THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
CONSTITUENCIES BEGINNING WITH "P"
 
              Last updated 13/05/2013
Date   Name Born Died  Age
Dates in italics in the first column denote that the election held on that
date was a by-election. Dates shown in normal type were general elections,
or, in some instances, the date of a successful petition against a 
previous election result.
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the MP was baptised on
that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate that the MP was
buried on that date
  PADDINGTON
28 Feb 1974 Arthur Charles Latham 14 Aug 1930
3 May 1979 John Daniel Wheeler  [kt 1990] 1 May 1940
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  PADDINGTON NORTH
25 Nov 1885 Lionel Louis Cohen        1832 26 Jun 1887 54
 8 Jul 1887 John Aird,later [1901] 1st baronet  3 Dec 1833  6 Jan 1911 77
17 Jan 1906 Leo George Chiozza Money  [kt 1915] 13 Jun 1870 25 Sep 1944 74
For further information on this MP, see the 
note at the foot of this page.
17 Jan 1910 Arthur Strauss 28 Apr 1847 30 Nov 1920 73
14 Dec 1918 William George Perring  [kt 1926] 17 Mar 1866 24 Aug 1937 71
30 May 1929 Brendan Bracken,later [1952] 1st
Viscount Bracken 15 Feb 1901  8 Aug 1958 57
26 Jul 1945 Sir Frank Noel Mason-Macfarlane 23 Oct 1889 12 Aug 1953 63
20 Nov 1946 William James Field 22 May 1909 11 Oct 2002 93
 3 Dec 1953 Benjamin Theaker Parkin 21 Apr 1906  3 Jun 1969 63
30 Oct 1969 Arthur Charles Latham 14 Aug 1930
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED FEB 1974 
  PADDINGTON SOUTH
25 Nov 1885 Lord Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill 13 Feb 1849 24 Jan 1895 45
10 Feb 1895 Thomas George Fardell  [kt 1897] 26 Oct 1833 12 Mar 1917 83
17 Jan 1910 Henry Percy Harris  [kt 1917]  8 Sep 1856 23 Aug 1941 84
15 Nov 1922 Henry Douglas King  1 Jun 1877 20 Aug 1930 53
For information on the death of this MP,see
the note at the foot of this page
30 Oct 1930 Ernest Augustus Taylor  [kt 1952] 17 Apr 1876 11 Mar 1971 94
23 Feb 1950 Somerset Struben de Chair 22 Aug 1911 3 Jan 1995 83
25 Oct 1951 Robert Alexander Allan,later [1973] Baron
Allan of Kilmahew [L] 11 Jul 1914  4 Apr 1979 64
31 Mar 1966 Nicholas Paul Scott  [kt 1995]  5 Aug 1933 6 Jan 2005 71
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED FEB 1974 
  PAISLEY
21 Dec 1832 Sir John Maxwell,7th baronet 31 Oct 1768 30 Jul 1844 75
24 Mar 1834 Sir Daniel Keyte Sandford 3 Feb 1798  4 Feb 1838 40
19 Jan 1835 Alexander Graham Speirs 24 Dec 1847
17 Mar 1836 Archibald Hastie        1791 9 Nov 1857 66
11 Dec 1857 Humphrey Ewing Crum-Ewing 16 Jul 1802  3 Jul 1887 84
 7 Feb 1874 William Holms         1827 8 Oct 1903 76
15 Feb 1884 Stewart Clark         1830 21 Nov 1907 77
25 Nov 1885 William Boyle Barbour        1828 13 May 1891 62
 1 Jun 1891 William Dunn,later [1895] 1st baronet 22 Sep 1833 31 Mar 1912 78
15 Jan 1906 John Mills McCallum  [kt 1912]        1847 10 Jan 1920 72
12 Feb 1920 Herbert Henry Asquith,later [1925] 1st Earl of
Oxford and Asquith 12 Sep 1852 15 Feb 1928 75
29 Oct 1924 Edward Rosslyn Mitchell 16 May 1879 31 Oct 1965 86
30 May 1929 James Welsh 29 Jan 1881 16 Dec 1969 88
27 Oct 1931 Joseph Paton Maclay [kt 1946],later [1951]
2nd Baron Maclay 31 May 1899  7 Nov 1969 70
26 Jul 1945 Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin,styled Viscount Corvedale,
later [1947] 2nd Earl Baldwin of Bewdley  1 Mar 1899 10 Aug 1958 59
18 Feb 1948 Douglas Harold Johnston  1 Feb 1907 18 Feb 1985 78
20 Apr 1961 John Robertson  3 Feb 1913 16 May 1987 74
 3 May 1979 Allender Steele Adams 16 Feb 1946 5 Sep 1990 44
CONSTITUENCY SPLIT INTO NORTH 
& SOUTH DIVISIONS 1983
PAISLEY NORTH
 9 Jun 1983 Allender Steele Adams 16 Feb 1946 5 Sep 1990 44
29 Nov 1990 Katherine Patricia Irene Adams,later [2005]
Baroness Adams of Craigielea [L] 27 Dec 1947
NAME ALTERED TO "PAISLEY &
RENFREWSHIRE NORTH" 2005
PAISLEY SOUTH
 9 Jun 1983 Norman Findlay Buchan 27 Oct 1922 23 Oct 1990 67
29 Nov 1990 Gordon James McMaster 13 Feb 1960 25 Jul 1997 37
6 Nov 1997 Douglas Garven Alexander 26 Oct 1967
NAME ALTERED TO "PAISLEY &
RENFREWSHIRE SOUTH" 2005
PAISLEY & RENFREWSHIRE NORTH
5 May 2005 James Sheridan 24 Nov 1952
PAISLEY & RENFREWSHIRE SOUTH
5 May 2005 Douglas Garven Alexander 26 Oct 1967
  PARK (SHEFFIELD)
14 Dec 1918 Henry Kenyon Stephenson,later [1936]
1st baronet 16 Aug 1865 20 Sep 1947 82
 6 Dec 1923 Richard Storry Deans        1868 31 Aug 1938 70
30 May 1929 George Lathan  5 Aug 1875 14 Jun 1942 66
27 Oct 1931 Sir Arthur Shirley Benn,1st baronet,later 
[1936] 1st Baron Glenravel 20 Dec 1858 13 Jun 1937 78
14 Nov 1935 George Lathan  5 Aug 1875 14 Jun 1942 66
27 Aug 1942 Thomas William Burden,later [1950] 1st Baron 
Burden 29 Jan 1885 27 May 1970 85
23 Feb 1950 Frederick William Mulley,later [1984]
Baron Mulley [L]  3 Jun 1918 15 Mar 1995 76
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  PARTICK (GLASGOW)
 4 Dec 1885 Alexander Craig Sellar        1835 16 Jan 1890 54
11 Feb 1890 James Parker Smith 30 Aug 1854 30 Apr 1929 74
25 Jan 1906 Robert Balfour,later [1911] 1st baronet 6 Mar 1844  4 Nov 1929 85
15 Nov 1922 Sir Robert John Collie 15 Aug 1860  4 Apr 1935 74
 6 Dec 1923 Andrew Young  6 Nov 1858  9 Feb 1943 84
29 Oct 1924 George Humphrey Maurice Broun-Lindsay 23 Oct 1888 23 Jun 1964 75
30 May 1929 Adam Storey McKinlay 1887 17 Mar 1950 62
27 Nov 1931 Charles Glen MacAndrew [kt 1935],later [1959]
1st Baron MacAndrew 13 Jan 1888 11 Jan 1979 90
14 Nov 1935 Sir Arthur Stewart Leslie Young,1st
baronet 10 Oct 1889 14 Aug 1950 60
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  PAVILION (BRIGHTON)
23 Feb 1950 Luke William Burke Teeling  [kt 1962]  5 Feb 1903 26 Oct 1975 72
27 Mar 1969 Harold Julian Amery,later [1992] Baron Amery
of Lustleigh [L] 27 Mar 1919 3 Sep 1996 77
9 Apr 1992 Sir Derek Harold Spencer 31 Mar 1936
1 May 1997 David Lepper 15 Sep 1945
6 May 2010 Caroline Patricia Lucas 9 Dec 1960
  PECKHAM
28 Nov 1885 Arthur Anthony Baumann 9 Jan 1856 20 Jun 1936 80
   Jul 1892 Frederick George Banbury,later [1903] 1st
baronet and [1924] 1st Baron Banbury 
of Southam  2 Dec 1850 13 Aug 1936 85
17 Jan 1906 Charles Goddard Clarke 10 May 1849  7 Mar 1908 58
23 Mar 1908 Henry Cubitt Gooch  [kt 1928] 7 Dec 1871 15 Jan 1959 87
   Dec 1910 Albion Henry Herbert Richardson  [kt 1919]  2 Oct 1874  7 Jul 1950 75
15 Nov 1922 Collingwood James Hughes 31 Jan 1872 25 Mar 1963 91
29 Oct 1924 Edward Hugh John Neale Dalton,later [1960]
Baron Dalton [L] 26 Aug 1887 13 Feb 1962 74
30 May 1929 John Warburton Beckett 11 Oct 1894 28 Dec 1964 70
For further information on this MP,see the note
at the foot of the page containing details of
the members for Gateshead
27 Oct 1931 David Field Beatty,styled Viscount Borodale,
later [1936] 2nd Earl Beatty 22 Feb 1905 10 Jun 1972 67
 6 May 1936 Lewis Silkin,later [1950] 1st Baron Silkin 14 Nov 1889 11 May 1972 82
23 Feb 1950 Freda Kunzlen Corbet 15 Nov 1900 1 Nov 1993 92
28 Feb 1974 Harry George Lamborn  1 May 1915 21 Aug 1982 67
28 Oct 1982 Harriet Harman 30 Jul 1950
NAME ALTERED TO "CAMBERWELL AND
PECKHAM" 1997
  PEEBLES
8 Jun 1708 William Morison 19 Apr 1663 1739 76
3 Nov 1710 Alexander Murray,later [1729] 3rd baronet after 1684 18 May 1743
9 Oct 1713 William Morison 19 Apr 1663 1739 76
 8 Feb 1715 Alexander Murray     c 1686    Sep 1755
26 Apr 1722 John Douglas     c 1698 16 Mar 1732
28 Apr 1732 Sir James Naesmyth,2nd baronet  (to 1741)     c 1704  4 Feb 1779
25 May 1734 Sir Alexander Murray
Double return between Sir James Nasmyth
and Sir Alexander Murray. Nasmyth declared
elected 7 Feb 1735
 4 Jun 1741 Alexander Murray     c 1686    Sep 1755
23 Jul 1747 John Dickson     c 1707  2 Dec 1767
31 Dec 1767 Adam Hay 15 Nov 1775
31 Mar 1768 James Montgomery,later [1801] 1st baronet    Oct 1721  2 Apr 1803 81
17 Jun 1775 Adam Hay 15 Nov 1775
14 Dec 1775 Sir Robert Murray-Keith 30 Sep 1730 21 Jun 1795 64
28 Sep 1780 Alexander Murray 11 May 1736 16 Mar 1795 58
20 Mar 1783 Alexander Murray 24 Apr 1747 24 Sep 1820 73
 3 May 1784 David Murray 10 May 1748  7 May 1794 45
 5 Jul 1790 William Montgomery 25 Jan 1765 25 Oct 1800 35
23 Dec 1800 James Montgomery,later [1803] 2nd baronet  9 Oct 1766 27 May 1839 72
4 Mar 1831 Sir George Montgomery,2nd baronet 1765 10 Jul 1831 66
9 Aug 1831 Sir John Hay,6th baronet  3 Aug 1788  1 Nov 1838 50
 4 Aug 1837 William Forbes Mackenzie 18 Apr 1807 24 Sep 1860 53
16 Jul 1852 Sir Graham Graham-Montgomery,3rd
baronet  9 Jul 1823  2 Jun 1901 77
 UNITED WITH SELKIRK 1868 
  PEEBLES & SELKIRK
25 Nov 1868 Sir Graham Graham-Montgomery,3rd
baronet  9 Jul 1823  2 Jun 1901 77
9 Apr 1880 Charles Tennant,later [1885] 1st baronet  4 Nov 1823  4 Jun 1906 82
14 Jul 1886 Walter Thorburn  [kt 1900] 22 Nov 1842 10 Nov 1908 65
19 Jan 1906 Alexander William Charles Oliphant Murray,
later [1912] 1st  Baron Murray of Elibank 12 Apr 1870 13 Sep 1920 50
20 Jan 1910 William Younger,later [1911] 1st baronet 28 Jun 1862 28 Jul 1937 75
   Dec 1910 Donald Maclean  [kt 1917] 9 Jan 1864 15 Jun 1932 68
NAME ALTERED TO "PEEBLES 
& SOUTHERN" 1918
  PEEBLES & SOUTHERN 
14 Dec 1918 Sir Donald Maclean 9 Jan 1864 15 Jun 1932 68
15 Nov 1922 Joseph Westwood 11 Feb 1884 17 Jul 1948 64
27 Oct 1931 Archibald Henry Maule Ramsay  4 May 1894 11 Mar 1955 60
For further information on this MP, see
the note at the foot of this page
26 Jul 1945 David Johnstone Pryde  3 Mar 1890  2 Aug 1959 69
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  PEMBROKE (DUBLIN COUNTY)
  
14 Dec 1918 Thomas Desmond Fitzgerald 13 Feb 1888  9 Apr 1947 59
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  PEMBROKE (PEMBROKESHIRE)
c Apr 1660 Sir Hugh Owen,1st baronet  4 May 1604 c Oct 1670 66
22 Apr 1661 Rowland Laugharne     c 1607 16 Nov 1675
 2 Oct 1676 Sir Hugh Owen,2nd baronet     c 1645 13 Jan 1699
 3 Mar 1679 Arthur Owen 18 Jul 1647 c Jun 1705 57
30 Dec 1695 John Philipps.later [1697] 4th baronet c 1666 5 Jan 1737
24 Jul 1702 John Meyrick c 1673 by May 1735
17 May 1708 Sir Arthur Owen,3rd baronet c 1674 6 Jun 1753
23 Feb 1712 Lewis Wogan by 1676 28 Nov 1714
14 Feb 1715 Thomas Ferrers     c 1665 22 Oct 1722
27 Nov 1722 William Owen,later [1753] 4th baronet     c 1697  7 May 1781
[At the general election in Jul 1747,he was
also returned for Pembrokeshire,for which
he chose to sit]
21 Dec 1747 Hugh Barlow 29 Nov 1763
 2 Apr 1761 Sir William Owen,4th baronet     c 1697  7 May 1781
14 Oct 1774 Hugh Owen,later Barlow        1729 23 Jan 1809 79
 9 Feb 1809 Sir Hugh Owen,6th baronet 12 Sep 1782  8 Aug 1809 26
13 Sep 1809 John Owen,later [1813] 1st baronet   [at the        1776  6 Feb 1861 84
general election in Oct 1812,he was also returned 
for Pembrokeshire,for which he chose to sit]
19 Mar 1813 Sir Thomas Picton 24 Aug 1758 18 Jun 1815 56
For further information on this MP,see the
note at the foot of this page
 3 Jul 1815 John Jones 15 Sep 1777 10 Nov 1842 65
19 Jun 1818 John Hensleigh Allen 29 Aug 1769 12 Apr 1843 73
13 Jun 1826 Hugh Owen Owen,later [1861] 2nd baronet 25 Dec 1803  5 Sep 1891 87
20 Feb 1838 Sir James Robert George Graham,2nd 
baronet  1 Jun 1792 25 Oct 1861 69
 3 Jul 1841 Sir John Owen,1st baronet        1776  6 Feb 1861 84
22 Feb 1861 Sir Hugh Owen Owen,2nd baronet 25 Dec 1803  5 Sep 1891 87
18 Nov 1868 Thomas Meyrick,later [1880] 1st baronet 14 Mar 1837 30 Jul 1921 84
12 Feb 1874 Edward James Reed  [kt 1880] 20 Sep 1830 30 Nov 1906 76
7 Apr 1880 Henry George Allen 29 Jul 1815 20 Nov 1908 93
NAME ALTERED TO "PEMBROKE 
& HAVERFORDWEST" 1885
  PEMBROKE & HAVERFORDWEST
30 Nov 1885 Henry George Allen 29 Jul 1815 20 Nov 1908 93
 8 Jul 1886 Richard Charles Mayne        1835 29 May 1892 56
   Jul 1892 Charles Francis Egerton Allen 14 Oct 1847 31 Dec 1927 80
17 Jul 1895 John Wimburn Laurie 1 Oct 1835 20 May 1912 76
18 Jan 1906 Sir Owen Cosby Philipps,later [1923] 1st 
Baron Kylsant 25 Mar 1863  5 Jun 1937 73
   Dec 1910 Christian Henry Charles Guest 15 Feb 1874  9 Oct 1957 83
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  PEMBROKESHIRE
c Apr 1660 Arthur Owen     c 1608  8 Sep 1678
19 Nov 1678 John Owen     c 1645        1696
11 Feb 1679 Sir Hugh Owen,2nd baronet     c 1645 13 Jan 1699
 8 Mar 1681 William Wogan  [kt 1689]     c 1638  1 Dec 1708
28 Apr 1685 William Barlow     c 1655        1733
16 Jan 1689 Sir Hugh Owen,2nd baronet     c 1645 13 Jan 1699
31 Dec 1695 Arthur Owen,later [1699] 3rd baronet c 1674 6 Jun 1753
5 Jun 1705 Wirriot Owen c 1681 1713
17 Oct 1710 John Barlow c 1682 29 Oct 1739
 1 Mar 1715 Sir Arthur Owen,3rd baronet     c 1674  6 Jun 1753
 5 Sep 1727 John Campbell        1695  6 Sep 1777 82
21 Jul 1747 William Owen,later [1753] 4th baronet     c 1697  7 May 1781
 7 Apr 1761 Sir John Philipps,6th baronet     c 1701 23 Jun 1764
12 Feb 1765 Sir Richard Philipps,7th baronet,later [1776]
1st Baron Milford [I]   [his election declared void 1744 28 Nov 1823 79
6 Mar 1770]
20 Mar 1770 Hugh Owen,later [1781] 5th baronet     c 1731 16 Jan 1786
 9 Feb 1786 Richard Philipps,1st Baron Milford [I] 1744 28 Nov 1823 79
30 Oct 1812 John Owen,later [1813] 1st baronet   [following        1776  6 Feb 1861 84
the general election in May 1831,his election was 
declared void 30 Sep 1831. At the subsequent
by-election held on 24 Oct 1831,he was again
returned]
 6 Jul 1841 John Frederick Vaughan,styled Viscount
Emlyn,later [1860] 2nd Earl Cawdor 11 Jun 1817 29 Mar 1898 80
19 Jan 1861 George Lort Phillips        1811 30 Oct 1866 55
26 Nov 1866 James Bevan Bowen        1828 14 Nov 1905 77
21 Nov 1868 Sir John Henry Scourfield,1st baronet 30 Jan 1808  3 Jun 1876 68
28 Jun 1876 James Bevan Bowen        1828 14 Nov 1905 77
5 Apr 1880 William Davies  [kt 1893]        1821 23 Nov 1895 74
   Jul 1892 William Rees Morgan Davies  [kt 1913] May 1863 14 Apr 1939 75
15 Feb 1898 John Wynford Philipps,later [1908] 1st Baron
St.Davids and [1918] 1st Viscount St.Davids 30 May 1860 28 Mar 1938 77
15 Jul 1908 Walter Francis Roch 20 Jan 1880  3 May 1965 85
14 Dec 1918 Sir Evan Davies Jones,1st baronet 18 Apr 1859 20 Apr 1949 90
15 Nov 1922 Gwilym Lloyd-George,later ]1957] 1st 
Viscount Tenby  4 Dec 1894 14 Feb 1967 72
29 Oct 1924 Charles William Mackay Price  [kt 1932] 22 Nov 1872  6 Jul 1954 81
30 May 1929 Gwilym Lloyd-George,later ]1957] 1st 
Viscount Tenby  4 Dec 1894 14 Feb 1967 72
23 Feb 1950 Desmond Louis Donnelly 16 Oct 1920  4 Apr 1974 53
18 Jun 1970 Roger Nicholas Edwards,later [1987]
Baron Crickhowell [L] 25 Feb 1934
11 Jun 1987 Nicholas Jerome Bennett 7 May 1949
9 Apr 1992 Nicholas Richard Ainger 24 Oct 1949
NAME ALTERED TO "PRESELI
PEMBROKESHIRE" 1997
PENDLE (LANCASHIRE)
 9 Jun 1983 John Robert Louis Lee,later [2006] Baron Lee
of Trafford [L] 21 Jun 1942
9 Apr 1992 Gordon Prentice 28 Jan 1951
6 May 2010 Andrew Stephenson 17 Feb 1981
  PENISTONE (YORKSHIRE)
14 Dec 1918 Sydney Arnold,later [1924] 1st Baron Arnold 13 Jan 1878  3 Aug 1945 67
 5 Mar 1921 William Gillis 10 Nov 1859 18 Sep 1929 69
15 Nov 1922 William Mather Rutherford Pringle 22 Jan 1874  1 Apr 1928 54
29 Oct 1924 Rennie Smith 14 Apr 1888 25 May 1962 74
27 Oct 1931 Clifford William Hudson Glossop 30 Jun 1901  4 Jul 1975 74
14 Nov 1935 Henry George McGhee  3 Jul 1898  6 Feb 1959 60
11 Jun 1959 John Jakob Mendelson 6 Jul 1917 20 May 1978 60
13 Jul 1978 Allen McKay 5 Feb 1927 2 May 2013 86
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  PENISTONE & STOCKSBRIDGE
6 May 2010 Angela Christine Smith 16 Aug 1961
  PENRITH (CUMBERLAND)
 3 Dec 1885 Henry Charles Howard 17 Sep 1850  4 Aug 1914 63
10 Jul 1886 James William Lowther,later [1921] 1st
Viscount Ullswater  1 Apr 1855 27 Mar 1949 93
NAME ALTERED TO "PENRITH 
& COCKERMOUTH" 1918
  PENRITH & COCKERMOUTH (CUMBERLAND)
14 Dec 1918 James William Lowther,later [1921] 1st
Viscount Ullswater  1 Apr 1855 27 Mar 1949 93
13 May 1921 Sir Henry Cecil Lowther  1 Jan 1869  1 Nov 1940 71
15 Nov 1922 Levi Collison        1875 22 Oct 1965 90
 6 Dec 1923 Arthur Carlyne Niven Dixey        1889 25 May 1954 64
14 Nov 1935 Alan Vincent Gander Dower 28 Mar 1898  6 May 1980 82
  NAME ALTERED TO "PENRITH 
& THE BORDER" 1950
  PENRITH & THE BORDER
23 Feb 1950 Robert Donald Scott  [kt 1955] 13 Nov 1901 18 Jun 1974 72
26 May 1955 William Stephen Ian Whitelaw,later [1983] 1st
Viscount Whitelaw 28 Jun 1918 1 Jul 1999 81
28 Jul 1983 David John Maclean,later [2011] Baron
Blencathra [L] 16 May 1953
6 May 2010 Roderick James Nugent Stewart 3 Jan 1973
  PENRYN (CORNWALL)
13 Apr 1660 Samuel Enys 11 Oct 1611  8 Nov 1697 86
James Robyns by 1625  after 1682
16 Apr 1661 William Pendarves 20 Jul 1600  4 Jun 1671 70
John Birch  (to 1679)  7 Sep 1615 10 May 1691 75
 3 Feb 1673 Sir Robert Southwell  (to Sep 1679) 31 Dec 1635 11 Sep 1702 66
This election was declared void 6 Feb 1673.
At the subsequent by-election held on 13
Feb 1673,Southwell was again elected
14 Feb 1679 Francis Trefusis  8 Jul 1650  5 Nov 1680 30
17 Sep 1679 Sir Nicholas Slanning,1st baronet  (to 1689)    Jun 1643    Apr 1691 47
Charles Smythe 10 Mar 1628    Feb 1683 54
 9 May 1685 Henry Fanshawe  8 Jun 1634 31 Aug 1685 51
12 Jan 1689 Anthony Rowe after 1641  9 Sep 1704
Alexander Pendarves  (to 1698)   11 Nov 1662  8 Mar 1725 62
1 Mar 1690 Samuel Rolle  [he was also returned for 5 Nov 1646 5 Nov 1719 73
Devon,for which he chose to sit]
30 Apr 1690 Sidney Godolphin 12 Jan 1652 23 Sep 1732 80
30 Oct 1695 James Vernon  (to 1699)  [at the general 1 Apr 1646 31 Jan 1727 80
election of 1698 he was also returned for
Westminster,for which he chose to sit]
1 Aug 1698 Samuel Trefusis  (to 1713) 6 Oct 1676 4 Apr 1724 47
16 Jan 1699 Alexander Pendarves 11 Nov 1662  8 Mar 1725 62
19 May 1705 James Vernon 1 Apr 1646 31 Jan 1727 80
21 Oct 1710 Alexander Pendarves  (to 1714) 11 Nov 1662  8 Mar 1725 62
7 Sep 1713 Hugh Boscawen,later [1720] 1st Viscount
Falmouth  (to 1720)     c 1680 25 Oct 1734
15 Mar 1714 Samuel Trefusis  (to 1722)  6 Oct 1676  4 Apr 1724 47
24 Jun 1720 William Godolphin,styled Viscount Rialton 1712-
1722 and Marquess of Blandford 1722-1731     c 1699 24 Aug 1731
12 Apr 1722 Sidney Meadows     c 1699 15 Nov 1792
Edward Vernon  (to 1734) 12 Nov 1684 30 Oct 1757 72
26 Aug 1727 Sir Cecil Bishopp,6th baronet 15 Jun 1778
 3 May 1734 Sir Richard Mill,5th baronet     c 1689 16 May 1760
John Clavering 19 Jul 1698 23 May 1762 63
12 May 1741 John Evelyn,later [1763] 2nd baronet 24 Aug 1706 11 Jun 1767 60
(to 1747)
Edward Vernon  [he was also returned for 12 Nov 1684 30 Oct 1757 72
Ipswich,for which he chose to sit]
22 Feb 1743 George Boscawen  (to 1761)  1 Dec 1712  3 May 1775 62
 1 Jul 1747 Henry Seymour Conway 12 Aug 1719  9 Jul 1795 75
18 Apr 1754 Richard Edgcumbe,later [1758] 2nd
Baron Edgcumbe  2 Aug 1716 10 May 1761 44
 2 Dec 1758 John Plumptre 10 Feb 1711 23 Feb 1791 80
 4 Apr 1761 Sir Edward Turner,2nd baronet 18 Apr 1719 31 Oct 1766 47
George Brydges Rodney,later [1782] 1st Baron
Rodney  (to 1768) 13 Feb 1719 24 May 1792 73
19 Nov 1766 Francis Basset  (to 1770)        1715 17 Nov 1769 54
 
21 Mar 1768 Hugh Pigot  (to 1774) 28 May 1722 15 Dec 1792 70
17 Jan 1770 William Lemon,later [1774] 1st baronet 11 Oct 1748 11 Dec 1824 76
12 Oct 1774 Sir George Osborn,4th baronet 10 May 1742 29 Jun 1818 76
William Chaytor 11 Jan 1732 15 May 1819 87
11 Sep 1780 Sir Francis Basset,1st baronet,later [1796] 
1st Baron de Dunstanville  (to 1796)  9 Aug 1757 14 Feb 1835 77
John Rogers 15 Aug 1750 22 Feb 1832 81
13 Dec 1782 Reginald Pole-Carew 28 Jul 1753  3 Jan 1835 81
 3 Apr 1784 Sir John St.Aubyn,5th baronet 17 May 1758 10 Aug 1839 81
19 Jun 1790 Richard Glover     c 1750 20 Aug 1822
27 May 1796 Thomas Wallace,later [1828] 1st Baron Wallace c 1768 23 Feb 1844  
William Meeke  3 Jan 1758 15 Jul 1830 72
10 Jul 1802 Sir Stephen Lushington,1st baronet 17 Jun 1744 12 Jan 1807 62
Sir John Nicholl 16 Mar 1759 26 Aug 1838 79
 1 Nov 1806 Henry Swann  (to 1819) 15 Nov 1763 24 Apr 1824 60
Sir Christopher Hawkins   [he was unseated    May 1758  6 Apr 1829 70
on petition in favour of John Bettesworth-
Trevanion 4 Feb 1807]
 4 Feb 1807 John Trevanion Purnell Bettesworth-
Trevanion        1780  8 Mar 1840 59
 9 May 1807 Charles Lemon,later [1824] 2nd baronet 30 Sep 1784 13 Feb 1868 83
10 Oct 1812 Philip Gell    Jul 1775 25 Jan 1842 66
19 Jun 1818 Sir Christopher Hawkins,1st baronet  (to 1820) 29 May 1758  6 Apr 1829 70
26 Feb 1819 Henry Swann declared not elected on
petition, and no writ issued until the next
general election
9 Mar 1820 Pascoe Grenfell  (to 1826) 3 Sep 1761 23 Jan 1838 76
Henry Swann  15 Nov 1763 24 Apr 1824 60
10 May 1824 Robert Stanton 4 Jan 1793 3 May 1833 40
12 Jun 1826 David Barclay 29 Sep 1784  1 Jul 1861 76
William Manning  1 Dec 1763 17 Apr 1835 71
2 Aug 1830 Sir Charles Lemon,2nd baronet 30 Sep 1784 13 Feb 1868 83
James William Freshfield  (to 1832) 8 Apr 1774 27 Jun 1864 90
2 May 1831 Charles Stewart 30 Sep 1801 30 Jun 1891 89
  NAME ALTERED TO "PENRYN 
& FALMOUTH" 1832
  PENRYN & FALMOUTH (CORNWALL)
11 Dec 1832 Robert Monsey Rolfe [kt 1835],later [1850] 1st
Baron Cranworth  (to 1840) 18 Dec 1790 26 Jul 1868 77
Charles William Bury,styled Baron Tullamore,
later [1835] 2nd Earl of Charleville 29 Apr 1801 14 Jul 1851 50
 6 Jan 1835 James William Freshfield  (to 1841) 8 Apr 1774 27 Jun 1864 90
23 Jan 1840 Edward John Hutchins        1809 11 Feb 1876 66
30 Jun 1841 John Cranch Walker Vivian 18 Apr 1818 22 Jan 1879 60
James Hanway Plumridge  [kt 1855] c 1788 29 Nov 1863
30 Jul 1847 Howel Gwyn  (to 1857) 24 Jun 1806 25 Jan 1888 81
Francis Mowatt        1803 12 Feb 1891 87
 8 Jul 1852 James William Freshfield 8 Apr 1774 27 Jun 1864 90
27 Mar 1857 Thomas George Baring,later [1866] 2nd Baron
Northbrook and [1876] 1st Earl of Northbrook 22 Jan 1826 15 Nov 1904 78
Samuel Gurney  (to 1868)        1816  4 Apr 1882 65
15 Oct 1865 Jervoise Smith        1828 21 Jul 1884 56
17 Nov 1868 Robert Nicholas Fowler,later [1885] 1st
baronet 12 Sep 1828 22 May 1891 62
Edward Backhouse Eastwick        1814 16 Jul 1883 69
 6 Feb 1874 David James Jenkins  (to 1886)        1824 26 Feb 1891 66
Henry Thomas Cole        1816  5 Jan 1885 68
2 Apr 1880 Reginald Baliol Brett,later [1899] 2nd 
Viscount Esher 30 Jun 1852 22 Jan 1930 77
  REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1885
 2 Jul 1886 William George Cavendish-Bentinck        1854 22 Aug 1909 55
16 Jul 1895 Frederick John Horniman  8 Oct 1835  5 Mar 1906 70
15 Jan 1906 John Barker,later [1908] 1st baronet 6 Apr 1840 16 Dec 1914 74
15 Jan 1910 Charles Sydney Goldman        1868  7 Apr 1958 89
14 Dec 1918 Sir Edward Nicholl 17 Jun 1862 30 Mar 1939 76
15 Nov 1922 Denis Ewart Bernard Kingston Shipwright 20 May 1898 13 Sep 1984 86
 6 Dec 1923 Sir Courtenay Cecil Mansel,13th baronet 25 Feb 1880  4 Jan 1933 52
29 Oct 1924 George Pilcher 26 Feb 1882  8 Dec 1962 80
30 May 1929 Sir John Tudor Walters        1868 16 Jul 1933 65
27 Oct 1931 Maurice Petherick  5 Oct 1894 4 Aug 1985 90
26 Jul 1945 Evelyn Mansfield King 30 May 1907 14 Apr 1994 86
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  PENTLANDS (EDINBURGH)
23 Feb 1950 Lord John Adrian Hope,later [1864] 1st Baron
Glendevon  7 Apr 1912 18 Jan 1996 83
15 Oct 1964 Norman Russell Wylie,later [1974] Lord Wylie
(Scottish Lord of Session) 26 Oct 1923 7 Sep 2005 81
28 Feb 1974 Malcolm Leslie Rifkind  [kt 1997] 21 Jun 1946
1 May 1997 Lynda Margaret Clark,later [2005] Baroness 
Clark of Calton [L] 26 Feb 1949
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 2005
  PERRY BARR (BIRMINGHAM)
23 Feb 1950 Cecil Charles Poole        1902  2 Feb 1956 53
26 May 1955 Charles Alfred Howell 22 Oct 1905 26 Oct 1974 69
15 Oct 1964 Wyndham Roy Davies 3 Jun 1926 4 Dec 1984 58
31 Mar 1966 Christopher Price 26 Jan 1932
18 Jun 1970 Joseph Ronald Kinsey 28 Aug 1921 7 Jul 1983 61
28 Feb 1974 Jeffrey William Rooker,later [2001] 
Baron Rooker [L] 5 Jun 1941
7 Jun 2001 Khalid Mahmood 13 Jul 1961
  PERTH (PERTHSHIRE)
26 May 1708 Joseph Austin 8 Nov 1735
28 Oct 1710 George Yeaman by Feb 1733
 6 Feb 1715 Patrick Haldane     c 1683 10 Jan 1769
28 Apr 1722 William Erskine 19 Mar 1691  2 May 1754 62
Charles Leslie
Double return. Erskine declared elected
27 Oct 1722
 9 Sep 1727 John Drummond        1676 20 Dec 1742 66
20 Jan 1743 Thomas Leslie     c 1701 17 Mar 1772
20 Apr 1761 George Dempster  8 Dec 1732 13 Feb 1818 85
13 Apr 1768 William Pulteney   [he was also returned for 19 Oct 1729 30 May 1805 75
Cromartyshire,for which he chose to sit]
 4 Apr 1769 George Dempster  8 Dec 1732 13 Feb 1818 85
12 Jul 1790 George Murray 22 Aug 1741 17 Oct 1797 56
 4 Apr 1796 David Scott 27 Feb 1746  4 Oct 1805 59
27 Nov 1805 Sir David Wedderburn,1st baronet 10 Mar 1775  7 Apr 1858 83
11 Jul 1818 Archibald Campbell     c 1763 13 Jun 1838
1 Apr 1820 Hugh Primrose Lindsay 31 Oct 1765 22 Apr 1844 78
23 Aug 1830 John Stuart-Wortley (Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie
from 1845),later [1845] 2nd Baron Wharncliffe 20 Apr 1801 22 Oct 1855 54
13 Jan 1831 Francis Jeffrey   [his name was erased from  23 Oct 1773 26 Jan 1850 76
the return and that of William Ogilvy 
substituted 28 Mar 1831]
28 Mar 1831 William Ogilvy 19 Sep 1793 10 Apr 1871 77
23 May 1831 Francis Jeffrey 23 Oct 1773 26 Jan 1850 76
26 Dec 1832 Laurence Oliphant 22 Jun 1791 29 May 1862 70
29 Jul 1837 Arthur Fitzgerald Kinnaird,later [1878] 10th
Lord Kinnaird [S]  8 Jul 1814 26 Apr 1887 72
19 Aug 1839 David Greig
 2 Jul 1841 Fox Maule,later [1860] 11th Earl of Dalhousie 22 Apr 1801  6 Jul 1874 73
15 May 1852 Arthur Fitzgerald Kinnaird,later [1878] 10th
Lord Kinnaird [S]  8 Jul 1814 26 Apr 1887 72
29 Jan 1878 Charles Stuart Parker 1 Jun 1829 18 Jun 1910 81
   Jul 1892 William Whitelaw 15 Mar 1868 19 Jan 1946 77
13 Jul 1895 Robert Wallace  [kt 1916]        1850 19 Mar 1939 88
12 Feb 1907 Sir Robert Pullar 18 Feb 1828  9 Sep 1912 84
17 Jan 1910 Alexander Frederick Whyte  [kt 1922] 30 Sep 1883 30 Jul 1970 86
14 Dec 1918 William Young 5 Feb 1863  7 Jun 1942 79
15 Nov 1922 Archibald Noel Skelton 1 Jul 1880 22 Nov 1935 55
 6 Dec 1923 Robert Macgregor Mitchell 1875 25 Apr 1938 62
29 Oct 1924 Archibald Noel Skelton 1 Jul 1880 22 Nov 1935 55
27 Oct 1931 Mungo David Malcolm Murray,styled Baron Scone,
later [1935] 8th Earl of Mansfield  9 Aug 1900  2 Sep 1971 71
16 Apr 1935 Francis Norie-Miller,later [1936] 1st baronet 11 Mar 1859  4 Jul 1947 88
14 Nov 1935 Thomas Hunter  [kt 1944]  2 Oct 1872 19 Mar 1953 80
26 Jul 1945 Alan Gomme Gomme-Duncan  [kt 1956]  5 Jul 1893 13 Dec 1963 70
NAME ALTERED TO "PERTH & EAST
PERTHSHIRE" 1950 BUT REVERTED 1997
1 May 1997 Roseanna Cunningham 27 Jul 1951
7 Jun 2001 Annabelle Janet Ewing 20 Aug 1960
NAME ALTERED TO "PERTH & 
PERTHSHIRE NORTH" 2005
  PERTH & EAST PERTHSHIRE
23 Feb 1950 Alan Gomme Gomme-Duncan  [kt 1956]  5 Jul 1893 13 Dec 1963 70
 8 Oct 1959 Ian MacArthur 17 May 1925 30 Nov 2007 82
10 Oct 1974 George Douglas Crawford 1 Nov 1939 17 Apr 2002 62
 3 May 1979 William Connoll Walker 20 Feb 1929
NAME ALTERED TO "PERTH 
& KINROSS" 1983
PERTH & KINROSS
 9 Jun 1983 Nicholas Hardwick Fairbairn  [kt 1988] 24 Dec 1933 19 Feb 1995 61
25 May 1995 Roseanna Cunningham 27 Jul 1951
NAME ALTERED TO "PERTH" 1997
PERTH & PERTHSHIRE NORTH
5 May 2005 Peter Wishart 9 Mar 1962
  PERTHSHIRE
15 Jun 1708 Dougal Stewart  [he was also returned for  after 1658 16 Jun 1712
Buteshire at the general election in 1708 and
appears to have been permitted to sit for both
seats until his appointment as a Lord of
Session on 7 Jun 1709. No writ for a fresh
election appears to have been issued before
the general election in 1710]
25 Oct 1710 Lord James Murray 8 May 1663 30 Dec 1719 56
10 Feb 1715 Lord James Murray,later [1724] 2nd Duke
of Atholl 28 Aug 1690  8 Jan 1764 73
31 Dec 1724 David Graeme     c 1676 14 Mar 1726
28 Apr 1726 Mungo Haldane     c 1682  1 Jun 1755
12 Oct 1727 John Drummond        1752
 9 May 1734 Lord John Murray 14 Apr 1711 26 May 1787 76
21 Apr 1761 John Murray,later [1764] 3rd Duke of Atholl 25 Apr 1729  5 Nov 1774 45
23 Mar 1764 David Graeme  2 Feb 1716 19 Jan 1797 80
11 Jun 1773 James Murray 19 Mar 1734 19 Mar 1794 60
11 Apr 1794 Thomas Graham 19 Oct 1748 19 Dec 1843 95
19 May 1807 Lord James Murray,later [1821] 1st Baron
Glenlyon 29 May 1782 12 Oct 1837 55
19 Mar 1812 James Andrew John Lawrence Charles
Drummond 24 Mar 1767 14 May 1851 84
6 Apr 1824 Sir George Murray  6 Feb 1772 28 Jul 1846 74
29 Dec 1832 John Campbell,styled Earl of Ormelie,later
[1834] 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane 26 Oct 1796  8 Nov 1862 66
 5 May 1834 Sir George Murray  6 Feb 1772 28 Jul 1846 74
17 Jan 1835 Fox Maule,later [1860] 11th Earl of Dalhousie 22 Apr 1801  6 Jul 1874 73
 4 Aug 1837 William David Murray,styled Viscount Stormont,
later [1840] 4th Earl of Mansfield 20 Feb 1806  2 Aug 1898 92
 9 Mar 1840 Henry Home-Drummond        1783 12 Sep 1867 84
16 Jul 1852 Sir William Stirling (Stirling-Maxwell from 
Mar 1866),9th baronet  8 Mar 1818 15 Jan 1878 59
23 Nov 1868 Charles Stuart Parker 1 Jun 1829 18 Jun 1910 81
12 Feb 1874 Sir William Stirling-Maxwell,9th baronet  8 Mar 1818 15 Jan 1878 59
 4 Feb 1878 Henry Edward Home-Drummond-Moray      
[later Henry Edward Stirling-Home-Drummond] 15 Sep 1846 16 May 1911 64
5 Apr 1880 Sir Donald Currie 17 Sep 1825 13 Apr 1909 83
COUNTY SPLIT INTO EAST 
& WEST DIVISIONS 1885
  PERTHSHIRE EAST
 1 Dec 1885 Robert Stewart Menzies        1856 25 Jan 1889 32
19 Feb 1889 Sir John George Smyth Kinloch,2nd baronet  8 Jan 1849 20 May 1910 61
26 Feb 1903 Thomas Ryburn Buchanan        1846  7 Apr 1911 64
25 Jan 1910 William Young 5 Feb 1863  7 Jun 1942 79
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  PERTHSHIRE WEST
28 Nov 1885 Sir Donald Currie 17 Sep 1825 13 Apr 1909 83
 6 Oct 1900 John Stroyan        1856  5 Dec 1941 85
18 Jan 1906 David Charles Erskine        1866 26 May 1922 55
20 Jan 1910 John George Stewart-Murray,styled Marquess
of Tullibardine,later [1917] 8th Duke of Atholl 15 Dec 1871 15 Mar 1942 70
21 Feb 1917 Archibald Stirling        1867 18 Feb 1931 63
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  PETERBOROUGH (NORTHAMPTONSHIRE)
c Mar 1660 Humphrey Orme  (to 1671) 12 Oct 1620  2 Mar 1671 50
Charles Fane,styled Lord Le Despencer,later
[1666] 3rd Earl of Westmorland  6 Jan 1635 18 Sep 1691 56
Francis St.John      c 1634 29 Jul 1705
Double return between Lord le Despencer
and St.John. Lord le Despencer declared
elected 26 May 1660
12 Apr 1666 Edward Palmer  [he was unseated on petition 26 Aug 1644 14 Aug 1667 22
in favour of William Fitzwilliam,Baron
Fitzwilliam 8 Nov 1667]
 8 Nov 1667 William Fitzwilliam,3rd Baron Fitzwilliam [I[,
later [1716] 1st Earl Fitzwilliam [I]  (to Aug 1679) 29 Apr 1643 28 Dec 1719 76
22 Mar 1671 Sir Vere Fane,later [1691] 4th Earl of 
Westmorland 13 Feb 1645 29 Dec 1693 48
24 Feb 1679 Francis St.John  (to 1685)     c 1634 29 Jul 1705
28 Aug 1679 Charles Orme     c 1654 25 Sep 1691
15 Feb 1681 William Fitzwilliam,3rd Baron Fitzwilliam [I[,
later [1716] 1st Earl Fitzwilliam [I]  29 Apr 1643 28 Dec 1719 76
16 Mar 1685 Charles Fitzwilliam  (to Dec 1689)     c 1646    Sep 1689
Charles Orme     c 1654 25 Sep 1691
 8 Jan 1689 Gilbert Dolben,later [1704] 1st baronet     c 1659 22 Oct 1722
(to 1698)
28 Dec 1689 William Brownlow,later [1697] 4th baronet  5 Nov 1665  6 Mar 1701 35
23 Jul 1698 Sidney Wortley-Montagu  (to 1710) 28 Jul 1650 11 Nov 1727 77
Francis St.John c 1634 29 Jul 1705
3 Jan 1701 Sir Gilbert Dolben,1st baronet     c 1659 22 Oct 1722
6 Oct 1710 John Fitzwilliam,styled Viscount Milton from
1716,later [1719] 2nd Earl Fitzwilliam [I]     c 1681 28 Aug 1728
(to 1729)
  Charles Parker 1663         1730 67
22 Mar 1722 Sidney Wortley-Montagu 28 Jul 1650  9 Nov 1727 77
18 Aug 1727 John Fitzwilliam,styled Viscount Milton from
1716,later [1719] 2nd Earl Fitzwilliam [I]     c 1681 28 Aug 1728
Sir Edward O'Brien,2nd baronet     7 Apr 1705 26 Nov 1765 60
Sidney Wortley-Montagu 28 Jul 1650  9 Nov 1727 77
[Two returns - one naming Fitzwilliam and O'Brien 
and the other naming Fitzwilliam and Wortley.
O'Brien was unseated on petition 9 Apr 1728. 
Wortley-Montagu was declared to have been duly
elected 13 May 1728,even though he had died six
months earlier]
13 May 1728 Sidney Wortley-Montagu 28 Jul 1650  9 Nov 1727 77
22 May 1728 Joseph Banks  (to Apr 1734) 21 Jun 1695 31 Mar 1741 45
29 Jan 1729 Charles Gounter-Nicoll  7 Oct 1704 24 Nov 1733 29
29 Jan 1734 Armstead Parker  (to 1741)     c 1699  5 Feb 1777
26 Apr 1734 Edward Wortley-Montagu  (to 1761)  8 Feb 1678 22 Jan 1761 82
 4 May 1741 William Fitzwilliam,3rd Earl Fitzwilliam [I] and
later [1746] 1st Earl Fitzwilliam [E] 15 Jan 1719 10 Aug 1756 37
 3 May 1742 Armstead Parker      c 1699  5 Feb 1777
26 Jun 1747 Matthew Lamb,later [1755] 1st baronet       c 1705  6 Nov 1768
(to Nov 1768)
27 Mar 1761 Armstead Parker     c 1699  5 Feb 1777
16 Mar 1768 Matthew Wyldbore  (to 1780)     c 1716 15 Mar 1781
29 Nov 1768 Henry Belasyse,styled Viscount Belasyse,
later [1774] 2nd Earl Fauconberg 13 Apr 1743 23 Mar 1802 58
16 Feb 1774 Richard Benyon  (to 1796) 28 Jun 1746 22 Aug 1796 50
 9 Sep 1780 James Farrel Phipps 24 Jul 1744  6 Feb 1786 41
28 Feb 1786 Lionel Damer  (to 1802) 16 Sep 1748 28 May 1807 58
26 Oct 1796 French Laurence  (to 1809)  3 Apr 1757 27 Feb 1809 51
 5 Jul 1802 William Elliot  (to Feb 1819) 12 Mar 1766 26 Oct 1818 52
14 Mar 1809 Francis Russell,styled Marquess of Tavistock,
later [1839] 7th Duke of Bedford 13 May 1788 14 May 1861 73
 8 Oct 1812 George Ponsonby  4 Mar 1755  8 Jul 1817 62
16 Apr 1816 William Lamb,later [1828] 2nd Viscount 
Melbourne  (to Nov 1819) 15 Mar 1779 24 Nov 1848 69
10 Feb 1819 Sir James Scarlett,later [1835] 1st Baron 
Abinger  (to 1830) 13 Dec 1769  7 Apr 1844 74
30 Nov 1819 Sir Robert Heron,2nd baronet  (to 1847) 27 Nov 1765 29 May 1854 88
2 Aug 1830 Charles William Fitzwilliam,styled Viscount
Milton,later [1833] 5th Earl Fitzwilliam  4 May 1786  4 Oct 1857 71
24 Nov 1830 John Nicholas Fazakerley 7 Mar 1787 16 Jul 1852 65
29 Jun 1841 George Wentworth Fitzwilliam  (to 1859)  3 May 1817  4 Mar 1874 56
30 Jul 1847 William George Cavendish,later [1863] 2nd
Baron Chesham 29 Oct 1815 26 Jun 1882 66
 7 Jul 1852 Richard Watson  6 Jan 1800 24 Jul 1852 52
 6 Dec 1852 George Hampden Whalley 22 Jan 1813  7 Oct 1878 65
[His election was declared void 8 Jun 1853.
At the subsequent by-election held on 
25 Jun 1853,he was again returned,but
his election was again declared void
15 Aug 1853]
15 Aug 1853 Thomson Hankey  (to 1868)        1805 13 Jan 1893 87
30 Apr 1859 George Hampden Whalley  (to 1878) 22 Jan 1813  7 Oct 1878 65
18 Nov 1868 William Wells 15 Mar 1818  1 May 1889 71
 3 Feb 1874 Thomson Hankey  (to 1880)        1805 13 Jan 1893 87
29 Oct 1878 William John Wentworth-Fitzwilliam  (to 1889) 7 Aug 1852 11 Sep 1889 37
For further information on the death of this MP, 
see the note at the foot of this page
1 Apr 1880 George Hammond Whalley        1851
For further information on this MP, see
the note at the foot of this page
23 Jun 1883 Sydney Charles Buxton,later [1920] 1st
Earl Buxton 25 Oct 1853 15 Oct 1934 80
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1885
 7 Oct 1889 Alpheus Cleophas Morton  [kt 1918]        1840 26 Apr 1923 82
15 Jul 1895 Robert Purvis  [kt 1905]        1844 23 Jun 1920 75
15 Jan 1906 Granville George Greenwood  [kt 1916] 3 Jan 1850 27 Oct 1928 78
14 Dec 1918 Henry Leonard Campbell Brassey,later [1922]
1st baronet and [1938] 1st Baron Brassey 
of Apethorpe  7 Mar 1870 22 Oct 1958 88
30 May 1929 James Francis Horrabin  1 Nov 1884  2 Mar 1962 77
27 Oct 1931 David George Brownlow Cecil,styled Baron
Burghley,later [1956] 6th Marquess of Exeter  9 Feb 1905 21 Oct 1981 76
15 Oct 1943 John Michael Henry Hely-Hutchinson,
styled Viscount Suirdale,later [1948] 7th
Earl of Donoughmore 12 Sep 1902 12 Aug 1981 78
26 Jul 1945 Stanley Tiffany 11 Jun 1908 19 Mar 1971 62
23 Feb 1950 Harmar Nicholls,later [1960] 1st baronet and
[1975] Baron Harmar-Nicholls [L]  1 Nov 1912 15 Sep 2000 87
10 Oct 1974 Michael John Ward  7 Apr 1931 25 Mar 2009 77
 3 May 1979 Brian Stanley Mawhinney [kt 1997],later [2005]
Baron Mawhinney [L] 26 Jul 1940
1 May 1997 Helen Rosemary Brinton (later Clark) 23 Dec 1954
5 May 2005 Stewart James Jackson 31 Jan 1965
  PETERSFIELD (HAMPSHIRE)
 9 Apr 1660 Thomas Cole 15 Jan 1622  4 Mar 1681 59
Arthur Bold  (to 1677)     c 1604 22 May 1677
15 Apr 1661 Sir Humphrey Bennet     c 1605    Dec 1667
14 Feb 1668 Thomas Neale  (to 1679)  3 Oct 1641 17 Dec 1699 58
28 May 1677 Leonard Bilson  (to 1685)  5 Dec 1616 10 Dec 1695 79
18 Feb 1679 Sir John Norton,3rd baronet  (to 1689)  7 Dec 1619  9 Jan 1687 67
19 Mar 1685 Thomas Bilson  (to 1690)     c 1655 11 Jan 1692
11 Jan 1689 Robert Michell  (to 1701) 11 Apr 1653  1 Aug 1729 76
Thomas Bilson  (to 1690)     c 1655 11 Jan 1692
Richard Norton
Double return between Michell and Norton.
Michell declared elected 23 Feb 1689
28 Feb 1690 Richard Holt c 1635 14 Apr 1710
21 Jul 1698 Peter Bettesworth 21 Nov 1676 13 Feb 1738 61
6 Jan 1701 Ralph Bucknall c Jan 1711
Richard Markes  (to 1704) 3 Aug 1671  Jan 1704 32
28 Nov 1701 Robert Michell  (to 1705) 11 Apr 1653  1 Aug 1729 76
13 Jan 1704 Leonard Bilson  (to Nov 1715) 25 Sep 1681 28 Jun 1715 33
11 May 1705 Norton Powlett  (to 1734) 27 Sep 1680 18 Jun 1741 60
 7 Nov 1715 Samuel Pargiter-Fuller     c 1690 21 Nov 1722
21 Mar 1722 Edmund Miller     c 1669 21 May 1730
28 Jan 1727 Joseph Taylor   [he was unseated on petition     c 1679 19 May 1759
in favour of Edmund Miller 4 May 1727]
 4 May 1727 Edmund Miller     c 1669 21 May 1730
21 Aug 1727 Joseph Taylor     c 1679 19 May 1759
27 Apr 1734 Sir William Jolliffe        1660  7 Mar 1750 89
Edward Gibbon    Oct 1707 10 Nov 1770 63
27 May 1741 John Jolliffe  (to 1754)     c 1697 31 Jan 1771
Francis Fane     c 1698 27 May 1757
 2 Jul 1747 William James Conolly by Dec 1706  2 Jan 1754
 9 Feb 1754 William Gerard Hamilton  (to 1761) 28 Jan 1729 16 Jul 1796 67
19 Apr 1754 William Beckford   [he was also returned 19 Dec 1709 21 Jun 1770 60
for London,for which he chose to sit]
 9 Dec 1754 Sir John Philipps,6th baronet     c 1701 23 Jun 1764
 1 Apr 1761 John Jolliffe  (to 1768)     c 1697 31 Jan 1771
Richard Pennant,later [1783] 1st Baron 
Penrhyn [I]     c 1736 21 Jan 1808
17 Dec 1767 Richard Croftes     c 1740  5 Jul 1783
22 Mar 1768 William Jolliffe  (to Mar 1802) 16 Apr 1745 20 Feb 1802 56
Welbore Ellis,later [1794] 1st Baron Mendip 15 Dec 1713  2 Feb 1802 88
 7 Oct 1774 Sir Abraham Hume,2nd baronet 20 Feb 1749 24 Mar 1838 89
 6 Sep 1780 Thomas Samuel Jolliffe 22 Jun 1746  6 Jun 1824 77
 9 Feb 1787 John Christopher Burton Dawnay,
5th Viscount Downe [I] 15 Nov 1764 18 Feb 1832 67
16 Jun 1790 George Augustus North,styled Baron North
from Aug 1790,later [1792] 3rd Earl of Guilford 11 Sep 1757 20 Apr 1802 44
29 Dec 1790 William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Scott-
Bentinck,styled Marquess of Titchfield,later
[1809] 4th Duke of Portland   24 Jun 1768 27 Mar 1854 85
29 Apr 1791 Welbore Ellis,later [1794] 1st Baron Mendip 15 Dec 1713  2 Feb 1802 88
12 Jan 1795 Charles Greville  2 Nov 1762 26 Aug 1832 69
26 May 1796 Hylton Jolliffe 28 Feb 1773 13 Jan 1843 69
 7 Jan 1797 Sir John Sinclair,1st baronet 10 May 1754 21 Dec 1835 81
29 Mar 1802 Hylton Jolliffe  (to 1830) 28 Feb 1773 13 Jan 1843 69
 6 Jul 1802 William Draper Best,later [1829] 1st Baron
Wynford 13 Dec 1767  3 Mar 1845 77
31 Oct 1806 John William Ward,later [1827] 1st Earl
of Dudley  9 Aug 1781  6 Mar 1833 51
 6 May 1807 Booth Grey 12 Feb 1783 13 Apr 1850 67
 9 Oct 1812 George Canning   [he was also returned for 11 Apr 1770  8 Aug 1827 57
Liverpool,for which he chose to sit]
24 Dec 1812 George Canning, later [1818] 1st Baron 
Garvagh [I] 15 Nov 1778 20 Aug 1840 61
9 Mar 1820 Beaumont Hotham,3rd Baron Hotham [I]  9 Aug 1794 12 Dec 1870 76
[he was also returned for Leominster,for
which he chose to sit]
27 Jun 1820 Sir Philip Musgrave,8th baronet 12 Jul 1794 16 Jul 1827 33
2 Apr 1825 James Law Lushington  [kt 1837] 24 Jul 1780 29 May 1859 78
10 Jun 1826 William Marshall 26 May 1796 16 May 1872 75
2 Aug 1830 Sir William George Hylton Jolliffe,1st baronet,
later [1866] 1st Baron Hylton  (to 1832)  7 Dec 1800  1 Jun 1876 75
Gilbert East Jolliffe 13 Jan 1802 17 Dec 1833 31
2 May 1831 Hylton Jolliffe 28 Feb 1773 13 Jan 1843 69
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1832
14 Dec 1832 John George Shaw-Lefevre   [he was 24 Jan 1797 20 Aug 1879 82
unseated on petition in favour of Sir William
George Hylton Jolliffe 5 Mar 1833]
 5 Mar 1833 Hylton Jolliffe 28 Feb 1773 13 Jan 1843 69
 7 Jan 1835 Cornthwaite John Hector 1773 19 Feb 1842 68
25 Aug 1837 Sir William George Hylton Jolliffe,1st baronet,
later [1866] 1st Baron Hylton   [he was   7 Dec 1800  1 Jun 1876 75
unseated on petition in favour of Cornthwaite 
John Hector 14 Feb 1838]
14 Feb 1838 Cornthwaite John Hector 1773 19 Feb 1842 68
29 Jun 1841 Sir William George Hylton Jolliffe,1st baronet,
later [1866] 1st Baron Hylton  7 Dec 1800  1 Jun 1876 75
23 Jul 1866 William Nicholson        1824
 5 Feb 1874 William Sydney Hylton Jolliffe 27 Sep 1841 19 Jan 1912 70
2 Apr 1880 William Nicholson        1824
 3 Dec 1885 William Waldegrave Palmer,styled Viscount
Wolmer,later [1895] 2nd Earl of Selborne 17 Oct 1859 26 Feb 1942 82
   Jul 1892 William Wickham 10 Jul 1831 16 May 1897 65
 8 Jun 1897 William Graham Nicholson 11 Mar 1862 29 Jul 1942 80
14 Nov 1935 Reginald Hugh Dorman-Smith  [kt 1937] 10 Mar 1899 20 Mar 1977 77
22 Feb 1941 Sir George Darell Jeffreys,later [1952] 1st
Baron Jeffreys  8 Mar 1878 19 Dec 1960 82
25 Oct 1951 Peter Richard Legh,later [1960] 4th Baron Newton  6 Apr 1915 16 Jun 1992 77
16 Nov 1960 Joan Mary Quennell 23 Dec 1923 2 Jul 2006 82
10 Oct 1974 Michael John Mates  9 Jun 1934
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  PLAISTOW (WEST HAM)
14 Dec 1918 William James Thorne  8 Oct 1857  2 Jan 1946 88
26 Jul 1945 Frederick Elwyn Jones [kt 1964],later [1974]
Baron Elwyn-Jones [L] 24 Oct 1909 4 Dec 1989 80
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  PLATTING (MANCHESTER)
14 Dec 1918 John Robert Clynes 27 Mar 1869 23 Oct 1949 80
27 Oct 1931 Alan Ernest Leofric Chorlton 24 Feb 1874  6 Oct 1946 72
14 Nov 1935 John Robert Clynes 27 Mar 1869 23 Oct 1949 80
26 Jul 1945 Hugh James Delargy 26 Sep 1908  4 May 1976 67
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
Sir Leo George Chiozza Money. MP for Paddington North 1906-1910
and Northamptonshire East 1910-1918
On 23 April 1928, Sir Leo and 22-year-old Irene Savage (or Savidge) were arrested in Hyde 
Park and later charged with 'being concerned together in behaving in a manner reasonably 
likely to offend against public decency.' When arrested, Sir Leo protested that 'I am not the
usual riff-raff. I am a man of substance. For God's sake, let me go.' 
At the police station Sir Leo was allowed to phone his friend, the Home Secretary, Sir
William Joynson-Hicks (later Viscount Brentford). When the case came before the magistrate
Sir Leo denied that the incident had taken place and the charges were dismissed, and £10
costs were awarded against the police.
The divisional superintendent of police sensed a conspiracy between social equals and
demanded a re-trial, although this was against the judicial principle of autrefois acquit 
which states that an accused cannot be tried for a crime of which he has already been
acquitted. 
On 17 May 1928, Thomas Johnston, MP for Dundee, accused the police of examining Miss 
Savage using third degree methods and sending her home in a state of collapse. Joynson-
Hicks decided to have the case investigated by Chief Inspector Collins, a policeman with
an impeccable record. Sir Leo, however, refused to co-operate. Eventually, the Director of
Public Prosecutions warned Sir Leo that he persisted in his refusal to co-operate, more
serious steps would be taken. 
By this stage, the matter had become serious enough for Joynson-Hicks to establish a 
public inquiry, chaired by Sir John Eldon Banks, a retired judge. Miss Savage accused
Collins of distorting her testimony by putting words into her mouth. She insisted that, with
regard to a statement that Sir Leo's hand had been on her knee, Collins had made this 
suggestion and that she let it go as she was 'fed up' by this time and would have 'signed
anything to get away.' The inquiry's eventual decision was to acquit Collins of any
improper conduct.
 
Sir Leo, however, appears not have learnt his lesson. In September 1933, he was back in 
court, charged with assaulting Miss Ivy Ruxton, a 30-year-old shop assistant by kissing her.
on a train carriage on the Southern Railway. He was convicted and fined 40 shillings.
Henry Douglas King, MP for Norfolk North 1918-1922 and Paddington South 1922-1930
King, together with five other persons, was drowned when the motor yacht on which he was
a passenger was smashed onto rocks near Fowey in Cornwall during a gale on 20 August 1930.
The following (edited) report appeared in the 'Chicago Daily Tribune' on 22 August 1930:-
'Eight [actually six] persons, including Commodore Henry Douglas King, a Conservative member
of parliament, drowned last night as the 22-ton motor yacht Islander was swept on jagged
rocks during a violent gale off Lantivet Bay, Cornwall.
'Commodore King had chartered the yacht for a three week's cruise off the Cornish coast......
'The vessel was pounded on the rocks and the helpless occupants hurled into the raging sea
as a coast guard boat and hundreds standing on the cliff held an impotent watch over the
disaster. None of the bodies was recovered today.
'There is uncertainty regarding the actual number of victims owing to the statement of one 
witness that he saw two women floating on an inflated lifebuoy and further assertions that at
least one child lost its life. 
'The witness, who saw the two women in the sea, said, "I believe they were dead. Neither
struggled nor shouted. But a man who was near them was still struggling and holding up an
arm as if to arrest attention. All three, however, were soon buried in the mountainous seas
and I saw them no more."
'The vessel was first known to be in distress early last night when flares were seen from the
yacht by watchers on the coast. Those aboard the yacht had, it is reported, made the flares
by stripping themselves of their clothing and setting it alight.
'The Fowey coast guard boat immediately put off in an attempt to rescue the boat. At the 
same time watchers made a perilous descent down the face of a steep cliff in order to get
near the ship which the waves were hurling ever nearer to the rocks. They stood only a short
distance from the craft but were helpless to aid. A mountainous wave finally turned over and
shattered the craft to bits.
'Witnesses to the tragedy tell a ghastly story of how they could hear the screams of the 
victims through the roaring of the gale. They threw a rope to the Islander and those aboard
managed to tie it to the mast, but the tossing of the vessel snapped it off. One of the men
on the yacht then threw a heavier line from the Islander, and this was held by those on the
shore while attempted to pull himself to safety. But heaving of the yacht caused the rescuer
to be dragged in the water and nearly drowned. Seeing this, the man who thrown the rope
clambered back into the yacht and this moment the waves turned it turtle. One of the victims
was at one time less than three yards away, but it suicide to attempt to pull him out.
'The coast guard boat also shot a lifeline to the Islander, which, at the time, was dragging its
anchor in an effort to escape going on the rocks. No one aboard the craft, however, seized
the line, and a huge wave so changed the position of the ship that it was impossible to get
near it.
'Commodore King had had a distinguished career as a sailor, soldier and politician. He was a 
sailor until 1899, when he went into law and politics. He saw active service during the world
war both in France and at Gallipoli, was wounded, and decorated for gallantry. He became
aide-de-camp to King George, Conservative whip in the House of Commons in 1921, [and] was
Lord Commissioner of the Treasury from 1922 to 1924.'
Archibald Henry Maule Ramsay, MP for Peebles and Southern 1931-1945
Ramsay was the only MP to be interned during the Second World War.
He was descended from the aristocratic family of the Earls of Dalhousie, and married into
another aristocratic family, his wife being the daughter of Viscount Gormanston and widow 
of Lord Ninian Crichton-Stuart, 2nd son of the 3rd Marquess of Bute. Lord Ninian was MP for 
Cardiff between December 1910 and his death in action in 1915.
Ramsay enlisted at the outbreak of the Great War and served for two years in France before
being wounded and invalided out of the services.  During the next ten years he became 
active in the Conservative Party and was elected for Peebles and Southern at the 1931 
general election. Until 1938, he appears to have had an unremarkable career on the back-
benches, although he openly supported Franco in the Spanish Civil War. After 1938, 
however, he became a rabid anti-semite and was convinced that most, if not all, of the 
revolutionary causes throughout history, including the English Civil War and the French and 
Russian Revolutions had been brought about by the actions of Jews. These views were
shared by his wife, who claimed that the British press was largely under Jewish control.
Given Ramsay's prejudices, it is not surprising that he believed that the Conservative Party
was also under Jewish control. In order to combat this threat, he established 'The Right 
Club' in May 1939. The club included a wide range of anti-semitic men and women, including
William Joyce, later to become infamous as 'Lord Haw-Haw.' Details of the membership of
the club were maintained by Ramsay in the so-called 'Red Book.'
During the next year, Ramsay became increasingly strident in his denunciation of all things
Jewish. He made a grave mistake, however, when he entrusted the care of the 'Red Book' 
to Tyler Kent, a cipher clerk at the American Embassy in London. Kent was suspected of
stealing documents from the Embassy which he then passed on to pro-German agents. 
After the Americans had waived Kent's diplomatic immunity, his flat was raided and he was
arrested. The police also found in his possession the 'Red Book.' This discovery caused deep
concern for the authorities, since, if Kent had chosen to pass the stolen documents to
Ramsay, who as an MP enjoyed Parliamentary privilege, there was nothing to stop Ramsay
from publishing such documents.
On 23 May 1940, Ramsay was arrested under Section 18B of the Emergency Powers Act
(1939) and lodged in Brixton prison. The Emergency Powers Act allowed for the internment
of people suspected of being Nazi sympathisers and it suspended the rights of individuals
to the doctrine of habeas corpus, in much the same way as has happened in recent years
with regard to suspected terrorists.
As an MP, Ramsay argued that his detention was a breach of Parliamentary privilege. As a
result, his case was referred to the Committee for Privileges in October 1940, but the
Committee ruled that this was not the case. In 1941, Ramsay's constituency complained
that his internment had deprived them of parliamentary representation and he was pressed 
to resign, but refused to do so. 
In 1941, Ramsay sued the 'New York Times' for libel. That paper had printed an article on
25 August 1940 under the heading "Britain's Fifth Column." The article read as follows:-
"A car from Brixton Prison drew up last week at the British House of Commons. Waiting was
the Sergeant-at-Arms……He took from the police custody of Captain Archibald Henry Maule
Ramsay, M.P., World War veteran of the Coldstream Guards. The captain, arrested last May
under the Defence Regulations, had been brought to Westminster to argue that the
detention violated his traditional Parliamentary rights of immunity…….Before the war he was
strongly anti-Communist, anti-semitic and pro-Hitler. Although no specific charges were 
made against him on his arrest - Defence Regulations allow that - informed American 
sources said that he had sent to the German Legation in Dublin treasonable information
given him by Tyler Kent, clerk in the American Embassy in London."
Ramsay complained that the article's words meant that he had committed high treason.
When the court reached its decision, it found that Ramsay had indeed been libelled, but 
it awarded him derisory damages of one farthing and ordered that he pay the defendant's
costs.
Ramsay was released from internment on 26 September 1944 and immediately returned to
Westminster to resume his seat in the House of Commons. His final action in Parliament, in
June 1945, was to table a motion calling on the government to reintroduce the Statute of
Jewry of 1275, which placed a number of heavy restrictions on the Jewish population in
England at that time. A number of fellow MPs complained about this motion, but the
Speaker ruled that he was the protector of minority opinions in the House, whether he
agreed with them or not. 
At the July 1945 general election, Ramsay did not defend his seat. In 1952, he published 
his autobiography 'The Nameless War' which sought to justify his actions. 
Sir Thomas Picton, MP for Pembroke 1813-1815
The following biography of Sir Thomas Picton appeared in the monthly Australian magazine
"Parade" in its issue for June 1955:-
'It is a curious fact that some of the most admirable leaders of men in war have proved to be
the most detestable rulers in peace. Australia has its own historic instance of it in the case of
the courageous and able sailor William Bligh, who, as Governor, proved himself to be an 
autocrat and a tyrannical martinet. A short while before Bligh was ousted from New South
Wales by the Rum Rebellion, another British dominion was undergoing a similar lesson at the
hands of an equally redoubtable warrior, a British Army officer, Brigadier-General [later Major 
General Sir] Thomas Picton.  There are some strange parallels matching the character of the
soldier, Picton, with that of the sailor, Bligh - probably because both men were the product of
a brutal code of discipline, when rankers were savagely flogged, tortured and even hanged for
misdemeanours that would bring a few days stopped shore leave today.
 
'Picton, who had been a professional soldier since the age of 15, first went to the West Indies
with Sir Ralph Abercromby's expedition against the Spanish colonies in 1794. He took part in 
the capture of the islands of St. Vincent and St. Lucia, and was promoted Lieutenant-
Colonel for his part in the latter operation. When Trinidad fell to the British in 1797 Abercromby
appointed Picton, who was then 39, Governor of the island, and ordered him to continue to
administer the Spanish law until he received instructions from the British government.
 
'But apparently the absolute nature of his power went to Picton's already autocratic head and
by October, 1801 - in which month he was gazetted Brigadier-General - there was a growing 
list of abuses of power of which he had been guilty, which in several instances had resulted in 
acts of shocking cruelty. Rumours of his rigorous and despotic rule spread to England and 
resulted in a demand by humanitarians that he be removed from office.
'The demands swelled into a public outcry and the British Government decided to send a 
commission of inquiry to Trinidad to investigate the allegations at first hand. The commission, 
led by Colonel William Fullarton [1754-1808, MP for Plympton Erle 1779-1780, Haddington 1787-
1790, Horsham 1793-1796 and Ayrshire 1796-1803], arrived at the island in January, 1803.
'Among the stories of brutality which were placed before the commission was that of Goliah, a
negro slave owned by a planter named Dawson who was arrested one Sunday on his way from 
church despite the fact that he was able to produce his "ticket of protection" or "leave pass."
As soon as he heard of the arrest Dawson called at the Governor's residence and asked that
the slave be freed. He even offered to pay the gaol fees, but Picton angrily refused to release
the negro and shouted at Dawson: "You give your slaves too much freedom, sir. I'll humble 
them!" Dawson returned to his plantation, and next day was shocked to discover Goliah lying
near the gates, soaked in blood and near to death, his back cut to pieces by a merciless
flogging. Before he died the slave was able to gasp: "Me go dead. The Governor kill me."
'On the military side of the record, the injustice meted out to Private Hugh Gallagher was
indefensible even in those days of inhuman military administration. Gallagher was confined to
the guard-room at the barracks for some alleged offence by order of the Governor. He was
given no trial, but despite that and the fact that he stoutly protested his innocence Picton
Picton ordered him to be hanged. The unhappy soldier was taken to the gallows and while
preparations for the execution were under way Picton arrived and furiously harangued and
abused the condemned man. When he paused for breath the object of his venom cried out 
that he swore before God that he was innocent. The assertion seemed to make Picton
momentarily insane. "By God," he screamed, ''you are going to hell with a lie in your mouth!"
And before Gallagher could make another protestation of his innocence the Governor signalled
to the execution squad and the doomed man was swung up to his death.
 
The presence of the Commission made Picton's position untenable, so he resigned and took
ship to England, only to be arrested on his arrival in December 1803. Legal complications - and
doubtless, the Government's reluctance to prosecute such a distinguished soldier - caused
the proceedings to drag on for more than two years before Picton was brought to trial.
 
'When the trial at last began on February 24, 1806, before Lord Ellenborough, the only charge
brought against Picton was one relating to the application of torture to a Creole girl, Liusa
Calderon, in December, 1801. Evidence was given that the Creole girl, though less than 15
years old, was at that time living with a man named Pedro Rouis and at the same time having
an affair with one Carlos Gonzales. It was established that Gonzales had broken into Rouis'
house and stolen 2000 dollars from a trunk. He was arrested, and both Luisa and her mother
were also taken into custody and charged, in effect, with having been accessories to the 
crime.
 
'Interrogated by the alcalde, or Spanish magistrate, the girl had denied that she had assisted
Gonzales in the commission of the theft, and the alcalde, one Hilariot Begorrat, had then
written to Picton asking the Governor's permission to inflict "a slight torture" on Luisa with the
object of making her confess. Begorrat's evidence in this respect seems to indicate that 
torture was not unknown during the Spanish regime in Trinidad, but other witnesses swore
that it had not been employed since 1786. 
'In reply to the alcalde's request Picton had written and signed a note which read: "Inflict the
torture on Luisa Calderon." Before the torture was applied Luisa had been warned, and to 
frighten her, three negresses who had been tortured for "witch-craft" were brought into the
cell. Still she had protested her innocence, and the torture known as "picketing" was applied
to her. Her left wrist was tied by a long rope, passed through a pulley fastened to the ceiling;
her right wrist and left foot were lashed together behind her back, and she was then 
suspended in such a way that her right foot, with practically the whole weight of her body 
above it, came down upon a sharp stick in the floor of the cell. 
 
'Luisa herself, a graceful figure clad in a white muslin gown and white turban, was called as a
witness at the trial, having been brought to England by Colonel Fullarton. She said that she
had endured the agony of the torture for 45 minutes on the first occasion. At the end of that
period it had proved too much for her, and she had screamed out that she was guilty. On
being released she had fainted, but on recovering consciousness she had retracted her 
"confession" and had been strung up again, for 20 minutes, 
 
'She had been held in prison for eight months, and during the whole period, she said, her wrists
had been bound and her ankles fettered in an instrument called the "grillo" - a long piece of 
fastened to the wall of the cell at one end with two holes at the other through which her feet
were thrust. She had not been permitted to see either a doctor or a lawyer.
 
'In his address to the jury, Mr. [later Sir William] Garrow [1760-1840], counsel for the Crown, 
subjected Picton to a verbal flaying. The ex-Governor, he said, had "abused his situation and
discredited the country to which he belongs by inflicting what in England few people have ever
heard of, and have only read of with detestation and horror - the torture of one of His 
Majesty's subjects without the least pretence of law, the least justification."
'Counsel for the defence, a Mr. Dallas [Sir Robert Dallas 1756-1824], argued, principally, that 
the Spanish law provided for the employment of torture, and that Picton had been bound to
administer that law; that therefore there had been no malice towards Luisa Calderon in his 
order to the magistrate; that if it were shown that torture was unlawful in Trinidad, then 
Picton had been guilty merely of having made a mistake. But the jury found that there was no
such law in Trinidad, and returned a verdict of guilty. 
'Mr. Dallas immediately moved for a new trial, and Picton was released on the enormous bail of
£40,000. Another two years passed before the retrial was heard, again before Lord 
Ellenborough. It resulted in a "special verdict" which amounted to an acquittal, and it is
reasonable to assume that there  was a collective sigh of relief both at Whitehall and at
the War Office at the result. 
'So, while technically the principle of equal justice for all had been upheld, in fact the Creole
girl obtained no satisfaction for the physical and mental anguish she had suffered, and the
reputation and military value of the general - very important at that time, with England at 
grips with the great Napoleon - suffered no impairment.
'In July, 1809, Picton returned to active soldiering when he was appointed to command a 
brigade in the attack on the French and their allies at Walcheren, a large island off the coast
of Holland. In the following year he was given command of the famous 3rd Division, which he 
led ably and bravely during the Peninsula War in Spain and Portugal under Sir Arthur Wellesley
(later the Duke of Wellington). He was wounded and returned to England, but recovered and
resumed command of the 3rd Division in time to lead it at the battle of Vittoria in the Pyrenees
campaign [21 June 1813], and at Orthez [27 February 1814] and Toulouse [10-12 April 1814].
 
'In 1813 he was elected to Parliament, received, for the seventh time, the thanks of the House
of Commons for his military services to the country and was knighted with the Grand Cross of
the Order of the Bath.
'The ruthless and despotic ex-governor of Trinidad died a hero's death, shot through the head
while leading a charge at the battle of Waterloo on June 18, 1815. It was doubly a hero's 
death because he had been severely wounded at Quatre Bas two days previously but had 
concealed his wound. And so, perhaps, Picton worked out his own redemption for the cruelty
of which he had been guilty in the island of Trinidad.'
 
Edward Vernon, MP for Penryn 1722-1734, Portsmouth 1741 and Ipswich 1741-1757
The following sketch of the life of Edward Vernon appeared in the November 1964 issue of
the Australian monthly magazine "Parade":-
'Captain Jenkins, formerly master of the sloop Rebecca, appeared before a committee of the
House of Commons in 1738 with a trophy which he had carried for seven years in a wooden
box. It was his right ear, sliced off by Spanish privateers who had captured his ship in 1731.
The ear was magnificent propaganda for His Majesty's Opposition, which was anxious to
declare war on Spain. It served its purpose. The ensuing conflict, known to historians as the
"War of Jenkins' Ear." added a new expression to the language and conferred unexpected
greatness on a sailor, Edward Vernon, whose hopes of fame had faded. But for the cutlass
stroke which removed Captain Jenkins' ear, Edward Vernon would have remained a forgotten
man, and the word 'grog' would never have been heard of.
'When Jenkins displayed his ear to the House of Commons, Captain Edward Vernon RN MP was
54 years old and had been off the navy's active list for a decade. An odd mixture of kindness
and bluster, brag and sound common sense, the veteran seadog had become a critic of Prime
Minister Robert Walpole and a vigorous advocate of naval reform. In 1738, when Spanish
attacks on British merchant shipping in the West Indies became a burning topic, Vernon's
oratory reached new heights. Because he had spent much of his career on the Spanish Main,
he was listened to as an authority. He told the House that the first step towards reducing 
Spanish depredations was to destroy bases like Porto Bello, on the Isthmus of Panama. A 
government supporter interjected that he was talking nonsense, as everybody knew that 
Port Bello was impregnable, and could be taken only after a long land and sea siege. [This
makes it appear that Vernon was a member of the House of Commons at that time, but he
most certainly was not].
 
'The captain offered to capture Porto Bello himself with half a dozen ships. Forthwith he was 
promoted to vice­admiral and commander-in-chief of a squadron which was to leave at once
for the West Indies. Whether this was Walpole's way of calling the veteran's bluff was not
known. If so, it failed.  Admiral Vernon did exactly what he had set out to do. He destroyed
Porto Bello with six ships.
 
'Born in London in 1684, Edward Vernon entered the navy at 16. He had attended Westminster
school, specialised in classics and history and developed a very pugnacious style of self-
expression. Promotion came rapidly. He was a lieutenant at 18, a captain at 21. His first
command was nearly his last, for he was in the fleet commanded by Sir Clowdesley Shovell
which was caught in the terrific blizzard of 1707 and wrecked on the Scilly Isles. Shovell's
flagship and three others went down with all hands, and several more were badly damaged. 
But the 23-year-old Vernon brought his ship safely home. He saw service in the Mediterranean,
but most of his experience was gained in the West Indies. As a result of his superior educat-
ional background, he acquired a more extensive knowledge of the military, naval and political
history and geographical layout of the Caribbean Sea than any other officer in the service.
 
'Then came an interval of comparative peace. Bored with inaction and seeing no chance of
further promotion, Vernon went on half-pay and did his fighting in the House of Commons.
Although he had not been to sea for 10 years when Walpole appointed him admiral, he moved
fast. Receiving his instructions on July 19, he sailed from Portsmouth four days later in his flag-
ship, the 70-gun Burford, which led eight other ships. But Vernon was disgusted with his 
crews, which consisted largely of pressed men. Few had ever sailed in a ship of war. Many,
indeed, had never been to sea.
 
'As soon as the fleet left Portsmouth, training began for the attack on Porto Bello. Seasick 
men who had never handled guns were taught the complicated drill required to load, lay and 
fire the ponderous muzzle-loading smoothbores. When they were ready to drop with weariness, 
they were persuaded not to by the liberal use of the boatswain's cane. On the other hand 
Vernon's officers delighted him. To show his approval, he issued orders that when the fleet
went into action captains were to use their own initiative if necessity arose. This was a radical 
innovation. Hitherto officers had been bound by orders issued before battle and were liable to 
court martial if they deviated from them.
'Despite his demands on them, the men of Vernon's squadron liked their commander-in-chief. 
He might have been brusque and dogmatic but he was competent, and, like most popular 
officers, was soon given a nickname. From his wardrobe of earlier days he had salvaged an 
ancient boat-cloak made of grogram, a coarse material woven from a mixture of mohair and 
silk, then water-proofed with gum. When the weather looked bad, he appeared wrapped in this 
garment, sometimes adding breeches made from the same fabric. As a result, the seamen 
dubbed him Old Grog, the nickname under which he eventually took his place in history.
'The word "grog" was to acquire a much wider significance. In Vernon's day, rum was regarded
as the white man's only hope of survival in the West Indies, where disease was rampant. The
men of Vernon's fleet were issued with a daily half-pint, measured by the generous standards
of the 18th century. The effect of half a gallon of raw spirit a week on the young Englishmen
was disastrous. Vernon ordered the rum issue in his squadron to be watered down four to one.
The men soon became accustomed to the mixture, which they called "grog" after its originator. 
'Having unconsciously added another word to the English language, the admiral proceeded with
his plan to capture Porto Bello. The first part of it was to leave three of his nine ships at
Jamaica in case of a surprise counter-attack on that island. The belief in Porto Bello's
impregnability had grown mainly because the narrow entrance to the harbour was defended by
a huge fort called the Iron Castle. Two mother forts at the head of the bay protected the 
town. Vernon believed that the element of surprise was in his favour, and that the Spanish
garrison, enervated by long service in a malaria-ridden death-trap, would not resist strongly.
'Old Grog's judgment was sound. Most of the guns in the formidable Iron Castle had fallen off
their rotting carriages and the morale of the garrison was in similar shape. The governor of
Porto Bello, Don Francisco Javier Martinez de la Vega y Retes, was described by one of his
own officers as being "of cowardly disposition, outward physical signs being the only evidence
that he was a man at all."
'Although Vernon did not know the circumstances were so much in his favour, he soon realised
that all was not well in Porto Bello. Anchoring his three biggest ships within pistol shot of the
Iron Castle, he pounded it with 500 cannon balls each hour. When the roof fell in, most of the
 Spaniards fled, although one battery held out gamely and refused to surrender until all hope
was lost. The commander handed his sword to Vernon, who, with typical generosity, passed it 
over to his second-in-command, Commodore [Charles] Brown, commander of the ship that had
done the most damage. By now the two town forts had wasted all their powder firing fruitlessly
at the fleet, and the crews of the Spanish privateers in port were ransacking the place. As a
result, the governor surrendered before his own countrymen burned the town. After blowing
up the forts, thus ruining Port Bello as a base, Vernon returned to Jamaica.
 
'When news reached England that he had done as he promised, he became a public hero.
Bonfires blazed, cities were illuminated and hundreds of inns changed their signs overnight,
becoming the "Admiral Vernon" instead of the popular "Green Man" or "Red Lion." Old Grog
himself was not particularly elated. He had merely proved that he was right. 
 
'After he had demolished another privateer base at Chagre [also in Panama], the government
decided to  follow up his victories with an all-out amphibious war against the Spanish 
possessions in the Caribbean. For this purpose, Vernon's fleet was heavily reinforced, and an
army sent under [the 8th] Lord Cathcart to take Cuba, Cartagena and possibly Panama. But 
Vernon had seen too many abortive military operations in the West Indies to believe that this 
scheme of territorial expansion could succeed. He denounced the plan in vain.
'Any chance the British had was lost when Lord Cathcart died of dysentery [in December 1740]
and the incompetent General [Thomas] Wentworth assumed command. While Wentworth 
delayed and changed his plans from day to day his soldiers died like flies. Meanwhile, Vernon
believed that if the campaign was accelerated the invasion might succeed. Many backed him. 
On the other hand, the admiral's suggestions were not stated diplomatically. If Wentworth was
the dullest general in the army, Old Grog was by long odds the rudest man in the navy. The 
runner-up was his second-in-command, Admiral [Sir Chaloner] Ogle.
 
'Finally Vernon and Wentworth were recalled. But if the government thought to make a 
scapegoat of Old Grog it was mistaken. To the public he was still the hero of Porto Bello. Back 
in the House of Commons, he attacked the government strongly and, when he was not 
promoted to the rank of full admiral, accused the administration of telling the King he was 
dead. He spent much of his time and energy trying to obtain better conditions for the men of 
the navy. In speeches and pamphlets he demanded more humane treatment, higher pay, 
pensions and the abolition of the press gang.
'Temporarily shelved, the irascible old sailor staged a brilliant comeback during the war against
France in 1744. With invasion threatened, the people demanded [Vernon's] reinstatement.
Promoted to admiral at last, he took command of the naval forces in the Channel. He certainly
harried the French, but he harried the Admiralty even more as he demanded more suitable 
ships, better trained crews, and more efficient organisation. In the end the French invasion
plans fell through, owing, naval experts agree, to Old Grog, whose untiring enthusiasm and
and unorthodox tactics checked them at every move.
 
'By the time the war was over, Admiral Vernon had insulted the cabinet so often that they had
had enough of him. He was struck off the list of flag officers. Walpole patronisingly referred
to him as a simpleton, but the common people loved the kindly, if truculent, old sea-dog who
stood up for his men. through thick and thin. Dying in 1757, at the age of 73, he was buried
at Nacton, Suffolk, "without any unnecessary pomp or vain pageantry" as he had instructed
in his will. Six years afterwards a marble monument was raised to his memory in Westminster
Abbey.
 
'Vernon's victory at Porto Bello is commemorated in the town of Porto Bello in Scotland, and in
famous Portobello Road, Notting Hill, London. But his most notable memorial stands on the
banks of the Potomac River, Virginia. Here, in 1743, Captain Lawrence Washington, who had
served in the ill-fated army in the West Indies. built a mansion which he called Mount Vernon
after the admiral he admired. It became the home and burial place of George Washington.'
 
William John Wentworth-Fitzwilliam, MP for Peterborough 1878-1889
Wentworth-Fitzwilliam, the fifth son of the 6th Earl Fitzwilliam, died as a result of a
riding accident. The "Leeds Mercury" of 11 September 1889 reported:-
'On Monday evening [9 September 1889] the Hon. W.J. Wentworth-Fitzwilliam met with a
serious accident whilst riding in Wentworth Park, the seat of Earl Fitzwilliam, K.G. Mr.
Fitzwilliam had been to the village of Hoober, about a mile from the house, where he had 
a farm. He remained there until close upon seven o'clock, and upon his return he travelled
by what is known as Sheepcoat Hill. The Park constable and two workmen on the estate
report that soon after seven o'clock they saw a horseman ride at a gentle trot in front
of Wentworth Woodhouse, and directly afterwards they heard a noise from that direction.
The men hurried to the spot and found the hon. gentleman in an insensible condition.
He was stretched out on the ground with his face downwards. A messenger was despatched
to the house, and Mrs. Cape, the housekeeper, and Mr. Romaine, the house steward,
together with a number of other servants, were speedily in attendance. Mr. Fitzwilliam was
carried directly to his bedroom, and Dr. Clarke, of Wentworth, was called in. He ascertained
that the unfortunate gentleman was still unconscious, and suffering from concussion of the
brain. A bruise was noticeable above the left eye. Dr. Favell, of Sheffield, was summoned by
telegraph, and arrived about 11.50 the same night. Yesterday, Dr. Jonathan Hutchinson, of
London, and [the delightfully named] Mr. Pridgin Teale, of Leeds, saw Mr. Fitzwilliam, and
no signs then appeared of returning consciousness, and it is feared there is very little hope
for his recovery.'
And so it proved, as Wentworth-Fitzwilliam died early in the morning of 11 September, the
immediate cause of death being a fractured skull.
George Hammond Whalley, MP for Peterborough 1880-1883
George Hampden Whalley was the son of George Hammond Whalley, MP for Peterborough 
1852-1853 and 1859-1878. After a career in the Army, during which he saw action during
the Zulu War in 1879, he too was elected to represent Peterborough in 1880, and sat until
he resigned in 1883.
Shortly after he left the House he was made bankrupt, but was soon in deeper trouble. The
following report appeared in the "Birmingham Daily Post" of 27 October 1884:-
'At the Central Criminal Court on Saturday - before the Recorder - George Hampden Whalley
(33), late M.P. for Peterborough, and Thomas Herbert (19) were indicted for stealing a 
brooch and other articles, valued at £200, the goods of Mrs. Mary Gamble.
'In opening the case for the prosecution, Mr. Poland said the prosecutrix was a lady residing
in the Colherne Road, Kensington, who, desiring to let her house furnished, came into
communication with the prisoner Whalley. Enquiries were made by her agent, and the 
prisoner Whalley was accepted as tenant. He should have paid the rent in advance, but
instead of doing so gave a bill at sight for £45, drawn on someone in Coleman Street. The
transaction was commenced with fraud, because the bill turned out to be worthless paper.
When possession was obtained he, his wife, the prisoner Herbert, a young man who had
been brought up to the sea, and a man named Frazer, who had been brought up as a 
gentleman, lived in the house. The agreement having been broken legal proceedings were
taken to recover possession. This was obtained in August last, and it was then discovered
that a room in which the prosecutrix had locked up a quantity of valuable property had been
broken open and the whole of the property removed. The drawers and boxes, which had
been sealed as well as locked, had been forced, and the contents removed. The two 
prisoners both absconded to Boulogne, and when Herbert, happening to return, was 
arrested, he said he had pledged the property for Whalley, who told him that it would be all 
right Whalley, he said, had also informed him that he hoped to redeem the property. Frazer
was also concerned in the robbery. When the cellars of the house came to be examined it
was found that the whole of the wine had been stolen. Whalley, when arrested, asked the
officer what imprisonment he thought he should get if the case went against him.
'Evidence was then given to prove the contents of the house, and it was also stated that
at the request of Whalley, Messrs. Bear and Co. acted as his agents in the matter.
'Henry Briant, clerk to Messrs. Bear and Co., said that when possession was recovered the
room, which had been left locked up, was found open, and in great disorder - Cross-
examined: Whalley, he believed, was elected M.P. for Peterborough in 1880.
'Mrs. Gamble deposed to letting the house to the prisoner Whalley, and she described the
property she left in the room which was locked up. In August last, from what she heard, she
went to the house and found that the room had been forced open, the seals on the drawers
broken, and a quantity of valuable property, including the wine from the cellars missing. She
had since seen some of her property in the hands of the pawnbrokers.
'A locksmith stated that in July he repaired the lock of the door of the room in question at
the request of Herbert. He saw Whalley there. Anyone could see that the lock had been 
forced open.
'Emily Cole, domestic servant to the Whalleys, said that when she entered the service the
room door was open. She had seen the prisoner and Mrs. Whalley in the room, and heard
them moving things about. Whalley broke open the seals of the wine bin, and took some of
the wine out. On the 28th August the prisoner Herbert left, and between one and two 
o'clock in the morning Whalley and his wife, Captain Nicholson, and a lady left. She did not
know they were going until about eleven o'clock. Whalley said he should be back on the 
Monday, but he never returned. They did not pay her any wages, but Captain Nicholson
had given her 10s - Cross-examined: When Whalley was taking the wine his wife told him
not to take it.
'Mr. Grain, in defence of Whalley, denied that there was any proof in the first instance
contemplating acting fraudulently. His client bore an honourable name, and had 
occupied the position of member of Parliament for the borough of Peterborough, and at the
time he took possession of the house there could be no doubt that he intended to have
carried out the engagement he had entered into. Mr. Whalley regretted very much indeed
that the prosecutrix had been put to so much inconvenience. As to the bill for £45, there
was no evidence to show that he did not believe that it was a valuable instrument. There
was no doubt the property had been pawned, but from first to last it did not appear that
he had pawned it. The whole of the case upon this point rested upon the statement of
Herbert, which ought to have no weight against his client. 
'The jury found the prisoners guilty, and Herbert was recommended to mercy by the
prosecutrix.
'Mr. Grain said that Whalley was the son of a late M.P., also for Peterborough, but owing
to an accident he was unable to pass his examinations in the navy. He then joined the
Militia and served in the Zulu War with Lonsdale's Horse. Coming into a sum of money by his
father's death, he had given way to intemperance, and fell into the hands of the man 
Frazer, who had been convicted of fraud.
'The Recorder said it was with great pain that he was now called upon to pass sentence 
upon the son of a gentleman whom he had known so well in the House of Commons. He
sentenced Whalley to nine months' hard labour, and Herbert to three months.'
According to one source, Whalley later changed his surname to White and emigrated to
Australia, where all trace of him was lost.
Copyright @ 2003-2013 Leigh Rayment