THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
CONSTITUENCIES BEGINNING WITH "L"
Last updated 07/03/2014
Date   Name Born Died Age
Dates in italics in the first column denote that the election held on that
date was a by-election. Dates shown in normal type were general elections,
or, in some instances, the date of a successful petition against a
previous election result.
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the MP was baptised on
that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate that the MP was
buried on that date
LADYWOOD (BIRMINGHAM)
14 Dec 1918 Arthur Neville Chamberlain 18 Mar 1869 9 Nov 1940 71
30 May 1929 Wilfrid Whiteley 3 Feb 1882 4 Apr 1970 88
27 Oct 1931 Geoffrey William Lloyd,later [1974] Baron
Geoffrey-Lloyd [L] 17 Jan 1902 12 Sep 1984 82
26 Jul 1945 Victor Francis Yates 19 Apr 1900 19 Jan 1969 68
26 Jun 1969 Wallace Leslie Lawler 15 Mar 1912 28 Sep 1972 60
18 Jun 1970 Doris Mary Gertrude Fisher,later [1974]
Baroness Fisher of Rednal [L] 13 Sep 1919 18 Dec 2005 86
28 Feb 1974 Alastair Brian Walden 8 Jul 1932
18 Aug 1977 Eric John Sever 1 Apr 1943
9 Jun 1983 Clare Short 15 Feb 1946
6 May 2010 Shabana Mahmood 1 Jan 1982
LAGAN VALLEY
9 Jun 1983 James Henry Molyneaux [kt 1996],later [1997]
Baron Molyneaux of Killead [L] 27 Aug 1920
1 May 1997 Jeffrey Mark Donaldson 7 Dec 1962
LAMBETH
12 Dec 1832 Charles Tennyson-D'Eyncourt (to 1852) 20 Jul 1784 21 Jul 1861 77
Benjamin Hawes [kt 1856] 1797 15 May 1862 64
31 Jul 1847 Charles Pearson 4 Oct 1793 14 Sep 1862 68
7 Aug 1850 William Williams (to May 1865) 12 Feb 1788 28 Apr 1865 67
8 Jul 1852 William Arthur Wilkinson 1795 13 Apr 1865 69
31 Mar 1857 William Roupell 7 Apr 1831 25 Mar 1909 77
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
5 May 1862 Frederick Doulton (to 1868) 1824 21 May 1872 47
9 May 1865 James Clarke Lawrence,later [1869] 1st
baronet 1820 21 May 1897 76
12 Jul 1865 Thomas Hughes 20 Oct 1822 22 Mar 1896 73
18 Nov 1868 Sir James Clarke Lawrence,1st baronet 1820 21 May 1897 76
William McArthur [kt 1882] 1809 16 Nov 1887 78
SPLIT INTO 4 DIVISIONS 1885
SEE "BRIXTON","KENNINGTON",
"LAMBETH NORTH" AND "NORWOOD"
LAMBETH CENTRAL
28 Feb 1974 Marcus Lipton 29 Oct 1900 22 Feb 1978 77
20 Apr 1978 John Vincent Tilley 13 Jun 1941 18 Dec 2005 64
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
LAMBETH NORTH
26 Nov 1885 Charles Crauford Fraser VC [kt 1891] 31 Aug 1829 7 Jun 1895 65
For further information on this MP and VC
winner, see the note at the foot of this page
Nov 1892 Francis Moses Coldwells 1832 29 Jul 1895 63
15 Jul 1895 Sir Henry Morton Stanley 28 Jan 1841 10 May 1904 63
2 Oct 1900 Frederick William Horner 1854
15 May 1906 Horatio Myer 1850 1 Jan 1916 65
15 Jan 1910 William Henry Houghton Gastrell [kt 1917] 24 Sep 1852 11 Apr 1935 82
14 Dec 1918 Frank Briant 1863 1 Sep 1934 71
30 May 1929 George Russell Strauss,later [1979] Baron
Strauss [L] 18 Jul 1901 5 Jun 1993 91
27 Oct 1931 Frank Briant 1863 1 Sep 1934 71
23 Oct 1934 George Russell Strauss,later [1979] Baron
Strauss [L] 18 Jul 1901 5 Jun 1993 91
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950
LANARK (LINLITHGOWSHIRE)
26 May 1708 George Douglas,later [1730] 13th Earl of Morton 1662 4 Jan 1738 75
17 Sep 1713 Sir James Carmichael,4th baronet c 1690 16 Jul 1727
16 Feb 1715 George Douglas,later [1730] 13th Earl of Morton 1662 4 Jan 1738 75
13 Apr 1722 Daniel Weir c 1675 21 May 1724
16 Apr 1725 John Murray 2 Jul 1753
18 May 1734 James Carmichael c 1705 c Apr 1754
2 Jun 1741 James Carmichael c 1705 c Apr 1754
John Mackye 23 Apr 1707 Oct 1797 90
Double return. Mackye declared elected
25 Jan 1742
22 Jul 1747 Lawrence Dundas,later [1762] 1st baronet c 1710 21 Sep 1781
[he was unseated on petition in favour of
James Carmichael 17 Mar 1748]
17 Mar 1748 James Carmichael c 1705 c Apr 1754
9 May 1754 John Murray 4 Apr 1726 28 Feb 1800 73
20 Apr 1761 John Lockhart-Ross,later [1778] 6th
baronet [at the general election in Apr 1768, 11 Nov 1721 9 Jun 1790 68
he was also returned for Lanarkshire,for
which he chose to sit]
29 Dec 1768 James Dickson c 1715 14 Nov 1771
9 Jan 1772 Sir James Cockburn,8th baronet 1729 26 Jul 1804 75
26 Apr 1784 John Moore 13 Nov 1761 16 Jan 1809 47
12 Jul 1790 William Grieve by 1806
20 Jun 1796 James George Stopford,styled Viscount
Stopford,later [1810] 3rd Earl of Courtown [I] 15 Aug 1765 15 Jun 1835 69
30 Jul 1802 William Dickson 3 Jun 1748 18 May 1815 66
24 Nov 1806 Sir Charles Lockhart-Ross,7th baronet 15 Aug 1763 8 Feb 1814 50
30 May 1807 William Maxwell 3 Jan 1768 7 Sep 1833 65
30 Oct 1812 Sir John Buchanan Riddell,9th baronet c 1768 21 Apr 1819
31 May 1819 John Pringle 10 Jul 1796 5 May 1831 34
31 Mar 1820 Henry Monteith c 1764 14 Dec 1848
3 Jul 1826 Adam Hay,later [1838] 7th baronet 14 Dec 1795 18 Jan 1867 71
23 Aug 1830 Henry Monteith c 1764 14 Dec 1848
23 May 1831 William Downe Gillon 31 Aug 1801 7 Oct 1846 45
CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1832,
BUT REVIVED 1918
14 Dec 1918 Walter Elliot Elliot 19 Sep 1888 8 Jan 1958 69
For information on the death of his first wife,
see the note at the foot of this page
6 Dec 1923 Thomas Scott Dickson 1 Nov 1885 25 Jan 1935 49
29 Oct 1924 Stephen Mitchell 10 Mar 1884 7 Jun 1951 67
30 May 1929 Thomas Scott Dickson 1 Nov 1885 25 Jan 1935 49
27 Oct 1931 Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home,styled Lord
Dunglass,later [1951] 14th Earl of Home and
[1974] Baron Home of the Hirsel [L] 2 Jul 1903 9 Oct 1995 92
26 Jul 1945 Thomas Steele 15 Nov 1905 28 May 1979 73
23 Feb 1950 Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home,styled Lord
Dunglass,later [1951] 14th Earl of Home and
[1974] Baron Home of the Hirsel [L] 2 Jul 1903 9 Oct 1995 92
25 Oct 1951 Patrick Francis Maitland,later [1968] 17th Earl
of Lauderdale 17 Mar 1911 2 Dec 2008 97
8 Oct 1959 Judith Constance Mary Hart [Dame 1979],later
[1988] Baroness Hart of South Lanark [L] 18 Sep 1924 8 Dec 1991 67
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
LANARK AND HAMILTON EAST
5 May 2005 James Hood 16 May 1948
LANARKSHIRE
15 Jun 1708 Lord Archibald Hamilton 17 Feb 1673 5 Apr 1754 81
31 Oct 1710 Sir James Hamilton,2nd baronet 24 Nov 1682 15 Mar 1750 67
24 Feb 1715 James Lockhart c 1675 19 Oct 1718
23 Dec 1718 Lord Archibald Hamilton 17 Feb 1673 5 Apr 1754 81
16 May 1734 Lord William Hamilton c 1706 11 Jul 1734
7 Mar 1735 Sir James Hamilton,2nd baronet 24 Nov 1682 15 Mar 1750 67
18 May 1750 Patrick Stuart c 1682 1760
9 May 1754 James Vere c 1715 4 Dec 1759
17 Jan 1760 Daniel Campbell c 1736 12 May 1777
14 Apr 1768 John Lockhart-Ross,later [1778] 6th
baronet 11 Nov 1721 9 Jun 1790 68
28 Oct 1774 Andrew Stuart 1725 18 May 1801 75
29 Apr 1784 Sir James Steuart-Denham,8th baronet Aug 1744 5 Aug 1839 95
21 Jul 1802 Lord Archibald Hamilton 6 Mar 1770 28 Aug 1827 57
16 Oct 1827 Sir Michael Shaw-Stewart,6th baronet 4 Oct 1788 19 Dec 1836 48
12 Aug 1830 Charles Douglas,later [1844] 3rd Baron Douglas
of Douglas 26 Oct 1775 10 Sep 1848 72
24 Dec 1832 John Maxwell,later [1844] 8th baronet 12 May 1791 6 Jun 1865 74
9 Aug 1837 Alexander Macdonald Lockhart 7 Jul 1806 27 Oct 1861 55
7 Jul 1841 William Lockhart 1787 25 Nov 1856 69
5 Jan 1857 Alexander Dundas Wishart Ross Baillie-
Cochrane,later [1880] 1st Baron Lamington 24 Nov 1816 15 Feb 1890 73
7 Apr 1857 Sir Thomas Edward Colebrooke,4th baronet 19 Aug 1813 11 Jan 1890 76
CONSTITUENCY SPLIT INTO NORTH &
SOUTH DIVISIONS 1868
LANARKSHIRE MID
1 Dec 1885 Stephen Mason 1832 21 Apr 1890 57
27 Apr 1888 John Wynford Philipps,later [1908] 1st Baron
St.Davids and [1918] 1st Viscount St.Davids 30 May 1860 28 Mar 1938 77
5 Apr 1894 James Caldwell 1839 25 Apr 1925 85
27 Jan 1910 John Howard Whitehouse 1873 28 Sep 1955 82
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918
LANARKSHIRE NORTH
21 Nov 1868 Sir Thomas Edward Colebrooke,4th baronet 19 Aug 1813 11 Jan 1890 76
CONSTITUENCY SPLIT INTO VARIOUS
DIVISIONS 1885. SEE "GOVAN",
"LANARKSHIRE NORTH-EAST","LANARKSHIRE
NORTH-WEST","LANARKSHIRE MID",
"LANARKSHIRE SOUTH" AND "PARTICK"
CONSTITUENCY RE-UNITED 1918
14 Dec 1918 Robert McLaren 17 Dec 1856 22 Apr 1940 83
15 Nov 1922 Joseph Sullivan 8 Sep 1866 13 Feb 1935 68
29 Oct 1924 Sir Alexander Sprot,1st baronet 24 Apr 1853 8 Feb 1929 75
21 Mar 1929 Jennie Lee,later [1970] Baroness Lee of
Asheridge [L] 3 Nov 1904 16 Nov 1988 84
27 Oct 1931 William John St.Clair Anstruther-Gray,later [1956]
1st baronet and [1966] Baron Kilmany [L] 5 Mar 1905 6 Aug 1985 80
26 Jul 1945 Margaret McCrorie Herbison 12 Mar 1907 29 Dec 1996 89
18 Jun 1970 John Smith 13 Sep 1938 12 May 1994 55
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
LANARKSHIRE NORTH-EAST
1 Dec 1885 Donald Crawford 1837 1 Jan 1919 81
23 Jul 1895 John Colville 3 Jul 1852 22 Aug 1901 49
26 Sep 1901 Sir William Henry Rattigan 4 Sep 1842 4 Jul 1904 61
For further information on the death of this MP,
see the note at the foot of this page
10 Aug 1904 Alexander Findlay 25 Nov 1844 2 Feb 1921 76
27 Jan 1910 Thomas Fleming Wilson [kt 1918] 2 Jun 1862 2 Apr 1929 66
9 Mar 1911 James Duncan Millar [kt 1932] 5 Aug 1871 10 Dec 1932 61
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918
LANARKSHIRE NORTH-WEST
4 Dec 1885 John Baird 1852 8 Jul 1900 48
9 Jul 1886 Robert Gallnigad Bontine Cunninghame
Graham 24 May 1852 20 Mar 1936 83
For further information on this MP,see the
note at the foot of this page
Jul 1892 Graeme Alexander Lockhart Whitelaw 1863 23 Jul 1928 65
24 Jul 1895 John Goundry Holburn 12 Apr 1843 25 Jan 1899 55
21 Feb 1899 Charles Mackinnon Douglas 2 Oct 1865 3 Feb 1924 58
23 Jan 1906 William Mitchell-Thomson,later [1918] 2nd
baronet and [1932] 1st Baron Selsdon 15 Apr 1877 24 Dec 1938 61
25 Jan 1910 William Mather Rutherfurd Pringle 22 Jan 1874 1 Apr 1928 54
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918
LANARKSHIRE SOUTH
26 Nov 1868 John Glencairn Carter Hamilton,later [1886]
1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzell 16 Nov 1829 15 Oct 1900 70
16 Feb 1874 Sir Windham Charles James Carmichael-
Anstruther,8th baronet 1825 26 Jan 1898 72
12 Apr 1880 John Glencairn Carter Hamilton,later [1886]
1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzell 16 Nov 1829 15 Oct 1900 70
8 Jul 1886 James Henry Cecil Hozier,later [1906] 2nd
Baron Newlands 4 Apr 1851 5 Sep 1929 78
23 Jan 1906 Walter Menzies [kt 1909] 24 Jul 1856 26 Oct 1913 57
12 Dec 1913 William Watson,later [1929] Baron
Thankerton [L] 8 Dec 1873 13 Jun 1948 74
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918
LANCASHIRE
17 Apr 1660 Sir Robert Bindlosse,1st baronet 8 May 1624 6 Nov 1688 64
Sir Roger Bradshaigh,later [1679] 1st
baronet (to 1679) 14 Jan 1628 31 Mar 1684 56
16 Apr 1661 Edward Stanley 7 Jan 1639 Oct 1664 25
17 Jan 1665 Thomas Preston 2 Mar 1600 9 Jan 1679 78
25 Feb 1679 Charles Gerard,styled Viscount Brandon from
July 1679,later [1694] 2nd Earl of Macclesfield c 1659 5 Nov 1701
(to 1685)
Peter Bold 2 Sep 1656 c May 1692 35
9 Sep 1679 Sir Charles Hoghton,4th baronet c 1644 10 Jun 1710
17 Mar 1685 Sir Roger Bradshaigh,2nd baronet c 1649 17 Jun 1687
James Holt Oct 1647 7 Jan 1713 65
17 Jan 1689 Charles Gerard,styled Viscount Brandon, later
[1694] 2nd Earl of Macclesfield (to 1694) c 1659 5 Nov 1701
Sir Charles Hoghton,4th baronet c 1644 10 Jun 1710
11 Mar 1690 James Stanley,later [1702] 10th Earl of Derby 3 Jul 1664 1 Feb 1736 71
(to 1703)
6 Feb 1694 Sir Ralph Assheton,2nd baronet 11 Feb 1652 4 May 1716 64
16 Aug 1698 Fitton Gerard,later [1701] 3rd Earl of Macclesfield 15 Oct 1663 26 Dec 1702
4 Feb 1701 Richard Bold (to 1704) 20 May 1678 21 Mar 1704 25
11 Jan 1703 Richard Assheton (to 1705) 4 May 1654 Sep 1705 51
18 Apr 1704 Richard Fleetwood 1653 21 Dec 1709 56
15 May 1705 Charles Zedenno Stanley 8 Dec 1666 9 Apr 1715 48
Richard Shuttleworth (to 1750) 3 Sep 1683 22 Dec 1749 66
22 Sep 1713 Sir John Bland,5th baronet 10 Sep 1691 9 Apr 1743 51
5 Sep 1727 Sir Edward Stanley,5th baronet,later [1736]
11th Earl of Derby 17 Sep 1689 22 Feb 1776 86
4 May 1736 Peter Bold c 1705 12 Sep 1762
26 May 1741 James Stanley (later Smith-Stanley),styled
Baron Strange (to 1771) 7 Jan 1717 1 Jun 1771 54
23 Jan 1750 Peter Bold c 1705 12 Sep 1762
14 Apr 1761 James Shuttleworth 6 Dec 1714 28 Jun 1773 58
5 Apr 1768 Lord Archibald Hamilton,later [1799] 9th Duke
of Hamilton and 6th Duke of Brandon (to 1772) 15 Jul 1740 16 Feb 1819 78
23 Jul 1771 Charles William Molyneux,8th Viscount
Molyneux [I], later [30 Nov 1771] 1st Earl of
Sefton [I] (to 1774) 11 Oct 1748 31 Jan 1795 46
4 Feb 1772 Sir Thomas Egerton,7th baronet,later [1801]
1st Earl of Wilton (to 1784) 14 Feb 1749 23 Sep 1814 65
11 Oct 1774 Edward Smith-Stanley,styled Baron Stanley,
later [1776] 12th Earl of Derby 12 Sep 1752 21 Oct 1834 82
26 Mar 1776 Thomas Stanley c 1753 late 1779
22 Feb 1780 Thomas Stanley (to 1812) 14 Sep 1749 25 Dec 1816 67
13 Apr 1784 John Blackburne (to 1830) 5 Aug 1754 11 Apr 1833 78
14 Oct 1812 Edward Smith-Stanley,styled Baron Stanley,
later [1834] 13th Earl of Derby (to 1832) 21 Apr 1775 30 Jun 1851 76
5 Aug 1830 John Wilson-Patten,later [1874] 1st Baron
Winmarleigh 26 Apr 1802 11 Jul 1892 90
10 May 1831 Benjamin Heywood,later [1838] 1st baronet 12 Dec 1793 11 Aug 1865 71
COUNTY SPLIT INTO NORTH &
SOUTH DIVISIONS 1832
LANCASHIRE NORTH
17 Dec 1832 Edward Geoffrey Smith-Stanley,styled Baron
Stanley from 1834,later [1851] 14th Earl of
Derby 29 Mar 1799 23 Oct 1869 70
John Wilson-Patten,later [1874] 1st Baron
Winmarleigh [(to 1874) 26 Apr 1802 11 Jul 1892 90
20 Sep 1844 John Talbot Clifton 5 Mar 1819 16 Apr 1882 63
3 Aug 1847 James Heywood 1810 17 Oct 1897 87
31 Mar 1857 Spencer Compton Cavendish,styled Marquess of
Hartington,later [1891] 8th Duke of Devonshire 23 Jul 1833 24 Mar 1908 74
17 Nov 1868 Frederick Arthur Stanley,later [1893] 16th
Earl of Derby (to 1885) 15 Jan 1841 14 Jun 1908 67
26 Mar 1874 Thomas Henry Clifton 3 Mar 1845 31 Mar 1880 35
14 Apr 1880 Randle Joseph Feilden 1824 19 May 1895 70
SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1885
SEE "BLACKPOOL","CHORLEY"
"LANCASTER" AND "NORTH LONSDALE"
LANCASHIRE NORTH-EAST
18 Nov 1868 James Maden Holt 18 Oct 1829 19 Sep 1911 81
John Pierce Chamberlain Starkie 1830 12 Jun 1888 57
14 Apr 1880 Spencer Compton Cavendish,styled Marquess of
Hartington,later [1891] 8th Duke of Devonshire 23 Jul 1833 24 Mar 1908 74
Frederick William Grafton 1816 27 Jan 1890 73
SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1885
SEE "ACCRINGTON","CLITHEROE"
"DARWEN" AND "ROSSENDALE"
LANCASHIRE SOUTH
18 Dec 1832 George William Wood 1781 3 Oct 1843 62
Charles William Molyneux,styled Viscount
Molyneux,later [1838] 3rd Earl of Sefton 10 Jul 1796 2 Aug 1855 59
23 Jan 1835 Lord Francis Egerton,later [1846] 1st Earl of
Ellesmere (to 1846) 1 Jan 1800 18 Feb 1857 57
Richard Bootle Wilbraham 27 Oct 1801 5 May 1844 42
24 May 1844 William Entwistle (to 1847)
21 Jul 1846 William Brown,later [1863] 1st baronet 30 May 1784 3 Mar 1864 79
(to 1859)
4 Aug 1847 Charles Pelham Villiers [he was also 3 Jan 1802 16 Jan 1898 96
returned for Wolverhampton,for which
he chose to sit]
20 Dec 1847 Alexander Henry 1783 4 Oct 1862 79
14 Jul 1852 John Cheetham 1802 18 May 1886 83
2 May 1859 Algernon Fulke Egerton (to 1868) 31 Dec 1825 14 Jul 1891 65
William John Legh,later [1892] 1st Baron Newton
(to 1865) 19 Dec 1828 15 Dec 1898 69
REPRESENTATION INCREASED
TO THREE MEMBERS 1861
14 Aug 1861 Charles Turner (to 1868) 1803 15 Oct 1875 72
22 Jul 1865 William Ewart Gladstone 29 Dec 1809 19 May 1898 88
CONSTITUENCY SPLIT INTO NORTH EAST &
SOUTH WEST DIVISIONS 1868
LANCASHIRE SOUTH EAST
23 Nov 1868 Algernon Fulke Egerton (to 1880) 31 Dec 1825 14 Jul 1891 65
John Snowdon Henry 30 Oct 1896
13 Feb 1874 Edward Hardcastle 1826 1 Nov 1905 79
14 Apr 1880 Robert Leake 1824 1 May 1901 76
William Agnew,later [1895] 1st baronet 20 Oct 1825 31 Oct 1910 85
SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1885
SEE "ECCLES","GORTON","HEYWOOD",
"MIDDLETON","PRESTWICH","RADCLIFFE-
CUM-FARNWORTH","STRETFORD" AND
"WESTHOUGHTON"
LANCASHIRE SOUTH WEST
21 Nov 1868 Charles Turner 1803 15 Oct 1875 72
Richard Assheton Cross,later [1886] 1st
Viscount Cross (to 1885) 30 May 1823 8 Jan 1914 90
6 Nov 1875 John Ireland Blackburne 28 May 1817 5 Sep 1893 76
SPLIT INTO VARIOUS DIVISIONS 1885
SEE "BOOTLE","INCE","LEIGH",
"NEWTON","ORMSKIRK","SOUTHPORT"
AND "WIDNES"
LANCASHIRE WEST
9 Jun 1983 Kenneth Harvard Hind 15 Sep 1949
9 Apr 1992 Colin Pickthall 13 Sep 1944
5 May 2005 Rosemary Elizabeth Cooper 5 Sep 1950
LANCASTER (LANCASHIRE)
Apr 1660 Sir Gilbert Gerard,1st baronet 23 Oct 1587 6 Jan 1670 82
William West 1 Feb 1612 7 Dec 1670 58
11 Apr 1661 Richard Kirkby (to 1685) c 1625 9 Sep 1681
Sir John Harrison c 1590 28 Sep 1669
25 Oct 1669 Richard Harrison Oct 1646 17 Jan 1726 79
11 Sep 1679 William Spencer c 1655 1690
16 Apr 1685 Henry Crispe c 1650 1700
Roger Kirkby c 1649 8 Feb 1709
17 Jan 1689 Thomas Preston (to 1697) 20 Jun 1647 31 Jan 1697 49
Curwen Rawlinson 3 Jun 1641 29 Aug 1689 48
21 Nov 1689 Roger Kirkby (to 1702) c 1649 8 Feb 1709
25 Feb 1697 Fitton Gerard,later [1701] 3rd Earl of Macclesfield 15 Oct 1663 26 Dec 1702 39
9 Aug 1698 Robert Heysham (to 1715) 16 Aug 1663 25 Feb 1723 59
27 Jul 1702 Sir William Lowther,1st baronet 4 Jan 1676 6 Apr 1705 29
15 May 1705 William Heysham (to 1716) 27 Jan 1666 13 Jun 1716 50
10 Feb 1715 Dodding Bradyll (to 1722) 28 Jun 1689 31 Dec 1748 59
16 Jul 1716 William Heysham (to 1727) 10 Dec 1691 14 Apr 1727 35
26 Mar 1722 Sir Thomas Lowther,2nd baronet (to 1745) c 1699 23 Mar 1745
1 May 1727 Christopher Tower c 1694 26 Sep 1771
4 May 1734 Robert Fenwick (to 1747) 5 Nov 1688 13 Feb 1750 61
25 Apr 1745 Francis Reynolds (to 1773) 12 Aug 1773
30 Jun 1747 Edward Marton c 1714 4 Dec 1758
22 Dec 1758 George Warren [kt 1761] (to 1780) 7 Feb 1735 31 Aug 1801 66
15 Sep 1773 Lord Richard Cavendish 19 Jun 1752 7 Sep 1781 29
11 Sep 1780 Wilson Braddyll 24 Feb 1756 20 Nov 1818 62
Abraham Rawlinson (to 1790) 1738 24 May 1803 64
26 Apr 1784 Francis Reynolds,later [1785] 3rd Baron Ducie 28 Mar 1739 20 Aug 1808 69
31 Mar 1786 Sir George Warren (to 1796) 7 Feb 1735 31 Aug 1801 66
30 Jun 1790 John Dent (to 1812) c 1761 14 Nov 1826
30 May 1796 Richard Penn c 1734 27 May 1811
14 Jul 1802 Alexander Hamilton,styled Marquess of
Douglas and Clydesdale,later [1819] 10th
Duke of Hamilton amd 7th Duke of Brandon 3 Oct 1767 18 Aug 1852 84
1 Nov 1806 John Fenton-Cawthorne 5 Jan 1753 1 Mar 1831 78
12 May 1807 Peter Patten (Patten-Bold from 1813) 1764 17 Oct 1819 55
7 Oct 1812 John Fenton-Cawthorne 5 Jan 1753 1 Mar 1831 78
Gabriel Doveton (to 1824) 1760 9 Apr 1824 63
1 Jul 1818 John Gladstone 11 Dec 1764 7 Dec 1851 86
10 Mar 1820 John Fenton-Cawthorne (to 1831) 5 Jan 1753 1 Mar 1831 78
20 Apr 1824 Thomas Greene (to 1852) 19 Jan 1794 8 Aug 1872 78
14 Mar 1831 Patrick Maxwell Stewart 28 Feb 1795 30 Oct 1846 51
25 Jul 1837 George Marton 1801 24 Nov 1867 66
29 Jul 1847 Samuel Gregson [his election was 1795 8 Feb 1865 69
declared void 29 Feb 1848]
9 Mar 1848 Robert Baynes Armstrong (to 1853) 1785 15 Jan 1869 83
[following the general election in Jul 1852,
his election was declared void 21 Feb 1853]
9 Jul 1852 Samuel Gregson (to 1865) 1795 8 Feb 1865 69
12 Apr 1853 Thomas Greene 19 Jan 1794 8 Aug 1872 78
28 Mar 1857 William James Garnett 10 Jul 1818 15 Sep 1873 55
13 Apr 1864 Edward Matthew Fenwick (to Apr 1866) 16 Oct 1877
20 Feb 1865 Henry William Schneider [following the 1817 11 Nov 1887 70
general election in Jul 1865,the election of
both members (Fenwick and Schneider) was
declared void 23 Apr 1866. No writ was
issued to replace them and the seat was
disenfranchised by the Reform Act 1867]
CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1867,
BUT REVIVED 1885
2 Dec 1885 George Blucher Heneage Marton 1839 18 Aug 1905 66
7 Jul 1886 James Williamson,later [1895] 1st Baron Ashton 31 Dec 1842 27 May 1930 87
19 Jul 1895 William Henry Foster 1848 27 Mar 1908 59
9 Oct 1900 Norval Watson Helme [kt 1912] 22 Sep 1849 6 Mar 1932 82
14 Dec 1918 Sir Archibald Hunter 6 Sep 1856 28 Jun 1936 79
15 Nov 1922 John Edward Singleton [kt 1934] 18 Jan 1885 6 Jan 1957 71
6 Dec 1923 John Joseph O'Neill 1888 20 Apr 1953 64
29 Oct 1924 Sir Gerald Strickland,later [1928] 1st Baron
Strickland 24 May 1861 22 Aug 1940 79
9 Feb 1928 Robert Parkinson Tomlinson 20 May 1881 3 Jun 1943 62
30 May 1929 Herwald Ramsbotham,later [1941] 1st Baron
Soulbury and [1954] 1st Viscount Soulbury 6 Mar 1887 30 Jan 1971 83
15 Oct 1941 Fitzroy Hew Royle Maclean,later [1957] 1st
baronet 11 Mar 1911 15 Jun 1996 85
8 Oct 1959 Humphrey John Berkeley 21 Feb 1926 15 Nov 1994 68
31 Mar 1966 Stanley Henig 7 Jul 1939
18 Jun 1970 Mary Elaine Kellett-Bowman [Dame 1988] 8 Jul 1923 4 Mar 2014 90
NAME ALTERED TO "LANCASTER
AND WYRE" 1997
LANCASTER AND FLEETWOOD (LANCASHIRE)
6 May 2010 Eric Ollerenshaw 26 Mar 1950
LANCASTER AND WYRE (LANCASHIRE)
1 May 1997 Thomas Hilton Dawson 30 Sep 1953
5 May 2005 Robert Ben Lobban Wallace 15 May 1970
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 2010
LANGBAURGH (CLEVELAND)
9 Jun 1983 James Richard Holt 2 Aug 1931 20 Sep 1991 60
7 Nov 1991 Ashok Kumar 28 May 1956 15 Mar 2010 53
9 Apr 1992 Michael Walton Bates,later [2008]
Baron Bates [L] 26 May 1961
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1997
LANGSTONE (PORTSMOUTH)
23 Feb 1950 Geoffrey Paul Stevens 10 Nov 1902 10 May 1981 78
15 Oct 1964 Ian Stewart Lloyd [kt 1986] 30 May 1921 26 Sep 2006 85
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED FEB 1974
LAUNCESTON (CORNWALL)
formerly known as DUNHEVED
12 Apr 1660 Edward Eliot 9 Jul 1618 c 1710
Thomas Gewen (to 1661) c 1585 Nov 1660
John Cloberry c 1625 31 Jan 1688
Double return. Eliot and Gewen seated
5 May 1660. Eliot subsequently unseated
and replaced by Clobery 29 Jun 1660
29 Jun 1660 Sir John Cloberry c 1625 31 Jan 1688
19 Mar 1661 Richard Edgcumbe 13 Feb 1640 3 Apr 1688 48
Sir Charles Harbord (to Sep 1679) 2 Jul 1596 25 May 1679 82
14 Feb 1679 Bernard Granville 4 Mar 1631 14 Oct 1701 70
1 Sep 1679 Sir John Coryton,1st baronet 29 Jul 1621 23 Aug 1680 59
Sir Hugh Piper (to 1689) c 1617 24 Jul 1687
19 Nov 1680 Charles Granville,styled Baron Lansdown,
later [1701] 2nd Earl of Bath 31 Aug 1661 4 Sep 1701 40
24 Feb 1681 William Harbord [he was also returned for 25 Apr 1635 31 Jul 1692 57
Thetford,but the Parliament was dissolved
before he chose which seat to represent]
27 Apr 1685 John Granville,later [1703] 1st Baron Granville 12 Apr 1665 3 Dec 1707 42
14 Jan 1689 William Harbord (to 1692) 25 Apr 1635 31 Jul 1692 57
Edward Russell,later [1697] 1st Earl of Orford 1653 26 Nov 1727 74
25 Feb 1690 Bernard Granville (to 1695) 4 Mar 1631 14 Jun 1701 70
15 Nov 1692 Henry Hyde,styled Viscount Hyde later [1711]
2nd Earl of Rochester and [1724] 4th Earl of
Clarendon (to 1711) Jun 1672 10 Dec 1753 81
28 Oct 1695 William Cary c 1661 by Oct 1710
24 Oct 1710 Francis Scobell (to 1713) 24 Aug 1664 20 Sep 1740 76
29 May 1711 George Clarke 7 May 1661 22 Oct 1736 75
7 Sep 1713 Edward Herle 12 Apr 1682 14 Apr 1721 39
John Anstis (to 1722) 28 Sep 1669 4 Mar 1744 74
11 May 1721 Alexander Pendarves (to 1725) 11 Nov 1662 8 Mar 1725 62
12 Apr 1722 John Friend [he was unseated on petition c 1677 26 Jul 1728
in favour of John Willes 17 Mar 1724]
17 Mar 1724 John Willes (to 1726) 29 Nov 1685 15 Dec 1761 76
29 Mar 1725 John Friend (to 1727) c 1677 26 Jul 1728
31 May 1726 Henry Vane,later [1754] 1st Earl of Darlington c 1705 6 Mar 1758
28 Aug 1727 John King,later [1734] 2nd Baron King of Ockham 13 Jan 1706 10 Feb 1740 34
(to 1735) [he was unseated on petition in favour
of Sir William Irby 24 May 1735]
Arthur Tremayne 23 Feb 1701 1796 95
3 May 1734 Sir William Morice,3rd baronet (to 1750) c 1707 17 Jan 1750
24 May 1735 Sir William Irby,2nd baronet,later [1761]
1st Baron Boston 8 Mar 1707 30 Mar 1775 68
2 Jul 1747 Sir John St.Aubyn,4th baronet (to 1754) 12 Nov 1726 12 Oct 1772 45
2 Feb 1750 Humphry Morice (to 1780) 1723 18 Oct 1785 62
19 Apr 1754 Sir George Lee c 1700 18 Dec 1758
30 Dec 1758 Sir John St.Aubyn,4th baronet [he was 12 Nov 1726 12 Oct 1772 45
unseated on petition in favour of Peter
Burrell 21 Feb 1759]
21 Feb 1759 Peter Burrell 6 Dec 1723 6 Nov 1775 51
18 Mar 1768 William Amherst 5 Feb 1732 13 May 1781 49
10 Oct 1774 John Buller 28 Feb 1745 26 Nov 1793 48
8 Sep 1780 James Cecil,styled Viscount Cranborne,later
[1780] 7th Earl of Salisbury and [1789] 1st
Marquess of Salisbury 4 Sep 1748 13 Jun 1823 74
Thomas Bowlby (to 1783) 2 May 1721 Oct 1795 74
28 Nov 1780 Charles George Perceval,later [1784] 1st Baron
Arden [I] and [1802] 1st Baron Arden (to 1790) 1 Oct 1756 5 Jul 1840 83
31 Jan 1783 Sir John Jervis,later [1797] 1st Earl of
St.Vincent 9 Jan 1735 13 Mar 1823 88
5 Apr 1784 George Rose 17 Jun 1744 13 Jan 1818 73
18 Jun 1788 Sir John Edward Swinburne,6th baronet 6 Mar 1762 26 Sep 1860 98
22 Jun 1790 John Rodney (to 1796) 10 May 1765 9 Apr 1847 81
Sir Henry Clinton 4 Jun 1730 23 Dec 1795 65
9 Jan 1795 William Garthshore 28 Oct 1764 5 Apr 1806 41
31 May 1796 John Theophilus Rawdon 19 Nov 1756 5 May 1808 51
James Brogden (to 1832) c 1765 24 Jul 1842
7 Jul 1802 Richard Alexander Henry Bennet c 1771 11 Oct 1818
4 Nov 1806 Hugh Percy,styled Earl Percy,later [1817]
3rd Duke of Northumberland [at the general 20 Apr 1785 11 Feb 1847 61
election in May 1807,he was also returned for
Northumberland,for which he chose to sit]
17 Jul 1807 Richard Alexander Henry Bennet c 1771 11 Oct 1818
8 May 1812 Jonathan Raine 21 Jan 1763 14 May 1831 68
9 Oct 1812 Pownoll Bastard Pellew,later [1833] 2nd
Viscount Exmouth 1 Jul 1786 3 Dec 1833 47
17 Mar 1829 Sir James Willoughby Gordon,1st baronet 21 Oct 1772 4 Jan 1851 78
9 Apr 1831 Sir John Malcolm 2 May 1769 30 May 1833 64
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1832
12 Dec 1832 Sir Henry Hardinge,later [1846] 1st Viscount
Hardinge 30 Mar 1785 24 Sep 1856 71
20 May 1844 William Bowles [kt 1862] 1780 2 Jul 1869 89
7 Jul 1852 Josceline William Percy 17 Jul 1811 25 Jul 1881 70
29 Apr 1859 Thomas Chandler Haliburton 17 Dec 1796 27 Aug 1865 68
10 Jul 1865 Alexander Henry Campbell 31 Jul 1822
9 Apr 1868 Henry Charles Lopes,later [1897] 1st Baron
Ludlow 3 Oct 1828 25 Dec 1899 71
9 Feb 1874 James Henry Deakin (the elder) [his election 1823 1880 57
was declared void 6 May 1874]
3 Jul 1874 James Henry Deakin (the younger) 1851 8 Nov 1881 30
3 Mar 1877 Sir Hardinge Stanley Giffard,later [1898] 1st
Earl of Halsbury 3 Sep 1823 11 Dec 1921 98
1 Jul 1885 Sir Richard Everard Webster,later [1899] 1st
baronet and [1913] 1st Viscount Alverstone 22 Dec 1842 15 Dec 1915 72
1 Dec 1885 Charles Thomas Dyke-Acland,later [1898]
12th baronet 16 Jul 1842 18 Feb 1919 76
Jul 1892 Thomas Owen 1840 10 Jul 1898 58
For further information on the death of this MP,
see the note at the foot of this page
3 Aug 1898 John Fletcher Moulton [kt 1906],later [1912]
Baron Moulton [L] 18 Nov 1844 9 Mar 1921 76
20 Jan 1906 George Croydon Marks [kt 1911],later [1929]
1st Baron Marks 9 Jun 1858 24 Sep 1938 80
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918
LEEDS
14 Dec 1832 John Marshall (to 1835) 28 Dec 1797 31 Oct 1836 38
Thomas Babington Macaulay,later [1857] 1st
Baron Macaulay 25 Oct 1800 28 Dec 1859 59
17 Feb 1834 Edward Baines (to 1841) 5 Feb 1774 3 Aug 1848 74
9 Jan 1835 Sir John Beckett,2nd baronet 17 May 1775 31 May 1847 72
28 Jul 1837 Sir William Molesworth,8th baronet 23 May 1810 22 Oct 1855 45
2 Jul 1841 William Beckett (to 1852) 1784 26 Jan 1863 78
William Aldam 1813 27 Jul 1890 77
30 Jul 1847 James Garth Marshall 20 Feb 1802 22 Oct 1873 71
9 Jul 1852 Matthew Talbot Baines (to 1859) 17 Feb 1799 22 Jan 1860 60
Sir George Goodman 13 Oct 1859
28 Mar 1857 Robert Hall 1801 25 May 1857 55
5 Jun 1857 George Skirrow Beecroft (to 1868) 16 Nov 1809 18 Mar 1869 59
30 Apr 1859 Edward Baines (to 1874) 28 May 1800 2 Mar 1890 89
REPRESENTATION INCREASED
TO THREE MEMBERS 1868
17 Nov 1868 Robert Meek Carter (to 1876) 1814 9 Aug 1882 68
William St.James Wheelhouse [kt 1882] 1821 8 Mar 1886 64
(to 1880)
6 Feb 1874 Robert Tennant (to 1880) 1828 5 Mar 1900 71
15 Aug 1876 John Barran,later [1895] 1st baronet (to 1885) 3 Aug 1821 3 May 1905 83
2 Apr 1880 William Ewart Gladstone [he was also 29 Dec 1809 19 May 1898 88
returned for Midlothian,for which he
chose to sit]
William Lawies Jackson,later [1902] 1st Baron
Allerton (to 1885) 16 Feb 1840 4 Apr 1917 76
8 May 1880 Herbert John Gladstone,later [1910] 1st
Viscount Gladstone 7 Jan 1854 6 Mar 1930 76
SPLIT INTO 5 DIVISIONS 1885
SEE BELOW
LEEDS CENTRAL
25 Nov 1885 Gerarld William Balfour,later [1930] 2nd Earl
of Balfour 9 Apr 1853 14 Jan 1945 91
15 Jan 1906 Robert Armitage 22 Feb 1866 10 Feb 1944 77
15 Nov 1922 Arthur Wellesley Willey 1868 2 Jul 1923 55
26 Jul 1923 Sir Charles Henry Wilson 13 Jan 1859 30 Dec 1930 71
30 May 1929 Richard Douglas Denman,later [1945] 1st
baronet 24 Aug 1876 22 Dec 1957 81
26 Jul 1945 George Porter 29 Jul 1884 25 Sep 1973 89
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1955,
BUT REVIVED 1983
9 Jun 1983 Derek John Fatchett 22 Aug 1945 9 May 1999 53
10 Jun 1999 Hilary James Wedgwood Benn 26 Nov 1953
LEEDS EAST
25 Nov 1885 Richard Dawson 1855
2 Jul 1886 John Lawrence Gane 1837 c Mar 1895 57
30 Apr 1895 Thomas Richmond Leuty 1853 15 Apr 1911 57
1 Oct 1900 Henry Strother Cautley,later [1936] 1st Baron
Cautley 9 Dec 1863 21 Sep 1946 82
15 Jan 1906 James O'Grady [kt 1924] 6 May 1866 10 Dec 1934 68
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918,
BUT REVIVED 1955
26 May 1955 Denis Winston Healey,later [1992] Baron
Healey [L] 30 Aug 1917
9 Apr 1992 George Edward Mudie 6 Feb 1945
LEEDS NORTH
25 Nov 1885 William Lawies Jackson,later [1902] 1st Baron
Allerton 16 Feb 1840 4 Apr 1917 76
30 Jul 1902 Rowland Hirst Barran [kt 1917] 7 Aug 1858 6 Aug 1949 90
14 Dec 1918 Alexander Charles Farquharson 15 Mar 1864 27 May 1951 87
15 Nov 1922 Hugh Myddleton Butler 3 May 1857 10 Oct 1943 86
6 Dec 1923 Sir William Gervase Beckett,1st baronet 14 Jan 1866 24 Aug 1937 71
30 May 1929 Osbert Peake,later [1956] 1st Viscount Ingleby 30 Dec 1897 11 Oct 1966 68
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1955
LEEDS NORTH-EAST
14 Dec 1918 Sir John Dearman Birchall 26 Sep 1875 6 Jan 1941 65
13 Mar 1940 John James Craik Henderson [kt 1953] 21 Dec 1890 3 Dec 1971 80
26 Jul 1945 Alice Martha Bacon,later [1970] Baroness
Bacon [L] 10 Sep 1909 24 Mar 1993 83
26 May 1955 Osbert Peake,later [1956] 1st Viscount Ingleby 30 Dec 1897 11 Oct 1966 68
9 Feb 1956 Sir Keith Sinjohn Joseph,2nd baronet,later [1987]
Baron Joseph [L] 17 Jan 1918 10 Dec 1994 76
11 Jun 1987 Timothy John Robert Kirkhope 29 Apr 1945
1 May 1997 Fabian Uziell Hamilton 12 Apr 1955
LEEDS NORTH-WEST
23 Feb 1950 Donald Kaberry,later [1960] 1st baronet and
[1983] Baron Kaberry of Abel [L] 18 Aug 1907 13 Mar 1991 83
9 Jun 1983 Keith Hampson 14 Aug 1943
1 May 1997 Harold Best 18 Dec 1937
5 May 2005 Gregory Thomas Mulholland 31 Aug 1970
LEEDS SOUTH
25 Nov 1885 Sir Lyon Playfair,later [1892] 1st Baron Playfair 21 May 1818 29 May 1898 80
22 Sep 1892 John Lawson Walton [kt 1905] 1852 19 Jan 1908 55
12 Feb 1908 William Middlebrook [kt 1916],later [1930] 1st
baronet 22 Feb 1851 30 Jun 1936 85
15 Nov 1922 Henry Charles Charleton 1 Mar 1870 8 Oct 1959 89
27 Oct 1931 Borras Noel Hamilton Whiteside 12 Dec 1903 13 Jun 1948 44
14 Nov 1935 Henry Charles Charleton 1 Mar 1870 8 Oct 1959 89
26 Jul 1945 Hugh Todd Naylor Gaitskell 9 Apr 1906 18 Jan 1963 56
20 Jun 1963 Merlyn Rees,later [1992] Baron
Merlyn-Rees [L] 18 Dec 1920 5 Jan 2006 85
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
LEEDS SOUTH-EAST
14 Dec 1918 James O'Grady [kt 1924] 6 May 1866 10 Dec 1934 68
29 Oct 1924 Sir Henry Herman Slesser 12 Jul 1883 3 Dec 1979 96
1 Aug 1929 James Milner,later [1951] 1st Baron Milner
of Leeds 12 Aug 1889 16 Jul 1967 77
7 Feb 1952 Denis Winston Healey,later [1992] Baron
Healey [L] 30 Aug 1917
26 May 1955 Alice Martha Bacon,later [1970] Baroness
Bacon [L] 10 Sep 1909 24 Mar 1993 83
18 Jun 1970 Stanley Cohen 31 Jul 1927 23 Feb 2004 76
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
LEEDS WEST
25 Nov 1885 Herbert John Gladstone,later [1910] 1st
Viscount Gladstone 7 Jan 1854 6 Mar 1930 76
17 Jan 1910 Thomas Edmund Harvey 4 Jan 1875 3 May 1955 80
14 Dec 1918 John Murray 28 Feb 1879 28 Dec 1964 85
6 Dec 1923 Thomas William Stamford 20 Dec 1882 30 May 1949 66
27 Oct 1931 Samuel Vyvyan Trerice Adams 22 Apr 1900 13 Aug 1951 51
For information on the death of this MP,see
the note at the foot of this page
26 Jul 1945 Thomas William Stamford 20 Dec 1882 30 May 1949 66
21 Jul 1949 Thomas Charles Pannell,later [1974] Baron
Pannell [L] 10 Sep 1902 23 Mar 1980 77
28 Feb 1974 Joseph Jabez Dean,later [1983] Baron Dean
of Beswick [L] 3 Jun 1922 26 Feb 1999 76
9 Jun 1983 Michael James Meadowcroft 6 Mar 1942
11 Jun 1987 John Dominic Battle 26 Apr 1951
6 May 2010 Rachel Jane Reeves 13 Feb 1979
LEEK (STAFFORDSHIRE)
2 Dec 1885 Charles Crompton 4 Feb 1833 25 Jun 1890 57
13 Jul 1886 Harry Tichborne Hinckes 1833 19 Mar 1895 61
Jul 1892 Charles Bill 8 Jan 1843 9 Dec 1915 72
26 Jan 1906 Robert Pearce [kt 1916] 15 Jan 1840 29 Sep 1922 82
20 Jan 1910 Arthur Howard Heath 29 May 1856 26 Apr 1930 73
Dec 1910 Robert Pearce [kt 1916] 15 Jan 1840 29 Sep 1922 82
14 Dec 1918 William Bromfield 24 Jan 1868 3 Jun 1950 82
27 Oct 1931 Arthur Ratcliffe 17 Feb 1882 3 May 1963 81
14 Nov 1935 William Bromfield 24 Jan 1868 3 Jun 1950 82
26 Jul 1945 Harold Davies,later [1970] Baron
Davies of Leek [L] 31 Jul 1904 28 Oct 1985 81
18 Jun 1970 David Laidlaw Knox [kt 1993] 30 May 1933
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
William Roupell, MP for Lambeth 1857-1862
The following is from 'The Times' of 27 March 1909:-
'The death of William Roupell, which occurred on Thursday [i.e. 25 March 1909] at his house
in Christchurch-road, Streatham, recalls one of the most remarkable cases of forgery that
has ever occupied the attention of the English courts. He was the illegitimate son of Richard
Palmer Roupell, a wealthy lead-smelter, who in the middle of the last century had a factory
near Doctors' Commons, and also possessed considerable properties in Surrey, Essex,
Hampshire and London. He was born some years before his parents were married. After the
marriage, which took place in 1838, three other children were born, and one of whom,
Richard, was afterwards the plaintiff in the action during which the life-story of his brother
William was brought to light. In spite of the irregularity of his birth, William was always
treated by both parents as their eldest son. His father trusted him, loved him, and was
proud of him, and, as it afterwards appeared, he exerted a very powerful influence over his
fond and doting mother, so that for all practical purposes the fact that he was born out of
wedlock made no difference in his position - if, that is to say, we are to believe his own
story.
'Before September, 1856, when the elder Roupell died, William was in serious pecuniary
difficulties, and had already started on the extraordinary course of deceit and forgery which
six years later was to land him in the felon's dock. To free himself from the pressure of his
creditors it seemed to him imperative to raise a large sum of money, which he proceeded to
do by forging deeds of gift to himself of certain of his father's estates and then raising loans
on the valuations.
'Even after their marriage, the relations between Richard Palmer Roupell and his wife
continued to be of rather an unusual kind. They had separate residences, though they were
on quite friendly terms, and it was, as a general rule, only from Saturday to Monday that
the husband used to visit the house in which his wife and children lived. On September 12,
1856, when the news of his death reached them, William and his mother at once went to his
house, and the housekeeper gave the keys to Mrs. Roupell, who, being overcome with grief,
handed them over to her son. He first opened the strong-box in the sitting-room downstairs,
and then, going up to his father's bedroom, opened a desk in which was his last will,
containing a final codicil, which had been added only a few days before, the general tenor
being that all his property was left to trustees for the benefit of his son Richard. He was too
clever to destroy the will. The draft copy was probably at that moment in the lawyer's
office. So that night, which he spent in the house where his dead father's body was lying,
he drew up another will to supersede it.
'The codicil to the genuine will was dated August 31, his father died on September 12, and
the date of the will to which he forged his signature and that of the necessary witness was
September 2. He was safe as far as his mother was concerned, since she was not on terms
of such intimacy with her late husband as to know how his money was left. A few days later
he attended the funeral, at which the false will was read and, after that ordeal, went with it
to the lawyers, who, although expressing surprise that it should revoke the will to which the
codicil had been added only two days previously, did not see any cause for suspicion. William
Roupell had been too clever to draw the will in his own favour. He was merely the executor.
Everything was left to "My dear wife, Sarah Roupell, to and for her own use and benefit
absolutely." But, as he had unbounded influence over his mother, he had virtually the
complete control of the testator's money.
'He launched out on a career of wild extravagance, sold estate after estate with his mother's
consent, promising to settle 3,000 a year on her and the other children. He became
member for Lambeth, and, when his election was petitioned against, and he was questioned
by counsel as to certain alleged acts of corruption, he answered that, if any man were to
make any kind of dishonourable proposition to him, he would knock him down. After a few
years of this riotous living the end came, and he was forced to flee the country, a ruined
man, having first, as he alleged, admitted to some of the people to whom he sold estates
that were not his to sell, as they were the property of his brother Richard.
'One of these victims of his perjury, a Mr Waite, had bought the Norbiton Park estate in
1861, and it was against him that, in August, 1862, Richard brought the famous action, at
which William Roupell's misdeeds were brought to light by his own confession. This strange
man, who without any qualms of conscience, had robbed his brothers and sisters and forged
his father's name over and over again, suddenly made up his mind to leave his safe
sanctuary in Spain and return to England to give evidence against himself.
'There were in effect three parties to the case. Richard Roupell, the man who had been
robbed of his heritage, was by the aid of the thief, his elder brother, proceeding against a
third man, who had done him no injury, and endeavouring to eject him from the estate
which he had purchased perfectly regularly and fairly. As plaintiff it was his object to prove
that his principal witness, his own brother, was a liar and forger. Mr Waite, as defendant,
was concerned in defence of his property to prove that the man who had defrauded both
himself and the plaintiff was not such a villain as he represented himself to be, and the chief
witness, the wrongdoer, had come of his own free will to deliver himself up to justice. The
presence of these three men in the Court, with the mother of two of them ready, if
necessary, to give evidence which should help to convict her first-born, the real defendant,
was extraordinarily dramatic, and it was no wonder that the case of "Roupell v Waite"
created the intense excitement that it did. But there was no need for Mr Serjeant Shee to
put Mrs Roupell into the witness-box. The man stood self-condemned. The case between
the two parties was compromised on the second day, and, in September, William Roupell
was arraigned at the Central Criminal Court on two charges of forgery, to each of which he
eventually pleaded "Guilty," and was sentenced to penal servitude for life.
'After serving only 14 years of his sentence, during which he is said to have done useful
religious work among his fellow-convicts, he was released on account of his exemplary
behaviour, and for the last 25 years of his life he had lived at Streatham. There on a
diminutive holding he had gained a rather precarious livelihood as a fruit farmer, living very
quietly and making only a few more shillings a week than were enough for his modest wants.'
For further reading, see 'The Roupells of Lambeth; Politics, Property and Peculation in
Victorian London' by Judy Harris, published by Local History Publications for the Streatham
Society, 2001.
Sir Charles Crauford Fraser VC, MP for Lambeth North 1885-1892
Fraser was a major in the 7th Hussars when, on 31 December 1858, an officer named
Captain Stisted and some men of his regiment had pursued some Indian mutineers into the
Raptee River in Oudh on the border of India and Nepal, and were in imminent danger of
being drowned. Fraser, although at the time partially disabled from a wound he had received
six months earlier, at once volunteered at great personal risk to jump into the river in an
attempt to rescue the soldiers. He succeeded in saving the officer and his men while all the
time under musket fire from the mutineers on the opposite bank of the river. Fraser was
awarded the Victoria Cross for his action.
He later sat in the House of Commons for Lambeth North between 1885 and 1892.
Walter Elliot Elliot, MP for Lanark 1918-1923, Kelvingrove 1924-1945 and 1950-1958
and Scottish Universities 1946-1950
Elliot was first elected to the House of Commons as member for Lanark at the General Election
in December 1918. The following year he married Helen Hamilton, but while the newly-wedded
couple were on their honeymoon, she was killed in a mountaineering accident. The following
report appeared in 'The Scotsman' of 10 September 1919:-
A serious accident, resulting in the death of Mrs. Elliot, wife of Captain Waler E. Elliot, M.C.,
M.P. for Lanark, is reported from Skye. About a fortnight ago Captain Elliot and his newly-
married wife came to Sligichan Hotel, the well-known hostelry at the foot of the Coolin Hills,
where they were spending their honeymoon. On Sunday they proceeded to climb one of the
peaks overlooking Hartacorry. The day was favourable as regards weather conditions, but
towards evening the hills were enveloped in a thick mist, and the climbers lost their way. It
would appear that Mrs. Elliot at this stage, while they were looking for some shelter wherein
to pass the night, stumbled and lost her footing, pulling her husband with her. They both
slid down the steep mountain side, and lay at the foot unconscious. Some time afterwards
Captain Elliot regained consciousness, and tried to rouse his wife, but found that life was
extinct. He was seriously injured, but on Monday he endeavoured to make his way to Sligichan,
which was several miles distant, in order to report the disaster and to obtain assistance for
the removal of his wife's body. A party was formed, and proceeded to the spot indicated by
Captain Elliot, but owing to the darkness and inaccessible nature of the locality, the body
could not be removed till yesterday, when it was taken to Sligichan, where arrangements are
being made for its removal to the South for burial.'
Sir William Henry Rattigan, MP for Lanarkshire North East 1901-1904
Sir William died from a broken neck when the car in which he was a passenger overturned
in July 1904. It is apparent from the subsequent inquest into his death that the car was not
in a road-worthy condition at the time of the accident. The following report appeared in
'The Times' on 5 July 1904:-
'News reached London shortly after 10 last night that, whilst motoring from London to
Blackwood, Lanarkshire, Sir William Rattigan, K.C., the member for North-East Lanark, had
met with a fatal accident at Langford, near Biggleswade. Sir William Rattigan, Lady Rattigan
and their chauffeur left London on a Darracq car for Scotland yesterday afternoon. They
were approaching Langford, a village near Biggleswade, at a speed of ten miles per hour,
when the spokes of the near hind wheel scattered as the car was rounding a corner. The
car overturned and Lady Rattigan and the chauffeur were imprisoned beneath the glass
canopy top, through which Sir William was thrown onto the road. Some labourers working
near by rendered assistance, and Sir William Rattigan was found to be dead. Lady Rattigan
was badly cut by broken glass, and the driver escaped with slight injuries. Both were
conveyed to the Boot Inn, whither the body of Sir William Rattigan was also removed
pending the inquest.'
The following [edited] account of the inquest appeared in 'The Times' on 7 July 1904:-
'The inquest on the death of Sir William Rattigan, M.P., who was killed in a motor-car accident
at Langford, near Biggleswade, on Monday evening, was opened at the Corner House Inn,
Langford, yesterday afternoon, before Mr. Mark Whyley, the county coroner.
'After formal evidence, Agnes Thompson, the wife of a labourer of Langford, said that about 7
o'clock on Monday evening a motor-car passed her near Gravel Pit going in the direction of
Langford. It was swaying about. When it got 30 yards past her it fell over. It seemed as
though the wheel flew out and the car went crash on the side. The wheel went into the ditch.
She ran up and found two men and a lady. A gentleman was lying in the bottom of the car
and the lady was lying beside him. The chauffeur was out looking at the gentleman, whom she
saw breathe twice, but he did not move. She went to the lady's assistance.
'George Milton, farm foreman, said the car passed him as he was cycling to Langford, and he
noticed the near hind wheel wobbling very much. The car was going under 12 miles an hour.
At the corner the car turned over after swaying two or three times. He rode up and found Sir
William Rattigan lying partly in the car and partly on the ground.
'John Young, the chauffeur, who was driving, said that he was in the employ of the late Sir
William Rattigan. They started from London on Monday about 3 o'clock in a motor-car - a
Darracq - from Lanarksleigh, Cornwall-gardens. He had not been this road before. They
stopped near Hatfield for ten minutes to attend to the carburettor. He noticed nothing else
amiss with the car. All went well until Langford. He was driving at ten miles an hour. As they
came round the bend of the road a wheel flew out and the car went over instantaneously. For
the minute he was stunned, but managed to stop the engine. The engine was not damaged.
He had had 12 months' experience and had driven this car one month. Before starting he
examined the car and satisfied himself that it was in travelling order. He understood the
mechanism of the car. One spring bent was all he noticed defective. The wheels and steering
apparatus appeared perfect. The car was second-hand when purchased by Sir William
privately. No wheel struck the bank, but the back of the car struck when it fell. The car had a
canopy with a glass front and back. He felt nothing wrong with the wheel before reaching the
corner. He went out in the morning with the car. They had a slight accident on leaving
Cornwall-gardens, colliding slightly with a coal cart, but not enough to damage the car. The
spring was bent and he had it straightened at Mr. Rawlings' garage. It was a job that could be
done in half an hour. There was no difficulty in steering. He was quite sure the car did not
touch the bank. The car was perfectly safe for the road.
'Dr. Emmerson, of Biggleswade.......found Sir William lying dead. Next morning he examined the
body and found slight bruises on the forehead, nose and chin. There was no other sign of
injury, except to the neck, which was broken.
'Edward George Nicholson, manager of Rawlings Brothers, said he saw the car on Monday
morning and found the bottom web buckled up. There was a day's work in the repairs. There
were three distinct injuries and the car was not safe to run, the wheels being out of parallel.
In the presence of the foreman he said to Young, "If you take the car away in this condition
you take it against our advice and on your own responsibility." The steering, the witness
continued, ought to have been looked to. The work the firm did was still sound. The injuries
received in the morning would make steering difficult. The car was not in a fit condition to set
upon the road.
'After other evidence, the jury decided to hear no more, and returned a verdict of "Accidental
death." They added they considered the car not in a condition to send on the road, but the
driver, having acted under the instructions of his master, was fully exonerated from all blame.'
Robert Gallnigad Bontine Cunninghame Grahame. MP for Lanarkshire North West
1886-1892
The following biography of Cunninghame Graham is taken from the February 1953 issue of the
Australian monthly magazine "Parade." The author of the biography is obviously extremely
impressed with Cunninghame Graham's literary works, but unfortunately these works are
almost forgotten today.
'Pandemonium reigned in a bleak Clydeside meeting hall one night in 1886 as a tall, elegant
man with twinkling eyes and the long hair, moustache and beard of a modern Don Quixote,
tried vainly to make an election speech to a mob of dockside workers, mostly from Ireland.
Convinced that the speaker was against Home Rule, they were resolved to howl him down.
Suddenly the man left the stage but was back almost at once. Raising a heavy six-shooter, he
levelled it at the audience. "Silence," he roared, "You are going to listen to me if it's the last
thing you do. If another man opens his mouth, I'll blow his brains out." The babble ceased.
Then the dockers roared with laughter and applauded wildly.
'Robert Bontine Cunningham Graham, big-hearted Scottish laird, ex-revolutionary soldier,
pampas gaucho, frontiersman, prospector, master duellist, shop-assistant, buffalo hunter,
historian and one of Britain's greatest authors, had won his audience. When he told them the
revolver was a dummy left by an amateur theatrical company, they yelled with delight. He
brought the house down with the statement that, though a member of an ancient family,
he was also in favour of Irish Home Rule. He won the election and kept his seat for six years
when, disillusioned by "Tory-minded Labour leaders," he washed his hands of the "filth of
politics."
'A dandy and a gentleman, Cunninghame Graham could lasso a maddened bullock and tear a
double pack of cards in two. In his later days he was the impressive and extremely articulate
figure-head of the Scottish Nationalist Movement. His books are likely to become classics.
Joseph Conrad, the great novelist, described his "Mograb el Acksa" [Heineman, London, 1898]
as the adventure travel book of the century, while Bernard Shaw used it as a background to
to his "Captain Brassbound's Conversion" [a play set in Morocco, its theme being the futility
of revenge].
'Cunninghame Graham had the blood of Spanish hidalgos and Scottish kings in his veins. His
father was an impoverished Scottish laird, whose mother, Donna Catalina, lived in Madrid.
Roberto, as he was called, spent his childhood between the mists of Scotland and the warm
sunshine of Spain. His grandmother took him to colourful fiestas and taught him the customs
and folklore of her hot-blooded country. Little wonder, therefore, that he found Harrow, with
its stiff collars and top hats, somewhat dull. At 14 he badgered his parents into sending him to
and academy at Brussels, where sword play and fencing took the place of cricket in the
sporting life of the school.
Roberto, as he was called, stayed there a year, Then, with a knowledge of foils and French
which was to help him out of many a tight spot, he left with relatives to start a cattle ranch
in the Argentine. Out on the pampas Roberto dressed like a gaucho. He learned quickly to
break wild horses and throw a lariat. The daily chores of the ranch, however, wearied him.
'Accordingly, he rode off one day and joined the army of General Lopez Jordan [1822-1889],
who had just started an insurrection against the government of Paraguay. He had the time
of his life in what, for him, was a musical-comedy revolution. The wild-eyed, rangy Scottish
youth, with the shock of red hair and excellent flow of Spanish, shot to the fore as leader
of an intrepid gang which seemed to be occupied mainly in cattle rustling. Then the war was
stopped and Roberto, just 18, found himself in a small town. Incensed by government
injustice, he organised a public demonstration and was thrown into gaol.
'There he stayed till relatives rescued him. Somewhat subdued, he returned to London where
he tried to launch a company for growing "Yerba mate," a tea popular in South America. His
elegant gaucho clothes and dashing black sombrero created a sensation wherever he went.
In Paris, as a result of an insult about his appearance, he fought and won a duel against
France's leading fencer.
'Back in the Argentine Roberto went into partnership with a roughneck Englishman named
Mansel, and a guitar-playing former bandit from Mexico, Angel Caberra. Their idea was to buy
horses cheap in Uruguay and sell them dear in Brazil. After a hazardous journey during which
they ate iguanas and armadillos and were ambushed by their cut-throat assistants they
found that the horses were too thin to market. The impoverished partners returned to Buenos
Aires, where they were driven to work on the roads to earn a crust. Later they successfully
resumed horse dealing till Roberto was recalled to Scotland by his sick father.
'He took the opportunity to revisit Paris. One day, while riding in the Bois de Boulogne, he
accidentally knocked over an attractive girl who turned out to be Gabriella de la Balmondiere -
a Chilean poetess. It was love at first sight. They eloped to England, where they were married
in 1878. After a brief honeymoon at Roberto's beautiful old Georgian family home at Menteith,
his father gave him the money to buy a ranch in Texas. On arrival, however, Roberto thought
it better to cash in on the cotton boom. He and the equally-adventurous Gabriella loaded a
mule train with bales of cotton and set out across the rugged terrain for Mexico City. It was
an agonising trip. Repeatedly they had to fight off wild Indians. To their dismay they arrived
in Mexico City to find the bottom had fallen out of cotton and they were penniless.
'They were not at a loss for long. Robert opened a fencing academy, while Gabriella taught
the guitar. The academy became so fashionable that eight months later Roberto was able to
sell it for a substantial sum and buy a small ranch. Indians stole his stock and he was forced
to become in turn a store assistant, horse-trainer and interpreter on a buffalo expedition.
'When his father died in 1883, Roberto returned to Scotland to run the family estate, but
was compelled to sell much of it to defray the heavy mortgage. He plunged at once into
politics and became the bane of the House of Commons with his constant demands for
universal suffrage, wider distribution of land, free education and the eight-hour day. [He was
also the first MP to ever be suspended from the House for swearing, following his use of the
word "damn"]. He made the headlines in 1887 when, still an M.P., he was gaoled for two
months [sic - six weeks, but he served only four weeks] for his part in the Bloody Sunday riots
of 13 November which followed a forbidden labour meeting in Trafalgar Square. [Also gaoled for
his part in this riot was John Burns, later MP for Battersea 1892-1918].
'Roberto himself was badly beaten by the mounted police. He was horrified by gaol conditions
in England and never ceased to agitate for their reform. Three years later [May 1891] he was
arrested in France and deported for attempting to address another prohibited meeting.
'Turning his back on politics, Cunninghame Graham divided his time between supervising what
remained of his estates and making adventurous trips abroad. He visited Spain in search of
gold. He found no gold, but loaded his mules with quartz for analysis in Madrid. Peasants along
the route, however, were convinced the bags contained gold and entertained him at fiestas
wherever he stayed.
'In 1897 Roberto tried to visit the "forbidden" city of Tar[o]udant, capital of S[o]us, the
southern province of Morocco. Christians discovered within its precincts were invariably
murdered. He set out, disguised as a Turkish physician in a turban-draped fez with white robes
and yellow slippers, accompanied by a shifty-eyed slave-dealing muleteer named Mohammed el
Hassan. The track was rough and there was no food. Fifty miles from the city the pair were on
the point of starvation when they were captured and imprisoned in the mud castle of the Caid
of Kintaffi.
'The Caid had been seriously wounded in a skirmish and hoped the "Turkish doctor" would be
able to extract the bullet. Roberto, however, advised him to send for an English doctor he
knew in Marrakesh. Meanwhile, a horde of disease-ridden subjects of the Caif presented them-
selves before Roberto, who luckily had brought enough medicines to maintain some sort of
show. Just as the situation was getting difficult he was released and sent packing to the
coast. It was from these adventures that Cunninghame Graham wrote the immortal "Mogreb el
Acksa." [The book is available online at the Hathi Trust Digital Library].
'Tragedy struck Roberto in 1906 when his 28-year-old romance with Gabriella ended with her
sudden death in Spain. Heartbroken, he had her body taken back to Scotland and buried as
she wished, in the ruined Augustinian Priory on an island in Lake Menteith. He dug the grave
himself and lined it with purple heather. Then he covered her coffin with white flowers from her
nearby garden. To drown his grief, he threw himself into writing. In a few years he turned out
a dozen books and a hundred short stories, which gained him an undisputed place in English
letters.
'Early in 1914 he spoke at a mass peace rally in Trafalgar Square, but when World War I broke
out he joined up at once with a section of the Remount. He was given the rank of colonel but
refused to wear uniform. Several times he visited South America to buy horses. He was
returning with a shipload of mustangs on one occasion when the vessel was torpedoed.
Roberto saved his precious cargo by ordering the ship to be beached. When he appeared
before his commanding officer he was upbraided for not wearing a uniform. "And what the devil
do you mean beaching ship, anyway?" Roberto Cunninghame Graham gave a hideous grin, then
bellowed: "For fun, fool - for fun!"
'Roberto spent the remainder of his life between London, Paris and Buenos Aires, where he had
innumerable friends in the artistic, literary and political worlds. At the age of 83, when asked
to pose for a statue, he flabbergasted the sculptor by riding into the studio on a horse. In
1936, still bright and spry. he felt his end approaching and decided to ride with the gauchos
for the last time.
'He travelled to Argentina and went for long gallops across his beloved pampas with some of
his gaucho friends. While seeing through the press a Spanish translation of a book by his old
friend, the Brazilian-born naturalist, W.H. Hudson, he caught pneumonia and died. Gauchos
led his two favorite horses behind his bier to the wharves in an impressive ceremony attended
by the president of Argentina. His remains were then shipped to Scotland for burial at the side
of Gabriella under the purple heather of Menteith.'
Thomas Owen, MP for Launceston 1892-1898
Owen died as a result of an accident on 10 July 1898. The result of the inquest which was
held following his death was reported in the "Belfast News-Letter" on 12 July 1898:-
'An inquest has held at Cwmrhaidr Mansion, near Machynlleth, yesterday evening, relative to
the death of Mr. Thomas Owen, member of Parliament for the Launceston Division of
Cornwall. Mrs. Owen stated her husband and herself came to Cwmrhaidr on Friday in order
to recuperate her health. On Sunday afternoon they went to a spot under the waterfall,
and sat together some time. Her husband remarked that he had heard it was as easy to cross
the fall as to go by the path. He got up, and as he did not return she imagined he had gone
home. On her proceeding there, however, she found he had not arrived, and his dead body
was subsequently found in a pool underneath the fall. Evidence having been given as to the
dangerous nature of the spot in question, Dr. Rees said he had examined the body of the
deceased and found no signs of disease or illness. He was of opinion that Mr. Owen was
stunned by falling against a rock, and that before he came to his senses he was drowned.
The jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical
testimony.......'
Samuel Vyvyan Trerice Adams, MP for Leeds West 1931-1945
Adams drowned in August 1951 while swimming with his family at a Cornish beach, as reported
in 'The Manchester Guardian' of 14 August 1951:-
'Mr. Vyvyan Adams, 51, a barrister, of Regent's Parl, London, and formerly M.P. for West
Leeds, died while bathing at Gunwalloe Church Cove, near Helston, Cornwall, today.
'His daughter Sally, aged 14, was sais by witnesses to have helped to save her mother, who
was also in difficulties among the strong currents off this beach., with a younger child. Sally
then went back to her father but was too exhausted to bring him in.
'Other people on the beach said that the whole family appeared to be in difficulties but they
helped to bring the mother ashore after the daughter had supported her for some time while
the strong currents took Mr. Adams farther out. There were no other swimmers on the beach
at the time and the two lifelines there joined together were not long enough to reach him.
'The Lizard lifeboat was summoned and went to the cove. The body drifted within reach of
the rescuers, and artificial respiration was tried without success.
'Mr. Stephen Dale, of the local rescuers, said: "That daughter was the bravest child I have
ever seen. She helped to bring her mother ashore and then, although she was obviously tired,
she went out again to her father. She must have been too weary to bring him in, but she
fought her way back to the beach to see if there were any other swimmers there who could
help her. When she found there were none she wanted to go back a third time but we
persuaded her it was too late.'
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