THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
CONSTITUENCIES BEGINNING WITH "S"
 
               Last updated 09/09/2012
Date   Name Born Died  Age
Dates in italics in the first column denote that the election held on that
date was a by-election. Dates shown in normal type were general elections,
or, in some instances, the date of a successful petition against a 
previous election result.
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the MP was baptised on
that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate that the MP was
buried on that date
  SAFFRON WALDEN (ESSEX)
 5 Dec 1885 Herbert Coulston Gardner,later [1895] 1st
Baron Burghclere  9 Jun 1846  6 May 1921 74
16 Jul 1895 Charles Gold  [kt 1906]        1837  2 Nov 1924 87
13 Oct 1900 Armine Wodehouse 24 Sep 1860  1 May 1901 40
31 May 1901 Joseph Albert Pease,later [1917] 1st Baron
Gainford 17 Jan 1860 15 Feb 1943 83
20 Jan 1910 Douglas James Proby 23 Sep 1856 18 Nov 1931 75
   Dec 1910 Arthur Cecil Tyrrell Beck  [kt 1920]  3 Dec 1876 22 Mar 1932 55
15 Nov 1922 William Foot Mitchell  [kt 1929] 26 Jun 1859 31 Jul 1947 88
30 May 1929 Richard Austin Butler,later [1965] Baron
Butler of Saffron Walden [L]  9 Dec 1902 8 Mar 1982 79
23 Mar 1965 Sir Peter Michael Kirk 18 May 1928 17 Apr 1977 48
 7 Jul 1977 Alan Gordon Barraclough Haselhurst  [kt 1995] 23 Jun 1937
  ST.ALBANS (HERTFORDSHIRE)
Apr 1660 William Foxwist     c 1610        1673
Richard Jennings  (to 1668)     c 1616  8 May 1668
27 Mar 1661 Thomas Arris  (to Feb 1679)     c 1622     c 1684
15 May 1668 Samuel Grimston,later [1685] 3rd baronet  7 Jan 1644 17 Oct 1700 56
 7 Feb 1679 Sir Thomas Pope Blount,1st baronet  (to 1685) 12 Sep 1649 30 Jun 1697 47
John Gape  5 Dec 1623 20 Apr 1703 79
13 Aug 1679 Samuel Grimston,later [1685] 3rd baronet  7 Jan 1644 17 Oct 1700 56
31 Mar 1685 George Churchill  (to 1708) 20 Feb 1654  8 May 1710 56
Thomas Docwra  7 Oct 1624 by 1706
 9 Jan 1689 Sir Samuel Grimston,3rd baronet  7 Jan 1644 17 Oct 1700 56
15 Jan 1701 Joshua Lomax  [his election was declared c 1652 11 Dec 1724
void 10 Mar 1701]
19 Mar 1701 John Gape  [he was unseated on petition in 26 Aug 1652 7 May 1734 81
favour of Henry Killigrew 24 Nov 1705]
24 Nov 1705 Henry Killigrew c 1652 9 Nov 1712
4 May 1708 John Gape  (to 1713) 26 Aug 1652 7 May 1734 81
Joshua Lomax c 1652 11 Dec 1724
3 Oct 1710 William Grimston,later [1719] 1st Viscount 
Grimston [I]  (to 1722) 31 Dec 1684 15 Oct 1756 71
26 Aug 1713 William Hale  [he was unseated on petition in     c 1686  2 Oct 1717
favour of John Gape 27 Apr 1714]
27 Apr 1714 John Gape 26 Aug 1652 7 May 1734 81
26 Jan 1715 William Hale     c 1686  2 Oct 1717
 3 Dec 1717 Joshua Lomax     c 1652 11 Dec 1724
21 Mar 1722 William Gore     c 1675 22 Oct 1739
William Clayton,later [1735] 1st Baron Sundon [I]  9 Nov 1671 29 Apr 1752 80
16 Aug 1727 William Grimston,1st Viscount Grimston [I]
(to 1734) 31 Dec 1684 15 Oct 1756 71
Caleb Lomax     c 1695  7 Mar 1730
23 Mar 1730 Thomas Gape 17 Aug 1685 11 Dec 1732 47
23 Jan 1733 John Merrill 19 Dec 1734
26 Apr 1734 Sir Thomas Aston,4th baronet     c 1704 17 Feb 1744
Thomas Ashby  (to 1743)     c 1694 29 Jan 1743
 5 May 1741 James West  (to 1768)  2 May 1703  2 Jul 1772 69
11 Feb 1743 Hans Stanley 23 Sep 1721 12 Jan 1780 58
26 Jun 1747 Sir Peter Thompson 30 Oct 1698 31 Oct 1770 72
13 Apr 1754 James Grimston,later [1756] 2nd 
Viscount Grimston [I]  9 Oct 1711 15 Dec 1773 62
28 Mar 1761 George Simon Harcourt,styled Viscount
Nuneham,later [1777] 2nd Earl Harcourt  1 Aug 1736 20 Apr 1809 72
16 Mar 1768 Richard Sutton,later [1772] 1st baronet 31 Jul 1733 10 Jan 1802 68
John Radcliffe  (to 1783)        1738 21 Dec 1783 45
 8 Sep 1780 William Charles Sloper  (to 1790)  after 1728     c 1813
29 Dec 1783 James Bucknall Grimston,3rd Viscount
Grimston [I]  9 May 1747 30 Dec 1808 61
 2 Apr 1784 William Grimston 23 Jun 1750 25 Apr 1814 63
16 Jun 1790 Richard Bingham,styled Lord Bingham from 
1795,later [1799] 2nd Earl of Lucan  (to 1800)  4 Dec 1764  1 Jul 1839 74
John Calvert     c 1758  2 Jun 1844
27 May 1796 Thomas Skip Dyot Bucknall  (to 1802)     c 1734 11 Jan 1804
23 Jun 1800 William Stephen Poyntz  (to 1807) 20 Jan 1770  8 Apr 1840 70
 6 Jul 1802 James Walter Grimston,later [1808] 10th
Lord Forrester and [1815] 1st Earl of Verulam  26 Sep 1775 17 Nov 1845 70
(to 1809)
 6 May 1807 Joseph Thompson Halsey  (to Feb 1818) 27 Jun 1774 10 Feb 1818 43
25 Jan 1809 Daniel Giles        1761 27 Dec 1831 70
 6 Oct 1812 Christopher Smith  (to Jun 1818) c 1749 20 Jan 1835
26 Feb 1818 William Tierney Robarts  (to 1821)     c 1786  9 Dec 1820
18 Jun 1818 Lord Charles Spencer-Churchill  3 Dec 1794 28 Apr 1840 45
8 Mar 1820 Christopher Smith  (to 1830) c 1749 20 Jan 1835
9 Jan 1821 Sir Henry Wright-Wilson c 1760 3 Dec 1832
12 Jun 1826 John Easthope,later [1841] 1st baronet 29 Oct 1784 11 Dec 1865 81
3 Aug 1830 James Walter Grimston,styled Viscount
Grimston,later [1845] 2nd Earl of Verulam 22 Feb 1809 27 Jul 1895 86
Charles Tennant 1 Jul 1796 10 Mar 1873 76
29 Apr 1831 Sir Francis Vincent,10th baronet  (to 1835)  3 Mar 1803  6 Jul 1880 77
Richard Godson 19 Jun 1797 c Aug 1849 52
12 Dec 1832 Henry George Ward  (to 1837) 27 Dec 1797  2 Aug 1860 62
 7 Jan 1835 Edward Harbottle Grimston  (to Feb 1841)  2 Apr 1812  4 May 1881 69
25 Jul 1837 George Alfred Muskett  (to Jun 1841)        1785 31 Jan 1843 57
 9 Feb 1841 William Hare,2nd Earl of Listowel [I]  (to 1846) 22 Sep 1801  4 Feb 1856 54
29 Jun 1841 George William John Repton  (to 1852)        1818 30 Aug 1906 88
11 Aug 1846 Benjamin Bond Cabell 1791  9 Dec 1874 83
29 Jul 1847 Alexander Raphael c 1776 17 Nov 1850
24 Dec 1850 Jacob Bell   [following this election, the 5 Mar 1810 12 Jun 1859 49
seat was disenfranchised by an Act which
received Royal assent on 3 May 1852]
CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1852,
BUT REVIVED 1885
 3 Dec 1885 James Walter Grimston,styled Viscount
Grimston,later [1895] 3rd Earl of Verulam 11 May 1852 11 Nov 1924 72
   Jul 1892 Vicary Gibbs 12 May 1853 13 Jan 1932 78
16 Feb 1904 John Bamford Slack  [kt 1906] 11 Jul 1857 11 Feb 1909 51
17 Jan 1906 Edward Hildred Carlile [kt 1911],later [1917]
1st baronet 10 Jul 1852 26 Sep 1942 90
10 Dec 1919 Francis Edward Fremantle  [kt 1932] 29 May 1872 26 Aug 1943 71
 5 Oct 1943 John Grimston,later [1960] 6th Earl of Verulam 17 Jul 1912 15 Apr 1973 60
26 Jul 1945 Cyril Walter Dumpleton 25 Jun 1897  1 Oct 1966 69
23 Feb 1950 John Grimston,later [1960] 6th Earl of Verulam 17 Jul 1912 15 Apr 1973 60
 8 Oct 1959 Victor Henry Goodhew  [kt 1982] 30 Nov 1919 11 Oct 2006 86
 9 Jun 1983 Peter Bruce Lilley 23 Aug 1943
1 May 1997 Kerry Patrick Pollard 27 Apr 1944
5 May 2005 Anne Margaret Main 17 May 1957
  ST.ANDREWS
24 Dec 1832 Andrew Johnston        1798 24 Aug 1862 64
28 Jul 1837 Edward Ellice 19 Aug 1810  2 Aug 1880 69
8 Apr 1880 Stephen Williamson 28 Jun 1827 16 Jun 1903 75
 7 Dec 1885 Sir Robert Anstruther,5th baronet 28 Aug 1834 21 Jul 1886 51
Stephen Williamson 28 Jun 1827 16 Jun 1903 75
Double return,Anstruther and Williamson
receiving an equal number of votes. After
scrutiny,Anstruther had a majority of 2 and
was accordingly declared elected 18 Feb 1886
12 Jul 1886 Henry Torrens Anstruther 28 Nov 1860  5 Apr 1926 65
17 Sep 1903 Edward Charles Ellice 1 Jan 1858 21 Feb 1934 76
20 Jan 1906 William Anstruther-Gray  6 Sep 1859 17 Apr 1938 78
22 Jan 1910 James Duncan Millar  [kt 1932] 5 Aug 1871 10 Dec 1932 61
   Dec 1910 William Anstruther-Gray  6 Sep 1859 17 Apr 1938 78
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  ST.ANNES (BELFAST)
14 Dec 1918 Thomas Henry Burn 19 Jan 1875 1949 74
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  ST.AUGUSTINE'S (KENT)
 5 Dec 1885 Aretas Akers-Douglas,later [1911] 1st
Viscount Chilston 21 Oct 1851 15 Jan 1926 74
 7 Jul 1911 Ronald John Macneill,later [1927] 1st Baron 
Cushendun 30 Apr 1861 12 Oct 1934 73
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  ST.AUSTELL (CORNWALL)
 3 Dec 1885 William Copeland Borlase        1848 31 Mar 1899 50
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page
18 May 1887 William Alexander McArthur        1857  7 Jun 1923 65
 5 Feb 1908 Thomas Charles Reginald Agar-Robartes 22 May 1880 30 Sep 1915 35
24 Nov 1915 Sir Francis Layland-Barratt,1st baronet 26 Sep 1860 12 Sep 1933 72
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  ST.AUSTELL AND NEWQUAY (CORNWALL)
6 May 2010 Stephen David John Gilbert 1 Nov 1976
  ST.GEORGE'S (TOWER HAMLETS)
26 Nov 1885 Charles Thomson Ritchie,later [1905] 1st
Baron Ritchie of Dundee  19 Nov 1838  9 Jan 1906 67
   Jul 1892 John Williams Benn,later [1914] 1st baronet 13 Nov 1850 10 Apr 1922 71
17 Jul 1895 Harry Hananel Marks  9 Apr 1855 22 Dec 1916 61
 4 Oct 1900 Thomas Robert Dewar,later [1917] 1st baronet
and [1919] 1st Baron Dewar  6 Jan 1864 11 Apr 1930 65
17 Jan 1906 William Wedgwood Benn,later [1942] 1st
Viscount Stansgate 10 May 1877 17 Nov 1960 83
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  ST.GEORGES,HANOVER SQUARE
25 Nov 1885 Lord Algernon Malcolm Arthur Percy  2 Oct 1851 28 Dec 1933 82
 9 Feb 1887 George Joachim Goschen,later [1900]
1st Viscount Goschen 10 Aug 1831  7 Feb 1907 75
 2 Oct 1900 Heneage Legge  3 Jul 1845  1 Nov 1911 66
15 Jun 1906 Alfred Lyttelton 7 Feb 1857  4 Jul 1913 56
15 Jul 1913 Sir Alexander Henderson,1st baronet,later 
[1916] 1st Baron Faringdon 28 Sep 1850 17 Mar 1934 83
11 Jan 1916 Sir George Houston Reid 25 Feb 1845 12 Sep 1918 73
For information on this MP,see the note at
the foot of this page
 4 Oct 1918 Sir Newton James Moore 17 May 1870 28 Oct 1936 66
14 Dec 1918 Walter Hume Long,later [1921] 1st Viscount Long
of Wraxall 13 Jul 1854 26 Sep 1924 70
 7 Jun 1921 James Malcolm Monteith Erskine  [kt 1929] 18 Jul 1863  5 Nov 1944 81
30 May 1929 Sir Laming Worthington-Evans,
1st baronet 23 Aug 1868 14 Feb 1931 62
19 Mar 1931 Alfred Duff Cooper,later [1952] 1st Viscount
Norwich 22 Feb 1890  1 Jan 1954 63
26 Jul 1945 Arthur Jared Palmer Howard 30 May 1896 25 Apr 1971 74
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  ST.GERMANS (CORNWALL)
23 Apr 1660 John Eliot  (to 1679) 18 Oct 1612 25 Mar 1685 72
Richard Knightley c 1610 29 Jun 1661
11 Apr 1661 Edward Eliot 9 Jul 1618 c 1710
20 Feb 1679 Daniel Eliot  (to Jan 1701) c 1646 11 Oct 1702
Richard Eliot 22 Apr 1652 22 Dec 1685 33
29 Apr 1685 Sir Thomas Higgons c 1624 24 Nov 1691
14 Jan 1689 Sir Walter Moyle 9 Mar 1627 19 Sep 1701 74
24 Feb 1690 Henry Fleming c 1663 1713
9 Aug 1698 John Tanner 29 Jun 1699
4 Jan 1700 Henry Fleming  (to 1708) c 1663 1713
13 Jan 1701 John Speccot    [he was also returned for 19 Apr 1665 16 Jun 1705 40
Cornwall,for which he chose to sit]
2 Apr 1701 Daniel Eliot  c 1646 11 Oct 1702
1 Dec 1701 Richard Edgcumbe,later [1742] 1st Baron 
Edgcumbe of Mount Edgcumbe 23 Apr 1680 22 Nov 1758 78
28 Jul 1702 John Anstis 28 Sep 1669 4 Mar 1744 74
22 May 1705 Samuel Rolle  [he was also returned for 5 Nov 1646 5 Nov 1719 73
Callington,for which he chose to sit]
4 Dec 1705 Edward Eliot  (to 1715) c 1684 18 Sep 1722
13 May 1708 Francis Scobell 24 Aug 1664 20 Sep 1740 76
20 Oct 1710 John Knight  (to 1722)     c 1686  2 Oct 1733
28 Jan 1715 Waller Bacon  [he was also returned for     c 1669 11 Nov 1734
Norwich,for which he chose to sit]
 3 May 1715 Philip Dormer Stanhope,styled Baron Stanhope,
later [1726] 4th Earl of Chesterfield 22 Sep 1694 24 Mar 1773 78
10 Apr 1722 Charles Hamilton,styled Lord Binning      c 1697 27 Dec 1732
Philip Cavendish 14 Jul 1743
23 Aug 1727 Sir Gilbert Heathcote,later [1733] 1st    2 Jan 1652 25 Jan 1733 81
baronet  (to Mar 1733)
Sidney Godolphin 12 Jan 1652 22 Sep 1732 80
29 Jan 1733 Richard Eliot  (to 1734) 28 Oct 1694 19 Nov 1748 54
 1 Mar 1733 Dudley Ryder  [kt 1740]  4 Nov 1691 25 May 1756 64
 3 May 1734 Charles Calvert,5th Baron Baltimore [I] 29 Sep 1699 24 Apr 1751 51
Charles Montagu  after 1695 29 May 1759
13 May 1741 John Hynde Cotton,later [1752] 4th baronet     c 1717 23 Jan 1795
James Newsham  7 Oct 1715    Nov 1769 54
 2 Jul 1747 Richard Eliot 28 Oct 1694 19 Nov 1748 54
Thomas Potter  (to 1754)     c 1718 17 Jun 1759
12 Dec 1748 Edward Eliot (Craggs-Eliot from 1789),later
[1784] 1st Baron Eliot of St.Germans    8 Jul 1727 17 Feb 1804 76
(to Dec 1768)   [at the general election in
Mar 1768,he was also returned for Liskeard,
for which he chose to sit]
22 Apr 1754 Anthony Champion  5 Feb 1725 22 Feb 1801 76
 2 Apr 1761 Philip Stanhope    Mar 1732 16 Nov 1768 36
11 Jun 1765 William Hussey  1 Jan 1725 26 Jan 1813 88
23 Mar 1768 Samuel Salt   [he was also returned for     c 1723 27 Jul 1792
Liskeard,for which he chose to sit]
14 Dec 1768 George Jennings     c 1721  9 Jun 1790
Benjamin Langlois  (to 1780)  7 Jan 1727 20 Nov 1802 75
12 Oct 1774 Edward Eliot (Craggs-Eliot from 1789),later
[1784] 1st Baron Eliot of St.Germans    8 Jul 1727 17 Feb 1804 76
23 Nov 1775 John Pownall        1720 17 Jul 1795 75
31 May 1776 John Peachey 16 Mar 1749 27 Jun 1816 67
11 Sep 1780 Edward James Eliot 24 Aug 1758 20 Sep 1797 39
Dudley Long (North from 1789-1812 and then
Long-North thereafter) 14 Mar 1748 21 Feb 1829 80
 5 Apr 1784 John James Hamilton,later [1789] 9th Earl of
Abercorn and [1790] 1st Marquess of Abercorn    Jul 1756 27 Jan 1818 61
(to Feb 1790)
Abel Smith 14 Mar 1717 12 Jul 1788 71
 3 Sep 1788 Samuel Smith  (to 1790) 14 Apr 1754 12 Mar 1834 79
 1 Feb 1790 Sir Charles Hamilton,2nd baronet 25 Jun 1767 14 Sep 1849 82
22 Jun 1790 George William Campbell,styled Marquess of 
Lorne,later [1806] 6th Duke of Argyll  (to 1796) 22 Sep 1766 22 Oct 1839 73
Edward James Eliot  [he was also returned 24 Aug 1758 20 Sep 1797 39
for Liskeard,for which he chose to sit]
 7 Jan 1791 William Eliot,later [1823] 2nd Earl of  
St.Germans  (to 1802)  1 Apr 1767 19 Jan 1845 77
28 May 1796 George Harry Grey,styled Baron Grey,later 
[1819] 6th Earl of Stamford 31 Oct 1765 26 Apr 1845 79
 6 Jul 1802 Thomas Hamilton,styled Lord Binning,later
[1828] 9th Earl of Haddington  21 Jun 1780  1 Dec 1858 78
James Langham,later [1812] 10th baronet 21 Aug 1776 14 Apr 1833 56
 1 Nov 1806 Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke  6 Jun 1768  5 May 1831 62
For further information on the death of this
MP, see the note at the foot of the page
containing details of the MPs for Reigate
Matthew Montagu,later [1829] 4th Baron Rokeby
(to 1812) 23 Nov 1762  1 Sep 1831 68
27 Apr 1810 Charles Philip Yorke 12 Mar 1764 13 Mar 1834 70
 9 Oct 1812 William Henry Pringle  [kt 1815]     c 1771 23 Dec 1840
Henry Goulburn 19 Mar 1784 12 Jan 1856 71
17 Jun 1818 Seymour Thomas Bathurst 27 Oct 1793 10 Apr 1834 40
Charles Arbuthnot  (to 1827) 14 Mar 1767 18 Aug 1850 83
13 Jun 1826 Charles Ross  (to 1832) 6 Jul 1799 21 Mar 1860 60
7 Jun 1827 James Loch 7 May 1780 28 Jun 1855 75
31 Jul 1830 Sir Henry Hardinge,later [1846] 1st Viscount 
Hardinge 30 Mar 1785 24 Sep 1856 71
17 Dec 1830 Winthrop Mackworth-Praed 26 Jul 1802 15 Jul 1839 36
 CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1832 
  ST.HELENS
25 Nov 1885 Henry Seton-Karr  [kt 1902] 5 Feb 1853 29 May 1914 61
16 Jan 1906 Thomas Glover 25 Mar 1852  9 Jan 1913 60
   Dec 1910 Rigby Philip Watson Swift  [kt 1920]  7 Jun 1874 19 Oct 1937 63
14 Dec 1918 James Sexton  [kt 1931] 13 Apr 1856 27 Dec 1938 82
27 Oct 1931 Richard Austin Spencer  8 Aug 1892  8 Dec 1956 64
14 Nov 1935 William Albert Robinson        1877 31 Dec 1949 72
26 Jul 1945 Sir Hartley William Shawcross,later [1959]
Baron Shawcross [L]  4 Feb 1902 10 Jul 2003 101
12 Jun 1958 Leslie Spriggs 22 Apr 1910 22 May 1990 80
CONSTITUENCY SPLIT INTO NORTH
& SOUTH DIVISIONS 1983
ST.HELENS NORTH (MERSEYSIDE)
 9 Jun 1983 John Evans,later [1997] Baron Evans 
of Parkside [L] 19 Oct 1930
1 May 1997 David Leonard Watts 26 Aug 1951
ST.HELENS SOUTH (MERSEYSIDE)
 9 Jun 1983 Gerald Edward Bermingham 20 Aug 1940
7 Jun 2001 Shaun Anthony Woodward 26 Oct 1958
NAME ALTERED TO "ST.HELENS SOUTH
AND WHISTON" 2010
ST.HELENS SOUTH AND WHISTON (MERSEYSIDE)
6 May 2010 Shaun Anthony Woodward 26 Oct 1958
  ST.IVES (CORNWALL)
16 Apr 1660 John St.Aubyn c 1613 20 Aug 1684
Edward Nosworthy 18 Nov 1610 22 May 1686 75
James Praed        1687
Double return between Nosworthy and Praed.
Praed seated 5 May 1660,but subsequently
unseated on petition in favour of Nosworthy
16 Jul 1660
16 Jul 1660 Edward Nosworthy  18 Nov 1610 22 May 1686 75
27 Mar 1661 James Praed  (to 1679)        1687
Edward Nosworthy  18 Nov 1610 22 May 1686 75
John Basset     c 1624 c Dec 1661
Double return. Praed and Nosworthy seated
16 May 1661,but Nosworthy subsequently
unseated on petition in favour of Basset
18 Dec 1661
18 Dec 1661 John Basset     c 1624 c Dec 1661
10 Jan 1662 Daniel O'Neill     c 1612 24 Oct 1664
19 Jan 1665 Edward Nosworthy  (to 1681) 18 Nov 1610 22 May 1686 75
11 Feb 1679 Edward Nosworthy  (to 1685)  5 Dec 1637 31 Aug 1701 63
12 Feb 1681 James Praed     c 1656        1706
30 Apr 1685 Charles Davenant 17 Nov 1656  6 Nov 1714 57
James St.Amand     c 1643  4 Oct 1728
12 Jan 1689 James Praed  (to 1705)     c 1656        1706
Walter Vincent 25 May 1663 25 Apr 1692 28
10 Mar 1690 William Harris c 1652 17 Oct 1709
29 Oct 1695 John Michell c 1643 13 Mar 1718
2 Aug 1698 Sir Charles Wyndham 2 Apr 1638 22 Jul 1706 68
16 Jan 1701 Benjamin Overton c 1647 1711
4 Dec 1701 Sir John Hawles 18 Mar 1645 2 Aug 1716
27 Jul 1702 Richard Chaundler  [he was unseated on c 1650 by Sep 1729
petition in favour of John Pitt 8 Dec 1702]
8 Dec 1702 John Pitt c 1673 5 Aug 1731
21 May 1705 Sir Bartholomew Gracedieu by May 1715
John Borlase  (to 1710) 24 Mar 1667 Apr 1754 87
17 May 1708 John Praed  (to 1713) c 1657 10 Oct 1717
21 Oct 1710 John Hopkins  (to 1715) c 1663 25 Apr 1732
8 Sep 1713 Sir William Pendarves c 1689 13 Mar 1726
27 Jan 1715 Lord Harry Powlett,later [1754] 4th Duke 
of Bolton 24 Jul 1691  9 Oct 1759 68
Sir John Hobart,5th baronet,later [1746] 1st
Earl of Buckinghamshire  (to 1727) 11 Oct 1693 22 Sep 1756 62
12 Apr 1722 Henry Knollys  (to 1734)     c 1689  early 1747
25 Aug 1727 Sir Robert Rich,4th baronet  (to 1741)  3 Jul 1685  1 Feb 1768 82
 2 May 1734 William Mackworth-Praed  3 Nov 1694  early 1752 57
12 May 1741 John Bristow  (to 1754) 25 Apr 1701 14 Nov 1768 67
Gregory Beake 19 Jun 1749
 2 Jul 1747 John Hobart,Baron Hobart,later [1756] 2nd
Earl of Buckinghamshire  [he was also returned 17 Aug 1723  3 Sep 1793 70
for Norwich,for which he chose to sit]
11 Dec 1747 John Plumptre  9 Feb 1679 29 Sep 1751 72
 9 Dec 1751 Samuel Stephens        1728  1 Mar 1794 65
22 Apr 1754 George Hobart,later [1793] 3rd Earl of
Buckinghamshire Oct 1731 14 Oct 1804 73
James Whitshed     c 1716 20 Feb 1789
31 Mar 1761 Humphrey Mackworth-Praed     c 1718  6 Mar 1803
Charles Hotham,later [1771] 8th baronet 18 Jun 1729 25 Jan 1794 64
21 Mar 1768 Thomas Durrant     c 1733  6 Sep 1790
Adam Drummond  (to 1778) 31 Jan 1713 17 Jun 1786 73
10 Oct 1774 William Praed     [his election was declared 24 Jun 1747  9 Oct 1833 86
void 8 May 1775]
16 May 1775 Sir Thomas Wynn,3rd baronet,later 
[1776] 1st Baron Newborough [I]  (to 1780)        1736 12 Oct 1807 71
26 Dec 1778 Philip Dehany     c 1720 27 Oct 1809
11 Sep 1780 William Praed    (to 1806) 24 Jun 1747  9 Oct 1833 86
Abel Smith 14 Mar 1717 12 Jul 1788 71
 5 Apr 1784 Richard Barwell  8 Oct 1741  2 Sep 1804 62
19 Jun 1790 William Mills 10 Nov 1750 20 Mar 1820 69
28 May 1796 Richard Carr Glyn,later [1800] 1st baronet  2 Feb 1755 27 Apr 1838 83
 9 Jul 1802 Jonathan Raine 21 Jan 1763 14 May 1831 68
 3 Nov 1806 Samuel Stephens  (to 1812)     c 1768 25 Feb 1834
Francis Horner 12 Aug 1778  8 Feb 1817 38
12 May 1807 Sir Walter Stirling,1st baronet  (to 1820) 24 Jun 1758 25 Aug 1832 74
10 Oct 1812 William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley,
later [1845] 4th Earl of Mornington 22 May 1788  1 Jul 1857 69
19 Jun 1818 Samuel Stephens     c 1768 25 Feb 1834
10 Mar 1820 Lyndon Evelyn  (to 1826) c 1759 30 Apr 1839
James Robert George Graham,later [1824]
2nd baronet  1 Jun 1792 25 Oct 1861 69
26 May 1821 Sir Christopher Hawkins,1st baronet 29 May 1758 6 Apr 1829 70
(to 1828)
9 Jun 1826 James Halse  (to 1830) 28 Jan 1769 14 May 1838 69
29 Feb 1828 Charles Arbuthnot 14 Mar 1767 18 Aug 1850 83
4 Aug 1830 William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley,
later [1845] 4th Earl of Mornington 22 May 1788  1 Jul 1857 69
James Morrison 6 Sep 1789 30 Oct 1857 68
30 Apr 1831 James Halse  (to 1838) 28 Jan 1769 14 May 1838 69
Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer (Bulwer-
Lytton from 1844),later [1866] 1st Baron 
Lytton   25 May 1806 18 Jan 1873 66
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1832
24 May 1838 William Tyringham Praed        1780    Jun 1846 65
21 Jul 1846 Lord William John Frederick Powlett (Vane
from Mar 1864),later [Jan 1864] 3rd 
Duke of Cleveland  3 Apr 1792  6 Sep 1864 72
 9 Jul 1852 Robert Laffan  [kt 1877]        1821 22 Mar 1882 60
27 Mar 1857 Henry Paull        1824 1898 74
16 Nov 1868 Charles Magniac        1827 23 Nov 1891 64
 5 Feb 1874 Edward Gershour Davenport        1838  4 Dec 1874 36
30 Dec 1874 Charles Tyringham Praed   [His election was        1833 19 Oct 1895 62
declared void 18 Feb 1875. At the subsequent
by-election held on 8 Mar 1875, he was 
again returned]
7 Apr 1880 Sir Charles Reed        1819 25 Mar 1881 61
13 Apr 1881 Charles Campbell Ross        1849
 7 Dec 1885 Sir John St.Aubyn,2nd baronet,later [1887]
1st Baron St.Levan 23 Oct 1829 14 May 1908 78
 
 9 Jul 1887 Thomas Bedford Bolitho 5 Jan 1835 22 May 1915 80
 6 Oct 1900 Edward Hain  [kt 1910]        1851 20 Sep 1917 66
25 Jan 1906 Clifford John Cory,later [1907] 1st baronet 10 Apr 1859  3 Feb 1941 81
15 Nov 1922 John Anthony Hawke  [kt 1928]  7 Jun 1869 30 Oct 1941 72
6 Dec 1923 Sir Clifford John Cory,1st baronet 10 Apr 1859  3 Feb 1941 81
29 Oct 1924 John Anthony Hawke  [kt 1928]  7 Jun 1869 30 Oct 1941 72
 6 Mar 1928 Hilda Runciman 28 Sep 1869 28 Oct 1956 87
30 May 1929 Walter Runciman,later [1937] 1st Viscount
Runciman of Doxford 19 Nov 1870 14 Nov 1949 78
30 Jun 1937 Nevil Alexander Beechman  5 Aug 1896  6 Nov 1965 69
23 Feb 1950 Greville Reginald Charles Howard  7 Sep 1909 20 Sep 1987 78
31 Mar 1966 John William Frederic Nott  [kt 1983]  1 Feb 1932
 9 Jun 1983 David Anthony Harris 1 Nov 1937
1 May 1997 Andrew Henry George 2 Dec 1958
  ST.JAMES'S (DUBLIN)
14 Dec 1918 Joseph McGrath 1887 26 Mar 1966 78
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  ST.MARYLEBONE
14 Dec 1918 Sir Samuel Edward Scott 25 Oct 1873 21 Feb 1943 69
15 Nov 1922 Sir Douglas McGarel Hogg,later [1929] 1st
Viscount Hailsham 28 Feb 1872 16 Aug 1950 78
30 Apr 1928 Sir James Rennell Rodd,later [1933] 1st Baron
Rennell  9 Nov 1858 26 Jul 1941 82
28 Apr 1932 Alec Stratford Cunningham-Reid 20 Apr 1895 26 Mar 1977 81
26 Jul 1945 Sir William Wavell Wakefield,later [1963] 1st
Baron Wakefield of Kendal 10 Mar 1898 12 Aug 1983 85
 5 Dec 1963 Quintin McGarel Hogg,later [1970] Baron
Hailsham of St.Marylebone [L]  9 Oct 1907 12 Oct 2001 94
22 Oct 1970 Kenneth Wilfred Baker,later [1997] Baron 
Baker of Dorking [L]  3 Nov 1934
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  ST.MAWES (CORNWALL)
13 Apr 1660 Arthur Spry  (to Feb 1679) 4 Feb 1612 17 Sep 1685 73
Sir William Tredenham c 1638 12 May 1662
John Cloberry     c 1625 31 Jan 1688
Double return. Spry and Tredenham
seated 5 May 1660
27 Mar 1661 Arthur Spry  (to Feb 1679) 4 Feb 1612 17 Sep 1685 73
Sir William Tredenham c 1638 12 May 1662
Sir Richard Vyvyan,1st baronet c 1613 3 Oct 1665
Double return. Spry and Tredenham
seated 16 May 1661
17 Mar 1663 Sir Richard Vyvyan,1st baronet c 1613 3 Oct 1665
19 Dec 1665 Joseph Tredenham c 1641 25 Apr 1707
Sir Vyell Vyvyan,2nd baronet 20 May 1639 24 Feb 1697 57
Double return. Tredenham seated c Sep 1666
10 Feb 1679 Sidney Godolphin,later [1706] 1st Earl of 
Godolphin 15 Jun 1645 15 Sep 1712 67
Henry Seymour (Henry Seymour Portman from c 1637 23 Feb 1728
1690)  (to 1690)  [at the general election
in Mar 1690 he was also returned for Totnes,
for which he chose to sit]
10 Sep 1679 Sir Joseph Tredenham  [at the general c 1641 25 Apr 1707
election held on 27 Apr 1685,Tredenham was
also returned for Grampound,for which he
chose to sit]
22 Jun 1685 Sir Peter Prideaux,3rd baronet 13 Jul 1626 22 Nov 1705 79
14 Jan 1689 Sir Joseph Tredenham  (to 1695) c 1641 25 Apr 1707
9 Apr 1690 John Tredenham  (to 1705) 28 Mar 1668 25 Dec 1710 42
5 Nov 1695 Seymour Tredenham 14 Jan 1670 10 Sep 1696 26
21 Nov 1696 Henry Seymour Portman c 1637 23 Feb 1728
1 Aug 1698 Sir Joseph Tredenham   (to 1707) c 1641 25 Apr 1707
19 May 1705 Francis Godfrey  (to 1710) 15 Jun 1681 6 Oct 1712 31
21 Nov 1707 John Tredenham  (to 1711) 28 Mar 1668 25 Dec 1710 42
20 Oct 1710 Sir Richard Onslow,2nd baronet,later [1716]
1st Baron Onslow  (to 1713) 23 Jun 1654 5 Dec 1717 63
20 Jan 1711 John Anstis 28 Sep 1669 4 Mar 1744 74
8 Sep 1713 Edward Rolt c 1686 22 Dec 1722  
Francis Scobell 24 Aug 1664 20 Sep 1740 76
27 Jan 1715 William Lowndes  1 Nov 1652 20 Jan 1724 71
John Chetwynd,later [1736] 2nd Viscount
Chetwynd [I]     c 1680 21 Jun 1767
14 Apr 1722 Sidney Godolphin  (to 1727) 12 Jan 1652 22 Sep 1732 80
Samuel Travers     c 1655 17 Sep 1725
 1 Feb 1726 Samuel Molyneux 16 Jul 1689 13 Apr 1728 38
26 Aug 1727 Henry Vane,later [1754] 1st Earl of Darlington
(to 1741)     c 1705  6 Mar 1758
John Knight  [he was also returned for     c 1686  2 Oct 1733
Sudbury,for which he chose to sit]
 2 Mar 1728 William East     c 1695  7 Nov 1737
 2 May 1734 Richard Plumer     c 1689 25 Nov 1750
12 May 1741 Robert Nugent,later [1767] 1st Viscount
Clare [I] and [1776] 1st Earl Nugent [I]         1709 14 Oct 1788 79
(to Dec 1754)   [at the general election in
Apr 1754,he was also returned for Bristol,
for which he chose to sit]
James Douglas  2 Jun 1751
 2 Jul 1747 William Clayton,1st Baron Sundon [I]  9 Nov 1671 29 Apr 1752 80
13 Jan 1753 Sir Thomas Clavering,7th baronet 19 Jun 1719 14 Oct 1794 75
19 Apr 1754 Henry Seymour Conway  (to 1761) 12 Aug 1719  9 Jul 1795 75
10 Dec 1754 James Newsham  7 Oct 1715    Nov 1769 54
14 Apr 1761 Edmund Nugent  (to 1770)        1731 26 Apr 1771 39
Richard Hussey     c 1715 11 Sep 1770
23 Mar 1768 George Boscawen  (to 1774)  4 Sep 1745  after 1780
17 Jan 1770 Michael Byrne     c 1744  4 Nov 1772
 4 Dec 1772 James Edward Colleton     c 1709 30 Aug 1790
12 Oct 1774 Robert Nugent,Viscount Clare [I],later        1709 14 Oct 1788 79
[1776] 1st Earl Nugent [I]
Hugh Boscawen  (to 1790)  4 Sep 1795
19 Jun 1784 Sir William Young,2nd baronet  (to 1806)    Dec 1749 10 Jan 1815 65
19 Jun 1790 John Graves Simcoe 25 Feb 1752 26 Oct 1806 54
21 Feb 1792 Thomas Calvert 26 May 1755  after 1821
10 Nov 1795 William Drummond c 1770 29 Mar 1828
28 May 1796 George Nugent   [he was also returned for 10 Jun 1757 11 Mar 1849 91
Buckingham,for which he chose to sit]
28 Oct 1796 Jeremiah Crutchley 20 Dec 1745 28 Dec 1805 60
 7 Jul 1802 William Windham  3 May 1750  4 Jun 1810 60
 3 Nov 1806 Sir John Newport   [he was also returned for 24 Oct 1756  9 Feb 1843 86
Waterford,for which he chose to sit]
Scrope Bernard (Bernard-Morland from 1811),  1 Oct 1758 18 Apr 1830 71
later [1818] 4th baronet  (to 1808)
21 Jan 1807 William Shipley   [he was also returned for 25 Nov 1778 29 Nov 1820 42
Flint,for which he chose to sit]
22 Jul 1807 Hugh Fortescue,styled Viscount Ebrington,
later [1841] 2nd Earl Fortescue  (to Feb 1809) 13 Feb 1783 14 Sep 1861 78
22 Apr 1808 George Granville Leveson-Gower,styled Earl
Gower,later [1833] 2nd Duke of Sutherland  
(to 1812)  8 Aug 1786 28 Feb 1861 74
28 Feb 1809 Scrope Bernard (Bernard-Morland from 1811),
later [1818] 4th baronet  (to 1830)  1 Oct 1758 18 Apr 1830 71
14 Oct 1812 William Shipley  25 Nov 1778 29 Nov 1820 42
For information on the death of this MP,see
the note at the foot of the page containing
details of the members for Flint
17 Apr 1813 Francis Horner 12 Aug 1778 8 Feb 1817 38
12 Mar 1817 Joseph Phillimore 14 Sep 1775 24 Jan 1855 79
9 Jun 1826 Sir Codrington Edmund Carrington  22 Oct 1769 28 Nov 1849 80
(to 1831)
3 May 1830 George Grenville Wandisford Pigott  10 Mar 1796 4 Jan 1865 68
(to 1832)
3 May 1831 Sir Edward Burtenshaw Sugden,later [1852] 1st
Baron St.Leonards 12 Feb 1781 29 Jan 1875 93
 CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1832 
  ST.MICHAN'S (DUBLIN)
14 Dec 1918 Michael Staines        1885 26 Oct 1955 70
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  ST.MICHAEL'S (CORNWALL) - see MITCHELL
  ST.PANCRAS EAST
25 Nov 1885 Thomas Eccleston Gibb        1838  6 Jun 1894 55
 5 Jul 1886 Robert Grant Webster         1845 14 Jan 1925 79
12 Jul 1899 Thomas Wrightson,later [1900] 1st baronet 31 Mar 1839 18 Jun 1921 82
15 Jan 1906 Hugh Cecil Lea 27 May 1869 29 Jan 1926 56
17 Jan 1910 Joseph Martin 24 Sep 1852  2 Mar 1923 70
  CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  ST.PANCRAS NORTH
25 Nov 1885 Thomas Henry Bolton    Feb 1841 24 Sep 1916 75
 5 Jul 1886 Charles Wallace Alexander Napier Ross Cochrane-
Baillie,later [1890] 2nd Baron Lamington 31 Jul 1860 16 Sep 1940 80
 4 Mar 1890 Thomas Henry Bolton    Feb 1841 24 Sep 1916 75
16 Jul 1895 Edward Robert Pacy Moon        1858 11 Sep 1949 91
15 Jan 1906 Willoughby Hyett Dickinson,later [1930] 1st
Baron Dickinson  9 Apr 1859 31 May 1943 84
14 Dec 1918 John William Lorden  [kt 1925] 15 Jul 1862 21 Apr 1944 81
 6 Dec 1923 James Marley        1893 11 Apr 1954 60
29 Oct 1924 William Jocelyn Ian Fraser [kt 1934],later [1958]
Baron Fraser of Lonsdale [L] 30 Aug 1897 19 Dec 1974 77
30 May 1929 James Marley        1893 11 Apr 1954 60
27 Oct 1931 William Jocelyn Ian Fraser [kt 1934],later [1958]
Baron Fraser of Lonsdale [L] 30 Aug 1897 19 Dec 1974 77
 4 Feb 1937 Robert Grant Grant-Ferris [kt 1969],later [1974]
Baron Harvington [L] 30 Dec 1907 1 Jan 1997 89
26 Jul 1945 George House  7 Mar 1892  8 Feb 1949 56
10 Mar 1949 Kenneth Robinson 19 Mar 1911 16 Feb 1996 84
18 Jun 1970 Albert William Stallard,later [1983] Baron 
Stallard [L] 5 Nov 1921 29 Mar 2008 86
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  ST.PANCRAS SOUTH
25 Nov 1885 Sir Julian Goldsmid,3rd baronet  8 Oct 1838  7 Jan 1896 57
28 Jan 1896 Herbert Merton Jessel,later [1917] 1st baronet
and [1924] 1st Baron Jessel 27 Oct 1866  1 Nov 1950 84
15 Jan 1906 Philip Whitwell Wilson 21 May 1875  6 Jun 1956 81
17 Jan 1910 Herbert Merton Jessel,later [1917] 1st baronet
and [1924] 1st Baron Jessel 27 Oct 1866  1 Nov 1950 84
  CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  ST.PANCRAS SOUTH-EAST
14 Dec 1918 John Wells Wainwright Hopkins,later [1929]
1st baronet 16 Feb 1863 16 Feb 1946 83
 6 Dec 1923 Herbert George Romeril        1881  2 Oct 1963 82
29 Oct 1924 John Wells Wainwright Hopkins,later [1929]
1st baronet 16 Feb 1863 16 Feb 1946 83
30 May 1929 Herbert George Romeril        1881  2 Oct 1963 82
27 Oct 1931 Sir Alfred Lane Beit,2nd baronet 19 Jan 1903 12 May 1994 91
26 Jul 1945 Santo Wayburn Jeger 20 May 1898 24 Sep 1953 55
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  ST.PANCRAS SOUTH-WEST
14 Dec 1918 Richard Whieldon Barnett  [kt 1925]  6 Dec 1863 17 Oct 1930 66
30 May 1929 William Carter 12 Aug 1867 18 Aug 1940 73
27 Oct 1931 George Gibson Mitcheson  [kt 1936] 27 Jun 1883 18 Jun 1955 71
26 Jul 1945 Haydn Davies  8 May 1905 18 Apr 1976 70
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  ST.PANCRAS WEST
25 Nov 1885 Harry Lawson Webster Lawson,later [1916] 2nd
Baron Burnham and [1919] 1st Viscount Burnham 18 Dec 1862 20 Jul 1933 70
   Jul 1892 Harry Robert Graham 20 Feb 1850 11 Jan 1933 82
15 Jan 1906 William Job Collins  [kt 1914] 9 May 1859 12 Dec 1946 87
   Dec 1910 Felix Maximilian Schoenbrunn Cassel,later
[1920] 1st baronet                      16 Sep 1869 22 Feb 1953 83
16 Oct 1916 Richard Whieldon Barnett  [kt 1925]  6 Dec 1863 17 Oct 1930 66
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
  ST.PATRICK'S (DUBLIN)
 1 Dec 1885 William Martin Murphy 29 Dec 1844 26 Jun 1919 74
   Jul 1892 William Field Jun 1843 29 Apr 1935 91
14 Dec 1918 Constance Georgine Markievicz  4 Feb 1868 15 Jul 1927 59
For further information on this MP (the first
woman elected to the House of Commons,see
the note at the foot of this page
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  ST.ROLLOX (GLASGOW)
27 Nov 1885 John McCulloch        1842
 5 Jul 1886 James Caldwell        1839 25 Apr 1925 85
   Jul 1892 Sir James Morse Carmichael,3rd baronet 20 Jul 1844 31 May 1902 57
17 Jul 1895 Ferdinand Faithfull Begg 27 Dec 1847  4 Dec 1926 78
 4 Oct 1900 John Wilson 1837  5 Jan 1928 90
18 Jan 1906 Thomas McKinnon Wood 26 Jan 1855 26 Mar 1927 72
14 Dec 1918 Charles Gideon Murray,later [1927] 2nd
Viscount Elibank 7 Aug 1877 11 Mar 1951 73
15 Nov 1922 James Stewart        1863 17 Mar 1931 67
 7 May 1931 William Leonard 14 Feb 1887 14 Oct 1969 82
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  ST.STEPHEN'S GREEN (DUBLIN)
 1 Dec 1885 Edmund Dwyer Gray 29 Dec 1845 27 Mar 1888 42
For further information on this MP,see
the note at the foot of the page containing
details of the members for co.Carlow
12 May 1888 Thomas Alexander Dickson 12 Oct 1833 17 Jun 1909 75
   Jul 1892 William Kenny 14 Jan 1846  4 Feb 1921 75
21 Jan 1898 James Henry Mussen Campbell,later [1917] 1st
baronet and [1921] 1st Baron Glenavy  4 Apr 1851 22 Mar 1931 79
 3 Oct 1900 James McCann        1840 14 Feb 1904 63
22 Mar 1904 Laurence Ambrose Waldron 14 Nov 1858 27 Dec 1923 65
19 Jan 1910 Patrick Joseph Brady        1868 20 May 1943 74
14 Dec 1918 Thomas Kelly 13 Sep 1868 20 Apr 1942 73
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  SALFORD (LANCASHIRE)
20 Dec 1832 Joseph Brotherton 22 May 1783  7 Jan 1857 73
 2 Feb 1857 Edward Ryley Langworthy 1797  7 Apr 1874 76
28 Mar 1857 William Nathaniel Massey        1809 25 Oct 1881 72
 3 Feb 1865 John Cheetham        1802 18 May 1886 83
REPRESENTATION INCREASED
TO TWO MEMBERS 1868
18 Nov 1868 Charles Edward Cawley        1812  9 Apr 1877 64
William Thomas Charley  [kt 1880]  (to 1880) 5 Mar 1833  8 Jun 1904 71
19 Apr 1877 Oliver Ormerod Walker        1833 30 May 1914 80
3 Apr 1880 Benjamin Armitage        1823  4 Dec 1899 76
Arthur Arnold  [kt 1895] 28 May 1833 20 May 1902 68
 SPLIT INTO 3 DIVISIONS 1885 
SEE BELOW. RE-UNITED 1997
1 May 1997 Hazel Anne Blears 14 May 1956
NAME ALTERED TO "SALFORD
AND ECCLES" 2010
  SALFORD AND ECCLES
6 May 2010 Hazel Anne Blears 14 May 1956
  SALFORD EAST
23 Feb 1950 Edward Arthur Hardy        1884  4 Feb 1960 75
26 May 1955 Frank Julian Allaun 27 Feb 1913 26 Nov 2002 89
 9 Jun 1983 Stanley Orme,later [1997] Baron Orme [L]  5 Apr 1923 27 Apr 2005 82
  CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1997
  SALFORD NORTH
25 Nov 1885 Edward Hardcastle        1826  1 Nov 1905 79
   Jul 1892 William Henry Holland [kt 1902],later [1907] 1st
baronet and [1910] 1st Baron Rotherham 15 Dec 1849 26 Dec 1927 78
13 Jul 1895 Frederick Platt-Higgins        1840  6 Nov 1910 70
13 Jan 1906 William Pollard Byles  [kt 1911] 13 Feb 1839 15 Oct 1917 78
 2 Nov 1917 Benjamin Tillett 11 Sep 1860 27 Jan 1943 82
29 Oct 1924 Samuel Finburgh        1867 26 Apr 1935 67
30 May 1929 Benjamin Tillett 11 Sep 1860 27 Jan 1943 82
27 Oct 1931 John Patrick Morris 21 Mar 1894 31 Jul 1962 68
26 Jul 1945 William McAdam  7 Aug 1886 22 Apr 1952 65
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  SALFORD SOUTH
25 Nov 1885 William Mather  [kt 1902] 15 Jul 1838 18 Sep 1920 82
 2 Jul 1886 Henry Hoyle Howorth  [kt 1892] 1 Jul 1842 15 Jul 1923 81
 2 Oct 1900 James Grimble Groves 24 Oct 1854 23 Jun 1914 59
13 Jan 1906 Joseph Hilaire Peter Rene Belloc 27 Jul 1870 16 Jul 1953 82
   Dec 1910 Sir Clement Anderson Barlow,later [1924] 
1st baronet 28 Feb 1868 31 May 1951 83
 6 Dec 1923 Joseph Toole        1887  4 Jun 1945 57
29 Oct 1924 Edmund Ashworth Radford    Feb 1881 27 May 1944 63
30 May 1929 Joseph Toole        1887  4 Jun 1945 57
27 Oct 1931 John Joseph Stourton  5 Mar 1899 2 Feb 1992 92
26 Jul 1945 Edward Arthur Hardy        1884  4 Feb 1960 75
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  SALFORD WEST
25 Nov 1885 Benjamin Armitage        1823  4 Dec 1899 76
 2 Jul 1886 Lees Knowles,later [1903] 1st baronet 16 Feb 1857  7 Oct 1928 71
13 Jan 1906 George William Agnew,later [1910] 2nd baronet 19 Jan 1852 19 Dec 1941 89
14 Dec 1918 Frederick Wolfe Astbury        1872 28 Dec 1954 82
 6 Dec 1923 Alexander Wilkinson Frederick Haycock 28 Dec 1882 15 Dec 1970 87
29 Oct 1924 Frederick Wolfe Astbury        1872 28 Dec 1954 82
30 May 1929 Alexander Wilkinson Frederick Haycock 28 Dec 1882 15 Dec 1970 87
27 Oct 1931 Frederick Wolfe Astbury        1872 28 Dec 1954 82
14 Nov 1935 James Frederick Emery  [kt 1957] 17 Dec 1886 30 Oct 1983 96
26 Jul 1945 Charles Royle,later [1964] Baron Royle [L] 23 Jan 1896 30 Sep 1975 79
15 Oct 1964 Stanley Orme,later [1997] Baron Orme [L]  5 Apr 1923 27 Apr 2005 82
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
William Copeland Borlase, MP for Cornwall East 1880-1885 and St. Austell 1885-1887
Borlase's downfall appears to have been a fine example of Congreve's famously misquoted
phrase that "hell hath no fury like a woman scorned."
After being appointed Under-Secretary of the Local Government Board in 1886, Borlase's
career crashed in the following year when his mistress, Madame de Quiros, spilt the beans
over their relationship and his level of debts.
The following edited report of Borlase's bankruptcy hearing is taken from "Lloyd's Weekly 
Newspaper" of 4 December 1887:-
'At the London Bankruptcy court, on Wednesday, a meeting was held, before Mr. Registrar
Giffard, for the public examination of William Copeland Borlase, ex-M.P. for St. Austell, and
Under-Secretary of the Local Government Board in the last Liberal Administration. The
bankrupt is described as of Laregan, Penzance, and Bond-street……Madame L. de Quiros
had been entered in his statement as a creditor for £5,111, to which was a note to the 
effect that the money claimed by her had been lent between 1883 and 1887, and that she
had recovered judgment for £3,700 in default of his being able to pay the money into court;
but that he did not admit the claim, as she was in possession of furniture and jewellery and
other articles which more than covered the debt. That statement was absolutely true. - Do
you swear that she has ever lent you money? - To the best of my recollection, she has not.
I first knew Mdme. de Quiros when she resided at Hyde-park-place, where she had a
furnished house of her own. - And did you pass as Mr. de Quiros? - Never, that I am aware
of. The servants might have announced me as Mr. de Quiros, but I never went by that
name. - Were you a married man at that time? - I was. - Did you conceal from her the fact
that you were a married man? - Certainly not. When I first knew her she was possessed of
some furniture at Hyde-park-place, but I afterwards paid £800 to retain the furniture. It was
afterwards removed to Queen Anne-street, which house I took in my own name. What did 
you allow this lady? - I allowed her the sum of £25 per week. I allowed it her first because
I knew her history and pitied her, but it was afterwards extorted from me. - What do you
mean by that expression? - It was extorted from me in consequence of my public position
as M.P. and magistrate for my county. It was not an extortion at first, but it became one
when this lady followed me all over the world to Spain, and finally to Wales, where I had to
obtain police protection against her and a bully who was with her. The last £500 he had
given to her was in Trafalgar-square. She was passing in a cab, and she flew at him and
attacked him before people whom he knew and made him go to the bank and get the £500  
£500 for her. It was a fact that Madame de Quiros had given a bill of sale over the furniture
at Queen Anne-street to a Mr. Brown, and he had given her the money to repay Brown. 
Madame de Quiros accused him of things which he had never done, and at two o'clock in
the morning she insisted on walking down the street and going into his wife's bedroom and 
telling her who he was and who she was. Since then his life had been a misery from the
action of Madame de Quiros.'
Borlase's next examination was in late January 1888. The "Ipswich Journal" commented in
its issue of 27 January 1888:-
'Madame de Quiros, the lady for whom the debtor [Borlase] had furnished and maintained 
at the expenditure of £25 a week a sumptuous residence in Queen Anne-street, is the most
unrelenting of his creditors. Her counsel has had Mr. Borlase under examination for eight
hours, and today she occupied a seat in Court, and prompted questions which were likely
to be embarrassing to the debtor. The name of another lady whom Mr. Borlase had started
in business at an expenditure of £6 was introduced, but the debtor absolutely refused to
answer questions relating to this transaction  unless he were allowed to make an 
explanation, which would "involve a third party." This, however, did not seem pleasing to
Madame's counsel, and the subject was not pursued. But even after such a degrading
exposure as that to which Mr. Borlase had been subjected, the measure of this implacable
female's vengeance was not appeased. As the parties left the Court she warned him, in
tones loud enough to provoke the remonstrance of the Registrar, that he need not delude
himself into the belief that the exposure of his conduct (she did not use the word conduct)
was at an end. Mr. Borlase has learnt by a bitter lesson how fiercely a woman can hate.'
Sir George Houston Reid, MP for St.George's, Hanover Square 1916-1918
Sir George is the only Australian Prime Minister to have also sat in the House of Commons. As 
far as I am aware, only two men have sat in both the Australian Federal Parliament and the
House of Commons - Sir George Reid, and William Yates, who sat in the House of Commons for 
The Wrekin 1955-1966 and in the Australian House of Representatives for the electorate of
Holt 1975-1980.
The following biography of Sir George Reid is taken from the Australian monthly magazine 
"Parade" for March 1964:-
'On his retirement from politics in 1909 the bluff and witty George Reid, who had been both
Premier of New South Wales and Prime Minister of the recently founded Commonwealth, was
honoured with a knighthood. A friend asked what the letters of his title (KCMG) stood for. 
"Keep Calling Me George," the new knight replied.
'A clumsily-built man with a "great amplitude of waistcoat," a ripple of chins, baby-pink skin, a
tremendous walrus moustache and short legs, Sir George Reid was indeed a picturesque 
politician. His habit of spending much of his time sitting on the political fence earned him the
title of Yes-No George, but the nickname did not worry him. At a public meeting an elector 
even went so far as to call him two-faced. Reid calmly surveyed him through his monocle. "It's
obvious," he said, "that you're not. If you had another face you wouldn't come out in that 
one."
'Sent off to England in the twilight of his career to be Australia's first High Commissioner in
London, Sir George became so popular that when his term ended he was offered a safe seat
in the House of Commons. He accepted and was returned unopposed - a compliment never
accorded him in Australia.
'George Houston Reid was born on February 25, 1845, at Johnstone, Scotland. His father, a
Presbyterian clergyman, moved the family to England when the boy was two. Years later when
he was Premier of NSW, George Reid paid a visit to his birthplace and was given a tumultuous
welcome, as the little town's most successful son. Joking about his 17-stone figure, he told
his audience his reason for leaving Johnstone was that he wished to make more room for the
rest of the inhabitants.
'The Reid family did not stay long in England. When George was seven they migrated to 
Melbourne. Six years later they moved again to Sydney when Reid senior was invited by the 
Rev. John Dunmore Lang to become his colleague at the Scots Church. 
'The 13-year-old George went to work as a clerk in a merchant's office. In his spare time he
began laying the foundations of his skill as a public speaker by taking part in weekly debates
with an organisation connected with the Phillip St. Presbyterian Church. At 18 he became a
temporary clerk in the NSW Treasury. Two years later he appeared as a witness for the
department in a court case. His skilful parrying of questions so impressed Sir Julian Salomons
QC that he sought out the lowly clerk and encouraged him to study for the Bar.
'Thus George Reid began a law course. But with his natural indolence, fondness for convivial
living and liking for feminine company, he took 13 years to finish it. Years later the presence
of a beautiful woman in the gallery of the Legislative Assembly excited comment among the
members. Reid's reputation as a Lothario was then so notorious that when Sir Henry Parkes
was asked her identity he replied, "Well, George Reid says he does not know her so I can only
conclude that she must be respectable."
'However, while ambling along through his law studies, Reid devoted some of his time to solid
literary work. He produced five essays on free trade, which won the medal of the English 
Cobden Society, as well as a handbook on NSW and its resources which the Government 
printed and circulated overseas.
'At last Reid passed his final examination and in 1879 was admitted to the NSW Bar. The
following year he resigned as Secretary of the Lands Department to stand for one of the four
East Sydney seats in the State House. He first addressed an election meeting while standing
on a wagon. The noisy audience greeted his rotund figure with a fusillade of rotten eggs and
bags of flour. When one rough interrupted his first sentence Reid flung him a half-crown with
the remark: "Go and get a drink." The invitation was accepted and the rest of the crowd then
good-humouredly settled down to hear his speech. 
'There were seven candidates for the four East Sydney seats including the former Premier,
Sir Henry Parkes. Yet when the election was over the previously unknown Reid had topped
the poll. Parkes just scraped home in fourth place.
'When Parkes became Premier again in a coalition government with Sir John Robertson and his
followers, Reid used his inside knowledge of the Lands Department to attack the Government. 
Reid pointed out that after 20 years of supposed free selection of land, there were still 8
million acres in NSW held by a handful of monopolists and their dummies. It was on this issue 
that the Parkes-Robertson Government eventually fell.
In January 1883 the new Premier, Alexander Stuart, offered Reid his first portfolio as Minister
for Education. Well aware of the inadequacies of the State's education system, the new
minister built new buildings to replace tent schools, established secondary schools in a number
of country towns, pioneered a system of technical education and provided for the first evening
lectures at the university.
'Both in the House and on the election platform he showed a skill at repartee rarely equalled.
Once an obese opposition member complained of the poor attendance in the House and 
secured an adjournment just as the Minister for Education was about to introduce a new 
measure. "I suppose the minister will try to sneak the Bill in again when there's another thin
House," he said sarcastically. "It will never be a thin House while the honourable member and I
sit in it," Reid said. However, Reid's best known quip was probably his reply to a woman who
shouted to him at an election meeting: "If I were your wife I'd give you poison." Reid looked
her over carefully through his monocle, and the observed: "And if I were your husband madam,
I'd take it." [Almost exactly the same words are often quoted in an exchange between
Winston Churchill and Nancy Astor]
'At the next election he lost his seat, but he won it back again in 1885 and then sat 
continuously in the Legislative Assembly until 1901 when his East Sydney followers sent him to
the new Commonwealth Parliament. In 1894, as leader of the Free Trade Party, he became
Premier of NSW. 
'All his life George Reid had the ability to catch up with his sleep whatever the hour pr the
surroundings. Almost nightly, commuters in the late train to Burwood were familiar with the 
sight of their top-hatted Premier fast asleep in the entire seat his bulk required. All his political
life he was an ardent supporter of free trade. He refused to believe that any local industry 
needed a tariff to assist against overseas competition. "Chuck 'em in and let 'em swim," was 
his constant war cry about such industries.
'In 1899 the minority Labor Party on which George Reid relied to stay in office transferred its
support to the opposition led by William Lyne. Lyne had attracted the Labor men by promising
to introduce an old-age pension bill. When the Government fell, Lyne became Premier. Reid 
switched to the Federal sphere and at the first elections in 1901 became the member for East 
Sydney.
'In the new Commonwealth Parliament he was leader of the strong free trade opposition 
against the protectionist government's first Prime Minister, Edmund Barton. After the second 
Federal elections in 1903 Reid joined with Labour to defeat the government of Alfred Deakin. 
J.C. Watson then became Labor Prime Minister.
'In the first 10 years of the Commonwealth Parliament, members changed alliances and parties
changed policies with high agility. No one was more ready to seize the opportunity of the
moment than wily Yes-No Reid. After putting Labor into power, he switched once more and
joined Deakin to overthrow Watson's Labor Ministry. As Deakin would not form a coalition
government himself, the way was left open for Reid to ally himself and his party with some of
Deakin's followers and grab the Prime Ministership. He had a majority of only two but managed
to stay in power for 10 months by effecting a truce with Deakin.
'On June 24, 1905, Deakin withdrew his support. Reid gambled and asked the Governor-General
for a dissolution and thus a new election, but the request was refused. Inevitably, Reid's 
Government fell. Deakin formed a new administration and carried on until November 1908. Then
Labor came back to power under Andrew Fisher.
'Reid, tiring of his long period in opposition and seeing no chance of regaining office retired 
from politics in 1909. He was knighted soon after, and the following year was appointed the 
first Australian High Commissioner in London. When his term expired in 1915 he offered to 
continue without salary. But W.M. Hughes, the then Australian Prime Minister, wanted the 
post for Andrew Fisher, who had stepped aside so Hughes could take office.
'Reid had a card up his sleeve. A few days before his term ended he was offered the House of
Commons seat of Hanover Square. He was duly elected unopposed as an independent 
imperialist. There, a lion of British society, Sir George Reid, the one-time temporary govern-
ment clerk in Sydney, ended his mercurial career in public life. He died of a cerebral seizure on
September 12, 1918.'
Constance Georgine Markievicz, MP for St.Patrick's, Dublin 1918-1922
Constance was the daughter of Sir Henry Gore-Booth, 5th baronet. Her major claim to fame,
apart from her role in the struggle for Irish independence, is that she was the first woman to 
be elected to the House of Commons, although, like all other Sinn Fein members, she never
took her seat. Remarkably, the following biography, which appeared in the April 1958 issue of
the Australian monthly magazine "Parade" makes no mention of this fact.
"All Con's mother gave her was her lovely nose, and all she got from her father was his foolish 
head," a friend once said. But whether she was a fool or a saint, Constance Gore-Booth -
"Madame" Markievicz as Southern Ireland called her after her marriage to a Polish Count - was 
a patriot of the company of her adoption, as brave, fearless and stubborn a fighter for 
"Ireland's rights" as any of those others the Irish still claim were martyred by the British in the
troublous 1910s.
'Constance Georgine Gore-Booth was, paradoxically enough, more English than Irish, but early
in [the 20th century] she gave up home, husband, child, friends and gracious living for the
misery of gaol and the sordid adventures of guerrilla fighting, spurned the honour of being the
first woman elected to Westminster, and identified herself with her chosen people to die in the
poor ward of a Dublin public hospital - all for a cause she believed right, the cause of Irish
freedom. She remains the only woman from the landlord class to whose memory a public
monument has been erected with the pennies of the landless poverty-stricken peasants of
Southern Ireland.
'The Gore-Booth title had been Anglo-Irish for 300 years in 1868 when this "wild Irish girl"
opened her infant's eyes on the socially sacred ground of Carlton House Terrace, London
residence of her father, Sir Henry Gore-Booth, fifth baronet. Her youthful life was divided 
between the fashionable round in London and carefree existence at Lissadell, the family estate
at Sligo, Western Ireland. Even as a child Constance seemed something of a freak against the
rather complacent respectability of her background. She was "as wild as a deer," spending 
every moment of escape from her governess on horseback, or in rubbing shoulders with the 
poor with "nivver a bit of the young Lady of Lissadell about her," as the Irish peasants said.
Fearless. Tireless, impulsive, self-assertive, she became famous on the hunting-field and 
carried her love for horses, her blunt speech and loud voice into the drawing room.
'In 1888 Constance made her debut in London but professed to be bored with her social 
launching until she discovered the admiration her good looks evoked. Then she began to "play
to the gallery," becoming for a while a typical spoiled beauty of chiselled profile and dark eyes.
But as the "seasons" passed and her sisters - first her favourite, Eva, then Mabel - were 
launched, she grew restless and began getting into scrapes. There was the time she trained a
pet snake to coil around her head as an adornment and let it "escape"; then the occasion 
when, in the refreshment tent at Henley Regatta just after the Prince of Wales walked in, she 
asked in her loud voice who "the very fat man" was, and the incident when she stopped a fight
between two drunks in a London street by foolhardily placing herself between them.
'At home in Carlton House Terrace she lived in "higgledy-piggledy" fashion, draping her clothes
all over the stairs, and bringing foreign students, Indians and beggars to tea. Her parents
heaved a sigh of relief when, in the mid-nineties, she announced her intention of studying art
seriously, and they gladly enrolled her at the Slade School. She worked hard, and by October,
1897, had moved to Paris and was studying under Jean-Paul Laurens. She was still young,
beautiful and moneyed, and in Paris in the last year of the century, after having laughed off
proposals of marriage for years, she fell in love with a fellow-student, Count Casimir Joseph
Dunin-Markievicz, an immense 6ft 4in Pole, at that time a widower with one son. 
'Although a warrior of many love affairs, Casimir was only 26 to Constance's 32, but her strong
will over-rode his greater interest in another Englishwoman in Paris. The Gore-Booths were 
somewhat alarmed, but careful inquiry revealed that the Count's title was 200 years older than
theirs. There was nothing they could do about it anyway. Accordingly, Constance's mother
consented with the best grace she could muster [her father had died in January 1900], and
on September 29, 1900, they were married "quietly" in London with "only" four bridesmaids
instead of the more usual dozen. At Lissadell, Constance's one child, Maeve Alice, was born in
November, 1901, after which they went to Dublin and settled in a house that had been 
Constance's mother's wedding present.
'At the time Dublin society was ruled from Dublin Castle and Constance and Casimir held all the
cards of entry. She soon grew bored, however, with the eternal hunting, shooting, yachting 
and dancing, and while Casimir, with inbred class distinction, enjoyed the environment - plus
the portrait commissions he could wangle - he, too, really preferred the companionship of
fellow artists and men-of-letters, and the gayer, less formal aspects of Irish life. To one fancy-
dress affair he turned up minus his trousers, explaining that as he was representing a sans-
culotte, he would not be recognized unless he dressed the part.
'Gradually the merry pair withdrew from the highest social circles, conscious that they were 
too poor to "do it properly" and finding that world too small anyway. The years rolled by and
love seemed to drop out of the marriage. Constance began to say too often, "I don't know
why Casimir married me," so that one day he snapped back the truth: "He didn't. She'd
married him!" 
'Constance admitted that she "had not required" her husband after Maeve had been born.
Presently in 1907 she left Maeve to be brought up by Lady Gore-Booth at Lissadell. Casimir
found consolation as a man about town, frequenting pubs with literary and artistic Bohemians
who adopted him as "Cassie." She herself had been growing to really love the Irish "common"
people and to identify herself with them. She had joined Sinn Fein, at the time a leftist
anti-British organisation connected with the Irish literary renaissance.
'In 1908, stirred and angry at the social evils of a country whose mortality rate led the world 
and where a man was paid 14s for a 90-hour week, she swung further to the left. After a 
meeting with Jim Larkin, the big-shouldered organiser of the new Irish Trade Union, she joined 
the underground extremists. On her own initiative, Constance began to develop an idea 
attempted and discarded years before - a boy's league called Fianna Eireann, which she 
modelled on the lines of the Boy Scout movement Baden Powell had just launched in England. 
There was a law permitting the use of guns on one's own property, so she took a cottage in
the foothills of the Dublin mountains and brought her boys out there for drill and training. A
crack shot herself and tirelessly energetic, Constance proved herself a good and respected
trainer. Casimir was furious. "Sprouts" he called her young protégés when their eternal comings
and goings ended his peace and his painting. Gloomily agreeing with the verdict of a visiting
journalist that it was "not a salon but a General Headquarters," he took himself off to Poland.
'When he returned two months later, it was to rescue Constance from the chaos of a co-
operative settlement she was trying to organise. He brought her back to a small house in
Dublin, but she then took to writing pamphlets and reeling off seditious handbills with an old
printing press on the dining-room table. The house was constantly under British secret service
supervision, and Casimir, disgusted, called Constance a "damned fool" and went off to the 
Balkans as a war-correspondent.
'In 1913, when the strike organised by Larkin plunged Ireland into deeper misery, Constance
ran a soup kitchen, working at the most menial tasks herself and rallying her helpers with her
courage and good humour. With the New Year, when, after eight months, poverty, hunger and
hopelessness drove the men back to work, the satisfaction of vested interests with their
victory was tempered by the uneasy feeling that Irish labour had gained the strength of unity
for a later contest. Everyone saw trouble ahead, and Constance plunged headlong into it,
rallying to the flag of James Connolly [1868-1916, executed following the Easter Rising] and 
the Irish Citizen Army whose avowed principal was that the ownership of Ireland, moral and
material, was "vested by right in the people of Ireland."
'She designed herself a dark-green uniform with slouch hat and knee boots. All through 1914
and 1915 she was working, lecturing and training. With Easter Monday, 1916, came the Irish
Rising in Dublin - curtain-raiser to the Anglo-Irish war. It began with a proclamation 
announcing the establishment of the Provisional Independent Irish Government by the rebels, 
and from that moment until the end of her life Constance had neither child, nor man, nor roof 
to call her own. She fought on Stephen's Green through that futile week of massacre of the 
Dublin Easter Rebellion and after the surrender was gaoled along with the ringleaders. From her 
cell she heard the firing squad end the lives of many of her comrades, and when, on May 4 
[1916] she was sentenced to death herself, she was perfectly happy. But the sentence was 
commuted to penal servitude for life and she was moved to Aylesbury Prison in England.
'Here Constance lived and worked as a convict, scrubbing floors and laundering, taking every 
petty persecution and the hard  work with a smile. A Duchess called to visit her one visiting 
day but she drove her away with scornful irony, spurning all sympathy. Constance was among 
the Irish prisoners released in 1917. She was given an overwhelming reception in Dublin when
she arrived in midsummer and almost immediately she was received into the Catholic Church. 
She went to work with De Valera and the reorganised Sinn Fein and Volunteers, who had 
grown to the proportions of a national army. She was busy campaigning against Lloyd George's 
Irish conscription issue when she was included amongst those rounded up in 1918 for alleged 
complicity in a treasonable plot with Germany - out of which Sir Roger Casement was hanged
for high treason [3 August 1916]. 
'She spent a year in Holloway Gaol, but was released in time to be appointed Secretary for
Labour in De Valera's first cabinet declared on April 2 1919. [She was only the second female
to hold a Cabinet position in Europe, the first being Alexandra Kollantai [1872-1952], People's
Commissar for Social Welfare under Lenin]. Casimir turned up again, but stayed only a short
while. By the time he got back to Poland Constance was in gaol again, this time in the Cork
female prison under a four months' sentence for a seditious platform speech in Mallow. When
Constance emerged again from prison, Michael Collins was organising his army. All through the
winter of 1919and the autumn of 1920 she was harried by British agents from pillar to post - a
woman of 52, living in disguises, carrying on her work as Secretary for Labour, always on the
run, making decisions that were held as law throughout Southern Ireland regardless of English
authority.
'However, it was as a sniper that Constance shone in the time of bloody murder and massacre.
She engaged, on one occasion, an English sniper for two hours from the tops of adjoining
buildings. In September 1920 she was re-arrested and sentenced to hard labour for 
treasonable practices. When she came out of Mountjoy Gaol in July 1921, the Black and Tan 
terror of the Anglo-Irish war was over. Lloyd George and Michael Collins had come to terms, 
and the Irish Free State was born. But there were many like De Valera and Constance 
Markievicz to criticise the terms of the treaty. She went off to Paris and then to America, 
addressing meetings and enlisting sympathy and aid for the new republic.
'By the time she returned to Ireland, Irishman was fighting Irishman as to who would now
administer the country. Constance was soon in the thick of it. Once again Constance was 
arrested - this time for speaking from a lorry urging the release of the imprisoned anti-
Treatyites. In a Dublin prison camp she went on a hunger strike along with others. When two
of them died, the strike was called off, and within a few months the Treatyites had achieved
military ascendancy. Released, Constance returned to her Fianna boys and bought a flivver
in which she charged about the countryside like an Irish Boadicea. She continued to dabble in
politics and in the 1927 election won back her old seat. Living among the poor, she became
softer, gentler and recovered some of her beauty in proportion to her loss of assertiveness.
'At the end of June 1927, she was driven to hospital by pain she had secretly endured for
months fearful lest it be cancer. She insisted on going to the poor ward and that none of her
friends be told, but after two operations and a relapse her critical condition was made known.
Summoned by a broadcast appeal, Maeve, Casimir and Stanislaus, her stepson, were gathered
around her bed on July 15 in time to see her die - a rash, headstrong, perhaps misguided, but
gallant woman.'
Copyright @ 2003-2013 Leigh Rayment