRAL
27 Nov 1885 Gilbert Beith        1827  5 Jul 1904 77
 5 Jul 1886 John George Alexander Baird 31 May 1854  6 Apr 1917 62
18 Jan 1906 Sir Andrew Mitchell Torrance 13 Feb 1845  4 Feb 1909 63
 1 Mar 1909 Charles Scott Dickson 13 Sep 1850  5 Aug 1922 71
16 Jul 1915 John Mackintosh McLeod,later [1924] 1st
baronet  5 May 1857  6 Mar 1934 76
14 Dec 1918 Andrew Bonar Law 16 Sep 1858 30 Oct 1923 65
 6 Dec 1923 Sir William Alexander  4 May 1874 29 Dec 1954 80
26 Jul 1945 James Riley Holt Hutchison,later [1956] 1st
baronet 10 Apr 1893 24 Feb 1979 85
23 Feb 1950 James McInnes 19 May 1901 14 Apr 1974 72
31 Mar 1966 Thomas McLellan McMillan 12 Feb 1919 30 Apr 1980 61
26 Jun 1980 Robert McTaggart  2 Nov 1945 23 Mar 1989 43
15 Jun 1989 Michael Goodall Watson,later [1997] Baron
Watson of Invergowrie [L] 1 May 1949
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1997
BUT REVIVED 2005
5 May 2005 Mohammed Sarwar 18 Aug 1952
6 May 2010 Anas Sarwar 14 Mar 1983
  GLASGOW EAST
5 May 2005 David Marshall 7 May 1941
24 Jul 2008 John Fingland Mason 15 May 1957
6 May 2010 Margaret Patricia Curran 24 Nov 1958
  GLASGOW NORTH
5 May 2005 Ann McKechin 22 Apr 1962
  GLASGOW NORTH EAST
5 May 2005 Michael John Martin,later [2009] Baron
Martin of Springburn [L]  3 Jul 1945
12 Nov 2009 William Thomas Bain 29 Nov 1972
  GLASGOW NORTH WEST
5 May 2005 John Robertson 17 Apr 1952
  GLASGOW SOUTH
5 May 2005 Thomas Harris 20 Feb 1964
  GLASGOW SOUTH WEST
5 May 2005 Ian Graham Davidson 8 Sep 1950
  GLASGOW & ABERDEEN UNIVERSITIES
 8 Dec 1868 James Moncreiff,later [1871] 1st baronet and
[1874] 1st Baron Moncreiff 29 Nov 1811 27 Apr 1895 83
22 Nov 1869 Edward Strathearn Gordon,later [1876]
Baron Gordon of Drumearn [L] 10 Apr 1814 21 Aug 1879 65
 1 Nov 1876 William Watson,later [1880] Baron Watson [L] 25 Aug 1827 14 Sep 1899 72
   Apr 1880 James Alexander Campbell        1825  9 May 1908 82
 6 Feb 1906 Sir Henry Craik,later [1926] 1st baronet 18 Oct 1846 16 Mar 1927 80
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
GLENROTHES
5 May 2005 John William MacDougall 8 Dec 1947 13 Aug 2008 60
6 Nov 2008 Lindsay Allan Roy 19 Jan 1949
  GLOUCESTER (GLOUCESTERSHIRE)
 3 Apr 1660 Sir Edward Massey  (to 1675)     c 1619        1674
James Stephens  9 Nov 1683
 2 Apr 1661 Evan Seys  (to 1681)     c 1604  early 1685
20 Apr 1675 Henry Norwood     c 1614 14 Sep 1689
18 Feb 1679 William Cooke     c 1620  early 1703
 2 Sep 1679 Sir Charles Berkeley,styled Viscount Dursley
later [1698] 2nd Earl of Berkeley  (to 1685)  8 Apr 1649 24 Sep 1710 61
15 Feb 1681 Charles Somerset,styled Baron Herbert of
Raglan and [from 1682] Marquess of Worcester    Dec 1660 13 Jul 1698 37
 5 May 1685 John Wagstaffe 12 Mar 1618 20 Mar 1697 79
John Powell 26 May 1645 14 Jun 1713 68
 9 Jan 1689 Sir Duncombe Colchester  26 Sep 1630 25 May 1694 63
William Cooke  (to 1695)     c 1620  early 1703
18 Feb 1690 William Trye  (to 1698) 30 Jul 1660 29 Jun 1717 56
29 Oct 1695 Robert Payne c 1630 20 Feb 1713
2 Aug 1698 Sir William Rich,2nd baronet c 1654 3 Jul 1711
William Selwyn  (to Dec 1701) c 1658 5 Apr 1702
21 Jan 1701 John Bridgeman c 1655 3 Jun 1729
2 Dec 1701 James Berkeley,styled Viscount Dursley later
[1710] 3rd Earl of Berkeley 1680 17 Aug 1736 56
John Hanbury c 1665 14 Jun 1734
22 Jul 1702 John Grobham Howe  [he was also returned for 9 Feb 1657 11 Jun 1722 65
Bodmin,Newton,and Gloucestershire,for 
which he chose to sit]
William Trye (to 1705) 30 Jul 1660 29 Jun 1717 56
29 Dec 1702 John Hanbury  (to 1708) c 1665 14 Jun 1734
25 May 1705 William Cooke  (to 1709) 18 Dec 1682 Jun 1709 26
11 May 1708 Thomas Webb  (to 1713) c 1663 26 Mar 1734
14 Dec 1709 Francis Wyndham c 1670 23 Sep 1716
24 Oct 1710 John Blanch c 1649 10 Jul 1725
7 Sep 1713 John Snell  (to 1726) 16 Jun 1682 13 Sep 1726 44
Charles Coxe     c 1661 17 Oct 1728
27 Mar 1722 Charles Hyett  (to 1727) 10 Apr 1677 17 Feb 1738 60
 6 Feb 1727 John Howe,later [1741] 1st Baron Chedworth by 1690  3 Apr 1742
 5 Sep 1727 Benjamin Bathurst  (to 1754) 25 Jun 1692  5 Nov 1767 75
Thomas Chester 2 May 1696 1 Oct 1763 67
Charles Selwyn        1689  9 Jun 1749 59
Matthew Ducie Moreton,later [1735] 2nd
Baron Ducie by 1700 25 Dec 1770
Double return. Bathurst and Selwyn
declared elected 16 Feb 1728
 7 May 1734 John Selwyn 20 Aug 1688  5 Nov 1751 63
19 Nov 1751 Sir Charles Barrow,1st baronet  (to 1789)     c 1707 10 Jan 1789
15 Apr 1754 George Augustus Selwyn 11 Aug 1719 25 Jan 1791 71
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of the page containing the
constituency of Ludgershall.
14 Sep 1780 John Webb  (to 1795)     c 1730  4 Feb 1795
 5 Feb 1789 John Pitt  (to 1805) 4 Aug 1725 14 Jul 1805 79
11 Feb 1795 Henry Thomas Howard [Howard-Molyneux  7 Oct 1766 17 Jun 1824 57
from 1812 and Howard-Molyneux-Howard
from 1817]  (to 1818)
 7 Aug 1805 Robert Morris  6 Sep 1816
 1 Oct 1816 Edward Webb  (to 1832) 30 Jan 1779 18 Sep 1839 60
24 Jun 1818 Robert Bransby Cooper 21 Feb 1762 10 May 1845 83
30 Jul 1830 John Phillpotts     Jul 1775 29 Jun 1849 73
2 May 1831 Maurice Frederick Fitzhardinge Berkeley,later
[1861] 1st Baron Fitzhardinge  (to 1833)  3 Jan 1788 17 Oct 1867 79
11 Dec 1832 John Philpotts   (to 1835)    Jul 1775 29 Jun 1849 73
 
 9 Apr 1833 Henry Thomas Hope  (to 1841) 30 Apr 1808  4 Dec 1862 54
     
 7 Jan 1835 Maurice Frederick Fitzhardinge Berkeley,later
[1861] 1st Baron Fitzhardinge    3 Jan 1788 17 Oct 1867 79
24 Jul 1837 John Philpotts  (to 1847)    Jul 1775 29 Jun 1849 73
29 Jul 1841 Maurice Frederick Fitzhardinge Berkeley,later
[1861] 1st Baron Fitzhardinge   (to 1857)  3 Jan 1788 17 Oct 1867 79
28 Jul 1847 Henry Thomas Hope 30 Apr 1808  4 Dec 1862 54
 8 Jul 1852 William Philip Price  (to 1859)        1817 31 Mar 1891 73
28 Mar 1857 Sir Robert Walter Carden,later [1887] 1st
baronet  7 Oct 1801 17 Jan 1888 86
30 Apr 1859 Charles James Monk   [following the general 30 Nov 1824 10 Nov 1900 75
election in Apr 1859,the election of the two
sitting members (Price and Monk) was
declared void 29 Jul 1859. The writ was
suspended until Feb 1862]
26 Feb 1862 Charles Paget Fitzhardinge Berkeley,
later [1896] 3rd Baron Fitzhardinge 19 Apr 1830  3 Dec 1916 86
John Joseph Powell        1816 15 Sep 1891 75
12 Jul 1865 William Philip Price        1817 31 Mar 1891 73
Charles James Monk  (to 1885) 30 Nov 1824 10 Nov 1900 75
 8 May 1873 William Killigrew Wait        1826 13 Dec 1902 76
1 Apr 1880 Thomas Robinson  [kt 1894]    Jan 1827 26 Oct 1897 70
[his election was declared void 9 Jun 1880.
The writ for the second seat remained
suspended until Nov 1885]
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1885
24 Nov 1885 Thomas Robinson  [kt 1894]    Jan 1827 26 Oct 1897 70
16 Jul 1895 Charles James Monk        1824 10 Nov 1900 76
 2 Oct 1900 Russell Rea 11 Dec 1846  5 Feb 1916 69
15 Jan 1910 Henry Terrell  9 May 1856  9 Sep 1944 88
14 Dec 1918 Sir James Bruton  6 Feb 1848 26 Feb 1933 85
 6 Dec 1923 James Nockells Horlick,later [1958] 4th
baronet 22 Mar 1886 31 Dec 1972 86
30 May 1929 Sir Harold Leslie Boyce,later [1952] 1st
baronet  9 Jul 1895 30 May 1955 59
26 Jul 1945 Moss Turner-Samuels 19 Oct 1888  6 Jun 1957 68
12 Sep 1957 John Diamond,later [1970] Baron Diamond [L] 30 Apr 1907 3 Apr 2004 96
18 Jun 1970 Sally Oppenheim,later [1989] Baroness
Oppenheim-Barnes [L] 26 Jul 1930
11 Jun 1987 Douglas Charles French 20 Mar 1944
1 May 1997 Teresa Jane Kingham 4 May 1963
7 Jun 2001 Parmjit Singh Dhanda 17 Sep 1971
6 May 2010 Richard Graham 4 Apr 1958
  GLOUCESTERSHIRE
18 Apr 1660 Edward Stephens 23 Apr 1597     c 1661
Matthew Hale  1 Nov 1609 25 Dec 1676 67
17 Apr 1661 John Grobham Howe  (to 1679) 25 Jan 1625 27 May 1679 54
Sir Baynham Throckmorton,2nd baronet    Jun 1606 28 May 1664 57
21 Dec 1664 Sir Baynham Throckmorton,3rd baronet 11 Dec 1629 31 Jul 1681 51
26 Feb 1679 Sir John Guise,2nd baronet     c 1654 19 Nov 1695
Sir Ralph Dutton,1st baronet c 1635 by Mar 1721
18 Mar 1685 Charles Somerset,styled Marquess of
Worcester  [at this election he was returned for     Dec 1660 13 Jul 1698 37
no fewer than 5 seats! - Brecon, Breconshire, 
Monmouth, Monmouthshire and Gloucestershire.
It appears that he was allowed to sit for both
Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire]
Sir Robert Atkyns 26 Aug 1647 29 Nov 1711 64
18 Jan 1689 Sir John Guise,2nd baronet     c 1654 19 Nov 1695
Sir Ralph Dutton,1st baronet  (to 1698) c 1635 by Mar 1721
11 Dec 1695 Thomas Stephens c 1639 1708
3 Aug 1698 John Grobham Howe 9 Feb 1657 11 Jun 1722 65
Sir Richard Cocks,2nd baronet  (to 1702) c 1659 21 Oct 1726
3 Dec 1701 Maynard Colchester  (to 1708) 4 Mar 1665 25 Jun 1715 50
6 Aug 1702 John Grobham Howe 9 Feb 1657 11 Jun 1722 65
16 May 1705 Sir John Guise,3rd baronet  (to 1710) c 1678 16 Nov 1732
12 May 1708 Matthew Ducie Moreton,later [1720] 1st 
Baron Ducie  (to 1713) 17 Mar 1663  2 May 1735 72
25 Oct 1710 John Symes Berkeley  (to 1715) 1 Feb 1663 11 Dec 1736 73
23 Sep 1713 Thomas Stephens  (to Mar 1720) 5 Feb 1672 24 Feb 1720 48
 9 Feb 1715 Matthew Ducie Moreton,later [1720] 1st 
Baron Ducie   17 Mar 1663  2 May 1735 72
30 Mar 1720 Henry Berkeley  (to 1734)  after 1682 23 May 1736
22 Jun 1720 Edmund Bray 7 Sep 1678  6 Sep 1725 46
28 Mar 1722 Kinard de la Bere     c 1666 13 Feb 1735
 6 Sep 1727 Sir John Dutton  2 Jan 1684 1 Feb 1743 59
 8 May 1734 Thomas Chester  (to Nov 1763)  2 May 1696  1 Oct 1763 67
Benjamin Bathurst 12 Aug 1711 23 Jan 1767 55
12 May 1741 Norborne Berkeley,later [1764] 4th Baron
Botetourt     c 1717 15 Oct 1770
27 Apr 1763 Thomas Tracy  (to 1770)     c 1716 24 Jun 1770
23 Nov 1763 Edward Southwell,later [1776] 20th Baron de
Clifford  (to 1776)  6 Jun 1738  1 Nov 1777 39
 6 Aug 1770 Sir William Guise,5th baronet  (to 1783) 26 Jul 1737  6 Apr 1783 45
 6 May 1776 William Bromley-Chester 30 Jul 1738 12 Dec 1780 42
24 Jan 1781 James Dutton,later [1784] 1st Baron
Sherborne  (to 1784) 22 Oct 1744 22 May 1820 75
28 Apr 1783 George Cranfield Berkeley  (to 1810) 10 Aug 1753 25 Feb 1818 64
12 Apr 1784 Thomas Master        1744 12 May 1823 78
 2 Jun 1796 Henry Charles Somerset,styled Marquess of
Worcester,later [1803] 6th Duke of Beaufort 22 Dec 1766 23 Nov 1835 68
14 Nov 1803 Lord Robert Edward Henry Somerset
(to 1831) 19 Dec 1776 1 Sep 1842 65
18 May 1810 William Fitzhardinge Berkeley,styled Viscount
Dursley,later [1841] 1st Earl
Fitzhardinge 26 Dec 1786 10 Oct 1857 70
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
 7 Feb 1811 Sir Berkeley William Guise,2nd baronet 14 Jul 1775 23 Jul 1834 59
(to 1832)
10 May 1831 Henry George Francis Reynolds-Moreton,later
[1840] 2nd Earl of Ducie    8 May 1802  2 Jun 1853 51
COUNTY SPLIT INTO EAST 
& WEST DIVISIONS 1832
  GLOUCESTERSHIRE EAST
21 Dec 1832 Sir Berkeley William Guise,2nd baronet 14 Jul 1775 23 Jul 1834 59
Henry George Francis Reynolds-Moreton,later
[1840] 2nd Earl of Ducie   (to 1835)  8 May 1802  2 Jun 1853 51
 7 Aug 1834 Christopher William Codrington  (to 1864) 12 Mar 1805 24 Jun 1864 59
10 Jan 1835 Augustus Henry Moreton 24 Jun 1804 14 Feb 1862 57
 5 Jul 1841 Francis Wemyss Charteris Douglas,later [1883]
10th Earl of Wemyss & March  4 Aug 1818 30 Jun 1914 95
27 Feb 1846 Henry Charles Fitzroy,styled Marquess of
Worcester,later [1853] 8th Duke of Beaufort  1 Feb 1824 30 Apr 1899 75
 9 Jan 1854 Sir Michael Hicks Hicks-Beach,8th baronet 25 Oct 1809 29 Nov 1854 45
19 Dec 1854 Robert Stayner Holford  (to 1872) 16 Mar 1808 22 Feb 1892 83
12 Jul 1864 Sir Michael Edward Hicks-Beach,9th baronet,
later [1915] 1st Earl St.Aldwyn  (to 1885) 23 Oct 1837 30 Apr 1916 78
11 Mar 1872 John Reginald Yorke 25 Jan 1836  2 Mar 1912 76
 SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1885 
SEE "CIRENCESTER","FOREST OF DEAN",
"STROUD","THORNBURY" AND
"TEWKESBURY"
  GLOUCESTERSHIRE SOUTH
23 Feb 1950 Charles Anthony Raven Crosland 29 Aug 1918 19 Feb 1977 58
26 May 1955 Frederick Vernon Corfield [kt 1972]  1 Jun 1915 25 Aug 2005 90
28 Feb 1974 John Ambrose Cope  [kt 1991] 13 May 1937
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  GLOUCESTERSHIRE WEST
24 Dec 1832 George Charles Grantley Fitzhardinge
Berkeley  (to 1852)        1800 23 Feb 1881 80
Augustus Henry Moreton 24 Jun 1804 14 Feb 1862 57
12 Jan 1835 Henry Fitzroy,styled Marquess of Worcester,
later [Nov 1835] 7th Duke of Beaufort  5 Feb 1792 17 Nov 1853 61
 2 Jan 1836 Robert Blagden Hale  (to 1857)        1807 22 Jul 1883 76
14 Jul 1852 Robert Nigel Fitzhardinge Kingscote
(to Mar 1885) 28 Feb 1830 22 Sep 1908 78
31 Mar 1857 John Rolt  [kt 1866]  5 Oct 1804  6 Jun 1871 66
25 Jul 1867 Edward Arthur Somerset 21 Feb 1817 12 Mar 1886 69
23 Nov 1868 Samuel Stephens Marling,later [1882] 1st
baronet 10 Apr 1810 22 Oct 1883 73
11 Feb 1874 Randal Edward Sherborne Plunkett 15 Nov 1848 25 Dec 1883 35
12 Apr 1880 Henry Haughton Reynolds-Moreton,styled 
Baron Moreton (to Nov 1885)  4 Mar 1857 28 Feb 1920 62
 
12 Mar 1885 Benjamin St.John Ackers  6 Nov 1839 18 Apr 1915 75
 SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1885 
SEE "CIRENCESTER","FOREST OF DEAN",
"STROUD","THORNBURY" AND
"TEWKESBURY"
CONSTITUENCY REVIVED 1950
23 Feb 1950 Morgan Philips Price 29 Jan 1885 23 Sep 1973 88
 8 Oct 1959 Charles William Loughlin 16 Feb 1914 23 Sep 1993 79
10 Oct 1974 John Taylor Watkinson 25 Jan 1941 21 Sep 2004 63
 3 May 1979 Paul Marland 19 Mar 1940
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1997
  GOOLE (YORKSHIRE)
23 Feb 1950 George Jeger 19 Mar 1903  6 Jan 1971 67
27 May 1971 Edmund Ian Marshall 31 May 1940
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  Arthur Alfred Lynch, MP for Galway 1901-1903 and Clare West 1909-1918
  A hush fell over the High Court in London on 23 January 1903 as a tall, well-built Australian,
Colonel Arthur Alfred Lynch, MP for Galway, rose in the dock to hear sentence passed on 
him for treason. Sternly, Mr. Justice Wills told Lynch that he had deserted England in her
darkest hour to fight for the Boers in South Africa. "You sought, for gold, to dethrone Great
Britain and make her name a byword and a reproach. You shed, or did your best to shed, 
your own countrymen's blood", the judge continued. Then, donning the traditional black cap,
he sentenced Lynch to death.
Fortunately for Lynch, influential friends intervened between him and the gallows. Within 
two days the death sentence was commuted to life imprisonment. A year later, Lynch was 
released on licence and in 1907 he was granted a free pardon. Two years later, Lynch took 
his seat in the House of Commons as the elected member for Clare West, a stark contrast 
to the death cell he once occupied.
Lynch was born in the gold-rush town of Smythesdale, near Ballarat, the son of an Irish civil 
engineer who had fought at the Eureka Stockade and a Scottish mother. He was educated 
at Grenville College, Ballarat and the University of Melbourne, where he graduated B.A. in 
1885 and M.A. in 1887. Around 1890, he went to Berlin and studied scientific subjects and 
psychology. He then went to Paris to obtain a diploma in electrical engineering, after which 
he qualified in London as a doctor. 
In the July 1892 general election, Lynch stood for Galway, but was defeated by 51 votes. 
He then obtained a job with Alfred Harmsworth, later Viscount Northcliffe, who appointed 
him foreign correspondent in Paris.
When war with the Boers flared in 1899, all Lynch's sympathies were with the Boers. He 
received commissions from London, Paris and New York newspapers to report the war on 
their behalf. Within days after arriving in the Boer capital of Pretoria, he formed the Second 
Irish Brigade of Volunteers to help the Boers and the Boer President Kruger appointed Lynch
as their colonel.
His first job was to protect the rear of the Boer force retreating after the relief of 
Ladysmith. He was then sent to the USA to win the support of the Irish immigrant 
population. While there he became friendly with Theodore Roosevelt. He returned to Paris, 
where he received word that the British, on the termination of the war, had agreed not to 
prosecute volunteers who had fought with the Boers. At the same time, he was approached 
by the Irish Nationalists to contest the seat of Galway at a by-election caused by the 
sitting member's succession to a peerage. He agreed, and was overwhelmingly elected in his
absence. The British Government replied by issuing a warrant for Lynch's arrest the moment
he stepped on British soil.
On 12 June 1902, he was arrested by three Scotland Yard detectives who were waiting at
the foot of the gangplank when he stepped ashore at Dover. He languished for seven 
months in prison until his trial for treason opened on 21 January 1903. Lynch frankly 
admitted he fought for the Boers. "I took up arms against the British for the same reason 
that my father joined the Ballarat miners at Eureka, because to both of us it was the strong 
oppressing the weak."
The trial lasted three days and at its end, the jury took only 26 minutes to find him guilty.
As soon as the sentence was passed, violent demonstrations flared in Ireland and America. 
Both Theodore Roosevelt and the "King of Grocers", Sir Thomas Lipton, interceded with King 
Edward VII. Within two days the sentence was commuted, and subsequently, after 
thousands had signed a petition, he was freed on licence and later granted a free pardon on 
9 July 1907.
At a by-election in 1909 and again at the January 1910 General Election, Lynch was 
returned for Clare West which he represented until 1918. During the war years, he did good 
service for the British government. In his autobiography "My Life Story" (1924) he claimed 
that he was one of the earliest to advocate unity of command. He was given the rank of 
colonel and endeavoured to enlist men in Ireland for the Allied cause, but without success. 
After losing his seat in 1918, he concentrated on his scientific and literary pursuits. He 
published at least 28 works by the time of his death from ptomaine poisoning in 1934.
Richard Martin, MP for Jamestown 1776-1783, Lanesborough 1798-1800 and Galway
County 1800 (in the Irish House of Commons) and Galway County 1801-1812 and 
1818-1827 (in the United Kingdom House of Commons)
Richard Martin was known during his lifetime as "Humanity" Martin due to his long and 
ultimately successful campaign to protect the rights of animals, which culminated in his
helping to found the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 
Apart from his humanitarian work, Martin led a very eventful life. He is reputed to have fought
over 100 duels, earning him the nickname of "Hairtrigger Dick." He survived two shipwrecks and
had the knack of being in the wrong place at the wrong time, being in America at the start of
American War of Independence, and in Paris when the French Revolution broke out.
After the general election in 1826, Martin was unseated when it was found that he was guilty
of illegal intimidation during the election. Because this meant he no longer had any protection
against being sued for debt, he fled the country and settled at Boulogne in France, where he
died in 1834.
The following sketch of the founding of the R.S.P.C.A. appeared in the July 1960 issue of the
Australian monthly magazine "Parade." I suggest that it should not be read while eating your
dinner:-
'In October, 1837, the less-enlightened citizens of the small Lincolnshire town of Stamford let
a bull loose in the town, hunted it, slashed it, worried it with savage dogs till it fell a mangled
hulk on the cobbles. It was the high spot of an annual carnival of cruelty, which hulking louts
referred to as one of the fine ennobling traditions of the day. Next October, they decided to
repeat the performance with two bulls. Preparations were well under way when a troop of
dragoons clattered into the town. There was to be no more bull running, declared their captain
briskly. The newly-founded and largely-execrated Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals had won one of its greatest victories. 
'The society had been fighting an uphill battle ever since a handful of humanitarians and philan-
thropists had met in Old Slaughter's Coffee House, London, on June 16, 1824, and pledged 
themselves to fight the wanton barbarities of an age that was in truth described as "the hell 
of the animals." 
 
'Three men - a politician, a clergyman and an inventor - were the pioneers who launched the 
first battles to end the horror. The politician, Richard Martin, in 1822 forced through Parliament
the first Act in history to protect animals. The clergyman, Rev. Arthur Broome [1779-1837], 
threw away a promising church career to become the society's first secretary, went to prison
because he made himself responsible for its debts, and died in poverty. The inventor, Lewis
Gompertz [c 1783-1861], financed the society's first inspectors - the men who risked their 
lives to expose the worst cases of cruelty to animals, and to pile up an indictment so grisly 
and damning that even hardened officialdom was goaded into action. 
'For 50 years before the R.S.P.C.A. came into existence humane individuals had been raising
lonely voices of protest against the hell of the animals. In 1776 Dr. Humphrey Primatt [1736-
1779] published his "Dissertation on the Duty of Mercy to Brute Animals" - a devastating
document that was many times later reprinted and distributed in thousands of pamphlets.
Not till 1800 came the first attempt at legislative action, when a Bill to prohibit bull-baiting
was thrown out after the future Prime Minister [George] Canning described the sport as
"inspiring courage and producing a noble elevation of the mind."
 
'A year later an impetuous little Irish M.P. from Galway, named Richard Martin, took his seat
in the Commons. For the next quarter of a century he was to fight with unrelenting zeal for 
animals' cause. When he rose to speak he was greeted with yelping, catcalls and roars of
derision. He was christened the "Member for Barking." The drovers of Smithfield market burned
him in effigy. Farmers threatened to stone him in the country towns.
 
'Smithfield market was the main target of Martin's attacks - the vast open shambles of filth
and blood to which thousands of beasts were driven every week to be slaughtered for the
dinner tables of London's citizens. Martin told how the roads to the market were lined with 
dying and mutilated cattle, their ears torn off by dogs, their eyes knocked out and legs broken
by the drovers' clubs, so exhausted from thirst that "they crowded together to suck up the
filth from the street gutters."  He told of noisome underground slaughterhouses where sheep
were flayed alive, pigs beaten to death to make their flesh tender, and calves were hung up
by iron hooks through the nose and slowly bled to death, "their jaws being closely muzzled
with straps lest the public be attracted by their moans." Cock-fighting, bull-baiting, the cruel
treatment of dogs and coach horses all were grist to Martin's ceaseless campaign. But only 
slowly and piecemeal could he convert the stubborn stupidity of Parliament. At last, in 1822,
he forced his first Bill through the House, to prevent the cruel and improper treatment of 
cattle. It was the first legislation anywhere in the world to curb's man's inhumanity to animals.
 
'Meanwhile, outside Parliament, a small and devoted band was forming to spread the campaign
throughout the length of Britain. Foremost among them was a quiet, rather sickly, 40-years-
old clergyman named Arthur Broome. In 1820 Broome had come from a peaceful parish in rural
Kent to be vicar of Bromley-by-Bow, in east London. His heart was filled with horror at the
vile treatment of animals in the great city - the starving costers' dogs, the coach horses with
with their flanks raw from beating, the cats flung to suffocate or drown in the fetid filth of the
Tower ditch. Broome wrote pamphlets, edited a new issue of Primatt's historic book, and 
tramped night and day round the London streets to collect his appalling dossier of facts.
 
'Then, in October, 1822, a few months after "Martin's Act" became law, he called a meeting at
Old Slaughter's Coffee House in St. Martin's Lane. The house, built in 1692, had long been
famous as the resort of writers, painters and émigré French aristocrats. In its smoky, timber-
beamed old coffee room the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was to be
born. The meeting was a failure. Far from despairing, Broome promptly resigned his church
living - despite the protests of his bishop that he had a promising future - and devoted the 
whole of his life to his chosen cause.
 
'On June 16, 1824, Broome called another meeting at Old Slaughter's. This time, some of the
greatest reform leaders in Parliament threw their weight behind the movement. In the chair
was the book-collector and humanitarian, Thomas Fowell Buxton. With him came the famous
anti-slavery leader, William Wilberforce, the great law reformer, Sir James Mackintosh, and
Richard Martin, the author of Martin's Act.  A Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
was formed. Broome was appointed first secretary. 
'The society's first act was to appoint "inspectors" to scour the streets and markets of London
and collect evidence. Broome was one. The only other to begin with was a man named 
Wheeler, who was to keep an eye on the Smithfield drovers. Broome dragged into light the vile 
race of cat skinners, who stripped the skins from living cats and sold them to the East End fur
dealers. In one den, occupied by a woman and her two daughters, he found the remains of 
150 cats, some still quivering in the last throes of agony. He discovered cab drivers who 
bought aged horses from the knackeries and drove them at night till they dropped dead in the 
shafts. Often, the wretched horses were beaten to death where they fell. In some country 
districts dogs were hired out as draught animals at a penny a day. On the Brighton road they 
dragged loads of more than 500lb., marking their trail with the bloodstained prints of their raw 
pads. Canaries blinded to "sweeten their throats," performing bears forced to dance on heated 
bricks, dogs trained to tear each other to the ring - so the catalogue of horrors piled up to 
startle and then convert the public conscience.
 
'The society, however, was having a desperate battle for existence. Its funds were meagre. 
Debts mounted up. Broome, almost penniless after losing his church stipend, made himself
responsible as secretary for the society's debts. In 1826 the duns moved into the humble 
office in Regent St. Broome was arrested and flung into a debtors' prison. He was rescued by
Richard Martin. By early 1828 the society was again faced with bankruptcy. Broome, who had
been forced to take on literary hack work to keep himself from starvation, resigned to make
way for a new secretary who had adequate private means. Broome remained a member of
the committee, but his heroic efforts had almost ruined him physically. He died in poverty in
Birmingham on July 16, 1837, having sacrificed both health and wealth for the animals' cause.
'The new secretary, Lewis Gompertz, third of the society's real founders, was a very different
but no less inspiring character. He lived to see the R.S.P.C.A. well on the road to its present
fame.  Gompertz was an inventor and mathematician, in some respects an eccentric figure,
whose patents included shot-proof ships, fortresses that deflected cannon balls back on the
firers, a "mechanical cure for apoplexy," and several engineering devices that are still in 
common use today. Many of his ideas, including steam carriages, were designed to make the
lives of animals easier. Few of them had any practical value in his day. Gompertz was 
secretary of the society for five years, but the period was the turning point in its existence.
He lifted it out of financial chaos, paid for the publication of thousands of pamphlets himself,
and won hundreds of supporters for its aims. Dissension forced Gompertz to resign in 1832.
For some years he conducted a rival organisation, the Animals' Friend Society, but it quickly
faded away when Gompertz himself retired in ill-health in 1846.
 
'The liberal Parliament elected after the great Reform Bill of 1832 opened the way to many of
the measures for which the society had been fighting, though prejudice and violent opposition
still lingered, especially in the country. In 1835 the first comprehensive Bill to protect all 
domestic animals went through Parliament with practically no debate. Cock-fighting and bull
and bear baiting - traditional sports dating from medieval times - were banned too, despite
the grumbles of diehard squires. 
 
'Followers of the ancient "sports" did not surrender without riots and bloodshed. One of the
society's inspectors was beaten to death when he tried to stop a bull-baiting at Hanworth.
Another had an eye knocked out when a Lichfield mob stoned him with cobbles. The climax
came with the annual bull running at Stamford, Lincolnshire. For centuries it had been the
custom, each October, to set a bull loose in the town's streets and hunt it to death with 
savage dogs. In 1836 the society sent its most intrepid inspector, Henry Thomas, to the scene.
Thomas watched the revolting spectacle, saw the mangled bull dragged down and worried to
death, and immediately launched a prosecution in the society's name against some of the 
leading citizens. 
'At the Lincoln Assizes in July, 1837, the "bull running" promoters were found guilty and bound
over. Three months later the Stamford mob defied the law and butchered another bull, 
swearing to lynch Thomas if he set foot in the town. By now, however, the society had roused
public wrath throughout the country. "Stamford forever!" roared the brutalised mobs who still
clung to the bloody old bull-baiting carnivals. But the Government itself was now determined to
intervene. In October, 1838, a troop of the 14th Dragoons clattered into Stamford. Two bulls
that had been smuggled into the town for the running were seized - and the barbarous "sport"
was ended in England forever.
'The victory brought the society a wave of public sympathy, money and support. In 1840 the
young Queen Victoria offered her patronage, and the society added the prefix "Royal" to its 
name. Many battles still lay ahead, but the society now had the law and the great mass of
enlightened public opinion on its side. '
 
Thomas Higgins, MP for Galway North
On four occasions during the twentieth century, members were posthumously elected to
Parliament. These members were Thomas Higgins (Galway North in 1906 - see below),
Noel Skelton (Combined Scottish Universities 1935), Sir Edward Taswell Campbell
(Bromley 1945) and Leslie Pym (Monmouth 1945). For further information on each of 
these cases, see the notes at the foot of the page which contain the various 
constituencies.
The following report is from 'The Times' of 27 January 1906:-
'Our Dublin correspondent telegraphs that the present position in North Galway is without
precedent in the history of Irish Parliamentary elections. During the last Parliament, the
sitting member, Colonel Nolan, incurred the hostility of the United Irish League by his
independent political action, and by a series of lawsuits with some of his tenants. It was
resolved to oppose an official candidate to Colonel Nolan at the general election, and at a
recent convention at Tuam Mr. Thomas Higgins, president of the North Galway executive
of the League, was selected as the candidate of the League. Both Colonel Nolan and Mr.
Higgins were nominated in due course and the polling took place on Thursday. Feeling ran
high in the district, and it was generally expected that there would be an exhaustive poll
and that Mr. Higgins would be elected by a substantial majority. During the morning of 
Thursday, Mr. Higgins took an active part in bringing his supporters to the poll, and, 
shortly before noon, he drove in from Killereran at the head of a long line of cars which
were conveying voters from that district. Immediately afterwards he entered Guy's Hotel
and complained of feeling ill. An hour later he was obliged to take to his bed. He became
rapidly worse, and the doctors who were called recognized that his case was hopeless.
He was suffering from heart failure. Mr. Higgins died an hour after midnight. The news of
his sudden illness was known to very few of his supporters, and, long after the poll had
closed, crowds of his friends and opponents were shouting round the hotel where he was
receiving the last rites of his Church. Last night Mr. Higgins's body was removed to the 
Roman Catholic Cathedral at Tuam and he will be buried today.
'When the news of Mr. Higgins's death was announced in Dublin yesterday morning the
liveliest interest was aroused with regard to its effect on the result of the election, and
this was increased when it became known that he had been returned at the head of the
poll. The votes were counted yesterday at the Court-house, Galway, and after the result
of the poll had been declared, Mr. Joseph Glynn, election agent for the late Mr. Higgins,
demanded that Mr. Higgins should be declared duly elected as member of Parliament for
North Galway. He argued that Mr. Higgins, having been alive at ten minutes to 1 o'clock
yesterday morning, was alive at the close of the poll; that the count which took place
yesterday was merely a continuation of the proceeding of Thursday; and that when the
poll closed Mr. Higgins was elected, since the postponement of the count and the
formal declaration was merely a matter of convenience for those concerned. Colonel
Nolan said he deeply regretted that Mr. Higgins had not lived to enjoy the fruits of his
victory; on the legal point he remained silent, as he knew nothing about it.
'The High Sheriff, Mr. Charles O'Farrell, acting on the advice of the Attorney-General for
Ireland, refused to declare Mr. Higgins elected. Mr. O'Farrell afterwards informed a 
representative of the Press that his only remaining duty was to report the situation to
the Speaker of the House of Commons.
'The legal problem created by the death of a winning candidate between the close of the
poll and the declaration of the result was the principal subject of conversation yesterday
in the Law Library at the Four Courts. There seemed to be a general agreement of
opinion among the leaders of the Bar that the death of Mr. Higgins must be followed by a
fresh election. The grounds of the Attorney-General's advice, on which the Sheriff acted
yesterday at Galway, are not known; neither is it known in what manner or at what time
the Irish authorities - presumably, in this case, the returning officer - will come to a 
definite decision. It is understood that no exact provision is made in any Act of Parliament
for such a situation as has arisen in North Galway. It seems clear, however, that Mr.
Higgins was duly elected to be member of Parliament for the division; and it is generally
believed that matters will now proceed in the same manner as if he had died at any time
after the formal declaration of the poll and before the meeting of Parliament.'
John Warburton Beckett, MP for Gateshead 1924-1929 and Peckham 1929-1931
Beckett was involved in an incident in the House of Commons on 17 Jul 1930 which led to his
suspension from the House after he seized the Mace. The following report appeared in the
Brisbane 'Courier' of 19 July 1930:-
'A series of disorderly incidents at question time in the House of Commons today ultimately led
to one of the most remarkable scenes in recent years, and ended in the suspensions of the
Labour members, Messrs. A. Fenner Brockway [MP for Leyton East 1929-1931 and Eton and
Slough 1950-1964, Baron Brockway [L] 1964] and John Beckett. They were the first actual
suspensions of the present Parliament. The exclusion of Mr. Beckett was most dramatic. 
Following the division carrying the motion for the suspension of Mr. Fenner Brockway and
before the figures were announced, Mr. Beckett, who was standing near the table, suddenly
picked up the Mace from it, shouting: "Mr. Speaker, it's a damned disgrace!" Amid shouts of
protest Mr. Beckett, holding the Mace aloft, carried it in the direction of the bar of the House
where a large group of excited members crowded. Instantly the House was thrown into a state
of confusion. An attendant rushed forward and grabbed the Mace from Mr. Beckett, who did
not resist, but stood nonchalantly with his hands in his pockets. The Sergeant-at-Arms, with
the utmost dignity, walked to the table and replaced the Mace.
'Opposition members shouted to Mr. Beckett: "Get out of it!" Then the Speaker declared 
carried the suspension of Mr. Fenner Brockway who walked out there and then. There were
cries of "What about the other? What about Beckett?" and a few counter-shouts from the
Labour benches of "Third Degree," and much booing.  Members excitedly appealed to the 
Speaker, who instantly named Mr. Beckett, his suspension being carried by 324 votes to 4.
The division was taken in an atmosphere of great excitement and tension. When the figures
were announced, Mr. Beckett was absent. There were cries of "He has run away." Mr. Beckett
actually had followed Mr. Fenner Brockway out. Both members were accompanied to the 
gates of the palace yard by a police inspector, in accordance with custom.
'Mr. Fenner Brockway's expulsion was due to his refusal to obey the Speaker when he was
dissatisfied with the answers to his persistent questions demanding an opportunity of debating
the situation in India. Mr. Fenner Brockway is the son of a missionary and was born in India.
He always has been an extreme member of the Left Wing, and spent two years in prison during
the war as a conscientious objector. Mr. Beckett a few days ago married the actress Kyrie
Bellew at Gretna Green. The last scene in which the Mace was removed occurred in 1917 when
Mr. F.N. Carrington [of whom I have no record], who had relinquished a huge family fortune
from a brewery, removed the mace as a protest against the Liquor Bill then being discussed.'
 
William Fitzhardinge Berkeley, styled Viscount Dursley, later Earl Fitzhardinge
MP for Gloucestershire 1810
Berkeley was the son of the 5th Earl of Berkeley and his long-term mistress, Mary Cole. 
In 1796, the 5th Earl and Mary were finally married, but the Earl gave out that the couple
had already been married for more than 10 years at the time of this 'second' marriage. If 
this was in fact true, then William Berkeley was legitimate; if not, he was illegitimate, and
could not inherit the Earldom. 
In 1799, the 5th Earl attempted to establish the legitimacy of his children who had been
born prior to 1796 by producing and laying before the House of Lords Committee of
Privileges evidence of the alleged marriage of 1785, but the Committee found itself
unable to judge the matter.
When the 5th Earl died in August 1810, William Berkeley was member for Gloucestershire.
On the death of his father, Berkeley vacated his seat in the belief that he had now 
succeeded to the earldom and that he would receive a writ calling him to the House of
Lords. However, his claim to the peerage was referred to the Committee of Privileges
which ruled, on 2 July 1811, that his claim had not been made out, on the basis that
the entry in the registry at Berkeley Church which recorded the 'marriage' of 1785 had
been forged by the 5th Earl at a later date. For a lengthy discussion on this case, see the
note under "Berkeley" in the Peerage pages.
Berkeley was later created Baron Seagrave in 1831 and promoted to Earl Fitzhardinge in
1841. He appears to have earned for himself a highly unsavoury reputation, beginning
with his elopement in 1811 with Anne, Countess of Antrim in her own right and wife of
Sir Henry Vane-Tempest, 2nd baronet. In his diaries, Greville described him as "an arrant
blackguard" who was "notorious for his worthlessness."
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