THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
CONSTITUENCIES BEGINNING WITH "L"
              Last updated 26/03/2013
Date   Name Born Died  Age
Dates in italics in the first column denote that the election held on that
date was a by-election. Dates shown in normal type were general elections,
or, in some instances, the date of a successful petition against a 
previous election result.
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the MP was baptised on
that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate that the MP was
buried on that date
  LONDON UNIVERSITY
17 Nov 1868 Robert Lowe,later [1880] 1st Viscount 
Sherbrooke  4 Dec 1811 27 Jul 1892 80
 4 Jun 1880 Sir John Lubbock,4th baronet,later [1900] 30 Apr 1834 28 May 1913 79
1st Baron Avebury
 6 Feb 1900 Sir Michael Foster 8 Mar 1836 29 Jan 1907 70
19 Jan 1906 Sir Philip Magnus,later [1917] 1st baronet  7 Oct 1842 29 Aug 1933 90
15 Nov 1922 Sir Sydney Russell Russell-Wells 25 Sep 1869 14 Jul 1924 54
29 Oct 1924 Ernest Gordon Graham Little (Graham-Little
from 1931)  [kt 1931] 8 Feb 1867  6 Oct 1950 83
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  LONDONDERRY
       1801 Henry Alexander 1763  6 May 1818 54
21 Jul 1802 Sir George Fitzgerald Hill,2nd baronet  1 Jun 1763  8 Mar 1839 76
17 Aug 1830 Sir Robert Alexander Ferguson,2nd baronet 26 Dec 1796 13 Mar 1860 63
[following the general election in Aug 1830,
his election was declared void. At the
subsequent by-election held on 2 Apr 1831,
he was again returned]
 2 Apr 1860 William McCormick        1801 12 Jun 1878 76
17 Jul 1865 Lord Claud John Hamilton 20 Feb 1843 26 Jan 1925 81
18 Nov 1868 Richard Dowse        1824 14 Mar 1890 65
22 Nov 1872 Charles Edward Lewis,later [1887] 1st baronet 25 Dec 1825 10 Feb 1893 67
[following the general election in Jul 1886, he 
was unseated on petition in favour of Justin 
Huntly McCarthy 25 Oct 1886]
25 Oct 1886 Justin Huntly McCarthy 22 Nov 1830 24 Apr 1912 81
   Jul 1892 John Ross,later [1919] 1st baronet 11 Dec 1854 17 Aug 1935 80
18 Jul 1895 Edmund Francis Vesey Knox 23 Jan 1865 15 May 1921 56
16 Feb 1899 Arthur John Moore        1849  5 Jan 1904 54
 4 Oct 1900 James Albert Edward Hamilton,styled Marquess
of Hamilton,later [1913] 3rd Duke of Abercorn 30 Nov 1869 12 Sep 1953 83
30 Jan 1913 David Cleghorn Hogg        1840 22 Aug 1914 74
30 Nov 1914 Sir James Brown Dougherty 13 Nov 1844  3 Jan 1934 89
14 Dec 1918 John MacNeill 15 May 1867 15 Oct 1945 78
15 Nov 1922 Sir Malcolm Martin Macnaghten 12 Jan 1869 24 Jan 1955 86
29 Jan 1929 Ronald Deane Ross,later [1935] 2nd baronet 13 Jul 1888 31 Jan 1968 79
19 May 1951 William Wellwood        1893 28 Jun 1971 77
26 May 1955 Robert Chichester-Clark  [kt 1974] 10 Jan 1928
28 Feb 1974 William Ross  4 Feb 1936
NAME ALTERED TO "LONDONDERRY
EAST" 1983
LONDONDERRY EAST
 9 Jun 1983 William Ross  4 Feb 1936
7 Jun 2001 Gregory Lloyd Campbell 15 Feb 1953
  LONDONDERRY COUNTY
       1801 Charles William Stewart,later [1814] 1st
Baron Stewart and [1822] 3rd Marquess 
of Londonderry  (to 1814) 18 May 1778  6 Mar 1854 75
The other member for this constituency 
remained vacant until the by-election held
on 14 Jan 1801
14 Jan 1801 Sir George Fitzgerald Hill,2nd baronet  1 Jun 1763  8 Mar 1839 76
21 Jul 1802 Lord George Thomas Beresford 12 Feb 1781 26 Oct 1839 58
26 Oct 1812 William Ponsonby  [kt 1815]  (to 1815) 13 Oct 1772 18 Jun 1815 42
19 Jul 1814 Alexander Stewart  (to 1818) 26 Mar 1746    Aug 1831 85
 7 Aug 1815 George Robert Dawson  (to 1830) 24 Dec 1790  3 Apr 1856 65
 1 Jul 1818 Alexander Robert Stewart 12 Feb 1795 25 Mar 1850 55
16 Aug 1830 Sir Robert Bateson,1st baronet 13 Mar 1782 21 Apr 1863 81
Theobald Jones  (to Apr 1857) 15 Apr 1790  7 Feb 1868 77
26 May 1842 Robert Bateson 29 Mar 1816 23 Dec 1843 27
13 Mar 1844 Thomas Bateson,later [1863] 2nd baronet and
[1885] 1st Baron Deramore  4 Jun 1819  1 Dec 1890 71
 9 Mar 1857 James Johnston Clark  (to 1859)        1809    Jun 1891 82
10 Apr 1857 Samuel Macurdy Greer        1809  3 Nov 1880 71
16 May 1859 Robert Peel Dawson         1818  2 Sep 1877 59
Sir Frederic William Heygate,2nd baronet  4 Sep 1822 14 Nov 1894 72
16 Feb 1874 Richard Smyth  4 Dec 1878
Hugh Law  (to 1881)        1818 10 Sep 1883 65
23 Dec 1878 Sir Thomas McClure,1st baronet  (to 1885) 4 Mar 1806 21 Jan 1893 86
10 Dec 1881 Andrew Marshall Porter,later [1902] 1st
baronet 27 Jun 1837 9 Jan 1919 81
12 Jan 1884 Samuel Walker,later [1906] 1st baronet 19 Jun 1832 13 Aug 1911 79
COUNTY SPLIT INTO NORTH 
& SOUTH DIVISIONS 1885
 
  LONDONDERRY COUNTY NORTH
 1 Dec 1885 Henry Lyle Mulholland,later [1895] 2nd
Baron Dunleath 30 Jan 1854 22 Mar 1931 77
23 Jul 1895 John Atkinson,later [1905] Baron Atkinson [L] 13 Dec 1844 13 Mar 1932 87
23 Jan 1906 Hugh Thom Barrie 6 Aug 1860 18 Apr 1922 61
14 Dec 1918 Hugh Alfred Anderson 26 Nov 1867 16 Jun 1933 65
 4 Mar 1919 Hugh Thom Barrie 6 Aug 1860 18 Apr 1922 61
4 Jun 1922 Sir Malcolm Martin Macnaghten 12 Jan 1869 24 Jan 1955 86
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  LONDONDERRY COUNTY SOUTH
 5 Dec 1885 Timothy Michael Healy 17 May 1855 26 Mar 1931 75
10 Jul 1886 Thomas Lea,later [1892] 1st baronet 17 Jan 1841  9 Jan 1902 60
 6 Oct 1900 John Gordon 23 Nov 1849 26 Sep 1922 72
22 May 1916 Denis Stanislaus Henry,later [1923] 1st
baronet 7 Mar 1864  1 Oct 1925 61
29 Aug 1921 Robert Peel Dawson Spencer Chichester 13 Aug 1873 10 Dec 1921 48
18 Jan 1922 Sir George William Hacket Pain  5 Feb 1855 14 Feb 1924 69
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  LONGFORD COUNTY
       1801 Sir Thomas Fetherston,2nd baronet  (to 1819)        1759 19 Jul 1819 60
Sir William Gleadowe-Newcomen,1st baronet     c 1740 21 Aug 1807
15 Jul 1802 Thomas Gleadowe-Newcomen,later [1807] 2nd
baronet and [1817] 2nd Viscount Newcomen 18 Sep 1776 15 Jan 1825 48
25 Nov 1806 George John Forbes,styled Viscount
Forbes  (to 1832)  3 May 1785 13 Nov 1836 51
15 Oct 1819 Sir George Ralph Fetherston,3rd baronet  4 Jun 1784 12 Jul 1853 69
11 Aug 1830 Anthony Lefroy 21 Mar 1800 11 Jan 1890 89
22 Dec 1832 Luke White    Aug 1854
James Halpin Rorke after 1843
[both members were unseated in favour of
George John Forbes,Viscount Forbes and
Anthony Lefroy 2 Apr 1833]
 2 Apr 1833 George John Forbes,styled Viscount
Forbes  3 May 1785 13 Nov 1836 51
Anthony Lefroy  (to 1837)        1800 12 Jan 1890 89
30 Dec 1836 Luke White    [he was unseated on petition    Aug 1854
in favour of Charles Fox 5 May 1837]
 5 May 1837 Charles Fox
18 Aug 1837 Luke White   [he was unseated on petition    Aug 1854
in favour of Anthony Lefroy 18 Apr 1842]
Henry White,later [1863] 1st Baron Annaly 1791 3 Sep 1873 82
(to 1847)
18 Apr 1842 Anthony Lefroy        1800 12 Jan 1890 89
13 Aug 1847 Samuel Wensley Blackall  1 May 1809  2 Jan 1871 61
Richard Maxwell Fox  (to 1856)        1816 26 Apr 1856 39
21 Apr 1851 Richard More O'Ferrall        1797 27 Oct 1880 83
19 Jul 1852 Fulke Southwell Greville-Nugent,later [1869] 1st 
Baron Greville  (to 1869) 17 Feb 1821 25 Jan 1883 61
13 May 1856 Henry George Hughes        1812 22 Jul 1872 60
16 Apr 1857 Henry White,later [1863] 1st Baron Annaly 1791 3 Sep 1873 82
 4 Jul 1861 Luke White,later [1873] 2nd Baron Annaly 26 Sep 1829 17 Mar 1888 58
 7 Mar 1862 Myles William O'Reilly  (to 1879)        1825  6 Feb 1880 54
31 Dec 1869 Reginald James Macartney Greville-
Nugent   [his election was declared  27 Nov 1848 28 Feb 1878 29
void 12 Apr 1870]
16 May 1870 George Frederick Greville-Nugent 11 Sep 1842 11 May 1897 54
12 Feb 1874 George Errington,later [1885] 1st baronet        1839 19 Mar 1920 80
(to 1885)
 5 Apr 1879 Justin McCarthy 22 Nov 1830 24 Apr 1912 81
COUNTY SPLIT INTO NORTH & SOUTH 
DIVISIONS 1885,BUT RE-UNITED 1918
14 Dec 1918 Joseph McGuinness 10 Apr 1875 31 May 1922 47
    CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  LONGFORD COUNTY NORTH
 3 Dec 1885 Justin McCarthy   [following the general  22 Nov 1830 24 Apr 1912 81
election in Jul 1886, he was returned on
petition for Londonderry in Oct 1886, for
which he chose to sit]
 5 Feb 1887 Timothy Michael Healy 17 May 1855 26 Mar 1931 75
   Jul 1892 Justin McCarthy 22 Nov 1830 24 Apr 1912 81
 5 Oct 1900 James Patrick Farrell 13 May 1865 11 Dec 1921 56
  CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  LONGFORD COUNTY SOUTH
 5 Dec 1885 Laurence Connolly        1833  4 Mar 1908 74
30 Jun 1888 James Gubbins Fitzgerald c 1852 7 May 1926
   Jul 1892 Dominick Edward Blake 13 Oct 1833  2 Mar 1912 78
 5 Sep 1907 John Phillips     c 1839  2 Apr 1917
10 May 1917 Joseph McGuinness 10 Apr 1875 31 May 1922 47
  CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  LONSDALE (LANCASHIRE)
14 Dec 1918 Claude William Henry Lowther        1872 17 Jun 1929 56
15 Nov 1922 Myles Storr Nigel Kennedy 12 Oct 1889 19 Jan 1964 74
 6 Dec 1923 Henry Maden 31 Mar 1892 17 Nov 1960 68
29 Oct 1924 David Robert Alexander Lindsay,styled Lord
Balniel,later [1940] 28th Earl of Crawford and
11th Earl of Balcarres 20 Nov 1900 13 Dec 1975 75
12 Apr 1940 Sir William Jocelyn Ian Fraser,later [1958] 30 Aug 1897 19 Dec 1974 77
Baron Fraser of Lonsdale [L]
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  LOSTWITHIEL (CORNWALL)
6 Apr 1660 Walter Moyle  [kt 1664] 9 Mar 1627 19 Sep 1701 74
  John Clayton c 1620 after 1694
Henry Ford
Double return. Moyle and Clayton declared
elected 4 Jun 1660
 4 Apr 1661 Sir Chichester Wrey,3rd baronet c 1628 14 May 1668
John Bulteel  (to 1670) 7 Dec 1669
26 Jan 1668 Charles Smythe  (to 1679) 10 Mar 1628 Feb 1683 54
 3 Feb 1670 Silius Titus c 1623 Dec 1704
13 Feb 1679 Sir John Carew,3rd baronet 6 Nov 1635 1 Aug 1692 56
Walter Kendall Oct 1626 5 Jul 1696 69
 5 May 1685 Sir Robert Southwell 31 Dec 1635 11 Sep 1702 66
Sir Matthias Vincent c 1645 c May 1687
16 Jan 1689 Francis Robartes 6 Jan 1650 3 Feb 1718 68
Walter Kendall  (to 1695) Oct 1626 5 Sep 1696 69
13 Mar 1690 Sir Bevill Granville 3 Mar 1665 15 Sep 1706 41
30 Oct 1695 Bernard Granville 4 Mar 1631 14 Jun 1701 70
Samuel Travers  (to Jan 1701) c 1655 17 Sep 1725
2 Aug 1698 George Booth c 1655 11 Jun 1726
15 Jan 1701 Sir John Molesworth,2nd baronet  (to 1705) 27 May 1635 18 Oct 1716 81
John Buller 15 Dec 1668 17 Mar 1701 32
18 Apr 1701 George Booth c 1655 11 Jun 1726
28 Jul 1702 Russell Robartes  (to 1708) 16 Jul 1671 1 Feb 1719 47
21 May 1705 Robert Molesworth,later [1716] 1st Viscount
Molesworth  [I]  [he was unseated on petition 7 Sep 1656 23 May 1725 68
in favour of James Kendall 17 Jan 1706]
17 Jan 1706 James Kendall  (to Dec 1709) 17 Jun 1647 10 Jul 1708 61
17 May 1708 Joseph Addison 1 May 1672 17 Jun 1719 47
Both members (Addison and Kendall) were
unseated on petition in favour of Francis
Robartes and Russell Robartes 20 Dec 1709,
even though Kendall had been dead for nearly
18 months at the time
20 Dec 1709 Francis Robartes  (to Oct 1710) 6 Jan 1650 3 Feb 1718 68
Russell Robartes  [he was also returned for 16 Jul 1671 1 Feb 1719 47
Bodmin,for which he chose to sit]
10 Jan 1710 Horatio Walpole,later [1756] 1st Baron Walpole 8 Dec 1678 5 Feb 1757 78
20 Oct 1710 John Hill 22 Jun 1735
Hugh Fortescue 2 Jun 1665 c Dec 1719 54
9 Sep 1713 Sir Thomas Clarges,2nd baronet 25 Jul 1688 19 Feb 1759 70
Erasmus Lewis 29 Apr 1671 10 Jan 1754 82
28 Jan 1715 Galfridus Walpole  (to 1721)        1683  7 Oct 1726 43
Thomas Liddell 14 May 1718
26 Nov 1718 Edward Eliot     c 1684 18 Sep 1722
25 Jun 1720 John Newsham  (to 1722) 15 Apr 1673 21 Nov 1724 51
 1 May 1721 William Cavendish,styled Marquess of Hartington
later [1729] 3rd Duke of Devonshire   [at the 1698  5 Dec 1755 57
general election in Apr 1722,Hartington was
also returned for Grampound,for which he
chose to sit]
14 Apr 1722 Philip Dormer Stanhope,styled Baron Stanhope,
later [1726] 4th Earl of Chesterfield 22 Sep 1694 24 Mar 1773 78
25 Feb 1724 Sir Orlando Bridgeman,2nd baronet  (to 1728) 27 Apr 1678  5 Dec 1746 68
[at the general election in Aug 1727,Bridgeman
was also returned for Bletchingley,for which
he chose to sit]
Henry Parsons 24 Jul 1687 29 Dec 1739 52
26 Jan 1727 Sir William Stanhope 20 Jul 1702  7 May 1772 69
25 Aug 1727 Darrell Trelawny      c 1695 14 Oct 1727
29 Feb 1728 Anthony Cracherode  (to 1734)     c 1674 22 Apr 1752
Sir Edward Knatchbull,4th baronet     c 1674  3 Apr 1730
29 Apr 1730 Edward Walpole  [kt 1753]        1706 12 Jan 1784 77
29 Apr 1734 Richard Edgcumbe,later [1742] 1st Baron 
Edgcumbe of Mount Edgcumbe  (to 1741) 23 Apr 1680 22 Nov 1758 78
Philip Lloyd 18 Mar 1735
31 Mar 1735 Matthew Ducie Moreton,later [May 1735] 2nd
Baron Ducie by 1700 25 Dec 1770
19 Mar 1736 Sir John Crosse,2nd baronet  (to 1747)        1700 12 Mar 1762 61
11 May 1741 Sir Robert Salusbury Cotton,3rd baronet  2 Jan 1695 27 Aug 1748 53
 3 Jul 1747 Richard Edgcumbe,later [1758] 2nd Baron 
Edgcumbe of Mount Edgcumbe  2 Aug 1716 10 May 1761 44
James Edward Colleton  (to 1768)     c 1709 30 Aug 1790
22 Apr 1754 Thomas Clarke  [kt May 1754]        1703 13 Nov 1764 61
31 Mar 1761 George Howard  [kt 1774] 20 Jun 1718 16 Jul 1796 78
 4 Apr 1766 Francis Seymour-Conway (Seymour-Ingram
from Dec 1807),styled Viscount Beauchamp,
later [1794] 2nd Marquess of Hertford 12 Feb 1743 17 Jun 1822 79
19 Mar 1768 Henry Cavendish,later [1776] 2nd baronet 29 Sep 1732  3 Aug 1804 71
Charles Brett  (to 1776)     c 1715 10 Feb 1799
11 Oct 1774 Arthur Hill,styled Viscount Fairford,later [1793]
2nd Marquess of Downshire  (to 1780) 23 Feb 1753  7 Sep 1801 48
28 Nov 1776 Thomas Potter        1740 14 Nov 1801 61
 9 Sep 1780 John St.John   [he was also returned for     c 1746  8 Oct 1793
Newport,for which he chose to sit]
Thomas de Grey,later [1781] 2nd Baron 
Walsingham  (to 1781) 14 Jul 1748 16 Jan 1818 69
 1 Dec 1780 George Johnstone  (to 1784)        1730 24 May 1787 56
 4 Jun 1781 George Capel,styled Viscount Malden,later
[1799] 5th Earl of Essex 13 Nov 1758 23 Apr 1839 81
 8 Apr 1784 John Sinclair,later [1786] 1st baronet 10 May 1754 21 Dec 1835 81
John Thomas Ellis 28 Sep 1756  6 Oct 1836 80
21 Jun 1790 Richard Edgcumbe,styled Viscount Valletort,
later [1795] 2nd Earl of Mt.Edgcumbe   [he was 13 Sep 1764 26 Sep 1839 75
also returned for Fowey,for which he chose 
to sit]
Reginald Pole-Carew  (to 1796) 28 Jul 1753  3 Jan 1835 81
28 Mar 1791 George Smith 30 Apr 1765 26 Dec 1836 71
31 May 1796 Hans Sloane  (to 1806) 14 Nov 1739        1827 87
William Drummond c 1770 29 Mar 1828
 7 Jul 1802 William Dickinson  (to Jan 1807)   [at the 1 Nov 1771 19 Jan 1837 65
general election in Nov 1806,he was also
returned for Somerset,for which he chose
to sit]
 4 Nov 1806 Cornelius O'Callaghan,1st Viscount
Lismore [I]  2 Oct 1775 30 May 1857 81
24 Jan 1807 Charles Cockerell,later [1809] 1st baronet 18 Feb 1755  6 Jan 1837 81
12 May 1807 George Peter Holford 1767 30 Apr 1839 71
Ebenezer Maitland (Fuller-Maitland from
Nov 1807) 23 Apr 1780  1 Nov 1858 78
 9 Oct 1812 Reginald Pole-Carew 28 Jul 1753  3 Jan 1835 81
John Ashley Warre  (to 1818)  5 Oct 1787 18 Nov 1860 73
26 Mar 1816 William Richard Edgcumbe,styled Viscount
Valletort 19 Nov 1794 29 Oct 1818 23
19 Jun 1818 Robert Wigram,later [1830] 2nd baronet 25 Sep 1773 17 Dec 1843 70
Alexander Cray Grant,later [1825] 8th baronet 30 Nov 1782 29 Nov 1854 71
(to Dec 1826)   [at the 1826 general election
he was also returned for Aldborough,for which 
he chose to sit]
9 Jun 1826 Ernest Augustus Edgcumbe,styled Viscount
Valletort,later [1839] 3rd Earl of Mount
Edgcumbe  (to 1830) 23 Mar 1797  3 Sep 1861 64
18 Dec 1826 Edward Cust,later [1876] 1st baronet 17 Mar 1794 14 Jan 1878 83
(to 1832)
4 Aug 1830 William Vesey-Fitzgerald,later [1832] 
2nd Baron Fitzgerald & Vesey c 1782 11 May 1843  
20 Dec 1830 Ernest Augustus Edgcumbe,styled Viscount
Valletort,later [1839] 3rd Earl of Mt.Edgcumbe 23 Mar 1797  3 Sep 1861 64
 
 CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1832 
  LOUGHBOROUGH (LEICESTERSHIRE)
 7 Dec 1885 Jabez Edward Johnson-Ferguson,later [1906]
1st baronet 27 Nov 1849 10 Dec 1929 80
14 Jul 1886 Edwin Joseph Lisle March Philipps
de Lisle 13 Jun 1852  5 May 1920 67
   Jul 1892 Jabez Edward Johnson-Ferguson,later [1906]
1st baronet 27 Nov 1849 10 Dec 1929 80
 9 Oct 1900 Maurice Levy [kt 1907],later [1913] 1st baronet        1859 26 Aug 1933 74
14 Dec 1918 Oscar Montague Guest 24 Aug 1888  8 May 1958 69
15 Nov 1922 Edward Louis Spears [kt 1942],later [1953] 1st
baronet  7 Aug 1886 27 Jan 1974 87
29 Oct 1924 Frank Gibbs Rye 12 Aug 1874 18 Oct 1948 74
30 May 1929 George Ernest Winterton 17 May 1873 15 May 1942 68
27 Oct 1931 Lawrence Kimball 25 Oct 1900 30 Dec 1971 71
26 Jul 1945 Mont Follick        1887 10 Dec 1958 71
26 May 1955 John Desmond Cronin  1 Mar 1916 3 Jan 1986 69
 3 May 1979 Stephen James Dorrell 25 Mar 1952
1 May 1997 Andrew John Reed 17 Sep 1964
6 May 2010 Nicola Ann Morgan 1 Oct 1972
  LOUTH COUNTY
       1801 John Foster,later [1821] 1st Baron Oriel of
Ferrard  (to 1821) 28 Sep 1740 23 Aug 1828 87
William Charles Fortescue,later [1806] 2nd
Viscount Clermont 12 Oct 1764 24 Jun 1829 64
18 Nov 1806 Robert Jocelyn,styled Viscount Jocelyn,later
[1820] 3rd Earl of Roden 27 Oct 1788 28 Mar 1870 81
19 May 1807 John Jocelyn 30 Jul 1768 21 Jan 1828 59
10 Feb 1810 Robert Jocelyn,styled Viscount Jocelyn,later
[1820] 3rd Earl of Roden 27 Oct 1788 28 Mar 1870 81
10 Aug 1820 John Jocelyn  (to 1826) 30 Jul 1768 21 Jan 1828 59
27 Sep 1821 Thomas Henry Skeffington,later [1824] 2nd
Viscount Ferrard Jan 1772 18 Jan 1843 71
21 Feb 1824 John Leslie Foster  (to 1830)     c 1781 10 Jul 1842
21 Jun 1826 Alexander Dawson  (to Sep 1831) c 1771 28 Aug 1831
13 Aug 1830 John McClintock 14 Aug 1769 12 Jul 1855 85
18 May 1831 Richard Lalor Shiel  (to 1832) 17 Aug 1791 25 May 1851 59
28 Sep 1831 Sir Patrick Bellew,7th baronet,later [1848]
1st Baron Bellew [I] 29 Jan 1798 10 Dec 1866 68
21 Dec 1832 Thomas FitzGerald c Dec 1834
Richard Montesquieu Bellew  (to 1852) 12 Feb 1803  8 Jan 1880 76
24 Dec 1834 Sir Patrick Bellew,7th baronet,later [1848]
1st Baron Bellew [I] 29 Jan 1798 10 Dec 1866 68
 5 Aug 1837 Henry Chester
31 Jul 1840 Thomas Fortescue
15 Jul 1841 Thomas Vesey Dawson 3 Sep 1819  5 Nov 1854 35
10 Aug 1847 Chichester Samuel Fortescue,later  [1874]
1st Baron Carlingford  (to 1874) 18 Jan 1823 30 Jan 1898 75
22 Jul 1852 Tristram Kennedy        1805 20 Nov 1885 80
10 Apr 1857 John McClintock,later [1868] 1st Baron
Rathdonnell 26 Aug 1798 17 May 1879 80
16 May 1859 Richard Montesquieu Bellew 12 Feb 1803  8 Jan 1880 76
15 Apr 1865 Tristram Kennedy        1805 20 Nov 1885 80
24 Nov 1868 Matthew O'Reilly Dease        1819 17 Aug 1887 68
14 Feb 1874 Alexander Martin Sullivan  (to May 1880) 1830 17 Oct 1884 54
Philip Callan  [he was also returned for        1837 Jun 1902 64
Dundalk,for which he chose to sit]
 9 Apr 1874 George Harley Kirk        1831 13 Mar 1912 80
15 Apr 1880 Philip Callan  (to 1885)        1837 Jun 1902 64
31 May 1880 Alan Henry Bellingham,later [1889] 4th baronet 23 Aug 1846  9 Jun 1921 74
COUNTY SPLIT INTO NORTH & SOUTH 
DIVISIONS 1885,BUT RE-UNITED 1918
14 Dec 1918 John Joseph O'Kelly 1873 26 Mar 1957 83
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  LOUTH COUNTY NORTH
 3 Dec 1885 Joseph Nolan        1846 14 Sep 1928 82
   Jul 1892 Timothy Michael Healy 17 May 1855 26 Mar 1931 75
   Dec 1910 Richard Hazleton   [his election was  5 Dec 1880 26 Jan 1943 62
declared void 23 Feb 1911]
15 Mar 1911 Michael Augustine Roche     c 1856  7 Dec 1915
24 Feb 1916 Patrick Joseph Whitty 13 May 1894 28 Jul 1967 73
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  LOUTH COUNTY SOUTH
28 Nov 1885 Thomas Patrick Gill 25 Oct 1858 19 Jan 1931 72
   Jul 1892 Daniel Ambrose        1843 17 Dec 1895 52
19 Mar 1896 Richard McGhee        1851 7 Apr 1930 78
 6 Oct 1900 Joseph Nolan        1846 14 Sep 1928 82
  CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  LOUTH (LINCOLNSHIRE)
28 Nov 1885 Francis Otter        1831 29 May 1895 63
 5 Jul 1886 Arthur Raymond Heath        1854  8 Jun 1943 88
   Jul 1892 Robert William Perks,later [1908] 1st baronet 24 Apr 1849 30 Nov 1934 85
20 Jan 1910 Henry Langton Brackenbury 26 Apr 1868 28 Apr 1920 52
   Dec 1910 Timothy Davies 22 Jan 1857 22 Aug 1951 94
14 Dec 1918 Henry Langton Brackenbury 26 Apr 1868 28 Apr 1920 52
 3 Jun 1920 Thomas Wintringham 22 Aug 1867  8 Aug 1921 53
22 Sep 1921 Margaret Wintringham  4 Aug 1879 10 Mar 1955 75
29 Oct 1924 Arthur Pelham Heneage  [kt 1945] 11 Jul 1881 22 Nov 1971 90
26 Jul 1945 Cyril Osborne  [kt 1961] 19 Jun 1898 31 Aug 1969 71
 4 Dec 1969 Jeffrey Howard Archer,later [1992] Baron Archer
of Weston-super-Mare [L] 15 Apr 1940
10 Oct 1974 Michael Lewis Brotherton 26 May 1931
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  LOUTH AND HORNCASTLE (LINCOLNSHIRE)
 1 May 1997 Sir Peter Hannay Bailey Tapsell 1 Feb 1930
  LOWESTOFT (SUFFOLK)
 9 Dec 1885 Sir Savile Brinton Crossley,2nd baronet,later
[1916] 1st Baron Somerleyton 14 Jun 1857 25 Feb 1935 77
   Jul 1892 Harry Seymour Foster  [kt 1918] 29 Apr 1855 20 Jun 1938 83
12 Oct 1900 Francis Alfred Lucas 7 Jun 1850 11 Dec 1918 68
23 Jan 1906 Edward Beauchamp,later [1911] 1st baronet 12 Apr 1849  1 Feb 1925 75
21 Jan 1910 Harry Seymour Foster  [kt 1918] 29 Apr 1855 20 Jun 1938 83
   Dec 1910 Sir Edward Beauchamp,1st baronet 12 Apr 1849  1 Feb 1925 75
15 Nov 1922 Gervais Squire Chittick Rentoul  [kt 1929]  1 Aug 1884  7 Mar 1946 61
15 Feb 1934 Pierse Creagh Loftus 29 Nov 1877 20 Jan 1956 78
26 Jul 1945 Edward Evans 11 Jan 1883 30 Mar 1960 77
 8 Oct 1959 James Michael Leathes Prior,later [1987]
Baron Prior [L] 11 Oct 1927
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  LUDGERSHALL (WILTSHIRE)
13 Apr 1660 William Prynne  [he was also returned for c 1602 24 Oct 1669
Bath,for which he chose to sit]
William Thomas  (to Mar 1661) c 1630 c Sep 1686
Sir John Evelyn
Double return between Thomas and Evelyn.
Thomas declared elected 23 May 1660
21 Jul 1660 Silius Titus c 1623 Dec 1704
29 Mar 1661 William Ashburnham  (to 1679) c 1604 9 Dec 1679
Geoffrey Palmer 28 Feb 1642 31 Oct 1661 19
 7 Dec 1661 Sir Richard Browne,1st baronet 24 Sep 1669
28 Oct 1669 Thomas Grey c 1625 16 Feb 1672
 1 Feb 1673 George Legge,later [1682] 1st Baron Dartmouth   c 1647 25 Oct 1691
[election declared void 6 Feb 1673. At the
subsequent by-election held on 12 Feb 1673,
Legge was again elected]
 6 Feb 1679 Thomas Neale  (to 1689) 3 Oct 1641 17 Dec 1699 58
John Smith c 1656 2 Oct 1723
 9 Aug 1679 John Garrard,later [1686] 3rd baronet c 1638 13 Jan 1701
 9 Feb 1681 Sir John Talbot 7 Jun 1630 13 Mar 1714 83
John Smith c 1656 2 Oct 1723
Thomas Neale  3 Oct 1641 17 Dec 1699 58
John Garrard,later [1686] 3rd baronet c 1638 13 Jan 1701
Double return which was not resolved prior
to the dissolution of Parliament on 28 Mar 1681
11 Mar 1685 Henry Clerke c 1640 30 Oct 1689
19 Jan 1689 John Smith c 1656 2 Oct 1723
John Deane  (to 1695) c 1632 4 Jan 1695  
18 Feb 1690 Thomas Neale  (to 1699)  [he was unseated 3 Oct 1641 17 Dec 1699 58
on petition in favour of John Richmond Webb
11 Feb 1699]
16 Jan 1695 John Richmond Webb 26 Dec 1667 5 Sep 1724 56
26 Jul 1698 Walter Kent  (to 1701) 9 Jun 1662 Feb 1746 83
11 Feb 1699 John Richmond Webb  (to 1705) 26 Dec 1667 5 Sep 1724 56
6 Jan 1701 Edmund Richmond Webb c 1639 13 Dec 1705
14 May 1705 Walter Kent  (to 1708) 9 Jun 1662 Feb 1746 83
Thomas Powell  [he was unseated on petition 7 May 1648 c Apr 1709 60
in favour of John Richmond Webb 17 Jan 1706]
17 Jan 1706 John Richmond Webb  (to 1714)  [at the 26 Dec 1667 5 Sep 1724 56
general election in Sep 1713,Webb was also
returned for Newport IOW,for which he
chose to sit]
10 May 1708 Robert Bruce  11 Feb 1668 19 May 1729 61
10 Oct 1710 Thomas Pearce after 1664 16 Jan 1739
 
1 Sep 1713 Robert Ferne  (to 1715) c 1690 6 Oct 1723
24 Mar 1714 John Ward 26 Jun 1682 30 Jul 1755 73
24 Jan 1715 John Richmond Webb  (to 1724) 26 Dec 1667  5 Sep 1724 56
John Ivory-Talbot     c 1691    Oct 1772
23 Mar 1722 Borlase Richmond Webb  (to 1734)     c 1696  3 Mar 1738
12 Dec 1724 Anthony Cornish  after 1688 29 Jun 1728
17 Aug 1727 Charles Boone  8 Oct 1735
27 Apr 1734 Peter Delme 28 Feb 1710 10 Apr 1770 60
Daniel Boone    Nov 1710 20 May 1770 59
 8 May 1741 Charles Selwyn        1689  9 Jun 1749 59
Thomas Hayward  2 Aug 1706 14 Mar 1781 74
29 Jun 1747 Thomas Farrington  after 1687 29 Jan 1758
George Augustus Selwyn 11 Aug 1719 25 Jan 1791 71
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
18 Apr 1754 Sir John Bland,6th baronet 13 Jan 1722  3 Sep 1755 33
Thomas Hayward  (to 1761)  2 Aug 1706 14 Mar 1781 74
21 Nov 1755 Henry Digby,later [1757] 7th Baron Digby [I]
and [1790] 1st Earl Digby 21 Jul 1731 25 Sep 1793 62
28 Mar 1761 Thomas Whately     c 1728 26 May 1772
John Paterson     c 1705  3 Dec 1789
21 Mar 1768 John Stewart,styled Lord Garlies,later [1773]
7th Earl of Galloway 15 Mar 1736 13 Nov 1806 70
Sir Peniston Lamb,2nd baronet,later [1781]
1st Viscount Melbourne  (to 1784) 29 Jan 1745 22 Jul 1828 83
22 Jan 1774 Whitshed Keene     c 1731 27 Feb 1822
11 Oct 1774 Lord George Gordon 26 Dec 1751  1 Nov 1793 41
For further information on this MP and his role in
the "Gordon Riots," see the note at the foot 
of this page
12 Sep 1780 George Augustus Selwyn  (to 1791) 11 Aug 1719 25 Jan 1791 71
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
 3 Apr 1784 Nathaniel William Wraxall  8 Apr 1751  7 Nov 1831 80
22 Jun 1790 William Assheton Harbord,later [1810] 2nd
Baron Suffield  (to 1796) 21 Aug 1766 1 Aug 1821 54
28 Apr 1791 Samuel Smith 19 Mar 1755 15 Jun 1793 38
27 Jun 1793 Nathaniel Newnham     c 1741 26 Dec 1809
26 May 1796 Charles William Henry Montagu-Scott,styled
Earl of Dalkeith,later [1812] 4th Duke of  24 May 1772 20 Apr 1819 46
Buccleuch and 6th Duke of Queensberry
Thomas Everett  (to 1810) 1740 8 Feb 1810 69
 7 May 1804 Magens Dorrien-Magens  (to Dec 1812) c 1761 30 May 1849
27 Feb 1810 Joseph Hague Everett c 1776 7 May 1853
19 Apr 1811 Charles Winn-Allanson,2nd Baron Headley [I] 25 Jun 1784 9 Apr 1840 55
7 Oct 1812 Joseph Hague Everett c 1776 7 May 1853
22 Dec 1812 Sandford Graham,later [1825] 2nd baronet 10 Mar 1788 18 Sep 1852 64
Joseph Birch  (to 1818) 18 Jun 1755 22 Aug 1833 78
26 Jun 1815 Charles Nicholas Pallmer 11 Jun 1772 30 Sep 1848 76
28 Jun 1817 Henry Lawes Luttrell,2nd Earl of
Carhampton [I]  (to 1821) 7 Aug 1743 25 Apr 1821 77
17 Jun 1818 Sandford Graham,later [1825] 2nd baronet 10 Mar 1788 18 Sep 1852 64
(to 1826)
5 May 1821 George Charles Pratt,styled Earl of 
Brecknock,later [1840] 2nd Marquess Camden  2 May 1799 8 Aug 1866 67
10 Jun 1826 George James Welbore Agar-Ellis,
later [1831] 1st Baron Dover 17 Jan 1797 10 Jul 1833 36
Edward Thomas Foley  (to 1832) 21 Dec 1791 30 Mar 1846 54
2 Aug 1830 Sir Sandford Graham,2nd baronet 10 Mar 1788 18 Sep 1852 64
 CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1832 
  LUDLOW (SHROPSHIRE)
13 Apr 1660 Timothy Littleton     c 1608  2 Apr 1679
Job Charlton,later [1686] 1st baronet  c 1614 26 May 1697
(to Feb 1679)
24 Feb 1670 Somerset Fox  (to Sep 1679) 18 Jan 1618 11 Oct 1689 71
12 Feb 1679 Francis Charlton,later [1697] 2nd baronet 27 Jun 1651 21 Apr 1729 77
(to 1685)
23 Sep 1679 Thomas Walcot  6 Aug 1629  6 Sep 1685 56
16 Mar 1681 Charles Baldwyn     c 1652  4 Jan 1707
15 Apr 1685 Sir Edward Herbert  (to Nov 1685) 10 Jun 1645  5 Nov 1698 53
William Charlton     c 1652 18 Apr 1685
 6 Jun 1685 Sir Josiah Child,1st baronet  (to 1689)     c 1630 22 Jun 1699
14 Nov 1685 Sir Edward Lutwyche  6 Sep 1634    Jun 1709 74
15 Jan 1689 Francis Herbert     c 1667 27 Feb 1719
Charles Baldwyn     c 1652  4 Jan 1707
11 Mar 1690 Thomas Hanmer c 1648 Aug 1701
William Gower c 1662 after 1714
Election declared void 22 Dec 1690
14 Jan 1691 Silius Titus c 1623 Dec 1704
Francis Lloyd c 1655 13 Mar 1704
1 Nov 1695 Thomas Newport,later [1716] 1st Baron 
Torrington c 1655 27 May 1719
Charles Baldwyn c 1652 4 Jan 1707
30 Jul 1698 Francis Herbert  (to Jan 1701)     c 1667 27 Feb 1719
William Gower  [he was unseated on petition c 1662 after 1714
in favour of Thomas Newport 1 Mar 1699]
1 Mar 1699 Thomas Newport,later [1716] 1st Baron 
Torrington c 1655 27 May 1719
8 Jan 1701 Sir Thomas Powys  (to 1713) c 1649 4 Apr 1719
William Gower c 1662 after 1714
1 Dec 1701 Francis Herbert     c 1667 27 Feb 1719
16 May 1705 Acton Baldwyn  (to 1715) 27 Jun 1681 30 Jan 1727 45
2 Sep 1713 Humphrey Walcot  (to 1722) 23 Feb 1672 29 Oct 1743 71
 1 Feb 1715 Francis Herbert     c 1667 27 Feb 1719
26 Mar 1719 Sir Robert Raymond,later [1731] 1st 
Baron Raymond 20 Dec 1673 19 Mar 1733 59
28 Mar 1722 Abel Ketelby  (to Sep 1727)     c 1676  5 Dec 1744
Acton Baldwyn 27 Jun 1681 30 Jan 1727 45
11 Feb 1727 Richard Herbert  (to 1741) 13 Dec 1704 17 May 1754 49
 1 Sep 1727 Henry Arthur Herbert,later [1748] 1st Earl
of Powis  (to 1743)     c 1703 11 Sep 1772
 4 May 1741 Sir William Corbet,5th baronet  (to 1748)        1702 15 Sep 1748 46
30 Dec 1743 Richard Herbert  (to Dec 1754) 13 Dec 1704 17 May 1754 49
 7 Dec 1748 Henry Bridgeman,later [1764] 5th baronet
and [1794] 1st Baron Bradford  (to 1768)  7 Sep 1725  5 Jun 1800 74
10 Dec 1754 Edward Herbert  (to 1770)     c 1700 26 Sep 1770
18 Mar 1768 William Fellowes  (to 1774)     c 1726  4 Feb 1804
 3 Nov 1770 Thomas Herbert     c 1727    May 1779
 8 Oct 1774 George Mason Villiers,styled Viscount Villiers,
later [1782] 2nd Earl Grandison [I] 13 Jul 1751 14 Jul 1800 49
Edward Clive,2nd Baron Clive of Plassey [I],later
[1804] 1st Earl of Powis  (to 1794)  7 Mar 1754 16 May 1839 85
15 Sep 1780 Frederick Cornewall  (Walker-Cornewall from 
1781) 13 Apr 1752    Mar 1783 30
 9 May 1783 Somerset Davies     c 1754 15 Oct 1817
 2 Apr 1784 Richard Payne Knight  (to 1806)     c 1750 23 Apr 1824
10 Oct 1794 Robert Clive  (to 1807) 30 Aug 1769 28 Jul 1833 63
 1 Nov 1806 Edward Herbert,styled Viscount Clive,later
[1839] 2nd Earl of Powis  (to 1839) 22 Mar 1785 17 Jan 1848 62
 8 May 1807 Henry Clive     c 1777 16 Mar 1848
17 Jun 1818 Robert Henry Clive 15 Jan 1789 20 Jan 1854 65
13 Dec 1832 Edward Romilly        1804 12 Oct 1870 66
 8 Jan 1835 Edmund Lechmere Charlton        1789 by May 1851
28 Jul 1837 Henry Salwey  (to 1841)        1794 10 Mar 1874 79
 6 Jun 1839 Thomas Alcock   [his election was declared        1801 22 Aug 1866 65
void 12 May 1840]
23 May 1840 Beriah Botfield  (to 1847)        1807  7 Aug 1863 56
 3 Jul 1841 James Ackers        1811 27 Sep 1868 57
31 Jul 1847 Henry Bayley Clive        1800 26 Feb 1870 69
Henry Salwey        1794 10 Mar 1874 79
 9 Jul 1852 Robert Windsor Clive 24 May 1824  4 Aug 1859 35
Lord William John Frederick Powlett (Vane
from Mar 1864),later [Jan 1864] 3rd Duke
of Cleveland  (to 1857)  3 Apr 1792  6 Sep 1864 72
 7 Feb 1854 Percy Egerton Herbert  [kt 1869]  (to 1860) 15 Apr 1822  7 Oct 1876 54
27 Mar 1857 Beriah Botfield  (to 1863)        1807  7 Aug 1863 56
 4 Sep 1860 George Herbert Windsor Windsor-Clive
(to 1885) 12 Mar 1835 28 Apr 1918 83
28 Aug 1863 Sir William Augustus Fraser,4th baronet 10 Feb 1826 17 Aug 1898 72
12 Jul 1865 John Edmund Severne 24 Apr 1826 21 Apr 1899 72
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1868
 3 Dec 1885 Robert Jasper More        1836 25 Nov 1903 67
22 Dec 1903 Rowland Hunt 13 Mar 1858 30 Nov 1943 85
14 Dec 1918 Sir Beville Stanier,1st baronet 12 Jun 1867 15 Dec 1921 54
4 Jan 1922 Ivor Miles Windsor-Clive,styled Viscount
Windsor,later [1923] 2nd Earl of Plymouth  4 Feb 1889  1 Oct 1943 54
19 Apr 1923 George Windsor-Clive  6 Apr 1878 25 Jun 1968 90
26 Jul 1945 Uvedale Corbett 12 Sep 1909 1 Sep 2005 95
25 Oct 1951 Christopher John Holland-Martin 16 Nov 1910  5 Apr 1960 49
16 Nov 1960 Jasper More  [kt 1979]    Jul 1907 28 Oct 1987 80
 3 May 1979 Eric Paul Cockeram  4 Jul 1924
11 Jun 1987 Christopher John Fred Gill 28 Oct 1936
7 Jun 2001 Matthew Roger Green 12 Apr 1970
5 May 2005 Philip Martin Dunne 14 Aug 1958
  LUTON (BEDFORDSHIRE)
 2 Dec 1885 Cyril Flower,later [1892] 1st Baron Battersea 30 Aug 1843 27 Nov 1907 64
29 Sep 1892 Samuel Howard Whitbread  8 Jan 1858 29 Jul 1944 86
25 Jul 1895 Thomas Gair Ashton,later [1911] 1st Baron
Ashton of Hyde  5 Feb 1855  1 May 1933 78
20 Jul 1911 Cecil Bisshopp Harmsworth,later [1939] 1st
Baron Harmsworth 28 Sep 1869 13 Aug 1948 78
15 Nov 1922 Sir John Prescott Hewett 25 Aug 1854 27 Sep 1941 87
 6 Dec 1923 Geoffrey William Algernon Howard 12 Feb 1877 20 Jun 1935 58
29 Oct 1924 Terence James O'Connor  [kt 1936] 13 Sep 1891  8 May 1940 48
30 May 1929 Edward Leslie Burgin 13 Jul 1887 16 Aug 1945 58
26 Jul 1945 William Noble Warbey 16 Aug 1903  6 May 1980 76
23 Feb 1950 Charles Hill,later [1963] Baron Hill of Luton [L] 15 Jan 1904 22 Aug 1989 85
 7 Nov 1963 William Howie,later [1978] Baron Howie of
Troon [L] 2 Mar 1924
18 Jun 1970 Charles Fitzmaurice Creighton Simeons 22 Sep 1921
 SPLIT INTO EAST & WEST DIVISIONS 
   FEB 1974
  LUTON EAST
28 Feb 1974 Ivor Malcolm Clemitson  8 Dec 1931 24 Dec 1997 66
 3 May 1979 Graham Frank James Bright  [kt 1994]  2 Apr 1942
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
LUTON NORTH
 9 Jun 1983 John Russell Carlisle 28 Aug 1942
1 May 1997 Kelvin Peter Hopkins 22 Aug 1941
LUTON SOUTH
 9 Jun 1983 Graham Frank James Bright  [kt 1994]  2 Apr 1942
1 May 1997 Margaret Moran 24 Apr 1955
6 May 2010 Gavin Shuker 10 Oct 1981
  LUTON WEST
28 Feb 1974 Brian Charles John Sedgemore 17 Mar 1937
 3 May 1979 John Russell Carlisle 28 Aug 1942
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  LYME REGIS (DORSET)
 4 Apr 1660 Walter Yonge,later [1663] 2nd baronet     c 1626 21 Nov 1670
(to 1661)
Thomas Moore  [he was also returned for 14 Apr 1618  6 Aug 1695 77
Heytesbury,for which he chose to sit]
18 Jun 1660 Henry Hyde,later [1674] 2nd Earl of Clarendon  2 Jun 1638 31 Oct 1709 71
15 Apr 1661 Sir John Shaw,1st baronet     c 1615  1 Mar 1680
Henry Henley  (to 1685)     c 1612 10 Jun 1696
17 Feb 1679 Sir George Strode 26 Nov 1626 24 Oct 1701 74
30 Sep 1679 Thomas Moore 14 Apr 1618  6 Aug 1695 77
19 Mar 1685 John Pole,later [1695] 3rd baronet  (to 1690) 17 Jun 1649 13 Mar 1708 58
Sir Winston Churchill 18 Apr 1620 26 Mar 1688 67
11 Jan 1689 John Burridge  (to 1695)     c 1651  6 Sep 1733
10 Mar 1690 Henry Henley  (to Jan 1701) 6 Feb 1670 9 Aug 1733 63
29 Oct 1695 Robert Henley  (to Nov 1701) 1638 by Mar 1711
9 Jan 1701 Joseph Paice  (to 1702) c 1658 15 Jul 1735
27 Nov 1701 John Burridge  (to 1710)     c 1651  6 Sep 1733
20 Jul 1702 Henry Henley 6 Feb 1670 9 Aug 1733 63
15 May 1705 Thomas Freke 17 Jan 1660 1721 61
10 Oct 1710 Henry Henley 6 Feb 1670 9 Aug 1733 63
John Burridge  (to 1728)   [he was unseated      c 1681  2 Feb 1753
on petition in favour of Henry Holt Henley
28 Feb 1728]
 1 Feb 1715 John Henley        1677 25 Apr 1732 54
24 Mar 1722 Henry Holt Henley  8 May 1748
21 Aug 1727 Henry Drax  (to 1734)     c 1693 24 May 1755
28 Feb 1728 Henry Holt Henley  (to 1748)  8 May 1748
30 Apr 1734 John Scrope  (to 1753)     c 1662  9 Apr 1752
24 May 1748 Robert Henley  (to 1754)     c 1682  2 Sep 1758
19 Jan 1753 Thomas Fane,later [1762] 8th Earl of
Westmorland  (to 1762)  8 Mar 1701 25 Nov 1771 70
15 Apr 1754 Francis Fane     c 1698 27 May 1757
13 Jun 1757 Henry Fane  (to 1777) 16 Oct 1703 31 May 1777 73
 1 Dec 1762 John Fane,styled Baron Burghersh,later [1771]
9th Earl of Westmorland  5 May 1728 26 Apr 1774 45
27 Jan 1772 Henry Fane (to 1780)  4 May 1739  4 Jun 1802 63
11 Jun 1777 Francis Fane  5 Dec 1752 10 Nov 1813 60
9 Sep 1780 Henry Fane   4 May 1739  4 Jun 1802 63
David Robert Michel     c 1735    Mar 1805
Henry Harford
Lionel Darell 25 Sep 1742 30 Oct 1803 61
Double return. Election declared void
4 Dec 1780
12 Dec 1780 Henry Fane   (to 1802)  4 May 1739  4 Jun 1802 63
  David Robert Michel     c 1735    Mar 1805
 1 Apr 1784 Thomas Fane  (to 1806)  6 Jul 1760 15 Apr 1807 46
 5 Jul 1802 Henry Fane  [kt 1815]  (to 1818) 26 Nov 1778 24 Mar 1840 61
18 Mar 1806 John Fane,styled Baron Burghersh,later [1841]
11th Earl of Westmorland  2 Feb 1784 16 Oct 1859 75
29 Mar 1816 John Thomas Fane  (to 1832) 28 Apr 1790 23 Mar 1833 42
17 Jun 1818 Vere Fane  5 Jan 1785 18 Jan 1863 78
9 Jun 1826 Henry Sutton Fane 13 Jan 1804 8 May 1857 53
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1832
14 Dec 1832 William Pinney   [he was unseated on petition        1806 30 May 1898 91
in favour of Thomas Hussey 31 May 1842]
31 May 1842 Thomas Hussey        1814
30 Jul 1847 Sir Thomas Neville Abdy,1st baronet 21 Oct 1810 10 Jul 1877 66
 8 Jul 1852 William Pinney        1806 30 May 1898 91
12 Jul 1865 John Wright Treeby        1809  5 Sep 1882 73
CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1868 
  LYMINGTON (HAMPSHIRE)
10 Apr 1660 Henry Bromfield     c 1610 19 Feb 1683
John Button     c 1624    Dec 1679
10 Apr 1661 Sir William Lewis,1st baronet  (to 1678) 26 Mar 1598    Nov 1677 79
John Bulkeley 11 Nov 1614    Sep 1662 47
 9 Mar 1663 Sir Nicholas Steward,1st baronet 11 Feb 1618 15 Feb 1710 92
(to Feb 1679)
11 Feb 1678 Sir Richard Knight 21 Nov 1639 12 Aug 1679 39
 7 Feb 1679 John Button  (to 1680)     c 1624    Dec 1679
Bartholomew Bulkeley    May 1679
22 May 1679 John Burrard  (to May 1698) 9 Jan 1646 14 May 1698 52
 1 Nov 1680 Henry Dawley     c 1646     c 1703
12 Mar 1685 Richard Holt     c 1635 14 Apr 1710
24 Feb 1690 Thomas Dore  (to Dec 1705) c 1658 c Oct 1705
30 May 1698 William Tulse by 1680 after 1727
23 Jul 1698 George Burrard after 1653 by Jan 1721
9 Jan 1701 Paul Burrard  c 1651 1706
12 May 1705 Paul Burrard  (to 1713) 29 May 1678 30 May 1735 57
7 Dec 1705 Charles Powlett,styled Marquess of Winchester,
later [1722] 3rd Duke of Bolton 3 Sep 1685 26 Aug 1754 58
6 May 1708 Richard Chaundler  c 1650 1729
7 Oct 1710 Lord William Powlett  (to 1715)  [at the  18 Aug 1666 25 Sep 1729 63
general election in Jan 1715,Powlett was
also returned for Winchester,for which he
chose to sit]
28 Aug 1713 Sir Joseph Jekyll  (to 1722) 3 Oct 1662 19 Aug 1738 75
18 Apr 1715 Richard Chaundler     c 1650        1729
24 Mar 1722 Lord Harry Powlett,later [1754] 4th Duke  24 Jul 1691  9 Oct 1759 68
of Bolton  [he was also returned for Hampshire,
for which he chose to sit]
Paul Burrard  (to 1727) 29 May 1678 30 May 1735 57
27 Oct 1722 Sir Gilbert Heathcote,later [1733] 1st baronet  2 Jan 1652 25 Jan 1733 81
23 Aug 1727 Lord Nassau Powlett  (to 1734) 23 Jun 1698 24 Aug 1741 43
Anthony Morgan 19 Apr 1729
13 May 1729 William Powlett     c 1693 28 Feb 1757
25 Apr 1734 Sir John Cope,6th baronet  1 Dec 1673  8 Dec 1749 76
Maurice Bocland     c 1695 15 Aug 1765
 5 May 1741 Lord Nassau Powlett  23 Jun 1698 24 Aug 1741 43
Sir Harry Burrard,1st baronet  (to 1778) 1707 12 Apr 1791 83
31 Dec 1741 Charles Powlett,styled Marquess of Winchester
from 1754,later [1759] 5th Duke of Bolton     c 1718  5 Jul 1765
17 Jan 1755 Lord Harry Powlett,later [1765] 6th Duke
of Bolton  6 Nov 1720 25 Dec 1794 74
27 Mar 1761 Adam Drummond   [at the general election in 31 Jan 1713 17 Jun 1786 73
Mar 1768,he was also returned for St.Ives,
for which he chose to sit]
23 Feb 1769 Hugo Meynell    Jun 1735 14 Dec 1808 73
10 Oct 1774 Edward Morant  (to 1780) 10 Dec 1730 27 Jul 1791 60
 4 Dec 1778 Henry Goodricke  6 Apr 1741  9 Jul 1784 43
 8 Sep 1780 Thomas Dummer     c 1739  3 Jun 1781
Harry Burrard  (to 1788)  1 Jun 1755 17 Oct 1813 58
25 Jun 1781 Edward Gibbon 27 Apr 1737 16 Jan 1794 56
 3 Apr 1784 Robert Colt  (to 1790) 22 Sep 1756 29 Dec 1797 41
 1 Jul 1788 George Rose 17 Jun 1744 13 Jan 1818 73
18 Jun 1790 Harry Burrard   1 Jun 1755 17 Oct 1813 58
Sir Harry Burrard (Burrard-Neale from 1795),
2nd baronet  (to 1802) 16 Sep 1765  7 Feb 1840 74
12 May 1791 Nathaniel Brassey Halhed 25 May 1751 18 Feb 1830 78
For further information on this MP and his 
championing of the false prophet Richard Brothers,
see the note at the foot of this page
27 May 1796 William Manning  (to 1806)  1 Dec 1763 17 Apr 1835 71
 9 Jul 1802 Harry Burrard   1 Jun 1755 17 Oct 1813 58
16 Dec 1802 John Kingston  (to 1814)        1736        1820 84
3 Nov 1806 Sir Harry Burrard-Neale,2nd baronet 16 Sep 1765  7 Feb 1840 74
7 May 1807 George Duckett,later [1822] 2nd baronet 17 Jul 1777 15 Jun 1856 78
6 Oct 1812 Sir Harry Burrard-Neale,2nd baronet  (to 1823) 16 Sep 1765  7 Feb 1840 74
 4 Aug 1814 John Taylor     c 1761  7 Jan 1820
17 Jun 1818 William Manning   1 Dec 1763 17 Apr 1835 71
7 Mar 1820 George Finch 2 Sep 1794 29 Jun 1870 75
 5 Jun 1821 William Manning   (to 1826)  1 Dec 1763 17 Apr 1835 71
 3 Apr 1823 Walter Boyd  (to 1830) 18 Nov 1753 16 Sep 1837 83
10 Jun 1826 Guy Lenox Prendergast 12 Jun 1773 21 Feb 1845 71
9 Jul 1827 Thomas Divett 3 Mar 1769 16 Jul 1828 59
31 Jul 1828 George Burrard,later [1856] 4th baronet 13 Oct 1805 7 Sep 1870 64
(to 1832)
31 Jul 1830 William Tatton Egerton,later [1859] 1st 
Baron Egerton of Tatton 30 Dec 1806 21 Feb 1883 76
30 Apr 1831 William Alexander Mackinnon  2 Aug 1784 30 Apr 1870 85
12 Dec 1832 Sir Harry Burrard-Neale,2nd baronet 16 Sep 1765 15 Feb 1840 74
John Stewart  (to 1847) 14 Mar 1860
 6 Jan 1835 William Alexander Mackinnon  (to 1852)  2 Aug 1784 30 Apr 1870 85
31 Jul 1847 George Thomas Keppel,later [1851] 6th 
Earl of Albemarle 13 Jun 1799 21 Feb 1891 91
30 Apr 1850 Edward John Hutchins  (to 1857)        1809 11 Feb 1876 66
 7 Jul 1852 Sir John Rivett-Carnac,2nd baronet  (to 1860) 10 Aug 1818  4 Aug 1883 64
28 Mar 1857 William Alexander Mackinnon  (to 1868)  4 Oct 1813 14 Sep 1903 89
24 May 1860 Lord George Charles Gordon-Lennox
(to 1874) 22 Oct 1829 22 Feb 1877 47
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1868
 9 Feb 1874 Edmund Hegan Kennard 14 Oct 1834  9 Jul 1912 77
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1885 
George Augustus Selwyn, MP for Ludgershall 1747-1754 and 1780-1791
and Gloucester 1754-1780
Selwyn had a passion for viewing corpses. His friend Horace Walpole wrote that a lady of 
Selwyn's acquaintance had once rebuked him as a barbarian for attending the 
beheading of a criminal, to which Selwyn replied, 'If that was such a crime, I'm sure I have
made amends, for I went to see it [the head] sewed on again.'
When Henry Fox, Lord Holland lay on his death-bed in 1774, he told his servant, 'The next
time Mr Selwyn calls, show him up; if I am alive I shall be delighted to see him, and if I'm
dead he'll be glad to see me.'
Lord George Gordon, MP for Ludgershall 1774-1780
The following sketch of the "Gordon Riots" of 1780 appeared in the February 1958 issue of the
Australian monthly magazine "Parade." For a full length book on this subject, I recommend 
"King Mob: The Story of Lord George Gordon and the Riots of 1780" by Christopher Hibbert
[Longmans, London 1958].
 
'Whatever his faults, the average Englishman can claim with justification today that he is 
tolerant in matters of religion. But it was not always so. In June 1780, feeling in London 
between Protestants and Catholics reached such a pitch of bitterness that it eventually
flared into open rioting. The ranks of the anti-Catholic demonstrators were quickly swelled
by every bully and thug and cutpurse in town, who saw a golden opportunity for looting, and
for five days the mob took complete charge of the city - smashing, pillaging, burning, beating-
up and murdering, almost at will. At the end, when the fury of the storm had spent itself, half
London was ablaze or wrecked and at least 285 people were dead, with hundreds more injured
and wounded. This outburst of mob violence is known to history as the Gordon Riots - after
the man primarily responsible, the "lunatic apostle" Lord George Gordon, one of the most
fanatical reformers and religious bigots of his own or any time, who, by the strange irony of 
fate, turned to the Hebrew faith in his later years, and died of a fever in prison.
 
'Ever since the days of Henry VIII Roman Catholics in England had suffered persecution in
varying degrees - at some periods purely nominal, and at other, bitter and tragic. When 
George III carne to the throne in 1760 the position was that Catholics were denied many of 
the rights of normal citizenship. They could not buy land, and on inherited property were
obliged to pay double the ordinary land tax. They could not practise as barristers, doctors and
school teachers. Marriage in their church was void in law, and their children were regarded as
illegitimate. A priest officiating at a marriage service was liable to 14 years' transportation, and
and it was even illegal for a priest to celebrate Mass.
 
'The injustice of these restrictions was apparent to many liberal-thinking people, and a strong
movement began to remove or lighten them. It culminated in the introduction of an Act in
Parliament [the Papist's Act 1778 - 18 George III c.60] which repealed many of the most 
glaring injustices. At once the forces of reaction went to work and whispers began to circulate
of vague Jesuit plots to further the English political ambitions of the Pope. At that period there 
was no large, powerful, well­educated middle-class in England which could assess such stories
at their true worth and then dismiss them. There were only the privileged rich and the under-
privileged poor. The rich should have been sensible enough to laugh such absurdities out of 
court. But apparently many of them were not. The poor, perhaps, were hardly blameworthy,
since they did no more than follow the example of their betters. Simple, illiterate, superstitious,
taxed beyond all reason to pay for wars, they were seething with discontent, and it required 
little effort by such a dangerous, bull-headed agitator as Gordon to fan their inborn mistrust of
Roman Catholicism into flame. 
'As president of the Protestant Association, Gordon whipped up sectarian opposition to the bill
before Parliament, and marched at the head of his followers to the House of Commons. It was 
never his intention that the march should be anything more than a gesture of protest, and he
was surprised and dismayed when it degenerated into a riot that laid half the city of London
waste. Ultimately the very vehemence of the outbreak did more to smash religious intolerance
in England than any amount of enlightened thinking or Acts of Parliament. It shocked the more
intelligent section of the community into a complete reappraisal of the whole question, and led
to the repealing of discriminatory laws and the granting of complete freedom of worship.
'Lord George Gordon was born in London in 1751, the third and youngest son of the [3rd] Duke
of Gordon. His godfather was George III. He was from the first a problem child of the privileged
class, a socialist by nature and conviction, born not to dally pleasantly with art and letters, 
with dice and drink and damsels, as a gentleman did in those days, but the difficult and 
ungrateful role of unconstitutional reformer. Throughout his childhood he showed an inclination
to tilt at windmills, but his political and social conscience seems to have really awakened
during a visit to the West Indies, where he observed the pathetic plight of the enslaved 
negroes. On his return to England, and prompted by his friend Edmund Burke, he decided to
enter the House of Commons. In the autumn of 1774, Lord George Gordon took his seat in
seat in Parliament, at the age of 23. He looked on the world and found it wicked.
'He was not only against the Government, but against the Opposition as well, taking his stand
in the centre and laying about him on all sides. Gordon opposed the American war, compared
the King's Council to "plague, pestilence and starvation," and even made a series of attacks on
the Crown. His violent speeches on the enormities of Popery excited scorn and ridicule inside
the House, but found an admiring audience outside. 
 
'It was in the summer of 1778 that the Government approached the leaders of the Roman 
Catholic party and offered to repeal some of the statutes against them as bait for their active
and financial support of the American war. The Relief Act, which freed Catholics only of
disabilities in regard to property and allowed them to worship in their own way, was carried
without a division through both Houses. But, moderate as the proposals were, public reaction
was furious and hostile. In Scotland it stirred fanatics to anger and there were serious riots
in Edinburgh and Glasgow. 
 
'The disorders died down, but not the frame of mind which inspired them. Finally, discontent
found a head in the Protestant Association, rich in enthusiasm, numbers, and public approb-
ation, and lacking only a leader. The presidency was offered to Gordon, then aged 28, and he
accepted it with fervour. His first move was to organise a petition to Parliament, which was
left open for signatures. He revived the old cry of "No Popery," and sacrificed in an instant
his years'-long association with Burke when Burke issued the ultimatum that he choose 
between their friendship and the Protestant Association.
 
'On May 29, 1780, Gordon called a meeting of the Association at the Coachmakers' Hall, and
proposed that they should go "in a firm, manly and resolute manner to the House, and present
their petition for the repeal of the Relief Act. The resolution was adopted. In order that they
might "know friends from enemies," Lord George asked "every true Protestant and friend of the
petition" to wear a blue cockade in his hat. Accordingly, on Friday morning, June 2, three great
bodies of men wearing blue cockades set off from St. George's-in-the-Fields (now, ironically,
the site of a Roman Catholic cathedral), to march to the House. There were about 20,000 of
them. Gordon led the procession on horseback, carrying a large, gold-headed ebony stick, his
long, straight powdered hair hanging about his pale, formidably­nosed face. He sat stiff and
awkward in the saddle, and before marched two men carrying the monster petition, a roll
containing the signatures of no less than 225,000 people.
'So far all was well. Their intention was merely to intimidate. But, on the way, the genuine 
petitioners were joined by young rough-and-toughs ready for a fight and a lark, the unempl-
oyed who thought there might be some advantage in it, and the criminal classes out for loot.
At the House, members were seized and under compulsion promised to vote for the repeal.
Fanatically zealous, drunk with power, Gordon presented the petition in the Commons. The
House, after a hurried debate, decided to adjourn. 
 
Saturday was quiet and it was thought the incident was closed. On Sunday, however, fresh
outrages occurred in the Catholic centre of Moorfields. The private chapels of the Sardinian
and Bavarian Ministers, where Catholics worshipped in diplomatic immunity, were wrecked and
plundered and a reward of £500 was offered for the apprehension of those responsible. The
city authorities showed reluctance and incapacity to cope with the situation. The laws
demanded that a military officer must have the approval of a magistrate before giving the
order to fire, and that an hour should elapse after the reading of the Riot Act. The mob,
emboldened and encouraged by the impunity with which they had carried out their former
outrages, increased their daring and boasted they would uproot Popery from the land.
 
'Monday, June 4, was the King's birthday, and official rejoicing contrasted with panic. The
rabble had grown still bolder. No Catholic was safe, but by now it was difficult to know one,
for nearly everyone wore a blue cockade, and even the servants of the Secretary of State
had blue ribbons in their hats. Parliament met under strong military guard but, in spite of this,
many members were waylaid and escaped with great difficulty. The Lord Chief Justice (Lord
Mansfield), who was suspected of Popish leanings on account of his friendship with the 
Catholic Duchess of Norfolk and for having acquitted a priest for saying Mass, had the 
windows of his carriage broken. Troops were concentrated at different points, but the defence
was badly organised and whole sections of the city were left unprotected. By the afternoon a
criminal, drunken, brutish rabble was at large in the city. The alarmed Protestant Association
issued a handbill, signed by George Gordon, begging its followers to "refrain from unconstit-
utional proceedings." It was pathetically ineffectual. The cry going up was "Destroy, burn, 
loot!" The house of Justice Hyde, in Leicester Square, was completely gutted by fire. A howling
mob descended on Lord Mansfield's beautiful home in Bloomsbury Square and, piling his 
exquisite furniture, his 2000-volume library, rare manuscripts and picture collection into the 
street, set them alight. They looted the cellars and finally set the house on fire. Routed after 
a furious siege of Lord North's house, the mob moved on to join a party of thousands of 
insurgents marching to Newgate Prison, where they got pickaxes to work on the doors. They 
plundered the keeper's house and set it alight, and flung brands to ignite the woodwork of the 
prison. Soon the iron gate collapsed before the heat, and the cells emptied dazed and 
bewildered recruits to swell the ranks of those holding London in terror.
 
'June 7, "Black Wednesday," as it was called for long afterwards, brought the climax. The 
failure of the city authorities to maintain order had thoroughly cowed the people. All shops 
were shut and the streets given up to rioters. Cannons were brought in at Hyde Park, regular
troops reinforced with militia, and guards stationed at the main public buildings. The insurg-
ents, insolent. and cocksure, sent notices to the King's Bench and Fleet Prison to say what
time they would come to burn them. In the evening they made good their threats, setting 
alight, as well, a dozen private houses. The rioters seized supplies of arms and attempted to
attack the Bank of England, but were beaten back by a strong body of troops.
'The King at last summoned the Privy Council and gave his opinion that if a mob were comm-
itting a felony, the reading of the Riot Act was unnecessary. This was adopted and powers
given to the soldiers, which proved the chief means of suppressing the riots. The rioters were
driven into small areas and finally subdued, and by Thursday order was restored. No exact
record was kept, but it is estimated that about 285 were killed or died of wounds. Of the 173
prisoners taken, 135 were brought to trial and 21 executed. Gordon was tried for high treason,
but there was no evidence that he was actually implicated in the riots and he was acquitted.
'The victory went to Lord George's head. Henceforth he was always courting the limelight as
the champion of every wronged cause in every domestic or international question. He went on
working for the repeal of the Act, but met blank walls wherever he turned. Finally he became
involved in two writs for criminal libel and, after his commitment for trial, he fled to the 
Continent. Towards the end of 1787 he returned to England and lived with an old Jewess and
her son. Under their influence he adopted the Hebrew faith [and the name Yisrael bar Avraham
Gordon] and underwent its initiatory rites.
 
'Eventually he was sentenced to five years in Newgate Prison. He lived there in style, kept a
lavish table, received aristocratic guests, wrote letters to the newspapers on subjects of the
day, and meticulously observed the rites of the Jewish code. He ate Kosher and "refused even
to talk to any Jew who was clean­shaven or who did not wear a head covering." When his
sentence ended in 1793, Gordon was unable to satisfy the court with sureties of £5000 for his
future good behaviour. Without doubt it was the court's - and perhaps his family's and the
Government's intention - that he should be imprisoned for life. He rejected a plan by a crowd 
of sailors who wanted to liberate him by force and went on writing a spate of letters on every
conceivable subject. He died on November 1 of the same year, according to some, reciting the
Hebrew liturgy.'
 
Nathaniel Brassey Halhed, MP for Lymington 1791-1796
Halhed was an Oriental scholar who had served the East India Company where, under the 
patronage of Warren Hastings, he published a number of philological works and became a
pioneer in the understanding of Indo-European languages. On his return to England, he was a
firm supporter of Hastings during his impeachment, but it was his support for another man 
which ultimately led to his downfall.
Halhed was returned at a by-election in Lymington in 1791. In early 1795, Halhed had become
a disciple of Richard Brothers, self-appointed "Nephew of the Almighty" who apparently
promised Halhed the government of India once Brothers' prophecies had come to pass. After
Brothers had been arrested on suspicion of treason, and subsequently found to be a criminal
lunatic, on 31 March 1795 Halhed made a speech in the House in which he moved that
Brothers' prophecies, together with his [Halhed's] commentary on such prophecies, be laid on
the table of the House, but his motion could not attract a seconder. He never recovered from
the profound embarrassment caused by this speech, and left Parliament the following year.
His assertion contained in his speech that the ancient city of Sodom was really London 
probably did little to endear him to his fellow members. Brothers' alleged relationship as 
"Nephew of the Almighty" is a little difficult to understand - God has a brother or a sister?
The following edited article on Richard Brothers [1757-1824] appeared in the NSW 'Liverpool 
Herald' on 24 December 1902:-
'The story of Richard Brothers, who announced himself "Prince of the Hebrews" and "Nephew
of the Almighty" is of special interest just now, in view of Mr. Pigott's doings at Clapton [this
refers to John Hugh Smyth-Pigott who in 1902 proclaimed that he was the Second Coming of 
the Messiah]. Richard Brothers had the honour [!] of being arraigned before the Privy Council
after being arrested by two King's Messengers at Paddington Street on a warrant for
'treasonable practices.' It does not appear that Brothers ever went in fear and trembling of a
London mob, nor was he ever granted police protection. But he made a great stir, and was
accepted as a prophet by a considerable number of people, including a member of Parliament
names Nathaniel Brassey Halhed, who wrote several pamphlets in Brothers' defence, and who
espoused his cause in the House of Commons.......Richard Brothers was a sailor; he fought in
one engagement under Admiral Keppel off Ushant [in 1778], and in another between Admiral
Rodney and the Comte de Grasse in the West Indies [in 1782].
'We first find Brothers busying himself in a wordy wrangle with the Lords of the Admiralty
concerning his pension, which he refused to draw because the form of attestation contained
the word 'voluntarily' in what Brothers contended was not a voluntary but an obligatory oath.
After this refusal Brothers' landlady appears on the scene with the statement that the ex-
naval officer and stickler over phrases owed her £35. The wrangle continued until Brothers
eventually became destitute, and found himself in Newgate for debt. By this time the word
'voluntarily' was struck out to suit his taste, but our prophet was 'a difficult man,' so My Lords
found, inasmuch as he then objected to the words 'our Sovereign Lord the King' as being
'blasphemous.' The Admiralty patience could go no further, and the pension seems to have
never been paid to Brothers. At one time he was in a workhouse, and the authorities drew it
for him. Later on, one Finlayson, a Scotch advocate and disciple of Brothers, preferred a claim
of £20,000 against the Government after Brothers' death for this pension.......
'In 1792 Brothers wrote to the King, the Ministers of State, and the Speaker of the House of
Commons, to say that he was commanded by the Almighty to announce to the House of 
Commons, and the assembled members of Parliament, that the time was come for the 
fulfilment of Daniel [chapter] vii. He followed this message by another to the King and Queen 
and Cabinet containing numerous prophecies. Among them were several good shots, and it 
caused some alarm to find that the King of Sweden [Gustav III, who was fatally wounded at 
the Royal Opera House in Stockholm] and Louis XI [of France, who was sent to the guillotine],
whose violent deaths he prophesied, did actually fulfil his words to the letter. People in high 
places began to think he knew too much, and his followers increased in number. His arrest by 
two King's messengers for 'treasonable practices' was a fine advertisement for a new sect. 
The Privy Council, advised by someone high in authority, placed him under restraint at an 
asylum at Islington.
'Meantime, his Parliamentary backer, Nathaniel Brassey Halhed, moved that Brothers' "Revealed
Knowledge," a series of prophecies, be laid on the table of the House. Halhed was an Oriental
traveller, and Brothers had promised to make him, in his new kingdom, "Governor of India or
President of the Board of Control." By the way, the actual plans for the 'New Jerusalem' in this
aforesaid kingdom were prepared by a draughtsman and magnificently engraved at a cost of
£1,200......'
After being confined in the asylum, Brothers remained there until his release in 1806, after 
which he moved into the home of the John Finlayson mentioned in the above article. He spent
the remainder of his life happily designing the flags, uniforms and palaces of New Jerusalem 
until his death in January 1824, aged 66. 
Copyright @ 2003-2013 Leigh Rayment