THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
CONSTITUENCIES BEGINNING WITH "T"
 
             Last updated 10/09/2013
Date   Name Born Died  Age
Dates in italics in the first column denote that the election held on that
date was a by-election. Dates shown in normal type were general elections,
or, in some instances, the date of a successful petition against a 
previous election result.
Dates in italics in the "Born" column indicate that the MP was baptised on
that date; dates in italics in the "Died" column indicate that the MP was
buried on that date
  TAIN (NORTHERN) BURGHS
comprising Tain and Dingwall (Ross-shire),
Dornoch (Sutherland),Wick (Caithness)
and Kirkwall (Orkney)
26 May 1708 William Sutherland,styled Lord Strathnaver 19 Dec 1683 13 Jul 1720 36
5 May 1709 Robert Douglas,later [1715] 12th Earl of 
Morton by 1662 22 Jan 1730
27 Oct 1710 Robert Munro,later [1729] 6th baronet 24 Aug 1684 17 Jan 1746 61
28 May 1741 Charles Areskine        1680  5 Apr 1763 82
Election declared void 1 Mar 1742
 2 Apr 1742 Robert Craigie     c 1685 10 Mar 1760
22 Jul 1747 Sir Harry Munro,7th baronet     c 1720 12 Jun 1781
20 Apr 1761 John Scott        1725  7 Dec 1775 50
11 Apr 1768 Alexander Mackay        1717 31 May 1789 71
26 Apr 1773 James Grant        1720 13 Apr 1806 85
 2 Oct 1780 Charles Ross     c 1729  5 Mar 1797
26 Apr 1784 Charles James Fox   [he was also returned 24 Jan 1749 13 Sep 1806 57
for Westminster,for which he chose to sit]
15 Mar 1786 George Ross        1700  7 Apr 1786 85
30 Jun 1786 Charles Lockhart-Ross,later [1790] 7th baronet 15 Aug 1763 8 Feb 1814 50
20 Jun 1796 William Dundas        1762 14 Nov 1845 83
30 Jul 1802 John Charles Villiers,later [1824] 3rd Earl
of Clarendon 14 Nov 1757 22 Dec 1838 81
26 Jun 1805 James MacDonald,later [1826] 2nd baronet 14 Feb 1784 29 Jun 1832 48
24 Nov 1806 John Randoll Mackenzie c 1763 28 Jul 1809
 7 May 1808 William Henry Fremantle 28 Dec 1766 19 Oct 1850 83
30 Oct 1812 Hugh Innes,later [1819] 1st baronet c 1764 16 Aug 1831
23 Aug 1830 James Loch 7 May 1780 28 Jun 1855 75
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1832 
  TAMWORTH (STAFFORDSHIRE)
30 Apr 1660 Richard Newdigate,later [1677] 1st baronet 17 Sep 1602 14 Oct 1678 76
Thomas Fox 4 Mar 1622 1666 44
 8 Apr 1661 Amos Walrond c 1623 11 Nov 1668
John Swinfen  (to Aug 1679) 19 Mar 1613 12 Apr 1694 81
26 Nov 1669 John Ferrers  [he was unseated on petition 26 Jul 1629 14 Aug 1680 51
in favour of Charles Boyle,Lord Clifford
26 Mar 1670]
26 Mar 1670 Charles Boyle,Viscount Dungarvan [I] 17 Nov 1639 12 Oct 1694 54
25 Feb 1679 Sir Thomas Thynne,2nd baronet, later [1682]
1st Viscount Weymouth  (to 1685) 8 Sep 1640 28 Jul 1714 73
11 Aug 1679 Sir Andrew Hacket c 1632 19 Mar 1709
28 Feb 1681 John Swinfen 19 Mar 1613 12 Apr 1694 81
Sir Thomas Thynne,2nd baronet, later [1682]
1st Viscount Weymouth   8 Sep 1640 28 Jul 1714 73
John Turton
Double return of Thynne and Turton which
was not resolved before the Parliament ended
31 Mar 1685 Richard Grobham Howe,later [1703] 3rd
baronet c 1652 3 Jul 1730
Sir Henry Gough  (to 1698) 3 Jan 1650 24 Jan 1725 75
11 Jan 1689 Henry Sydney,later [Sep 1689] 1st Viscount
Sydney and [1694] 1st Earl of Romney c Mar 1641 8 Apr 1704 63
 8 May 1689 Henry Boyle,later [1714] 1st Baron Carleton 12 Jul 1669 14 Mar 1725 55
28 Feb 1690 Michael Biddulph 19 Nov 1661 26 Jul 1697 35
1 Nov 1695 Thomas Guy  (to 1708) c 1644 27 Dec 1724
28 Jul 1698 John Chetwynd  [he was unseated on petition 1643 9 Dec 1702 59
in favour of Sir Henry Gough 17 Mar 1699]
17 Mar 1699 Sir Henry Gough 3 Jan 1650 24 Jan 1725 75
27 Nov 1701 Henry Thynne  [at the general election in 8 Feb 1675 20 Dec 1708 33
Jul 1702,Thynne was also returned for
Weymouth and Melcombe Regis,for which he
chose to sit]
14 Dec 1702 Joseph Girdler  (to 1715) 15 May 1642 16 Nov 1724 82
5 May 1708 Richard Swinfen 11 Apr 1677 22 Jul 1726 49
9 Oct 1710 Samuel Bracebridge  (to 1723)   [after the  4 Apr 1673 11 Nov 1735 62
general election in Mar 1722,Bracebridge was
unseated on petition in favour of Richard
Swinfen 23 Jan 1723]
31 Jan 1715 William Inge 28 Sep 1669  3 Jul 1731 61
24 Mar 1722 Francis Willoughby,later [1729] 2nd Baron
Middleton  (to Aug 1727) 29 Sep 1692 31 Jul 1758 65
23 Jan 1723 Richard Swinfen 11 Apr 1677 22 Jul 1726 49
30 Jan 1727 George Compton,later [1754] 6th Earl of
Northampton        1692  6 Dec 1758 66
21 Aug 1727 William O'Brien,4th Earl of Inchiquin [I]     c 1700 18 Jul 1777
Thomas Willoughby 11 Jun 1694  2 Dec 1742 48
29 Apr 1734 Lord John Philip Sackville  (to 1747) 22 Jun 1713  3 Dec 1765 52
George Compton,later [1754] 6th Earl of
Northampton   [he was also returned for        1692  6 Dec 1758 66
Northampton,for which he chose to sit]
 3 Apr 1735 Charles Cotes     c 1703 21 Mar 1748
 6 May 1741 John Floyer  [he was unseated on petition     c 1681  4 Jun 1762
in favour of Charles Cotes 22 Mar 1742]
22 Mar 1742 Charles Cotes     c 1703 21 Mar 1748
 3 Jul 1747 Thomas Villiers,later [1776] 1st Earl of
Clarendon  (to 1756)        1709 11 Dec 1786 77
Sir Henry Harpur,5th baronet     c 1708  7 Jun 1748
12 Dec 1748 Sir Robert Burdett,4th baronet  (to 1768) 28 May 1716 13 Feb 1797 80
28 Jun 1756 George Bussy Villiers,styled Viscount Villiers,
later [1769] 4th Earl of Jersey  9 Jun 1735 22 Aug 1805 70
23 Dec 1765 Edward Thurlow,later [1778] 1st Baron 
Thurlow  (to 1778)  9 Dec 1731 12 Sep 1806 74
18 Mar 1768 William de Grey,later [1780] 1st Baron  7 Jul 1719  9 May 1781 61
Walsingham  [he was also returned for
Newport,for which he chose to sit]
30 Nov 1768 Charles Vernon         1719  3 Aug 1810 91
10 Oct 1774 Thomas de Grey,later [1781] 2nd Baron 
Walsingham  (to 1780) 14 Jul 1748 16 Jan 1818 69
10 Jun 1778 Anthony Chamier  (to Nov 1780)  6 Oct 1725 12 Oct 1780 55
11 Sep 1780 John Courtenay  (to 1796) 22 Aug 1738 24 Mar 1816 77
27 Nov 1780 John Calvert  6 May 1726 22 Feb 1804 77
 5 Apr 1784 John Calvert     c 1758  2 Jun 1844
18 Jun 1790 Sir Robert Peel  (to 1820) 25 Apr 1750  3 May 1830 80
27 May 1796 Thomas Carter     c 1761 10 Jun 1835
 6 Jul 1802 William Loftus 1752 15 Jun 1831 78
 7 Oct 1812 Lord Charles Vere Ferrers Townshend 16 Sep 1785  5 Nov 1853 68
19 Jun 1818 William Yates Peel  (to 1830)  3 Aug 1789  1 Jun 1858 68
9 Mar 1820 Lord Charles Vere Ferrers Townshend
(to 1835) 16 Sep 1785  5 Nov 1853 68
30 Jul 1830 Sir Robert Peel,2nd baronet  (to 1850)  5 Feb 1788  2 Jul 1850 62
 5 Jan 1835 William Yates Peel  3 Aug 1789  1 Jun 1858 68
25 Aug 1837 Edward Henry A'Court 10 Dec 1783 22 Sep 1855 71
28 Jul 1847 William Yates Peel  3 Aug 1789  1 Jun 1858 68
18 Dec 1847 John Townshend,later [1855] 4th Marquess
Townshend  (to 1856) 28 Mar 1798 10 Sep 1863 65
19 Jul 1850 Sir Robert Peel,3rd baronet  (to 1880)  4 May 1822  9 May 1895 73
 7 Feb 1856 John Villiers Stuart Townshend,Viscount
Raynham,later [1863] 5th Marquess
Townshend 10 Apr 1831 26 Oct 1899 68
12 Oct 1863 John Peel  4 Feb 1804  2 Apr 1872 68
17 Nov 1868 Sir Henry Lytton Earle Bulwer,later [1871]
1st Baron Dalling & Bulwer 13 Feb 1801 23 May 1872 71
28 Mar 1871 John Peel  4 Feb 1804  2 Apr 1872 68
16 Apr 1872 Robert William Hanbury 24 Feb 1845 28 Apr 1903 58
25 Apr 1878 Hamar Alfred Bass  (to 1885) 30 Jul 1842  8 Apr 1898 55
3 Apr 1880 Jabez Spencer Balfour 4 Sep 1843 23 Feb 1916 72
For further information on this MP, see the 
note at the foot of this page.
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1885
 3 Dec 1885 Philip Albert Muntz,later [1902] 1st baronet 5 Jan 1839 21 Dec 1908 69
14 Jan 1909 Francis Alexander Newdigate-Newdegate 31 Dec 1862  2 Jan 1936 73
[kt 1917]
23 Feb 1917 Henry Wilson-Fox 18 Aug 1863 22 Nov 1921 58
17 Jan 1922 Sir Percy Wilson Newson,1st baronet  4 Apr 1874 17 May 1950 76
 6 Dec 1923 Sir Edward Maugar Iliffe,later [1933] 1st
Baron Iliffe 17 May 1877 25 Jul 1960 83
 2 Dec 1929 Sir Arthur Herbert Drummond Ramsay-
Steel-Maitland,1st baronet  5 Jul 1876 30 Mar 1935 58
10 May 1935 Sir John Serocold Paget Mellor,2nd baronet  6 Jul 1893 15 Jul 1986 93
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1945 
BUT REVIVED 1997
1 May 1997 Brian David Jenkins 19 Sep 1942
6 May 2010 Christopher John Pincher 24 Sep 1969
TATTON (CHESHIRE)
 9 Jun 1983 Mostyn Neil Hamilton 9 Mar 1949
1 May 1997 Martin Bell 31 Aug 1938
7 Jun 2001 George Gideon Oliver Osborne 23 May 1971
  TAUNTON (SOMERSET)
30 Mar 1660 Sir William Wyndham,later [1661] 1st baronet c 1632 28 Oct 1683
(to Feb 1679)
Thomas Gorges c 1618 21 Oct 1670
 4 Apr 1661 Sir William Portman,6th baronet  (to Sep 1679) 5 Sep 1643 Mar 1690 46
20 Feb 1679 John Trenchard  [kt 1689] (to 1685) 30 Mar 1649 27 Apr 1695 46
 9 Sep 1679 Sir John Cutler,1st baronet  [he was unseated  c 1608 15 Apr 1693
on petition in favour of Edmund Prideaux 
8 Dec 1680]
 8 Dec 1680 Edmund Prideaux 4 Dec 1634 12 Oct 1702 67
18 Mar 1685 Sir William Portman,6th baronet  (to Apr 1690) 5 Sep 1643 18 Mar 1690 46
John Sanford  2 Jan 1640 1711 71
10 Mar 1690 Edward Clarke  (to 1710) 14 Sep 1650 1 Oct 1710 60
10 Apr 1690 John Speke c 1652 1728
10 Aug 1698 Henry Portman  [at the general election in c 1637 23 Feb 1728
Jan 1701,Portman was also returned for
Wells,for which he chose to sit]
17 Mar 1701 Sir Francis Warre,1st baronet  (to 1715)     c 1659  1 Dec 1718
12 Oct 1710 Henry Seymour Portman c 1637 23 Feb 1728
[Both sitting members (Warre and Portman)
were again returned at the general election
in Feb 1715. Both members were subsequently
unseated on petition in favour of Sir William
Pynsent and James Smith 30 Aug 1715]
30 Aug 1715 William Pynsent,later [1719] 2nd baronet     c 1679  8 Jan 1765
James Smith  (to 1727)     c 1681     c 1734
21 Mar 1722 John Trenchard     c 1668 16 Dec 1723
18 Jan 1724 Abraham Elton,later [1728] 2nd baronet 30 Jun 1679 20 Oct 1742 63
19 Aug 1727 George Speke c 1686  2 Jan 1753
Francis Fane  (to 1741)     c 1698 27 May 1757
26 Apr 1734 Henry William Portman     c 1709 19 Jan 1761
13 May 1741 Sir John Chapman,2nd baronet  (to 1747)     c 1710 29 Jan 1781
John Buck 30 Dec 1703  3 Apr 1745 41
16 Apr 1745 Percy Wyndham-O'Brien,later [1756] 1st Earl
of Thomond [I]     c 1723 21 Jul 1774
29 Jun 1747 Sir Charles Wyndham,4th baronet,later [1750]
2nd Earl of of Egremont 19 Aug 1710 21 Aug 1763 53
Robert Webb  (to 1754)     c 1719  9 Sep 1765
27 Feb 1750 William Rowley  [kt 1753]     c 1690  1 Jan 1768
15 Apr 1754 George Carpenter,3rd Baron Carpenter,
later [1761] 1st Earl of Tyrconnel  (to 1762) 26 Aug 1723  9 Mar 1762 38
John Halliday     c 1709  8 Jun 1754
24 Dec 1754 Robert Maxwell,later [1759] 2nd Baron 
Farnham [I],[1760] 1st Viscount Farnham [I] and 
[1763] 1st Earl of Farnham [I]  (to 1768)     c 1720 16 Nov 1779
24 Mar 1762 Laurence Sulivan     c 1713    Feb 1786
18 Mar 1768 Alexander Popham     c 1729 13 Oct 1810
Nathaniel Webb  (to 1775) 21 Aug 1725    Nov 1786 61
18 Oct 1774 Edward Stratford,later [1777] 2nd Earl of
Aldborough 1734  2 Jan 1801 66
[Both sitting members (Webb and Stratford)
were unseated on petition in favour of 
John Halliday and Alexander Popham 
16 Mar 1775]
16 Mar 1775 John Halliday  (to 1784)     c 1737 21 Apr 1805
Alexander Popham     c 1729 13 Oct 1810
12 Sep 1780 John Roberts  9 Feb 1782
20 Mar 1782 Benjamin Hammet  (to 1800)     c 1736 22 Jul 1800
 5 Apr 1784 Alexander Popham     c 1729 13 Oct 1810
27 May 1796 William Morland  (to 1806) c Apr 1739 14 Jul 1815 76
 7 Aug 1800 John Hammet  (to 1811) 20 Nov 1767 16 Apr 1811 43
 4 Nov 1806 Alexander Baring,later [1835] 1st Baron 
Ashburton  (to 1826) 27 Oct 1774 12 May 1848 73
1 May 1811 Henry Powell Collins 1776 22 Aug 1854 78
24 Jun 1818 Sir William Burroughs,1st baronet   [he was     c 1753  1 Jun 1829
unseated on petition in favour of Henry Powell
Collins 7 May 1819]
 7 May 1819 Henry Powell Collins 1776 22 Aug 1854 78
6 Apr 1820 John Ashley Warre  5 Oct 1787 18 Nov 1860 73
22 Jun 1826 Henry Seymour 10 Nov 1776 27 Nov 1849 73
William Peachy     c 1763 21 Nov 1838
6 Aug 1830 Henry Labouchere,later [1859] 1st
Baron Taunton  (to 1859) 15 Aug 1798 13 Jul 1869 70
Edward Thomas Bainbridge 13 Dec 1798 30 Sep 1872 73
11 Feb 1842 Sir Thomas Edward Colebrooke,4th baronet 19 Aug 1813 11 Jan 1890 76
 9 Jul 1852 Arthur Mills   [his election was declared  20 Jul 1816 12 Oct 1898 82
void 18 Apr 1853]
 4 May 1853 Sir John William Ramsden,5th baronet 14 Sep 1831 15 Apr 1914 82
28 Mar 1857 Arthur Mills  (to 1865) 20 Jul 1816 12 Oct 1898 82
 9 Aug 1859 George Augustus Frederick Cavendish-
Bentinck  9 Jul 1821  9 Apr 1891 69
12 Jul 1865 Alexander Charles Barclay  (to 1880)        1823 10 Jan 1893 69
Lord William Montagu Hay,later [1878] 10th 
Marquess of Tweeddale 27 Jan 1826 25 Nov 1911 85
18 Nov 1868 Edward William Cox        1809 24 Nov 1879 70
[He was unseated on petition in favour of
Henry James 8 Mar 1869]
 8 Mar 1869 Sir Henry James,later [1895] 1st Baron 
James of Hereford  (to 1885) 30 Oct 1828 18 Aug 1911 82
1 Apr 1880 Sir William Palliser 18 Jun 1830  4 Feb 1882 51
17 Feb 1882 Samuel Charles Allsopp,later [1887] 2nd 
Baron Hindlip  (to 1887) 24 Mar 1842 12 Jul 1897 55
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1885
23 Apr 1887 Alfred Percy Allsopp 26 Aug 1861 22 Feb 1929 67
12 Jul 1895 Alfred Cholmeley Earle Welby 22 Aug 1849 18 May 1937 87
15 Jan 1906 Sir Edward Boyle,1st baronet 6 Sep 1848 19 Mar 1909 60
28 Feb 1909 William Robert Wellesley Peel,later [1912] 2nd
Viscount Peel and [1929] 1st Earl Peel  7 Jan 1867 28 Sep 1937 70
11 Nov 1912 Sir Gilbert Alan Hamilton Wills,2nd baronet,
later [1929] 1st Baron Dulverton 28 Mar 1880  1 Dec 1956 76
14 Dec 1918 Dennis Fortescue Boles,later [1922] 1st
baronet 6 Sep 1861 26 Jul 1935 74
 8 Apr 1921 Sir Arthur Sackville Trevor Griffith-
Boscawen 18 Oct 1865  1 Jun 1946 80
15 Nov 1922 John Hope Simpson  [kt 1925] 23 Jul 1868 10 Apr 1961 92
29 Oct 1924 Andrew Hamilton Gault 18 Aug 1882 28 Nov 1958 76
14 Nov 1935 Edward Thomas Ruscombe Wickham  4 May 1890 25 Aug 1957 67
26 Jul 1945 Victor John Collins,later [1958] Baron 
Stonham [L]  1 Jul 1903 22 Dec 1971 68
23 Feb 1950 Henry Lennox d'Aubigne Hopkinson,later
[1956] 1st Baron Colyton  3 Jan 1902  6 Jan 1996 94
14 Feb 1956 Edward Dillon Lott du Cann  [kt 1985] 28 May 1924
11 Jun 1987 David John Nicholson 17 Aug 1944
1 May 1997 Jacqueline Margaret Ballard 4 Jan 1953
7 Jun 2001 Adrian John Flook 9 Jul 1963
5 May 2005 Jeremy Richard Browne 17 May 1970
NAME ALTERED TO "TAUNTON DEANE" 2010
  TAUNTON DEANE (SOMERSET)
6 May 2010 Jeremy Richard Browne 17 May 1970
  TAVISTOCK (DEVON)
 5 Apr 1660 William Russell,styled Lord Russell from 1678 29 Sep 1639 21 Jul 1683 43
George Howard  (to 1673) Feb 1622 17 Sep 1671 49
Elizeus Crymes
Double return between Howard and Crymes.
Howard seated 27 Apr 1660
 5 Apr 1661 Sir John Davie,2nd baronet  [unseated on 6 Dec 1612 31 Jul 1678 65
petition in favour of Russell 17 Dec 1661]
George Howard  (to 1673) Feb 1622 17 Sep 1671 49
William Russell,styled Lord Russell from 1678 29 Sep 1639 21 Jul 1683 43
Double return between Howard and Russell.
Howard seated 16 May 1661
17 Dec 1661 William Russell  (to 1679) 29 Sep 1639 21 Jul 1683 43
26 Mar 1673 Sir Francis Drake,3rd baronet  (to 1685) 1 May 1647 15 Jun 1718 71
13 Feb 1679 Edward Russell (Lord Edward from 1694) c 1642 30 Jun 1714
23 Mar 1685 Sir James Butler c 1642 early 1704
John Beare c 1645 early 1711
14 Jan 1689 Robert Russell  (Lord Robert from 1694)  (to 1703) c 1644 26 Jul 1703
Sir Francis Drake,3rd baronet 1 May 1647 15 Jun 1718 71
29 Oct 1695 Lord James Russell  [he was unseated on c 1647 22 Jun 1712
petition in favour of Ambrose Manaton
12 Mar 1696]
12 Mar 1696 Ambrose Manaton 17 Jan 1648 1 Jun 1696 48
10 Nov 1696 Sir Francis Drake 1 May 1647 15 Jun 1718 71
9 Jan 1701 Lord Edward Russell c 1642 30 Jun 1714
24 Jul 1702 Lord James Russell  (to Dec 1703)  [he was c 1647 22 Jun 1712
unseated on petition in favour of Henry
Manaton 21 Dec 1703]
26 Nov 1703 James Bulteel  (to 1708) c 1676 1757
21 Dec 1703 Henry Manaton  (to 1711)  [he was unseated 17 Sep 1650 c May 1716 65
on petition in favour of James Bulteel
3 Feb 1711]
10 May 1708 Sir John Cope,later [1721] 6th baronet  (to 1728)  1 Dec 1673  8 Dec 1749 76
[at the general election in Aug 1727,Cope
was also returned for Hampshire,for which he
chose to sit]
3 Feb 1711 James Bulteel  c 1676 1757
1 Feb 1715 Francis Henry Drake,later [1718] 4th baronet   2 Mar 1694 26 Jan 1740 45
(to 1734)
24 Feb 1728 Sir Humphrey Monoux,4th baronet     c 1702  3 Dec 1757
29 Apr 1734 Charles Fane,later [1744] 2nd Viscount
Fane [I]  (to 1747)  after 1708 24 Jan 1766
Sidney Meadows     c 1699 15 Nov 1792
 9 May 1741 Lord Sherard Manners     c 1713 13 Jan 1742
28 Jan 1742 James Hamilton,1st Viscount Limerick [I],
later [1756] 1st Earl of Clanbrassil [I]     c 1691 17 Mar 1758
 4 Jul 1747 Richard Leveson-Gower  [he was also returned 30 Apr 1726 19 Oct 1753 27
for Lichfield,for which he chose to sit]
Thomas Brand  (to 1754)     c 1717 22 Aug 1770
12 Dec 1747 Sir Richard Wrottesley,7th baronet 12 Apr 1721 20 Jul 1769 48
24 Apr 1754 Richard Rigby  (to 1788)    Feb 1722  8 Apr 1788 66
Jeffrey French 14 May 1754
10 Dec 1754 Richard Vernon 18 Jun 1726 16 Sep 1800 74
28 Mar 1761 Richard Neville Aldworth (Neville from 1762)  3 Nov 1717 17 Jul 1793 75
 8 Oct 1774 Richard Fitzpatrick  (to Jul 1807)   [at the 24 Jan 1748 25 Apr 1813 65
general election in May 1807,he was also
returned for Bedfordshire,for which he 
chose to sit]
24 Apr 1788 Lord John Russell,later [1802] 6th Duke of
Bedford  6 Jul 1766 20 Oct 1839 73
19 Jun 1790 Charles William Wyndham  [he was also  8 Oct 1760  1 Jul 1828 67
returned for Midhurst,for which he chose 
to sit]
27 Dec 1790 Lord John Russell,later [1802] 6th Duke of
Bedford  6 Jul 1766 20 Oct 1839 73
25 Mar 1802 Lord Robert Spencer  8 May 1747 23 Jun 1831 84
11 May 1807 Lord William Russell  (to 1819) 20 Aug 1767  6 May 1840 72
For further information on the death of this MP,
see the note at the foot of this page
20 Jul 1807 Charles Grey,styled Viscount Howick,later
[Nov 1807] 2nd Earl Grey 13 Mar 1764 17 Jul 1845 81
19 Jan 1808 George Ponsonby  4 Mar 1755  8 Jul 1817 62
 8 Oct 1812 Richard Fitzpatrick 24 Jan 1748 25 Apr 1813 65
 4 May 1813 Lord John Russell, later [1861] 1st Earl Russell 18 Aug 1792 28 May 1878 85
12 Mar 1817 Lord Robert Spencer  8 May 1747 23 Jun 1831 84
18 Jun 1818 Lord John Russell, later [1861] 1st Earl Russell
(to 1820) 18 Aug 1792 28 May 1878 85
27 Mar 1819 John Peter Grant  (to 1826) 21 Sep 1774 17 May 1848 73
11 Mar 1820 John Nicholas Fazakerley 7 Mar 1787 16 Jul 1852 65
22 May 1820 Hugh Fortescue,styled Viscount Ebrington,
later [1841] 2nd Earl Fortescue  (to Nov 1830)  13 Feb 1783 14 Sep 1861 78
[at the general election in Aug 1830,he was 
also returned for Devon,for which he chose 
to sit]
12 Jun 1826 Lord William Russell   20 Aug 1767  6 May 1840 72
For further information on the death of this MP,
see the note at the foot of this page
2 Aug 1830 William Russell,styled Baron Russell until 1839
and Marquess of Tavistock from 1839,later
[1861] 8th Duke of Bedford  (to Oct 1831)  1 Jul 1809 26 May 1872 62
27 Nov 1830 Lord John Russell, later [1861] 1st Earl Russell 18 Aug 1792 28 May 1878 85
[at the general election held in May 1831,he
was also returned for Devon,for which he 
chose to sit]
13 Jul 1831 John Heywood Hawkins  (to 1832) 21 May 1802 27 Jun 1877 75
25 Oct 1831 Francis Russell 7 Mar 1793 24 Nov 1832 39
10 Dec 1832 William Russell,styled Baron Russell until 1839
and Marquess of Tavistock from 1839,later
[1861] 8th Duke of Bedford  (to 1841)  1 Jul 1809 26 May 1872 62
Charles Richard Fox 6 Nov 1796 13 Apr 1873 76
 8 Jan 1835 John Rundle  (to 1843)        1791  4 Jan 1864 72
30 Jun 1841 Lord Edward Russell  (to 1847) 24 Apr 1805 21 May 1887 82
16 Mar 1843 John Salusbury Trelawney,later [1856]  
9th baronet  (to Apr 1852)  2 Jun 1816  4 Aug 1885 69
 2 Aug 1847 Edward Southwell Russell,later [1874] 23rd
Lord de Clifford  (to Jul 1852) 30 Apr 1824  6 Aug 1877 53
28 Apr 1852 Samuel Carter  (to 1853)   [he was unseated        1814 31 Jan 1878 63
on petition in favour of Robert Joseph
Phillimore 21 Feb 1853]
 8 Jul 1852 George Henry Charles Byng,later [1886]
3rd Earl of Strafford  (to Sep 1857) 22 Feb 1830 28 Mar 1898 68
21 Feb 1853 Robert Joseph Phillimore [kt 1862],later [1881] 
1st baronet  5 Nov 1810  4 Feb 1885 74
28 Mar 1857 Sir John Salusbury Trelawney,9th baronet  2 Jun 1816  4 Aug 1885 69
(to 1865)
 4 Sep 1857 Lord Arthur John Edward Russell
(to 1885) 13 Jun 1825  4 Apr 1892 66
 
12 Jul 1865 Joseph d'Aguilar Samuda 21 May 1813 27 Apr 1885 71
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1868
 7 Dec 1885 Hugh Fortescue,styled Viscount Ebrington,
later [1905] 4th Earl Fortescue 16 Apr 1854 29 Oct 1932 78
   Jul 1892 Hugh Courtenay Fownes Luttrell 10 Feb 1857 14 Jan 1918 60
11 Oct 1900 John Ward Spear  [kt 1911]        1848 27 Apr 1921 72
24 Jan 1906 Hugh Courtenay Fownes Luttrell 10 Feb 1857 14 Jan 1918 60
   Dec 1910 John Ward Spear  [kt 1911]        1848 27 Apr 1921 72
14 Dec 1918 Charles Williams 21 Apr 1886 28 Oct 1955 69
15 Nov 1922 Maxwell Ruthven Thornton 11 Jul 1878 30 Aug 1950 72
29 Oct 1924 Philip Percy Kenyon-Slaney 12 Feb 1896  9 Sep 1928 32
11 Oct 1928 Wallace Duffield Wright VC 20 Sep 1875 25 Mar 1953 77
For further information on this MP and VC
winner,see the note at the foot of this page
27 Oct 1931 Colin Mark Patrick 21 Oct 1893  7 Jan 1942 48
 2 Apr 1942 Henry Gray Studholme,later [1956] 1st baronet 13 Jun 1899 9 Oct 1987 88
31 Mar 1966 Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine,later [2001]
Baron Heseltine [L] 21 Mar 1933
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED FEB 1974 
TAYSIDE NORTH
 9 Jun 1983 William Connoll Walker 20 Feb 1929
1 May 1997 John Ramsay Swinney 13 Apr 1964
7 Jun 2001 Peter Wishart 9 Mar 1962
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 2005
TEIGNBRIDGE (DEVON)
 9 Jun 1983 Patrick Charles Martyn Nicholls 14 Nov 1948
7 Jun 2001 Richard Younger-Ross 29 Jan 1953
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 2010
TELFORD
1 May 1997 Bruce Joseph Grocott,later [2001]
Baron Grocott [L] 1 Nov 1940
7 Jun 2001 David Wright 22 Dec 1966
  TEST (SOUTHAMPTON)
23 Feb 1950 Horace Maybray King,later [1971] Baron
Maybray King [L] 25 May 1901 3 Sep 1986 85
26 May 1955 John Melbourne Howard        1913 10 Aug 1982 69
15 Oct 1964 Sir John Fletcher-Cooke 8 Aug 1911 19 May 1989 77
 
31 Mar 1966 Richard Charles Mitchell 22 Aug 1927 18 Sep 2003 76
18 Jun 1970 Stanley James Allen Hill 21 Dec 1926 16 Feb 1999 72
10 Oct 1974 Bryan Charles Gould 11 Feb 1939
 3 May 1979 Stanley James Allen Hill  [kt 1996] 21 Dec 1926 16 Feb 1999 72
1 May 1997 Alan Patrick Vincent Whitehead 15 Sep 1950
  TEWKESBURY (GLOUCESTERSHIRE)
12 Apr 1660 Sir Henry Capell, later [1692] 1st Baron 
Capell of Tewkesbury  (to 1685) 6 Mar 1638 30 May 1696 58
Richard Dowdeswell 24 Feb 1601 25 Mar 1673 72
11 Nov 1673 Sir Francis Russell,2nd baronet  (to 1690) c 1638 25 Jan 1706
23 Mar 1685 Richard Dowdeswell  (to 1710) c 1653 7 Oct 1711
18 Feb 1690 Sir Henry Capell,later [1692] 1st Baron
Capell of Tewkesbury 6 Mar 1638 30 May 1696 58
14 Nov 1692 Sir Francis Winnington 7 Nov 1634 1 May 1700 65
26 Jul 1698 Charles Hancock 13 Mar 1643 29 Mar 1717 74
10 Jan 1701 Edmund Bray 7 Sep 1678 6 Sep 1725 46
6 May 1708 Henry Ireton  (to 1712) c 1652 14 Dec 1711
10 Oct 1710 William Bromley  (to 1713) 28 Apr 1685 7 Feb 1756 70
1 Jan 1712 William Dowdeswell  (to 1722) 18 Aug 1682  5 Sep 1728 46
5 Sep 1713 Charles Dowdeswell c 1688 c Jun 1714
18 Jun 1714 Anthony Lechmere 17 Jun 1674  8 Feb 1720 45
25 Jun 1717 Nicholas Lechmere,later [1721] 1st Baron
Lechmere  5 Aug 1675 18 Jun 1727 51
25 Oct 1721 Thomas Gage,1st Viscount Gage [I]  (to 1754)     c 1695 21 Dec 1754
20 Mar 1722 George Reade        1687 28 Mar 1756 68
29 Apr 1734 Robert Tracy     c 1706 28 Sep 1767
 5 May 1741 John Martin  8 Jul 1692  7 Mar 1767 74
30 Jun 1747 William Dowdeswell 12 Mar 1721  6 Feb 1775 53
16 Apr 1754 Nicolson Calvert  (to 1774)     c 1724  4 May 1793
John Martin        1724 28 May 1794 69
26 Mar 1761 Sir William Codrington,2nd baronet  (to 1792) 26 Oct 1719 11 Mar 1792 72
 8 Oct 1774 Joseph Martin 19 Jan 1726 30 Mar 1776 50
 8 Apr 1776 James Martin  (to 1807)  4 Jun 1738 26 Jan 1810 71
19 Mar 1792 William Dowdeswell 27 Feb 1760 1 Dec 1828 68
18 Dec 1797 Christopher Bethell-Codrington
(to 1812)    Oct 1764  4 Feb 1843 78
 5 May 1807 Charles Hanbury-Tracy,later [1838] 1st
Baron Sudeley 28 Dec 1778 10 Feb 1858 79
 5 Oct 1812 John Edmund Dowdeswell  (to Dec 1832) 3 Mar 1772 11 Nov 1851 79
John Martin 27 Nov 1774  4 Jan 1832 57
23 Jan 1832 Charles Hanbury-Tracy,later [1838] 1st
Baron Sudeley  (to 1837) 28 Dec 1778 16 Feb 1858 80
12 Dec 1832 John Martin        1805  7 Mar 1880 74
 6 Jan 1835 William Dowdeswell  (to 1847)    Oct 1804  5 Feb 1870 65
25 Jul 1837 John Martin  (to 1859)        1805  7 Mar 1880 74
28 Jul 1847 Humphrey Brown        1803  6 Jun 1860 56
28 Mar 1857 Frederick Lygon,later [1866] 6th Earl
Beauchamp  (to 1864) 10 Nov 1830 19 Feb 1891 60
29 Apr 1859 James Martin  (to 1865) 18 May 1807
 9 Feb 1864 John Reginald Yorke  (to 1868) 25 Jan 1836  2 Mar 1912 76
12 Jul 1865 William Edward Dowdeswell    Jun 1841 12 Jul 1893 52
20 Mar 1866 Sir Edmund Athony Harley Lechmere,3rd
baronet  8 Dec 1826 18 Dec 1894 68
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1868
17 Nov 1868 William Edwin Price   [following the general        1841 10 Feb 1886 44
election in Apr 1880, his election was
declared void 29 Jun 1880]
10 Jul 1880 Richard Biddulph Martin,later [1905] 1st
baronet 12 May 1838 23 Aug 1916 78
 5 Dec 1885 John Reginald Yorke 25 Jan 1836  2 Mar 1912 76
 2 Jul 1886 Sir John Edward Dorington,1st baronet 24 Jul 1832  5 Apr 1911 78
23 Jan 1906 Michael Hugh Hicks-Beach,styled Viscount
Quenington from 1915 19 Jan 1877 23 Apr 1916 39
17 May 1916 William Frederick Hicks-Beach 14 Jul 1841  7 Sep 1923 82
   CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1918 
BUT REVIVED 1997
1 May 1997 Laurence Anthony Robertson 29 Mar 1958
  THANET EAST (KENT)
28 Feb 1974 Jonathan William Patrick Aitken 30 Aug 1942
For further information on this MP, see the note
at the foot of this page
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
THANET NORTH (KENT)
 9 Jun 1983 Roger James Gale  [kt 2012] 20 Aug 1943
THANET SOUTH (KENT)
 9 Jun 1983 Jonathan William Patrick Aitken 30 Aug 1942
For further information on this MP, see the note
at the foot of this page
1 May 1997 Stephen John Ladyman 6 Nov 1952
6 May 2010 Laura Jane Sandys 1964
  THANET WEST (KENT)
28 Feb 1974 William Rupert Rees-Davies 19 Nov 1916 12 Jan 1992 75
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  THETFORD (NORFOLK)
   Apr 1660 Sir Philip Wodehouse,3rd baronet 24 Jul 1608 6 May 1681 72
Robert Paston,later [1663] 2nd baronet 
and [1679] 1st Earl of Yarmouth 29 May 1631 8 Mar 1683 51
25 Mar 1661 Sir Allen Apsley  (to 1679) 28 Aug 1616 15 Oct 1683 67
William Gawdy 24 Sep 1612 18 Aug 1669 56
22 Oct 1669 Joseph Williamson  [kt 1672]  (to Mar 1685) 25 Jul 1633 3 Oct 1701 68
24 Feb 1679 William Harbord  [at the 1681 general election, 25 Apr 1635 31 Jul 1692 57
he was also returned for Launceston,but the
Parliament was dissolved before he chose
which seat to represent]
26 Mar 1685 Henry Heveningham  [unseated on petition 5 Jan 1651 26 Nov 1700 49
in favour of Sir Joseph Williamson 17 Jun 1685]
William de Grey  (to 1689) 21 Oct 1652 27 Feb 1687 34
17 Jun 1685 Sir Joseph Williamson  25 Jul 1633 3 Oct 1701 68
15 Jan 1689 Sir Henry Hobart  [he was also returned for c 1658 21 Aug 1698
Norfolk for which he chose to sit]
William Harbord  (to Jun 1689)   [he was also 25 Apr 1635 31 Jul 1692 57
returned for Scarborough and for Launceston,
for which he chose to sit]
14 Feb 1689 Sir Francis Guybon  (to 1695) c 1638 23 Jan 1705
20 Jun 1689 John Trenchard  [kt Oct 1689] 30 Mar 1649 27 Apr 1695 46
28 Feb 1690 William Harbord  [he was also returned for 25 Apr 1635 31 Jul 1692 57
Launceston,for which he chose to sit]
Sir Francis Guybon  (to 1695) c 1638 23 Jan 1705
Sir Joseph Williamson 25 Jul 1633 3 Oct 1701 68
Adam Felton
Double return. Harbord and Guybon declared
elected 3 May 1690
26 May 1690 Baptist May 4 Nov 1628 2 Mar 1697 68
13 Nov 1695 Sir Joseph Williamson  [he was also returned 25 Jul 1633 3 Oct 1701 68
for Rochester,for which he chose to sit]
Sir John Wodehouse,4th baronet  (to 1698) 23 Mar 1669 9 Oct 1754 85
10 Jan 1696 James Sloane  [his election was declared 1655 5 Nov 1704 49
void 27 Jan 1700]
26 Jul 1698 Sir Joseph Williamson  [he was also returned 25 Jul 1633 3 Oct 1701 68
for Rochester,for which he chose to sit]
16 Jan 1699 Charles Paston,styled Baron Paston  29 May 1673 15 Dec 1718 45
(to Jan 1701)
8 Feb 1700 James Sloane 1655 5 Nov 1704 49
10 Jan 1701 Sir Joseph Williamson  [he was also returned 25 Jul 1633 3 Oct 1701 68
for Rochester,for which he chose to sit]
Edmund Soame  (to Nov 1701) c 1669 8 Sep 1706
19 Mar 1701 Sir Thomas Hanmer,4th baronet  (to 1702) 24 Sep 1677 7 May 1746 68
29 Nov 1701 Sir John Wodehouse,4th baronet 23 Mar 1669 9 Oct 1754 85
20 Jul 1702 Robert Benson,later [1713] 1st Baron Bingley 25 Mar 1676 9 Apr 1731 55
Edmund Soame c 1669 8 Sep 1706
14 May 1705 Sir Thomas Hanmer  24 Sep 1677 7 May 1746 68
Sir John Wodehouse,4th baronet 23 Mar 1669 9 Oct 1754 85
7 May 1708 Robert Baylis 14 Nov 1673 21 Nov 1748 75
Thomas de Grey 13 Aug 1680 18 Dec 1765 85
7 Oct 1710 Sir Thomas Hanmer   [he was also returned 24 Sep 1677 7 May 1746 68
for Suffolk,for which he chose to sit]
Dudley North  (to 1722) 23 Aug 1684  4 Feb 1730 45
12 Dec 1710 Sir Edmund Bacon,6th baronet c 1680 30 Apr 1755
21 Aug 1713 Sir William Barker,5th baronet c 1685 23 Jul 1731
29 Jan 1715 John Ward 13 Jun 1670 17 Mar 1749 78
26 Mar 1722 Sir Edmund Bacon,5th baronet  (to 1739)  7 Aug 1693  4 Oct 1738 45
Robert Jacomb 14 Dec 1732
 1 Feb 1733 Charles Fitzroy (Fitzroy-Scudamore from 1749)     c 1713 22 Aug 1782
(to 1754)  [at the general election in 
Apr 1754,he was also returned for Hereford,
for which he chose to sit]
10 Feb 1739 Lord Augustus Fitzroy 16 Oct 1716 28 May 1741 24
29 Dec 1741 Lord Henry Beauclerk  (to 1761) 11 Aug 1701  6 Jan 1761 59
12 Dec 1754 Herbert Westfaling     c 1699 28 Apr 1773
28 Mar 1761 Henry Seymour Conway  (to Oct 1774) 12 Aug 1719  9 Jul 1795 75
Aubrey Beauclerk,later [1781] 2nd Baron
Vere of Hanworth and [1787] 5th Duke of
St.Albans  3 Jun 1740  9 Feb 1802 61
16 Mar 1768 John Drummond 27 Apr 1723 25 Jul 1774 51
 6 Sep 1774 Charles Stanhope,styled Viscount Petersham,
later [1779] 3rd Earl of Harrington 20 Mar 1753 15 Sep 1829 76
10 Oct 1774 Charles Fitzroy,later [1780] 1st Baron 25 Jun 1737 21 Mar 1797 59
Southampton
Charles Fitzroy-Scudamore   (to 1782)     c 1713 22 Aug 1782
11 Sep 1780 Richard Hopkins  (to 1784)     c 1728 19 Mar 1799
 6 Apr 1782 George Henry Fitzroy,styled Earl of Euston,
later [1811] 4th Duke of Grafton 14 Jan 1760 28 Sep 1844 84
 5 Apr 1784 Sir Charles Kent,1st baronet     c 1743 14 Mar 1811
George Jennings     c 1721  9 Jun 1790
21 Jun 1790 Robert John Buxton,later [1800] 1st baronet 27 Oct 1753  3 Jun 1839 85
Joseph Randyll Burch  (to 1802)     c 1756 23 Sep 1826
27 May 1796 John Harrison  (to 1806)        1738  7 Feb 1811 72
 8 Jul 1802 Thomas Creevey  5 Mar 1768  5 Jun 1838 70
 4 Nov 1806 Lord William Fitzroy  (to 1812) 1 Jun 1782 13 May 1857 74
James Mingay   [he was unseated on petition  9 Mar 1752  9 Jul 1812 60
in favour of Thomas Creevey 4 Feb 1807]
 4 Feb 1807 Thomas Creevey  (to 1818)  5 Mar 1768  5 Jun 1838 70
 8 Oct 1812 Lord John Edward Fitzroy 24 Sep 1785 28 Dec 1856 71
19 Jun 1818 Lord Charles Augustus Fitzroy  (to 1830) 28 Feb 1791 13 Jun 1865 74
Nicholas William Ridley-Colborne,later [1839]
1st Baron Colborne 14 Apr 1779  3 May 1854 75
12 Jun 1826 William Bingham Baring,later [1848] 2nd
Baron Ashburton     Jun 1799 23 Mar 1864 64
2 Aug 1830 Lord James Henry Fitzroy  (to 1834) 19 Apr 1804 26 Jul 1834 30
Francis Baring,later [1864] 3rd Baron 
Ashburton 20 May 1800  6 Sep 1868 68
2 May 1831 Alexander Baring,later [1835] 1st Baron 
Ashburton 27 Oct 1774 12 May 1848 73
10 Dec 1832 Francis Baring,later [1864] 3rd Baron 
Ashburton  (to 1841) 20 May 1800  6 Sep 1868 68
 8 Aug 1834 Henry Fitzroy,styled Earl of Euston,later [1844]
5th Duke of Grafton  (to 1842)   [at the general 10 Feb 1790 26 Mar 1863 73
election on 30 Jun 1841,William Bingham
Baring received 86 votes and the Earl of
Euston and Sir James Flower each received 
71 votes. On scrutiny,Euston's vote was 
reduced by 1 and he was declared unduly
elected on 4 May 1842]
30 Jun 1841 William Bingham Baring,later [1848] 2nd
Baron Ashburton  (to 1848)    Jun 1799 23 Mar 1864 64
4 May 1842 Sir James Flower,2nd baronet 14 Dec 1794 17 May 1850 55
28 Jul 1847 William Henry Fitzroy,styled Earl of Euston,
later [1863] 6th Duke of Grafton   (to 1863)  5 Aug 1819 21 May 1882 62
 3 Aug 1848 Francis Baring,later [1864] 3rd Baron 
Ashburton    20 May 1800  6 Sep 1868 68
 
 9 Dec 1857 Alexander Hugh Baring,later [1868] 4th 
Baron Ashburton  (to 1867) 4 May 1835 18 Jul 1889 54
21 Apr 1863 Lord Frederick John Fitzroy  4 Apr 1823 12 Feb 1919 95
12 Jul 1865 Robert John Harvey Harvey,later [1868] 1st
baronet  (to 1868) 16 Apr 1817 19 Jul 1870 53
For information on the death of this MP,see the
note at the foot of the page containing details
of his baronetcy
 2 Dec 1867 Edward Strathearn Gordon,later [1876]
Baron Gordon of Drumearn [L] 10 Apr 1814 21 Aug 1879 65
 CONSTITUENCY DISENFRANCHISED 1868 
  THIRSK (YORKSHIRE)
16 Apr 1660 Barrington Bourchier  (to 1661) c 1627 29 Oct 1695
William Stanley  [he was also returned for 18 Oct 1640 25 Oct 1670 30
Liverpool,for which he chose to sit]
Thomas Harrison
Double return between Stanley and Harrison.
Stanley seated 3 May 1660
13 Jul 1660 Charles Kerr,2nd Earl of Ancram [S] 6 Aug 1624 10 Sep 1690 66
c Apr 1661 Sir Thomas Ingram  (to 1673) 23 Jun 1614 13 Feb 1672 57
Walter Strickland c 1623 1670
 8 Feb 1671 Sir William Frankland,1st baronet  (to 1685) c 1640 2 Aug 1697
c Jan 1673 Sir William Wentworth c 1636 Jun 1692
Election declared void 6 Feb 1673
18 Feb 1673 Sir William Wentworth c 1636 Jun 1692
Robert Wharton
Double return. Wentworth seated 30 Oct 1673
15 Feb 1679 Nicholas Saunderson c 1657 Dec 1692
15 Feb 1681 Sir William Ayscough 31 Jul 1614 12 Oct 1695 81
26 Mar 1685 Sir Hugh Cholmley,4th baronet 21 Jul 1632 9 Jan 1689 56
Thomas Frankland,later [1697] 2nd 
baronet  (to 1695) Sep 1665 30 Oct 1726 61
11 Jan 1689 Richard Staines  (to 1698) 4 Jul 1650 28 Jan 1705 54
29 Oct 1695 Sir Godfrey Copley,2nd baronet  (to 1709) c 1653 9 Apr 1709
26 Jul 1698 Sir Thomas Frankland,2nd baronet  (to 1711) Sep 1665 30 Oct 1726 61
6 May 1709 Leonard Smelt c 1683 30 May 1740
10 Oct 1710 Ralph Bell  (to 1717)  3 Nov 1733
21 Jun 1711 Thomas Worsley 16 Nov 1686 2 Mar 1751 64
1 Sep 1713 Thomas Frankland,later [1726] 3rd baronet     c 1685 17 Apr 1747
(to 1747)
30 Jul 1717 Thomas Pitt  5 Jul 1653 28 Apr 1726 72
28 Mar 1722 William St.Quintin,later [1723] 4th baronet     c 1699  9 May 1770
17 Aug 1727 Thomas Robinson,later [1761] 1st
Baron Grantham 24 Apr 1695 30 Sep 1770 75
25 Apr 1734 Frederick Meinhardt Frankland
(to 1749)     c 1694  8 Mar 1768
12 May 1747 Thomas Frankland,later [1768] 5th baronet 26 Jun 1718 21 Nov 1784 66
(to 1780)
 1 Apr 1749 William Monckton,later [1751] 2nd Viscount
Galway [I]     c 1725 18 Nov 1772
16 Apr 1754 Roger Talbot 14 Aug 1713  7 Mar 1777 63
30 Mar 1761 Henry Grenville 15 Sep 1717 22 Apr 1784 66
26 Dec 1765 James Grenville,later [1797] 1st Baron
Glastonbury  6 Jul 1742 26 Apr 1825 82
19 Mar 1768 William Frankland        1720 28 Dec 1805 85
12 Oct 1774 Thomas Frankland,later [1784] 6th baronet 18 Sep 1750  4 Jan 1831 80
12 Sep 1780 Sir Thomas Gascoigne,8th baronet  7 Mar 1745 11 Feb 1810 64
Beilby Thompson 17 Apr 1742 10 Jun 1799 57
 3 Apr 1784 Sir Thomas Frankland,5th baronet 26 Jun 1718 21 Nov 1784 66
Sir Gregory Page-Turner,3rd baronet  (to 1805) 16 Feb 1748  4 Jan 1805 56
11 Jan 1785 Robert Vyner 27 Jun 1717 19 Jul 1799 82
28 May 1796 Sir Thomas Frankland,6th baronet 18 Sep 1750 4 Jan 1831 80
 7 Nov 1801 William Frankland  (to 1806) 26 Jul 1761 10 Jun 1816 54
 6 Feb 1805 Richard Neville,later [1825] 3rd Baron 
Braybrooke 26 Sep 1783 13 Mar 1858 74
 4 Nov 1806 Robert Greenhill (Greenhill-Russell from 1815), 1763 12 Dec 1836 73
later [1831] 1st baronet  (to 1832)
James Topping 26 Apr 1756 12 Jan 1821 64
 9 May 1807 William Frankland 26 Jul 1761 10 Jun 1816 54
31 Mar 1815 Sir Robert Frankland,7th baronet  (to 1834) 16 Jul 1784 11 Mar 1849 64
REPRESENTATION REDUCED
TO ONE MEMBER 1832
21 Mar 1834 Sir Samuel Crompton,1st baronet    Jul 1785 27 Dec 1848 63
 1 Jun 1841 John Bell  6 Aug 1809  5 Mar 1851 41
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page
21 Mar 1851 Sir William Payne-Gallwey,2nd baronet        1807 19 Dec 1881 74
5 Apr 1880 Lewis Payn Dawnay  1 Apr 1846 30 Jul 1910 64
NAME ALTERED TO "THIRSK &
MALTON" 1885
  THIRSK & MALTON (YORKSHIRE)
 4 Dec 1885 Lewis Payn Dawnay  1 Apr 1846 30 Jul 1910 64
   Jul 1892 John Grant Lawson,later [1905] 1st baronet 28 Jul 1856 27 May 1919 62
23 Jan 1906 Charles William Reginald Duncombe,styled
Viscount Helmsley,later [1915] 2nd Earl of 
Feversham  8 May 1879 15 Sep 1916 37
12 Feb 1915 Edmund Russborough Turton,later [1926] 1st
baronet  1 Nov 1857  9 May 1929 71
30 May 1929 Robert Hugh Turton,later [1974] Baron 
Tranmire [L]  8 Aug 1903 17 Jan 1994 90
28 Feb 1974 John Deane Spence  7 Dec 1920 4 Mar 1986 65
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
BUT RE-CREATED 2010
27 May 2010   Anne Caroline Ballingall McIntosh 20 Sep 1954
[the poll was delayed following the death of
one of the candidates]
  THORNABY
28 Feb 1974 Ian William Wrigglesworth [kt 1991],later
[2013] Baron Wrigglesworth [L] 8 Dec 1939
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1983
  THORNBURY (GLOUCESTERSHIRE)
 4 Dec 1885 Edward Stafford Howard  [kt 1909] 28 Nov 1851  8 Apr 1916 64
14 Jul 1886 John William Plunkett,later [1889] 17th
Baron Dunsany 31 Aug 1853 16 Jan 1899 45
   Jul 1892 Charles Edward Hungerford Atholl
Colston,later [1916] 1st Baron Roundway 16 May 1854 17 Jun 1925 71
26 Jan 1906 Athelstan Rendall 16 Nov 1871 12 Jul 1948 76
15 Nov 1922 Herbert Charles Woodcock  2 Jun 1871 18 Jan 1950 78
 6 Dec 1923 Athelstan Rendall 16 Nov 1871 12 Jul 1948 76
29 Oct 1924 Derrick Wellesley Gunston,later [1938]
1st baronet 26 Feb 1891 13 Jul 1985 94
26 Jul 1945 Joseph Herbert Alpass 2 Feb 1873 31 May 1969 96
 CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1950 
  THORNBURY AND YATE (AVON)
6 May 2010 Steven John Webb 18 Jul 1965
  THURROCK
26 Jul 1945 Leslie Judah Solley 15 Dec 1905  8 Jan 1968 62
23 Feb 1950 Hugh James Delargy 26 Sep 1908  4 May 1976 67
15 Jul 1976 Oonagh Anne McDonald Feb 1938
11 Jun 1987 Timothy Simon Janman 9 Sep 1956
9 Apr 1992 Andrew Stuart MacKinlay 24 Apr 1949
6 May 2010 Jacqueline Doyle-Price 5 Aug 1969
  TIPPERARY
       1801 Francis James Mathew,styled Viscount 
Mathew,later [1806] 2nd Earl of Landaff [I]  2 Jan 1768 12 Mar 1833 65
John Bagwell     c 1752 21 Dec 1816
17 Nov 1806 Montague James Mathew  (to Apr 1819) 18 Aug 1773 20 Mar 1819 45
Francis Aldborough Prittie  4 Jun 1779  8 Mar 1853 73
17 Jul 1818 Richard Butler,styled Viscount Caher,later
[1819] 2nd Earl of Glengall 17 May 1794 22 Jun 1858 64
 2 Mar 1819 William Bagwell  (to 1826) c 1776  4 Nov 1826  
 8 Apr 1819 Francis Aldborough Prittie  (to 1831)  4 Jun 1779  8 Mar 1853 73
28 Jun 1826 John Hely Hutchinson,later [1832] 3rd Earl of
Donoughmore [I] 1787 14 Sep 1851 64
21 Aug 1830 Thomas Wyse  (to 1832)  9 Dec 1791 15 Apr 1862 70
12 May 1831 John Hely Hutchinson,later [1832] 3rd Earl of
Donoughmore [I] 1787 14 Sep 1851 64
8 Aug 1832 Robert Otway-Cave 1 Mar 1796 29 Nov 1844 48
17 Dec 1832 Cornelius O'Callaghan        1809 16 Aug 1849 40
Richard Lalor Sheil  (to 1841) 17 Aug 1791 25 May 1851 59
21 Jan 1835 Robert Otway Cave  (to 1845) c 1796 30 Nov 1844
14 Jul 1841 Valentine Maher          1780    Jan 1844 63
10 Feb 1844 Nicholas Maher  (to 1852) 18 Oct 1851
21 Feb 1845 Richard Albert Fitzgerald        1806 c Jun 1847 40
11 Aug 1847 Francis Scully  (to Apr 1857)        1820 18 Aug 1864 44
26 Jul 1852 James Sadleir  [expelled 16 Feb 1857] c 1815 4 Jun 1881
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
16 Mar 1857 Daniel O'Donoghue  (to Feb 1865) c 1824  7 Oct 1889
14 Apr 1857 Laurence Waldron  (to Jul 1865)        1811  3 Apr 1875 63
24 Feb 1865 Charles Moore  (to 1869)        1804 15 Aug 1869 65
24 Jul 1865 John Blake Dillon 5 May 1814 15 Sep 1866 52
17 Oct 1866 Charles William White  (to 1875)  9 Sep 1838 15 Oct 1890 52
27 Nov 1869 Jeremiah O'Donovan Rossa    [as a convicted Sep 1831 29 Jun 1915 83
felon, he was declared ineligible to sit
10 Feb 1870]
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
23 Feb 1870 Denis Caulfield Heron        1824 15 Apr 1881 56
14 Feb 1874 William Frederick Ormond O'Callaghan
(to 1877) 14 Nov 1852 20 Apr 1877 24
16 Feb 1875 John Mitchel   [he was adjudged to be a  3 Nov 1815 20 Mar 1875 59
convicted felon and thus ineligible to be
elected 18 Feb 1875. At the subsequent
by-election held on 13 Mar 1875, he was
again returned. He died a week later and
the seat was assigned to Stephen Moore 
(the defeated candidate at the 13 Mar by-
election) on 27 May 1875]
For further information on this MP, see the
note at the foot of this page.
27 May 1875 Stephen Moore  (to 1880)        1836
16 May 1877 Edmund Dwyer Gray 29 Dec 1845 27 Mar 1888 42
8 Apr 1880 Patrick James Smyth  (to Jan 1885)        1823 12 Jan 1885 61
For further information on this MP, see the
note regarding John Mitchel at the foot of the
page containing details of the constituency
of Tipperary.
John Dillon 4 Sep 1851  4 Aug 1927 75
23 Mar 1883 Thomas Mayne  (to 1885)        1832
12 Jan 1885 John O'Connor 10 Oct 1850 27 Oct 1928 78
 SPLIT INTO 4 DIVISIONS 1885 
SEE BELOW
  TIPPERARY EAST
 2 Dec 1885 Thomas Joseph Condon        1850 Jul 1943 93
14 Dec 1918 Pierce McCann 2 Aug 1882  6 Mar 1919 36
6 Mar 1919 vacant
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  TIPPERARY MID
 8 Dec 1885 Thomas Mayne        1832
15 May 1890 Henry Harrison 17 Dec 1867 20 Feb 1954 86
   Jul 1892 John McCarthy        1862  8 Feb 1893 30
24 Feb 1893 James Francis Hogan 29 Dec 1855  9 Nov 1924 68
15 Oct 1900 Kendal Edmund O'Brien        1849 21 Nov 1909 60
22 Jan 1910 John Hackett  5 Nov 1865 2 Oct 1940 74
14 Dec 1918 James Aloysius Burke 14 Jun 1893 10 Jun 1967 73
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
  TIPPERARY NORTH
   Dec 1885 Patrick Joseph O'Brien        1855 10 Jan 1911 55
17 Jan 1906 Michael Hogan        1853
   Dec 1910 John Joseph Esmonde 27 Jan 1862 17 Apr 1915 53
18 Jun 1915 John Lymbrick Esmonde,later [1943]
14th baronet 15 Dec 1893  6 Jul 1958 64
14 Dec 1918 Joseph McDonagh 25 Dec 1922
CONSTITUENCY ABOLISHED 1922 
Wallace Duffield Wright VC, MP for Tavistock 1928-1931
Wright was a Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion, Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, present
during the Kano-Sokoto Expedition in Nigeria, when, on 24 March 1903, his actions won 
him the Victoria Cross. The citation in the London Gazette of 11 September 1903 reads:-
'On March 24, 1903, Lieutenant Wright, with only one officer and 44 men, took up a position
in the path of the advancing enemy, and sustained the determined charges of 1,000 horse
and 2,000 foot for two hours, and when the enemy, after heavy losses, fell back in good 
order, Lieutenant Wright continued to follow them up till they were in full retreat. The
personal example of this officer, as well as his skilful leadership, contributed largely to the
brilliant success of this affair. He in no way infringed his orders by his daring initiative, as,
though warned of the possibility of meeting large bodies of the enemy, he had purposely
been left a free hand.'
Wright was elected to the House of Commons for the constituency of Tavistock in 1928 and
sat until he retired at the 1931 general election.
Jonathan William Patrick Aitken, MP for Thanet East 1974-1983 and
Thanet South 1983-1997
Before his downfall, Aitken was once considered to be a candidate for high political office.
At one stage he had a relationship with Margaret Thatcher's daughter, Carol, but upset Mrs 
Thatcher when he ended the relationship. Mrs Thatcher was further upset when Aitken
suggested to an Egyptian newspaper that Mrs Thatcher "probably thinks that Sinai is the
plural of Sinus". As a result, Aitken languished on the backbenches during Thatcher's
premiership. 
His political career took off under John Major, being appointed Minister of State for Defence
Procurement in 1992 and he entered the Cabinet as Chief Secretary to the Treasury in 
1994. He resigned from Cabinet in 1995 in order to defend himself against accusations that
while serving as Minister of State for Defence Procurement he had violated ministerial rules
by allowing an Arab businessman, Said Ayas, to pay for his stay at the Paris Ritz.
The Guardian newspaper reported on this story in its edition of 10 April 1995. Aitken then 
took the fatal step of suing the Guardian for libel. In June 1997, just after Aitken had lost
his seat at the general election, Aitken's action collapsed. His explanation was that his 
wife had paid for the hotel, but it was shown that, at the time, his wife been in Switzerland.
Aitken was then charged with perjury and perverting the course of justice and received an
18 month jail sentence, of which he served 7 months.  He was unable to pay for his legal
costs and was, as a result, declared bankrupt. He is one of the few people to resign from
membership of the Privy Council, along with John Profumo and John Stonehouse.
According to "Brewer's Rogues, Villains Eccentrics" by William Donaldson (Cassell, London 
2002), on his release he became a born-again Christian under the influence of the Reverend
Nicky Gumbel, a charismatic preacher practising at the Holy Trinity Church in Brompton, 
London. At Gumbel's so-called Alpha courses participants make animal noises and then fall 
over backwards. Other converts include Samantha Fox, the former topless model.
For further reading see the Guardian's webpage at http://www.guardian.co.uk/aitken
and also refer to "The Liar" by Luke Harding, Davie Leigh and David Palister (Penguin 1997)
Jabez Spencer Balfour, MP for Tamworth 1880-1885 and Burnley 1889-1893
The following is extracted from an article by David McKie titled 'House of Scandal' which was
published in 'The Guardian' on 13 March 2004.
…..Jabez Spencer Balfour [was] Liberal member for Tamworth from 1880 to 1885 and for
Burnley from 1889 until things came badly unstuck. The institution that made him was the 
Liberator Building Society - a name designed to entice nonconformist England and Wales,
since it echoed that of the Liberation Society, the principal voice of nonconformity against
the established church. That appeal was compounded by employing nonconformist ministers
desperate to augment their pitiful wages as agents of Balfour's Society. Exuding this odour
of sanctity, the Liberator soon became the biggest building society in the land, ringed with
satellite companies, and in time its own bank.
Increasingly, Balfour turned his hand to big prestige projects in central London, including the
building of what he intended to be the biggest hotel in Europe. His reputation in the City
rose to a point where companies eager to better themselves were glad to take this man with
the golden touch on board. In his home town, Croydon, his reputation as its leading citizen
was confirmed when in 1883 the place achieved borough status. Though not a councillor, 
Balfour was invited to accept nomination as mayor - a choice he repaid with lavish banquets
and parties at his fine house in Wellesley Road and in its handsome garden. Though he 
modestly disclaimed any such ambition, his real aim was to be MP for Croydon - so much
handier for his interests at Westminster and in the City than Tamworth, a constituency that
in any case was destined to disappear in a redistribution of seats. [This is not strictly 
correct - Tamworth was to lose one of its two members under the Reform Act of 1884].
But he lost in the General Election of 1885; and to add to his humiliation, local Tories 
arranged to have the Dead March From Saul played outside his house. Thereafter, he gave
up on Croydon, installing himself at grand addresses in London and buying most of the
village of Burcot near Abingdon, where he entertained on a lavish scale and lorded it as
squire.
But his empire's apparent success was built on illusion. The profits Balfour's companies
signalled at the close of each year with handsome dividends and bonuses for the directors,
were almost entirely fictitious. Very few of his schemes made any money; his real gift was
in cooking the books. And as the 1890s progressed, suspicions began to grow. The 
'Financial Times' and 'The Economist' warned investors against him. But too late. In
September 1892, the portrait of Jabez Spencer JP MP that hung in an honoured place on the
wall of the Croydon Liberal Club inexplicably crashed to the floor. Within days, his bank, and
thereafter all the companies with which it was linked, met the same fate.
Resigning his seat at Burnley, Balfour pledged himself to a reconstruction which he promised
would largely avert the catastrophe that shareholders and investors feared. But it soon 
became clear that the scale of his debts made rescue impossible. Thousands were ruined;
suicides were regularly reported; people who had saved for old age in the hope of avoiding 
the workhouse found themselves now condemned to it. When the police arrested two of
his main subordinates, Balfour vanished. Claims to have seen him came in from around the
world. In fact, he was 7,000 miles away in Argentina - a country, he had established, with
which Britain had no arrangements for extradition.
Eventually, Balfour was traced to the town of Salta, not far from the border with Chile. Here
he had set up house with the daughter, half his age, of a business colleague called Henry
Freeman. After Freeman's death, this daughter had been regarded as Balfour's ward; now 
they were living together as Mr and Mrs Samuel Butler. The great champion of temperance
was engaged in buying a brewery. Though the Argentinean government was sympathetic to
British attempts to recapture the fugitive, nothing could be done except through an
extradition treaty. But here Balfour had read things wrongly. Though no treaty existed, one
had been agreed, and was waiting for ratification. And in due course the Argentinean
parliament made it law.
Balfour and his supporters now hit on a new and ingenious tactic. It was stipulated in
Argentinean law that no one could leave the country if litigation was pending against him. 
Very well: the friends of Balfour would organise themselves into a rota and sue him one by 
one.
At this point, some of London's men in Buenos Aires despaired of ever getting Balfour back.
Better, perhaps, they said, to forget the whole thing. But the extradition expert at Scotland
Yard, Inspector Frank Froest, had other ideas. Dispatched by the police commissioner with
instructions not to come back until he had Balfour in handcuffs - he should expect, he was 
told, a stay of around five years - he soon found a way of breaking the deadlock.
What had happened before was that judgments given in Buenos Aires in favour of Balfour's
return were consistently blocked by local officials in Salta, not least because local people
believed that having this famous English financier among them was set to bring them 
prosperity. The answer Froest devised, as he boasted to his family later, amounted to 
kidnap. He commissioned a train, concealed it in sidings not far from Salta, waited until the
federal courts had given their latest ruling in favour of extradition - and then had Balfour
aboard the train before Salta officials knew what was happening.
They were hardly out of town before a posse on horseback set off in pursuit, armed with a
warrant for the return of Balfour and the arrest of Inspector Froest. As the train thundered
southwards, the inspector, who had stationed himself on the footplate to prevent any delay,
saw the horsemen approaching. One detached himself and rode his horse on to the track
ahead of the train, waving his warrant and calling on the driver to stop. But Froest 
obstructed the driver by throwing himself across the controls. The train surged on at
undiminished speed and struck down and killed both the horse and the rider. Later, the 
British government offered $50 as compensation, stipulating that this must cover both the
man and the horse.
Back in Buenos Aires, there were further foiled attempts at a rescue before Balfour was
taken home, in handcuffs, on the boat 'Tartar Prince.' In November 1895, he was sentenced 
to 14 years' imprisonment with hard labour. Released in 1906, he began a new career as a 
journalist, writing a series of prison memoirs that led page one of Lord Northcliffe's 'Weekly
Dispatch' for 26 consecutive weeks. Later, he set up as a mining engineer; later still, at the 
age of 71, Balfour took a post in Burma, but was ordered back to London on the grounds
that he would not survive in such heat. He returned to a bitter winter, which probably killed
him.
He died in February 1916 on a train taking him, at 72, to south Wales to begin a new job at
Morriston Colliery. Twenty years earlier, Balfour had been the most notorious man in the 
land, burned in effigy on bonfire night after his companies crashed. Now, until they examined
his papers, no one knew who he was.
For further reading see 'Jabez; the Rise and Fall of a Victorian Rogue' by David McKie
(Atlantic Books, London, 2004)
Lord William Russell, MP for Surrey 1789-1807 and Tavistock 1807-1819
and 1826-1830
Lord William Russell was murdered in his bed by his valet, Francois Benjamin Courvoisier
on 6 May 1840. The following is Courvoisier's entry in "The Newgate Calendar":-
'On the morning of Wednesday, the 6th of May, 1840, Lord William Russell, an aged member
of the illustrious house of Bedford, was discovered to have been murdered in his bed, at his
house, No. 14 Norfolk Street, Park Lane. The deceased was the posthumous child of Francis,
Marquis of Tavistock, eldest son of the fourth Duke of Bedford, by Lady Elizabeth Keppel,
daughter of the second Earl of Albemarle. He was the third and youngest brother of the two
late Dukes of Bedford, and uncle of the existing duke, who was the seventh of the family
of the family who had succeeded to the title. He was uncle also to the noble and highly
talented Lord John Russell, who at the time of this most melancholy catastrophe held the
office of Secretary of State for Colonial Affairs. By his marriage with Lady Charlotte Villiers,
eldest daughter of the fourth Earl of Jersey, his lordship had seven children, several of 
whom were still alive and were married into other noble families; but at the time of his death
he was a widower, his wife having died in the year 1806. His lordship was born in August,
1767, and was consequently in the seventy-third year of his age.
 
'Lord William Russell resided, attended only by his servants, at the house in Norfolk Street,
Park Lane. His household consisted of two female servants - a housemaid, Sarah Mancer, 
and a cook, Mary Hannell - his valet, Francois Benjamin Courvoisier, and a coachman and 
groom, all of whom lived in the house, with the exception of the two latter individuals. The
house was small, and consisted of only two rooms on a floor. On the basement storey were
the kitchen and the usual offices, and a room used by Courvoisier as a pantry. On the 
ground floor were two parlours, used as dining-rooms; on the first floor were the bedroom 
and dressing-room of his lordship, and in the storey above were the sleeping apartments of 
the servants. His lordship was a member of Brooks's Club, in St. James's Street, and usually
spent a considerable portion of the day there, but he generally dined at home, and then,
having passed several hours in reading, commonly retired to rest at about twelve o'clock.
The valet had been in his lordship's service for a period of only five weeks, and in the course
of that time had been heard by his fellow-servants to express himself in terms of dislike to
his master, whom he described as testy and dissatisfied, and to declare that if he only had
his money he should soon return to Switzerland, of which country he was a native.
 
'On the 5th of May his lordship rose at nine o'clock, and breakfasted at the usual hour, and
at about noon he went out to go to Brooks's, in accordance with his usual habit. Before he
quitted the house, however, he called his valet, and gave him several messages to deliver,
amongst which was one to the coachman to prepare his carriage and be in readiness to
take him home from his club at five o'clock. Upon Courvoisier going into the kitchen after
this, he declared his fears that he should forget some of his errands, and when he recounted
them he omitted that to the coachman. At half-past five his lordship returned home to 
dinner in a cab, and showed some dissatisfaction at the neglect of his servant; but it does
not appear that he exhibited any such anger as could well excite a feeling of hatred or ill-
will. Dinner was served at about seven o'clock; coffee was subsequently handed to his
lordship, and at about nine o'clock he retired to his library. At this time the three house-
servants only were at home. Some other persons had called in the course of the day, but 
they had all left and now Courvoisier, Sarah Mancer and Mary Hannell only were in the
house. Hannell had been out, but upon her return Courvoisier admitted her, and it was
observed that he locked and chained the street door after her entrance. Supper was, at
about ten o'clock, prepared in the kitchen, and some beer was fetched by Courvoisier, 
but he quitted the house and returned by way of the area, and the gate and kitchen door
were fastened by Hannell upon his readmission. The means of access to the house from
the street, therefore, were closed, and the only entrance from the back, on the basement
storey, was through the pantry.
'At about half-past ten the women-servants went to bed, leaving Courvoisier to attend
upon his master, and it was not until half-past twelve o'clock that his lordship rang his
bell for him to assist him in retiring to his apartment.
 
'On the following morning, at about half-past six o'clock, Sarah Mancer, the housemaid,
rose from her bed, and, having dressed herself, quitted her bedroom. As she passed the
door of the valet's room she knocked, in order to awake him, and then proceeded 
downstairs. Upon reaching the lower floors of the house she found everything in such a
state of confusion as to excite a suspicion in her mind that thieves had entered the house
with a view to the commission of a robbery. She hurried through the drawing-room, the
parlour and the passage on the ground floor; and there she found the furniture strewed
about, the drawers and boxes open, and a bundle lying on the ground, as if ready packed 
up to be carried off, while the street door had been unfastened, and was only upon the
latch. A momentary examination of these matters was sufficient to excite alarm in her mind,
and, hurrying upstairs again, she repaired to the cook to inform her of what she had seen,
by whose directions she at once proceeded to the apartment of the valet. Ten minutes had
scarcely elapsed since she had previously knocked at his door, and half-an-hour was
ordinarily occupied by him in dressing, but, to her surprise, she now found him dressed and
ready to descend. Hastily she informed him of what she had witnessed below, and he
accompanied her downstairs. Upon his seeing the state in which the lower part of the house
appeared to be, he exclaimed "Oh God! Somebody has robbed us." Mancer now suggested
the propriety of ascertaining whether anything had occurred to his lordship, and they went
together to his bedroom.
 
'Immediately upon their entrance Courvoisier proceeded to the window to open the shutters,
but Mancer went to the bedside, and saw the pillow saturated with blood, and his lordship
lying in bed, dead, with his throat cut. The woman screamed and ran out of the room, then
rushed from the house and obtained the aid of some neighbours and of the police, by whom
a surgeon was called in. Upon the entrance of these persons, Courvoisier, whose conduct
throughout the whole transaction had been of the most singular description, was found
dreadfully agitated, leaning on the bed where the body of his master lay; and although
questions were asked him he made no answer, and took no part in the proceedings which
succeeded. In a few minutes he appeared to recover, and at his suggestion an intimation
of the occurrence was conveyed to the son of the deceased nobleman, who resided in
Belgrave Square. When Courvoisier went downstairs he immediately took Sarah Mancer into
his pantry, pointed to some marks of violence which were perceptible upon the door which
was open, and remarked: "It was here they entered."
 
'The police now took possession of the house, and a minute examination of the premises
was made, the result of which was a firm conviction in their minds that the murder had been
perpetrated by an inmate of the house, and that a simulated robbery had been got up. A
parcel was found to contain many articles of his lordship's property. A cloth cloak, which had
been hanging up in the hall, was found rolled up, and within it were his lordship's gold opera-
glass, his gold toothpick, a silver sugar-dredger, a pair of spectacles, a caddy-spoon, and a
thimble belonging to the cook, but it was remarked that the latter articles were of a nature
which a thief would rather have put into his pocket than have packed up in so large a
parcel, and although the drawers of the sideboard in the parlour and of the writing-desk in 
the drawing-room were pulled open, nothing was found to have been extracted. In his
lordship's bedroom a state of things presented itself which tended to confirm the suspicions
of the police, and to supply a motive for the crime. His lordship had been in possession of a
case containing ivory rouleau, which were usually employed to hold gold coins. The boxes
which belonged to his lordship would hold about five hundred sovereigns, and it had been
remarked by Courvoisier that although he was entrusted with the keys of his master's
drawers, his lordship would never permit him to go to this case. Upon examination by the 
police the rouleau case was found to have been opened, and the rouleaux having been
searched, fruitlessly, for money, they had been placed on one side. The jewel-box and the
note-case of the deceased had also been opened, and while from the former several articles
of small value had been taken, from the latter a ten-pound note, known to have been in the
possession of his lordship, had been carried off. A purse which contained gold had also
disappeared. These circumstances induced a strong suspicion against Courvoisier, and his 
boxes were searched, but nothing was discovered which tended to fix upon him the guilt of
the crime, but it was nevertheless thought advisable that he should remain under 
surveillance
 
'On Friday, the 8th of May, a police officer examined the floor, the skirting-board and the 
sink, and behind the skirting board he found five gold rings, the property of his lordship. In
the same place were also found five pieces of gold coin and a piece of wax. Behind another
part of the skirting-board was found a Waterloo medal, which was known to have been in
the possession of his lordship, with a ribbon attached to it; and there was also found the 
ten-pound note which has been mentioned before. The fact of the discovery of this note
was a most important feature of the case. If it had been removed from the note-case, in
which it had been placed, by any ordinary thief, it would undoubtedly have been carried
off by him. Found as it was, however, concealed behind the skirting-board of the pantry,
it was taken as almost conclusive proof of the guilt of the valet, because no hand but his
could have placed it in that position; for it was proved that, from the moment of the
discovery of the murder, he was placed under surveillance, and could not therefore, have
conveyed away anything from the house. A further search was subsequently made, and a
split gold ring, on which his lordship kept his keys, and which had been attached to his
watch by a ribbon, was found, and then, on the evening of the next day, a locket was 
taken from Courvoisier's pocket; it contained a small portion of the hair of the nobleman's
deceased lady. A short time before his murder he had missed this relic, to which he 
attached great value. Upon this the police thought fit to take Courvoisier into custody, and,
after he had been taken off, still further discoveries were made. On the 11th of May a
chased gold key was discovered, and on Wednesday, the 13th, it was determined to
examine the sink in the pantry. A part of the sink was covered with lead, and when that
portion had been removed in the course of the investigation, it occurred to the police
officer that there was something extraordinary in the appearance of the lead. He turned it
up, and there he found the watch which had been placed at the noble lord's bed-head on
the night of the murder, but which, the next morning, was discovered to have been 
removed.
 
'These were the material facts adduced in evidence against Courvoisier upon his various
examinations before the magistrates; but strong as were the suspicions excited against
him, it was felt that there was still good reason to believe that he would escape conviction.
An experienced attorney, Mr. Flower, was engaged to conduct his defence, and so strong
a feeling had been excited in his behalf that a liberal subscription was raised among the
foreign servants in London to defray the expenses of employing the necessary counsel to
to appear for him at his trial. Mr. Hobler, an attorney, was engaged on behalf of the 
prosecution, and at length, on Thursday, the 18th of June, the trial of the prisoner came on
at the Central Criminal Court, before Lord Chief Justice Tindal and Mr. Baron Parke. The
prisoner, who was an alien, elected to be tried by a jury of Englishmen, and when the
indictment was read he pleaded not guilty.
 
'Evidence in proof of the circumstances which we have detailed was then produced, and
the first day's proceedings had closed when new and important testimony, affording 
conclusive proof of the guilt of the prisoner, was discovered.
 
'In the course of inquiries which had been made subsequent to the murder, some articles
of plate were found to have been removed from the house of his lordship, but after the
minute examination of the house which took place, there was good reason to believe that
this portion of the transaction had occurred long before, and not after, the murder. All the
efforts of the police to discover this stolen property had proved ineffectual; and, although
large rewards had been offered for its production, it was not until the evening of the first
day's trial that it was brought forward. An intimation was then conveyed to Mr. Hobler of
the fact of its being in the possession of Madame Piolaine, the keeper of a French hotel in
Leicester Place, Leicester Square, and when it was inspected by persons who were
competent to speak to its identity, they at once most positively proved that it was the
same which had been formerly in the possession of his lordship. The circumstances of this
most extraordinary discovery was directly notified to the prisoner's attorney; and when
Courvoisier was by him consulted as to the truth of the allegations made, he at once
admitted his guilt.
'At this stage of the proceedings it was felt that such a confession placed the advocates
who had been employed on his behalf in a condition of the greatest difficulty. For them to
have thrown up their briefs would have been at once to admit the uselessness of any
efforts to save their client from an ignominious death - a duty to the performance of which
they had pledged themselves; and it was therefore determined that they should continue
their defence of the prisoner; although the line of conduct which it became proper to pursue
was necessarily much altered by the discovery which had been made to them. The
instructions which they had originally received went to the extent of calling upon to 
endeavour to procure the implication of the female servants of his lordship, and of the
police, who were to be charged as their companions and associates in crime in the murder
of Lord [William] Russell, and in a conspiracy to secure the conviction and execution of
the valet; but although the former portion of this defence was of course deemed fit to be
withdrawn, a considerable degree of abuse was heaped upon the police by Mr. C. Phillips
in his speech for the defence of the prisoner, in consequence of some improper conduct
of which, he alleged, they had been guilty, tending to prejudice his case, and even going
to the length of fabricating evidence to excite suspicion in the minds of the jury against him.
 
'Mr. C. Phillips addressed the jury at very great length on the part of the prisoner; he 
contended with great talent that the evidence was that of suspicion only. Lord Chief Justice
Tindal having summed up, a verdict of guilty was returned, and the learned judge passed 
upon the prisoner the sentence of death.
 
'On the following day the wretched man made a confession, in which he said, "His lordship
was very cross with me and told me I must quit his service. As I was coming upstairs from
the kitchen I thought it was all up with me; my character was gone, and I thought it was
the only way I could cover my faults by murdering him. This was the first moment of any
idea of the sort entering my head. I went into the dining-room and took a knife from the
sideboard. I do not remember whether it was a carving-knife or not. I then went upstairs.
I opened his bedroom door and heard him snoring in his sleep; there was a rushlight in his
room burning at this time. I went near the bed by the side of the window, and then I
murdered him. He just moved his arm a little; he never spoke a word."
 
'The execution was carried out at Newgate, on the 6th of July, 1840.'
 
John Bell, MP for Thirsk 1841-1851
In July 1849, a commission was held to determine the state of mind of John Bell, the sitting 
MP for Thirsk. The following account of the proceedings is taken from the "Daily News" of 
10 July 1849, having been reprinted from the "Yorkshire Gazette."
'After the jury had been sworn in and the Commissioner had explained the nature of the 
inquiry, 'Mr Blanshard, who appeared as counsel on behalf of the petitioners, stated the 
case. The petitioners, he said, were Mrs McBean and Mrs Dainton, sisters and co-heiresses 
of Mr Bell, who had for some time represented the borough of Thirsk in parliament. He was 
a gentleman who had enjoyed in Thirsk and the neighbourhood great consideration and
popularity, and he was sure that the jury would all feel that the object of this inquiry was
for his comfort. It would be perfectly clear that this investigation had been originated for
the purpose of protecting Mr Bell and his property, and that he might be surrounded by 
those comforts which he had hitherto enjoyed. The law was perfectly clear, too. It was 
different to what it was fifty years ago. The same power by which this commission issued
was able to remove it, if, as was not very likely, Mr Bell should be restored to full health,
so that he could again enjoy his property and have unbounded liberty; the same power 
which imposed could take away the restriction. He should not only adduce medical evidence
respecting the untoward and unfortunate circumstance which called the together, but also
the testimony of parties who had been about Mr Bell's person. He should first call a gentle
man of high consideration in this neighbourhood - Mr Serjeantson, of Kirby Knowle, who
would speak to the delusions under which Mr Bell laboured and to his state of health
generally up to a late period. He should also call Mr Bell's butler, and Mr Milligan, a person 
who had been accustomed to the care of lunatics, and who had been about the person of 
Mr Bell, under an assumed guise. The jury would also have before them Dr Ryott, and two
physicians from York, Dr Belcombe and Dr Simpson, all professional gentlemen of consider-
able eminence. From these sources the jury would find that Mr Bell did labour under extra-
ordinary delusions - one of the most prevalent ones being that he was a bird. Sometimes he 
fancied himself to be an eagle, and made motions with his arms, as if endeavouring to raise 
himself from the ground to fly. Again, he supposed, and would not be persuaded to the 
contrary, that iodine was put in his tea. Sometimes he suspected his sister, and sometimes 
said it was done down stairs by the cook, or some of the servants. And his fatuity is such 
that, when dinner is announced, he will forget his way down stairs, and sometimes be found 
in his dressing room; and on one or two occasions, when seated at dinner with Mr and Mrs 
McBean, he has fancied himself in his dressing room, and begun to undress himself - all
showing that for some time  he has been in an unsound state of mind and labouring under
delusions. He is sometimes violent, strikes his keeper, and screams out, without any cause.
He is subject to fits of paroxysm of this sort, frequently requiring restraint, and then, when
these fits have passed off, he is quiet and tractable.'
'A succession of witnesses was then called, each of whom testified concerning Bell's mental
state, repeating his belief that he was a bird. Bell also told his relatives and acquaintances
that, while he was a bird, he could fly much better than a bird, because he kept his 
shoulders oiled.'
After the medical witnesses unanimously agreed that Bell was totally incompetent of caring
for himself, the jury returned its verdict that Bell was of unsound mind. Notwithstanding this
verdict, no action could be taken regarding Bell's membership of the House of Commons, and
he remained member for Thirsk until his death in March 1851. It was not until 1886 that the
passing of the Lunacy (Vacating of Seats) Act enabled insane members to be expelled from
Parliament. Since that time, as far as I am aware, the provisions of this Act have been 
invoked on only one occasion, when Charles Leach, the member for Colne Valley, was
thrown out of Parliament in August 1916.
James Sadleir, MP for Tipperary 1852-1857
James Sadleir was the younger brother of John Sadleir, MP for Carlow 1847-1853 and Sligo
1853-1856 (qv under Carlow).
James was elected as MP for Tipperary in 1852. At the time, he was also the Managing 
Director and Chairman of the Tipperary Bank, which had been founded by his brother John. 
In February 1856, the bank collapsed and John committed suicide. Even though John had, in 
a letter to James' wife, absolved James of all blame, James was left to carry the can. The 
bank's creditors began to take legal action against James to recover their losses. Initially
James had the sympathy of the public, but it soon emerged that James was implicated in the 
frauds, being accused of abstracting £250,000 of the bank's stock in a desperate attempt to
help his brother. As a result, any previous sympathy quickly evaporated. Charges were finally 
brought against James on 18 July 1856, but too late - he had absconded a month earlier, on
17 June.
It was speculated that James had fled to New Orleans or South America. When he failed to
appear to answer the charges against him, he was expelled from the House of Commons on
16 February 1857. His creditors seized all of his (and his wife's) property and sold it to 
recover their losses.
On 13 May 1857, the 'Dublin Evening Post' received a letter postmarked Paris from James in 
which he denied involvement in the frauds. This denial was, in turn, disproved by his cousin,
James Scully, who had also been implicated in the scandal.
James never returned to England to face justice, living out the remainder of his life in
Switzerland. In June 1881, James was taking his regular walk on the Zürichberg, a wooded 
hill overlooking Zürich, when a thief attempted to rob him of his gold watch. James resisted 
and was shot dead, his body being found a week later in a thicket by the side of the path.
For further reading, I recommend 'Prince of Swindlers' by James O'Shea (Geography
Publications, Dublin, 1999).
Jeremiah O'Donovan Rossa, MP for Tipperary 1869-1870
Rossa was born in county Cork, the son of tenant farmers. Inspired by the combination of 
the Great Famine in the 1840s and the Young Irelander rebellion of 1848, Rossa founded
the Phoenix National Literary Society, essentially a secret society whose aim was to win
independence from Great Britain, by force of arms if necessary. Two years later, he
became a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, better known as the 'Fenians.'
As a result of his activities as the manager of the Nationalist newspaper 'The Irish People,'
he was arrested in 1865 and imprisoned for life on a charge of high treason. While serving
this sentence, he was elected to the House of Commons in a by-election in November 1869
for the seat of Tipperary. However, as a convicted felon, he was ruled to be ineligible to
sit and his election was declared void in February 1870.
After agreeing to an enforced exile, Rossa was released in 1871 and emigrated to New York.
From here he organised the 'Dynamite Campaign,' a series of bombings in English cities
throughout the 1880s. This campaign brought him adoration in Ireland and made him 
infamous in Britain. The British authorities attempted to have him extradited, but without 
success.
On 9 January 1885, a man named Captain Thomas Phelan, a fellow Irishman, was visiting
Rossa's office when he received multiple stab wounds in an assassination attempt. Phelan's
'crime' appears to have been that he allowed an interview to be printed in a Kansas City
newspaper in which he stated that he had knowledge of some forthcoming bombings.
Just over three weeks later, on 2 February 1885, Rossa himself was the target for 
assassination. The potential assassin was a young English nurse, named Mrs. Lucille Yseult
Dudley, who appears to have decided to kill Rossa as revenge for the Fenians'
bombing campaigns in England.
Two days before the attempted assassination, Mrs. Dudley had sent Rossa a letter in which
she stated that she was interested in the Irish cause, but did not care to visit his office.
She would, therefore, meet him at the corner of Chambers Street and Broadway. After
meeting her, Rossa and Mrs. Dudley went to a hotel, where they talked. Mrs. Dudley told
Rossa that she would be able to give him a considerable sum of money if anything good 
could be done in the Irish cause, and that she would call again in two day's time.
On that day, she again met Rossa on the street corner. She showed him a receipt, which
he was to sign for the money to be donated, and suggested they go somewhere for the
purpose of handing over the money. While walking to their destination, Mrs. Dudley suddenly
stepped back, drew a five-shot revolver and began shooting at Rossa. Only one shot hit
him, in his back below the left shoulder-blade. She was quickly subdued and taken to the
nearest police station.
When questioned, Mrs. Dudley admitted to shooting Rossa, but declined to give her reasons.
When she inquired about Rossa, she expressed her sorrow that he had only been wounded.
Rossa himself was taken to hospital, where, ironically, he was placed in the same ward as
Captain Phelan, who appeared to be pleased that Rossa had been shot. Rossa eventually
made a full recovery and lived for another 30 years.
The reaction to the attempted assassination in contemporary newspapers was predictable.
'The Times' reported that "[Rossa's] wound is not a dangerous one, but this fact causes
general regret, as it is generally held that he richly deserves to be killed." A number of
other English newspapers praised Mrs. Dudley as being the re-incarnation of Charlotte 
Corday. On the other hand, contemporary Irish papers described the assassination attempt
as an outrage and suggested that Dudley was an agent of the British government. In July 
1885 Mrs. Dudley was found to be insane and was lodged in a lunatic asylum.
John Mitchel. MP for Tipperary February-March 1875
Mitchel was born in Dungiven, co. Londonderry and from a young age became one of 
Ireland's leading campaigners for independence. It is not the purpose of this note to discuss
Mitchel's fight for Irish independence, a lengthy summary of which can be found under 'John
Mitchel' in Wikipedia. Rather, my purpose is to inform readers of Mitchel's escape from 
Australia, whence he had been transported as a convict.
Suffice to say, therefore, that Mitchel was found guilty of treason felony in May 1848 and
sentenced to 14 years transportation. Initially, Mitchel was sent to the confusingly-named
Ireland Island in Bermuda, but his health deteriorated in the tropical environment, and in
1849 he was transferred to the convict ship Neptune bound for the Cape of Good Hope. 
However, riots among the good citizens of Cape Town over the dumping of convicts in the 
colony caused the Neptune to be diverted to Tasmania, then known as Van Diemen's Land.
Mitchel landed at Hobart on 7 April 1850. As a political prisoner, he has better treated than
other prisoners and was soon granted a ticket-of-leave, provided he gave his word of 
honour not to escape from the colony and reported to a police magistrate once a month.
He settled on a small farm a few miles from the inland town of Bothwell, where several
convicts were assigned to help him work the property. His wife and family arrived from 
Ireland to join him, and altogether Mitchel led a comfortable life, but he pined to get back
into the fight for Irish freedom.
His fellow freedom fighters in Ireland had not forgotten about him, and in 1853 they sent a
young man by the name of Patrick James Smyth to Hobart. Well supplied with cash, his 
orders were to get Mitchel away to the United States. For his part, Mitchel was eager to 
escape, but he told Smyth that he was a man of honour and could not go back on his 
pledged word not to escape.
The two considered the situation and agreed on a way out of the impasse. Mitchel decided
he could escape with honour unsoiled if he formally renounced the ticket-of-leave to a 
magistrate and then immediately fled. Accordingly, on 6 June 1853, Mitchel and Smyth 
galloped into Bothwell where they strode into the Court House and confronted Magistrate 
Davis, who sat in an office with his clerk and an attending constable. Mitchel slapped down 
a letter on the table and ordered Davis to read it. The magistrate saw both men standing
menacingly before him, hands on the evident revolvers inside their jackets. The note read, 'I 
hereby resign my ticket-of-leave and present myself to be taken into custody.' Mitchel and 
Smyth bade the magistrate good morning and strode to the door. By the time Davis could
summon assistance, Mitchel and Smyth were galloping out of town.
A few miles down the road, they changed horses and clothes. Mitchel set off across 
country, hoping to make his way over the mountains to Launceston with the aid of friendly 
landowners. Smyth's job was to throw pursuers off the scent. He galloped to the town of 
Oatlands and noisily asked directions to the coastal town of Spring Bay. As a result, the 
police rushed off on a wild goose chase to Spring Bay, while Smyth sat comfortably in the
coach bound for Launceston.
The Governor of Tasmania, Sir William Denison, threw every available man into the hunt for
Mitchel, who, hidden and guided by farmers who disliked Denison's regime, and who were 
also well paid with Smyth's cash, eventually reached a property not far from Launceston. 
There he received a message from Smyth that the brig Don Juan was to pick him up from a 
deserted beach near the mouth of the Tamar River on the night of 27 June 1853. 
Unfortunately for Mitchel, however, the brig failed to arrive. Mitchel then hid out on another
farm while Smyth arranged something else.
In a few days, word reached him that a passage was booked on the regular Launceston-
Melbourne steamer for a Catholic priest, Father Macnamara. A parcel of suitable clothing
next arrived and, donning the disguise, Mitchel set off to board the steamer. Before he got
to the wharf, he was met by a seaman with a message from the steamer's captain, who
dared not take the bogus priest aboard. He advised Mitchel to hire a boat and crew to row
him out to meet the steamer after it had sailed, and he would then be taken aboard.
Mitchel arranged for this suggestion to take place, but the weather intervened and the
steamer failed to see them.
Returning to Launceston, Mitchel bought a ticket to Hobart in the name of Father Blake.
During the journey, Mitchel was sat next to Tasmania's Attorney-General, but his disguise
stood the test. Several times they were stopped by police - on these occasions Mitchel
solemnly blessed his pursuers and wished them luck in their search.
Arrived at Hobart, Mitchel was secreted in a safe hide-out until 19 July 1853, when, as Mr.
Wright, he boarded the brig Emma and sailed to Sydney. There he was rejoined by Smyth,
who had brought with him Mitchel's wife and family. On 2 August 1853, they sailed for San
Francisco aboard the merchantman, the Orkney Lass.
News of Mitchel's escape had preceded him. Arriving in America, he was greeted and feted 
by the large Irish population. In New York, Mitchel started a rabid anti-British propaganda
journal, The Citizen, which attained a wide circulation. He soon became embroiled in the
controversy over slavery and strangely, for a person with freedom-loving ideals, he 
supported the South.
In 1861, Mitchel moved to France. He hoped to foment war between France and Britain, so
that in the resulting turmoil, Ireland could press for self-government. The American Civil War
broke out while he was in France and he rushed back to aid the Southern cause. His two 
sons were killed during the fighting, while Mitchel worked in an ambulance unit while editing 
a daily paper in his spare time.
After the war had concluded, Mitchel moved back to New York, where his writings and 
speeches on behalf of the beaten South soon got him into trouble. The military commandant 
of New York at the time, Major General John Adams Dix, had him thrown into prison. Mitchel
was released after four months, but his health was broken. He started another paper, The 
Irish Citizen, and wrote voluminously on Irish history.
In the summer of 1874, Mitchel risked a return to his homeland, but shortly thereafter 
returned to America.  At a by-election for the seat of Tipperary in February 1875, Mitchel 
was elected unopposed. The election was immediately declared void on the grounds that 
Mitchel was an escaped felon and a fresh election was held on 13 March 1875. Again 
Mitchel was elected, but a week later he died, thus avoiding any further action by 
Parliament.
Patrick Smyth, Mitchel's helper in fleeing Tasmania, was also elected to the House of
Commons, sitting for the constituency of co. Westmeath between 1871 and 1880.
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