PEERAGE
Last updated 11/07/2013
Date Rank Order Name Born Died Age
CLEVELAND
5 Feb 1626 E 1 Thomas Wentworth,4th Baron Wentworth 1591 25 Mar 1667 75
Created Earl of Cleveland 5 Feb 1626
See "Wentworth"
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3 Aug 1670 D 1 Barbara Palmer 27 Nov 1640 9 Oct 1709 68
Created Baroness Nonsuch,Countess
of Southampton and Duchess of
Cleveland 3 Aug 1670
For information on this peeress,see the note at
the foot of this page
9 Oct 1709 2 Charles Fitzroy 18 Jun 1662 9 Sep 1730 68
Created Baron of Newbury,Earl of
Chichester and Duke of Southampton
10 Sep 1675
Illegitimate son of Charles II
9 Sep 1730 3 William Fitzroy 19 Feb 1698 18 May 1774 76
to Peerages extinct on his death
18 May 1774
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29 Jan 1833 D 1 William Harry Vane,3rd Earl of Darlington 27 Jul 1766 29 Jan 1842 75
Created Marquess of Cleveland
5 Oct 1827 and Baron Raby and Duke of
Cleveland 29 Jan 1833
MP for Totnes 1788-1790 and Winchilsea
1790-1792. Lord Lieutenant Durham 1792-1842
KG 1839
29 Jan 1842 2 Henry Vane 6 Aug 1788 18 Jan 1864 75
MP for Durham 1812-1815, Winchilsea
1816-1818, Tregony 1818-1826, Totnes
1826-1830, Saltash 1830-1831 and
Shropshire South 1832-1842 KG 1842
18 Jan 1864 3 William John Frederick Powlett (Vane from 3 Apr 1792 6 Sep 1864 72
Mar 1864)
MP for Winchelsea 1812-1815, co.Durham
1815-1831, St Ives 1846-1852 and Ludlow
1852-1857
6 Sep 1864 4 Harry George Powlett 19 Apr 1803 21 Aug 1891 88
to MP for Durham South 1841-1859 and
21 Aug 1891 Hastings 1859-1864. KG 1865
Peerages extinct on his death
CLIFDEN
12 Jan 1781 V[I] 1 James Agar 25 Mar 1735 29 Dec 1788 53
Created Baron Clifden 27 Jul 1776
and Viscount Clifden 12 Jan 1781
PC [I] 1784
29 Dec 1788 2 Henry Agar (Agar-Ellis from 4 Feb 1804) 22 Jan 1761 13 Jul 1836 75
MP for Heytesbury 1793-1802
He subsequently succeeded to the Barony of
Mendip (qv) in 1802
13 Jul 1836 3 Henry Agar-Ellis 25 Feb 1825 20 Feb 1866 40
Succeeded to the Barony of Dover (qv)
1833
20 Feb 1866 4 Henry George Agar-Ellis 3 Sep 1863 28 Mar 1895 31
28 Mar 1895 5 Leopold George Frederick Agar-Ellis 13 May 1829 10 Sep 1899 70
MP for Kilkenny 1857-1874
On his death the Barony of Dover became extinct
10 Sep 1899 6 Thomas Charles Agar-Robartes 1 Jan 1844 19 Jul 1930 86
MP for Cornwall East 1880-1882. Lord
Lieutenant Cambridge 1906-1915
19 Jul 1930 7 Francis Gerald Agar-Robartes 14 Apr 1883 15 Jul 1966 83
15 Jul 1966 8 Arthur Victor Agar-Robartes 9 Jun 1887 22 Dec 1974 87
to The Barony and Viscountcy of Clifden
22 Dec 1974 became extinct on his death, while the Barony
of Mendip passed to the 6th Earl of Normanton (qv)
CLIFFORD
17 Feb 1628 B 1 Henry Clifford 28 Feb 1591 11 Dec 1643 52
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Clifford 17 Feb 1628
Succeeded as 5th Earl of Cumberland (qv)
in 1641
For further information on this peerage, which
was created in error,see the note at the foot of
this page
11 Dec 1643 2 Elizabeth Clifford 18 Sep 1618 6 Jan 1691 72
6 Jan 1691 3 Charles Boyle,Viscount Dungarvan [I] and Baron 17 Nov 1639 12 Oct 1694 54
Clifford of Lanesborough (see below)
MP for Tamworth 1670-1679
12 Oct 1694 4 Charles Boyle,2nd Earl of Burlington 30 Oct 1660 9 Feb 1704 43
9 Feb 1704 5 Richard Boyle,3rd Earl of Burlington 25 Apr 1694 3 Dec 1753 59
3 Dec 1753 6 Charlotte Elizabeth Cavendish 27 Oct 1731 24 Dec 1754 23
24 Dec 1754 7 William Cavendish,later [1764] 5th Duke of
Devonshire 14 Dec 1748 29 Jul 1811 62
29 Jul 1811 8 William Spencer Cavendish,6th Duke of
to Devonshire 21 May 1790 18 Jan 1858 67
18 Jan 1858 On his death the peerage fell into abeyance
CLIFFORD OF CHUDLEIGH
22 Apr 1672 B 1 Thomas Clifford 1 Aug 1630 17 Oct 1673 43
Created Baron Clifford of
Chudleigh 22 Apr 1672
MP for Totnes 1660-1661. Secretary of
State 1672. Lord High Treasurer 1672-1673
17 Oct 1673 2 Hugh Clifford 21 Dec 1663 12 Oct 1730 66
12 Oct 1730 3 Hugh Clifford 14 Apr 1700 26 Mar 1732 31
26 Mar 1732 4 Hugh Clifford 29 Sep 1726 1 Sep 1783 56
1 Sep 1783 5 Hugh Edward Henry Clifford 2 Jul 1756 15 Jan 1793 36
15 Jan 1793 6 Charles Clifford 28 Nov 1759 29 Apr 1831 71
29 Apr 1831 7 Hugh Charles Clifford 29 May 1790 28 Feb 1858 67
28 Feb 1858 8 Charles Hugh Clifford 27 Jul 1819 5 Aug 1880 61
5 Aug 1880 9 Lewis Henry Hugh Clifford 24 Aug 1851 19 Jul 1916 64
19 Jul 1916 10 William Hugh Clifford 17 Dec 1858 5 Jul 1943 84
For further information on this peer,see the
note at the foot of this page
5 Jul 1943 11 Charles Oswald Hugh Clifford 24 Apr 1887 1 Feb 1962 74
1 Feb 1962 12 Lewis Joseph Hugh Clifford 7 Feb 1889 27 Aug 1964 75
27 Aug 1964 13 Lewis Hugh Clifford 13 Apr 1916 17 Mar 1988 71
17 Mar 1988 14 Thomas Hugh Clifford 17 Mar 1948
CLIFFORD OF LANESBOROUGH
4 Nov 1644 B 1 Richard Boyle,2nd Earl of Cork 20 Oct 1612 15 Jan 1698 85
Created Baron Clifford of
Lanesborough 4 Nov 1644 and Earl of
Burlington 20 Mar 1664
See "Burlington" - peerage extinct 1753
***************
16 Jul 1689 Charles Boyle 17 Nov 1639 12 Oct 1694 54
He was summoned to Parliament by a Writ of
Acceleration as Viscount Dungarvan [I] 28 Jan
1663 and as Baron Clifford of Lanesborough
16 Jul 1689
He was the son and heir apparent of the 2nd Earl
of Burlington, but died before he could
succed to that title
***************
20 Nov 1694 Charles Boyle 30 Oct 1660 9 Feb 1704 43
He was summoned to Parliament as Baron
Clifford of Lanesborough 20 Nov 1694
He succeeded as the 2nd Earl of Burlington (qv)
in 1698 with which title this peerage the merged
until its extinction in 1753
CLIFTON
1 Dec 1376 B 1 John de Clifton 10 Aug 1388
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Clifton 1 Dec 1376
10 Aug 1388 2 Constantine de Clifton 1372 1395 23
1395 3 John de Clifton c 1394 by Dec 1447
to On his death the peerage fell into abeyance
by Dec 1447
CLIFTON OF LEIGHTON BROMSWOLD
9 Jul 1608 B 1 Sir Gervase Clifton c 1579 Oct 1618
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Clifton de Layton Bromswold
9 Jul 1608
Oct 1618 2 Katherine Stuart,Duchess of Lennox c 1592 17 Sep 1637
17 Sep 1637 3 James Stuart,4th Duke of Lennox & 1st 6 Apr 1612 30 Mar 1655 42
Duke of Richmond
30 Mar 1655 4 Esme Stuart,2nd Duke of Richmond 2 Nov 1649 10 Aug 1660 10
10 Aug 1660 5 Mary Butler,Countess of Arran 1649 4 Jul 1667 18
4 Jul 1667 6 Charles Stuart,3rd Duke of Richmond 7 Mar 1640 12 Dec 1672 32
12 Dec 1672 7 Katherine O'Brien 5 Dec 1640 11 Nov 1702 61
Her right to the peerage was recognised by the
House of Lords 7 Feb 1674
For information of her successful claim,see the
note at the foot of this page
11 Nov 1702 8 Catherine Hyde 29 Jan 1673 11 Aug 1706 33
11 Aug 1706 9 Edward Hyde 6 Oct 1691 12 Feb 1713 21
12 Feb 1713 10 Theodosia Bligh 9 Nov 1695 30 Jul 1722 26
30 Jul 1722 11 Edward Bligh,later [1728] 2nd Earl of Darnley 9 Nov 1715 22 Jul 1747 31
22 Jul 1747 12 John Bligh,3rd Earl of Darnley 1 Oct 1719 31 Jul 1781 61
31 Jul 1781 13 John Bligh,4th Earl of Darnley 30 Jun 1767 17 Mar 1831 63
17 Mar 1831 14 Edward Bligh,5th Earl of Darnley 25 Feb 1795 11 Feb 1835 39
11 Feb 1835 15 John Stuart Bligh,6th Earl of Darnley 16 Apr 1827 14 Dec 1896 69
14 Dec 1896 16 Edward Henry Stuart Bligh,7th Earl of Darnley 21 Aug 1851 31 Oct 1900 49
31 Oct 1900 17 Elizabeth Adeline Mary Bligh 22 Jan 1900 8 Jul 1937 37
8 Jul 1937 18 Esme Ivo Bligh,9th Earl of Darnley 11 Oct 1886 29 May 1955 68
29 May 1955 19 Peter Stuart Bligh,10th Earl of Darnley 1 Oct 1915 15 Jun 1980 64
15 Jun 1980 20 Adam Ivo Stuart Bligh,11th Earl of Darnley 8 Nov 1941
CLIFTON OF RATHMORE
14 Sep 1721 B[I] 1 John Bligh 1687 12 Sep 1728 41
Created Baron Clifton of Rathmore
14 Sep 1721,Viscount Darnley 7 Mar
1723 and Earl of Darnley 29 Jun 1725
See "Darnley"
CLINTON
6 Feb 1299 B 1 John de Clinton c 1312
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Clinton 6 Feb 1299
c 1312 2 John Clinton 1303 c 1335
c 1335 3 John Clinton 1326 8 Sep 1398 72
8 Sep 1398 4 William Clinton 1379 30 Jul 1432 53
30 Jul 1432 5 John Clinton 1410 24 Sep 1464 54
24 Sep 1464 6 John Clinton 1434 29 Feb 1488 53
29 Feb 1488 7 John Clinton 4 Jun 1515
4 Jun 1515 8 Thomas Clinton 1490 7 Aug 1517 27
7 Aug 1517 9 Edward Clinton,1st Earl of Lincoln 1512 16 Jan 1585 72
KG 1551
16 Jan 1585 10 Henry Clinton,2nd Earl of Lincoln 1540 29 Sep 1616 76
29 Sep 1616 11 Thomas Clinton,3rd Earl of Lincoln c 1568 15 Jan 1619
15 Jan 1619 12 Theophilus Clinton,4th Earl of Lincoln 1600 21 May 1667 66
21 May 1667 13 Edward Clinton,5th Earl of Lincoln c 1650 25 Nov 1692
to On his death the barony fell into abeyance
25 Nov 1692
15 Mar 1721 14 Hugh Fortescue 1696 2 May 1751 54
5 Jul 1746 E 1 Lord Lieutenant Devon 1721-1733
to Abeyance terminated in his favour 15 Mar 1721
2 May 1751 Created Baron Fortescue of Castle Hill (qv)
and Earl Clinton 5 Jul 1746
On his death the Earldom became extinct,the
barony of Fortescue devolved to his half-brother
by a special remainder and the barony of Clinton
again fell into abeyance
14 Mar 1760 15 Margaret Walpole 13 Jan 1781
Abeyance terminated in her favour
13 Jan 1781 16 George Walpole,3rd Earl of Orford 2 Apr 1730 5 Dec 1791 61
5 Dec 1791 17 Robert George William Trefusis 5 Oct 1764 28 Aug 1797 32
28 Aug 1797 18 Robert Cotton St.John Trefusis 28 Apr 1787 Oct 1832 45
Oct 1832 19 Charles Rodolph Trefusis 9 Nov 1791 10 Apr 1866 74
MP for Callington 1813-1818
10 Apr 1866 20 Charles Henry Rolle Hepburn-Stuart-
Forbes-Trefusis 2 Mar 1834 29 Mar 1904 70
MP for Devon North 1857-1866. Lord
Lieutenant Devon 1887-1904
29 Mar 1904 21 Charles John Robert Hepburn-Stuart-
to Forbes-Trefusis 18 Jan 1863 5 Jul 1957 94
5 Jul 1957 PC 1926
On his death the barony fell into abeyance
1965 22 Gerard Neville Mark Fane-Trefusis 7 Oct 1934
Abeyance terminated in his favour
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6 Sep 1330 B 1 William de Clinton c 1304 31 Aug 1354
to Summoned to Parliament as Lord
31 Aug 1354 Clinton 6 Sep 1330
He was subsequently created Earl of
Huntingdon (qv) in 1337 - peerage extinct
1354
CLINTON-DAVIS
8 May 1990 B[L] 1 Stanley Clinton Clinton-Davis 6 Dec 1928
Created Baron Clinton-Davis for life
8 May 1990
MP for Hackney Central 1970-1983 PC 1998
CLITHEROE
20 Jun 1955 B 1 Ralph Assheton 24 Feb 1901 18 Sep 1984 83
Created Baron Clitheroe 20 Jun 1955
MP for Rushcliffe 1934-1945, London
1945-1950 and Blackburn West 1950-1955.
Minister of Supply 1942. Financial Secretary
to the Treasury 1942-1944. Lord Lieutenant
Lancashire 1971-1976. PC 1944
18 Sep 1984 2 Ralph John Assheton 3 Nov 1929
CLIVE OF LUDLOW
14 May 1804 V 1 Edward Clive,2nd Baron Clive of Plassey 7 Mar 1754 16 May 1839 85
Created Baron Clive of Walcot
13 Aug 1794 and Baron Powis,Baron
Herbert of Chirbury,Viscount Clive of
Ludlow and Earl of Powis 14 May 1804
See "Powis"
CLIVE OF PLASSEY
15 Mar 1762 B[I] 1 Robert Clive 29 Sep 1725 22 Nov 1774 49
Created Baron Clive of Plassey
15 Mar 1762
MP for Mitchell 1754-1755 and
Shrewsbury 1761-1774. Lord Lieutenant
Shropshire 1772-1774 and Montgomery
22 Nov 1774 2 Edward Clive 7 Mar 1754 16 May 1839 85
Created Baron Clive of Walcot
13 Aug 1794 and Baron Powis,Baron
Herbert of Chirbury,Viscount Clive of
Ludlow and Earl of Powis 14 May 1804
He was created Earl of Powis (qv) 1804
CLIVE OF WALCOT
13 Aug 1794 B 1 Edward Clive,2nd Baron Clive of Plassey 7 Mar 1754 16 May 1839 85
Created Baron Clive of Walcot
13 Aug 1794 and Baron Powis,Baron
Herbert of Chirbury,Viscount Clive of
Ludlow and Earl of Powis 14 May 1804
See "Powis"
CLOGHER
1578 B[I] 1 Terence Lenagh 1532 1595 63
to Created Baron Clogher 1578 and Earl
1595 of Clanconnell May 1578
Nothing further appears to be known of
these peerages which presumably became
extinct on his death
CLONBROCK
3 Jun 1790 B[I] 1 Robert Dillon 27 Feb 1754 22 Jul 1795 41
Created Baron Clonbrock 3 Jun 1790
PC [I] 1795
22 Jul 1795 2 Luke Dillon 24 Apr 1780 13 Dec 1826 46
13 Dec 1826 3 Robert Dillon 29 Mar 1807 4 Dec 1893 86
Lord Lieutenant Galway 1874-1892
4 Dec 1893 4 Luke Gerald Dillon 10 Mar 1834 12 May 1917 83
Lord Lieutenant Galway 1892-1917
PC [I] 1898 KP 1900
12 May 1917 5 Robert Edward Dillon 21 May 1869 1 Nov 1926 57
to Peerage extinct on his death
1 Nov 1926
CLONCURRY
29 Sep 1789 B[I] 1 Sir Nicholas Lawless,1st baronet 30 Oct 1735 28 Aug 1799 63
Created Baron Cloncurry 29 Sep 1789
28 Aug 1799 2 Valentine Browne Lawless 19 Aug 1773 28 Oct 1853 80
14 Sep 1831 B 1 Created Baron Cloncurry 14 Sep 1831
PC [I] 1831
28 Oct 1853 3 Edward Lawless 13 Sep 1816 3 Apr 1869 52
2 For information on the death of this peer,
see the note at the foot of this page
3 Apr 1869 4 Valentine Lawless 2 Nov 1840 12 Feb 1928 87
3
12 Feb 1928 5 Frederick Lawless 20 Apr 1847 18 Jul 1929 82
to 4 Peerages extinct on his death
18 Jul 1929
CLONEY
19 Jul 1675 B[I] 1 Sir William Ducie c 1612 9 Sep 1679
to Created Baron of Cloney and Viscount
9 Sep 1679 Downe 19 Jul 1675
Peerage extinct on his death
CLONMELL
20 Dec 1793 E[I] 1 John Scott 8 Jun 1739 23 May 1798 58
Created Baron Earlsfort 20 May 1784,
Viscount Clonmell 18 Aug 1789 and
Earl of Clonmell 6 Dec 1793
Solicitor General [I] 1774. Attorney
General [I] 1777-1782 . PC [I] 1777
Chief Justice [I] 1784
For further information on this peer, see the
note at the foot of this page.
23 May 1798 2 Thomas Scott 15 Aug 1783 18 Jan 1838 54
MP for New Romney 1807-1812
18 Jan 1838 3 John Henry Scott 4 Jan 1817 7 Feb 1866 49
7 Feb 1866 4 John Henry Reginald Scott 2 Mar 1839 22 Jun 1891 52
22 Jun 1891 5 Thomas Charles Scott 18 Aug 1840 18 Jun 1896 55
18 Jun 1896 6 Beauchamp Henry John Scott 28 Dec 1847 1 Feb 1898 50
1 Feb 1898 7 Rupert Charles Scott 10 Nov 1877 18 Nov 1928 51
18 Nov 1928 8 Dudley Alexander Charles Scott 26 May 1853 16 Jan 1935 81
to Peerages extinct on his death
16 Jan 1935
CLONMORE
13 Apr 1676 V[I] 1 Lord John Butler 1643 Aug 1677 34
to Created Viscount Clonmore and Earl
Aug 1677 of Gowran 13 Apr 1676
Peerages extinct on his death
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
21 Jul 1776 B[I] 1 Ralph Howard c 1726 26 Jun 1789
Created Baron Clonmore 21 Jul 1776
and Viscount Wicklow 23 Jun 1785
See "Wicklow"
CLONTARFF
5 Nov 1541 V[I] 1 Sir John Rawson 1560
to Created Viscount Clontarff 5 Nov 1541
1560 Peerage extinct on his death
CLOUGHGRENAN
8 Mar 1693 B[I] 1 Charles Butler 4 Sep 1671 17 Dec 1758 87
to Created Baron of Cloughgrenan,
17 Dec1758 Viscount of Tullogh and Earl of
Arran 8 Mar 1693,and Baron Butler
of Weston 23 Jan 1694
Peerages extinct on his death
CLWYD
19 May 1919 B 1 Sir John Herbert Roberts,1st baronet 8 Aug 1863 19 Dec 1955 92
Created Baron Clwyd 19 May 1919
MP for Denbighshire West 1892-1918
19 Dec 1955 2 John Trevor Roberts 28 Nov 1900 30 Mar 1987 86
30 Mar 1987 3 John Anthony Roberts 2 Jan 1935 10 Oct 2006 71
10 Oct 2006 4 John Murray Roberts 27 Aug 1971
CLYDE
16 Aug 1858 B 1 Sir Colin Campbell 20 Oct 1792 14 Aug 1863 70
to Created Baron Clyde 16 Aug 1858
14 Aug 1863 Field Marshal 1862
Peerage extinct on his death
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1 Oct 1996 B[L] 1 James John Clyde 29 Jan 1932 6 Mar 2009 77
to Created Baron Clyde for life 1 Oct 1996
6 Mar 2009 Senator of the College of Justice in Scotland
1985-1996. Lord of Appeal in Ordinary 1996-2001
PC 1996
Peerage extinct on his death
CLYDESDALE
20 Sep 1660 M[S] 1 Lord William Hamilton 24 Dec 1635 18 Apr 1694 58
Created Marquess of Clydesdale and
Hamilton 20 Sep 1660
See "Hamilton"
CLYDESMUIR
26 Feb 1948 B 1 David John Colville 13 Feb 1894 31 Oct 1954 60
Created Baron Clydesmuir 26 Feb 1948
MP for Midlothian and Peebles North 1929-
1943. Financial Secretary to the Treasury
1936-1938. Secretary of State for Scotland
1938-1940. Governor of Bombay 1943-1948
PC 1936 Lord Lieutenant Lanark 1952-1954
31 Oct 1954 2 Ronald John Bilsland Colville 21 May 1917 2 Oct 1996 79
KT 1972. Lord Lieutenant Lanark 1963-1992
2 Oct 1996 3 David Ronald Colville 8 Apr 1949
COBBOLD
23 Nov 1960 B 1 Cameron Fromanteel Cobbold 14 Sep 1904 1 Nov 1987 82
Created Baron Cobbold 23 Nov 1960
Governor of the Bank of England 1949-1961
PC 1959 KG 1970
1 Nov 1987 2 David Antony Fromanteel Lytton-Cobbold 14 Jul 1937
COBHAM
30 Dec 1324 B 1 Sir Ralph de Cobham c 1325
to Summoned to Parliament as Lord
c 1325 Cobham 30 Dec 1324
Peerage extinct on his death
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3 Jan 1645 B 1 John Brooke 20 May 1660
to Created Baron Cobham 3 Jan 1645
20 May 1660 Peerage extinct on his death
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23 May 1718 V 1 Sir Richard Temple,4th baronet 24 Oct 1675 14 Sep 1749 73
Created Baron Cobham 19 Oct 1714
and Baron and Viscount Cobham
23 May 1718
The creations of 1718 contained a special remainder
failing the heirs male of his body,to his second sister,
Hester Grenville,and the heirs male of her body,
failing which to his third sister,Dame Christian
Lyttelton,and the heirs male of her body
MP for Buckingham 1697-1702 and 1708-1713
and Buckinghamshire 1704-1708. Lord
Lieutenant Buckingham 1728-1738. PC 1716
14 Sep 1749 2 Hester Grenville,Countess Temple (1st in line) c 1690 6 Oct 1752
6 Oct 1752 3 Richard Grenville-Temple,2nd Earl Temple 26 Sep 1711 11 Sep 1779 67
11 Sep 1779 4 George Nugent-Temple-Grenville,1st
Marquess of Buckingham 17 Jun 1753 11 Feb 1813 59
11 Feb 1813 5 Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-
Grenville,1st Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 20 Mar 1776 17 Jan 1839 62
17 Jan 1839 6 Richard Plantagenet Temple-Nugent-
Brydges-Chandos-Grenville,2nd Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos 11 Feb 1797 29 Jul 1861 64
29 Jul 1861 7 Richard Plantagenet Temple-Nugent- 10 Sep 1823 26 Mar 1889 65
Brydges-Chandos-Grenville,3rd Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos
26 Mar 1889 8 Charles George Lyttelton,5th Baron Lyttelton 27 Oct 1842 9 Jun 1922 79
9 Jun 1922 9 John Cavendish Lyttelton 23 Oct 1881 31 Jul 1949 67
Lord Lieutenant Worcestershire 1923-1949
31 Jul 1949 10 Charles John Lyttelton 8 Aug 1909 20 Mar 1977 67
Governor General of New Zealand 1957-
1962. KG 1964 PC 1967. Lord Lieutenant
Worcestershire 1963-1974
20 Mar 1977 11 John William Leonard Lyttelton 5 Jun 1943 13 Jul 2006 63
13 Jul 2006 12 Christopher Charles Lyttelton 23 Oct 1947
COBHAM (co Kent)
8 Jan 1313 B 1 Henry de Cobham 1260 25 Aug 1339 79
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Cobham 8 Jan 1313
25 Aug 1339 2 John de Cobham 25 Feb 1355
25 Feb 1355 3 John de Cobham 10 Jan 1408
10 Jan 1408 4 Joan Oldcastell 13 May 1434
13 May 1434 5 Joan Brooke c 1442
c 1442 6 Edward Brooke 1464
1464 7 John Brooke 9 Mar 1512
9 Mar 1512 8 Thomas Brooke 19 Jul 1529
19 Jul 1529 9 George Brooke c 1497 29 Sep 1558
KG 1549
29 Sep 1558 10 William Brooke 1 Nov 1527 6 Mar 1597 69
Lord Lieutenant Kent 1558-1596. KG 1584
6 Mar 1597 11 Henry Brooke 22 Nov 1564 24 Jan 1619 54
to Lord Lieutenant Kent 1598. KG 1599
1603 He was attainted and the peerage forfeited
24 Jan 1619 [12] William Brooke 1 Dec 1601 20 Sep 1643 41
to MP for Rochester 1628-1629.
20 Sep 1643 On his death,the Barony,though still under
attainder,fell into abeyance
1747 [13] William Boothby 4 May 1721 15 Apr 1787 65
Subject to the attainder,he became heir to
the peerage in 1747
15 Apr 1787 [14] Mary Disney 25 Oct 1716 14 Feb 1789 72
to On her death,the Barony,though still under
14 Feb 1789 attainder,again fell into abeyance
8 Sep 1916 15 Gervase Disney Alexander 6 May 1880 10 Jun 1933 53
to Attainder removed and abeyance terminated
10 Jun 1933 in his favour 8 Sep 1916. On his death
the peerage again fell into abeyance.
5 Dec 1933 16 Robert Disney Leith Alexander 23 Apr 1885 21 Feb 1951 65
to Abeyance terminated in his favour 5 Dec
21 Feb 1951 1933. On his death the peerage again fell
into abeyance
COBHAM (of Rundale)
3 Dec 1326 B 1 Stephen de Cobham 1332
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Cobham 3 Dec 1326
1332 2 John de Cobham 1319 14 Sep 1362 43
14 Sep 1362 3 Thomas Cobham 1343 1394 51
1394 4 Reynold Cobham 31 Oct 1405
31 Oct 1405 5 Thomas Cobham by 1429
to On his death the peerage fell into abeyance
by 1429
COBHAM (of Starborough)
15 Feb 1342 B 1 Reginald de Cobham c 1295 5 Oct 1361
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Cobham 15 Feb 1342
KG 1352
5 Oct 1361 2 Reginald de Cobham 1348 6 Jul 1403 55
to On his death the peerage appears to have
6 Jul 1403 become extinct
COCHRANE OF CULTS
16 May 1919 B 1 Thomas Horatio Arthur Ernest Cochrane 2 Apr 1857 17 Jan 1951 93
Created Baron Cochrane of Cults
16 May 1919
MP for Ayrshire North 1892-1910
17 Jan 1951 2 Thomas George Frederick Cochrane 19 Mar 1883 8 Dec 1968 85
8 Dec 1968 3 Thomas Charles Anthony Cochrane 31 Oct 1922 15 Jun 1990 67
15 Jun 1990 4 Ralph Henry Vere Cochrane 20 Sep 1926
COCHRANE OF DUNDONALD
26 Dec 1647 B[S] 1 Sir William Cochrane 1686
Created Lord Cochrane of Dundonald
26 Dec 1647,and Lord Cochrane of
Paisley and Ochiltree and Earl of
Dundonald 12 May 1669
See "Dundonald"
COCHRANE OF PAISLEY & OCHILTREE
12 May 1669 B[S] 1 William Cochrane,1st Lord Cochrane of 1686
Dundonald
Created Lord Cochrane of Paisley and
Ochiltree and Earl of Dundonald
12 May 1669
See "Dundonald"
COCKERMOUTH
3 Oct 1749 B 1 Algernon Seymour,7th Duke of Somerset 11 Nov 1684 7 Feb 1750 65
Created Baron Cockermouth and Earl
of Egremont 3 Oct 1749
See "Egremont"
COCKFIELD
14 Apr 1978 B[L] 1 Francis Arthur Cockfield 28 Sep 1916 8 Jan 2007 90
to Created Baron Cockfield for life 14 Apr 1978
8 Jan 2007 Minister of State,Treasury 1979-1982 PC 1982
Secretary of State for Trade 1982-1983. Chancellor
of the Duchy of Lancaster 1983-1984.
Peerage extinct on his death
COCKS OF HARTCLIFFE
6 Oct 1987 B[L] 1 Michael Francis Lovell Cocks 19 Aug 1929 26 Mar 2001 71
to Created Baron Cocks of Hartcliffe for life
26 Mar 2001 6 Oct 1987
MP for Bristol South 1970-1987. PC 1976
Peerage extinct on his death
COE
16 May 2000 B[L] 1 Sebastian Newbold Coe 29 Sep 1956
Created Baron Coe for life 16 May 2000
MP for Falmouth & Camborne 1992-1997. CH 2012
COGGAN
28 Jan 1980 B[L] 1 Frederick Donald Coggan 9 Oct 1909 17 May 2000 90
to Created Baron Coggan for life 28 Jan 1980
17 May 2000 Bishop of Bradford 1956-1961.Archbishop
of York 1961-1974. Archbishop of
Canterbury 1974-1980. PC 1961
Peerage extinct on his death
COHEN
12 Nov 1951 B[L] 1 Lionel Leonard Cohen 1 Mar 1888 9 May 1973 85
to Created Baron Cohen for life 12 Nov 1951
9 May 1973 Lord Justice of Appeal 1946. Lord of
Appeal in Ordinary 1951-1960. PC 1946
Peerage extinct on his death
COHEN OF BIRKENHEAD
16 Jul 1956 B 1 Henry Cohen 21 Feb 1900 7 Aug 1977 77
to Created Baron Cohen of Birkenhead
7 Aug 1977 16 Jul 1956
CH 1974
Peerage extinct on his death
COHEN OF BRIGHTON
13 May 1965 B[L] 1 Lewis Coleman Cohen 28 Mar 1897 21 Oct 1966 69
to Created Baron Cohen of Brighton for life
21 Oct 1966 13 May 1965
Peerage extinct on his death
COHEN OF PIMLICO
3 May 2000 B[L] 1 Janet Cohen 4 Jul 1940
Created Baroness Cohen of Pimlico for life
3 May 2000
COKE
9 May 1744 V 1 Thomas Coke c 1695 20 Apr 1759
to Created Viscount Coke and Earl of
20 Apr 1759 Leicester 9 May 1744
Peerages extinct on his death
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
12 Aug 1837 V 1 Thomas William Coke 6 May 1754 30 Jun 1842 88
Created Viscount Coke and Earl of
Leicester of Holkham 12 Aug 1837
See "Leicester"
COLBORNE
15 May 1839 B 1 Nicholas William Ridley-Colborne 14 Apr 1779 3 May 1854 75
to Created Baron Colborne 15 May 1839
3 May 1854 MP for Bletchingley 1805-1806, Malmesbury
1806-1807, Appleby 1807-1812, Thetford
1818-1826, Horsham 1827-1832 and
Wells 1834-1837
Peerage extinct on his death
COLCHESTER
5 Jul 1621 V 1 Thomas Darcy,3rd Baron Darcy of Chiche c 1565 21 Feb 1640
Created Viscount Colchester 5 Jul
1621 and Earl Rivers 4 Nov 1626
See "Rivers"
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3 Jun 1817 B 1 Charles Abbot 14 Oct 1757 8 May 1829 71
Created Baron Colchester 3 Jun 1817
MP for Helston 1795-1802, Woodstock
1802-1806 and Oxford University 1806-1817.
Chief Secretary for Ireland 1801. Speaker
of the House of Commons 1802-1817
PC 1801 PC [I] 1801
8 May 1829 2 Charles Abbot 12 Mar 1798 18 Oct 1867 69
Vice President of the Board of Trade 1852
Postmaster General 1858-1859 PC 1852
18 Oct 1867 3 Reginald Charles Edward Abbot 13 Feb 1842 26 Feb 1919 77
to Peerage extinct on his death
26 Feb 1919
COLE
24 Mar 1965 B[L] 1 George James Cole 3 Feb 1906 29 Nov 1979 73
to Created Baron Cole for life 24 Mar 1965
29 Nov 1979 Peerage extinct on his death
COLEBROOKE
20 Feb 1906 B 1 Sir Edward Arthur Colebrooke,5th baronet 12 Oct 1861 28 Feb 1939 77
to Created Baron Colebrooke 20 Feb 1906
28 Feb 1939 PC 1914
Peerage extinct on his death
COLEPEPER
21 Oct 1644 B 1 Sir John Colepeper 1600 11 Jul 1660 60
Created Baron Colepeper 21 Oct 1644
MP for Kent 1640. Chancellor of the
Exchequer 1642
11 Jul 1660 2 Thomas Colepeper 21 Mar 1635 27 Jan 1689 53
27 Jan 1689 3 John Colepeper 16 Mar 1640 8 Jul 1719 79
8 Jul 1719 4 Cheney Colepeper 6 Sep 1642 25 Jun 1725 82
to Peerage extinct on his death
25 Jun 1725
COLERAINE
31 Aug 1625 B[I] 1 Hugh Hare 1606 19 Oct 1667 61
Created Baron Coleraine 31 Aug 1625
19 Oct 1667 2 Henry Hare 21 Apr 1636 15 Jul 1708 72
MP for Old Sarum 1679-1681
15 Jul 1708 3 Henry Hare 10 May 1693 10 Aug 1749 56
to MP for Boston 1730-1734
10 Aug 1749 Peerage extinct on his death
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
26 Feb 1762 B[I] 1 Gabriel Hanger 9 Jan 1697 27 Jan 1773 76
Created Baron Coleraine 26 Feb 1762
MP for Maidstone 1753-1761 and Bridgwater
1763-1768
27 Jan 1773 2 John Hanger 3 Apr 1743 4 Dec 1794 51
4 Dec 1794 3 William Hanger 6 Aug 1744 11 Dec 1814 70
MP for East Retford 1775-1778, Aldborough
1778-1780 and St Michaels 1780-1784
11 Dec 1814 4 George Hanger 13 Oct 1751 31 Mar 1824 72
to Peerage extinct on his death
31 Mar 1824 For further information on this peer, see the note
at the foot of this page.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
16 Feb 1954 B 1 Richard Kidston Law 27 Feb 1901 15 Nov 1980 79
Created Baron Coleraine 16 Feb 1954
MP for Kingston upon Hull SW 1931-1945,
Kensington South 1945-1950 and
Haltemprice 1950-1954. Minister of State
1943-1945. Minister of Education 1945
PC 1943
15 Nov 1980 2 James Martin Bonar Law 8 Aug 1931
COLERIDGE
10 Jan 1874 B 1 Sir John Duke Coleridge 3 Dec 1820 14 Jun 1894 73
Created Baron Coleridge 10 Jan 1874
MP for Exeter 1865-1873. Solicitor
General 1868-1871. Attorney General 1871-
1873. Lord Chief Justice of the Common
Pleas 1873. Lord Chief Justice 1880-1894
PC 1873
14 Jun 1894 2 Bernard John Seymour Coleridge 19 Aug 1851 4 Sep 1927 76
MP for Attercliffe 1885-1894
4 Sep 1927 3 Geoffrey Duke Coleridge 23 Jul 1877 27 Mar 1955 77
27 Mar 1955 4 Richard Duke Coleridge 24 Sep 1905 20 May 1984 78
20 May 1984 5 William Duke Coleridge 18 Jun 1937
COLESHILL
1 Nov 1790 V 1 Henry Digby,7th Baron Digby 21 Jul 1731 25 Sep 1793 62
Created Viscount Coleshill and Earl
Digby 1 Nov 1790
See "Digby"
COLEVILLE
24 Dec 1264 B 1 Walter de Coleville by Sep 1277
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Colvill 24 Dec 1264
by Sep 1277 2 Roger de Coleville c 1251 c Mar 1288
c Mar 1288 3 Edmund de Coleville 25 Jan 1288 by Mar 1316 28
by Mar 1316 4 Robert de Coleville 0 Oct 1304 by May 1368 63
by May 1368 5 Robert de Coleville c 1364 14 Jul 1369
to Peerage extinct on his death
14 Jul 1369
COLGRAIN
28 Jan 1946 B 1 Colin Frederick Campbell 13 Jun 1866 3 Nov 1954 88
Created Baron Colgrain 28 Jan 1946
3 Nov 1954 2 Donald Swinton Campbell 6 Nov 1891 20 Oct 1973 81
20 Oct 1973 3 David Colin Campbell 24 Apr 1920 7 Feb 2008 87
7 Feb 2008 4 Alastair Colin Leckie Campbell 16 Sep 1951
COLLINGWOOD
20 Nov 1805 B 1 Cuthbert Collingwood 26 Sep 1750 7 Mar 1810 59
to Created Baron Collingwood 20 Nov 1805
7 Mar 1810 Peerage extinct on his death
COLLINS
6 Mar 1907 B[L] 1 Richard Henn Collins 1 Jan 1842 3 Jan 1911 69
to Created Baron Collins for life 6 Mar 1907
3 Jan 1911 Lord Justice of Appeal 1897-1901. Master
of the Rolls 1901-1907. Lord of Appeal in Ordinary
1907-1911. PC 1897
Peerage extinct on his death
COLLINS OF HIGHBURY
20 Jan 2011 B[L] 1 Raymond Edward Harry Collins 1955
Created Baron Collins of Highbury for life
20 Jan 2011
COLLINS OF MAPESBURY
21 Apr 2009 B[L] 1 Sir Lawrence Antony Collins 7 May 1941
Created Baron Collins of Mapesbury for life
21 Apr 2009
Lord Justice of Appeal 2007-2009. Lord of
Appeal in Ordinary 2009- PC 2007
COLLISON
14 Dec 1964 B[L] 1 Harold Francis Collison 10 May 1909 29 Dec 1995 86
to Created Baron Collison for life 14 Dec 1964
29 Dec 1995 Peerage extinct on his death
COLNBROOK
16 Oct 1987 B[L] 1 Humphrey Edward Gregory Atkins 12 Aug 1922 4 Oct 1996 74
to Created Baron Colnbrook for life
4 Oct 1996 16 Oct 1987
MP for Merton and Morden 1955-1970 and
Spelthorne 1970-1987. Secretary of State
for Northern Ireland 1979-1981. Lord Privy
Seal 1981-1982. PC 1973
Peerage extinct on his death
COLONSAY
26 Feb 1867 B 1 Duncan McNeill Aug 1793 31 Jan 1874 80
to Created Baron Colonsay 26 Feb 1867
31 Jan 1874 MP for Argyllshire 1843-1851. Solicitor
General for Scotland 1834-1835 and
1841-1842 PC 1853
Peerage extinct on his death
COLUMBERS
29 Jul 1314 B 1 Philip de Columbers 10 Feb 1342
to Summoned to Parliament as Lord
10 Feb 1342 Columbers 29 Jul 1314
Peerage extinct on his death
Barbara Palmer, Duchess of Cleveland
The following biography of Barbara Palmer appeared in the July 1968 issue of the Australian
monthly magazine "Parade":-
'King Charles II of England was deeply in love with his mistress, the beautiful Barbara Palmer. Yet
that did not stop him showering his favours on other charmers who happened to catch his eye.
For instance there was the serving maid of Queen Catherine (his wife), the actress Nell Gwyn,
the dancer Moll Davis and the more youthful members of the notorious brothels in Nightingale
Lane. Although the Queen Consort accepted her husband's infidelities philosophically, Barbara,
inflamed with jealousy, decided to bring the philanderer to heel. Her plan was simple - she took
a lover herself, a man described as having the "face of an African lemur, a hideously large head
and wobbly little pipe-stem legs." When news of this incongruous love affair reached Charles he
flew into a rage and then (as she had expected) settled down to win back the love of the
fascinating wanton whose charms he could not resist.
'Such incidents were part and parcel of the stormy yet enduring love match between the
insatiable Charles and his equally insatiable mistress. If it was not Charles who was being
unfaithful to the woman he was to create Duchess of Cleveland, it was Barbara who was
cavorting with young bucks of the court who were willing to risk their necks for her love.
'Barbara Palmer, Duchess of Cleveland, Countess of Castlemaine and Southampton, and Baroness
Nonsuch and perhaps the most sensational woman of her age, was born in 1640, the daughter
of William Villiers, Viscount Grandison. She was still a child when her father lost his life and
fortune fighting for the Royalists during the Cromwellian Civil war, and she was only 14 when
she begged the Earl of Chesterfield to elope with her. Chesterfield would probably have agreed
to this request from the lovely Barbara had not Cromwell imprisoned him in the Tower for
political crimes.
'In April 1659 the now exquisitively beautiful girl was on the verge of despair. She was without
funds and faced starvation. And that was when she met and married Roger Palmer, a rich
merchant's son. Just a year later Mrs. Palmer learned that Chesterfield had been released
from the Tower and had fled to Holland to join the exiled King Charles. Deciding the Earl would
make a better lover than her husband, she persuaded Palmer to take her to Holland on the
pretext they could enjoy a second honeymoon.
'A few weeks later Chesterfield's eyes fell on the dazzlingly lovely girl he had not seen since
her childhood days - and so did Charles's. The result was that within a few days of that meeting
members of the King's court in exile accepted the fact that Mrs. Palmer was the exclusive
property of the monarch. Chesterfield was delighted he was able to bring such happiness to his
adored King, while Palmer was so over-awed by his wife's sudden rise in the social scale that
he made no objection, although he fumed inwardly.
'In 1660 came the news from England - the people wanted Charles back on the throne. When he
arrived in London on May 29, 1660, one of the first to greet him was the pregnant Barbara Palmer.
Although some historians attribute the paternity of Mrs. Palmer's first child, Anne, to the King,
others claim that the father was the Earl of Chesterfield.
'Nevertheless, Charles accepted his mistress's word that the expected baby was his and,
immediately after the Restoration, entered with Barbara into an orgy of pleasure-seeking and
extravagance that shocked the English middle and lower classes. During royal balls in Whitehall,
Barbara Palmer invariably sat beside the King and passionately responded to his embraces in full
view of the noble guests.
'Following the birth of Barbara's daughter in February 1661, Roger Palmer began to make trouble.
The King's advisers suggested that Charles might for someone to pick a quarrel with his mistress's
husband and then run him through with a sword. But the King had a better plan. He created
Palmer Earl of Castlemaine, a title that carried large estates in Ireland. And as these estates
required constant supervision the new Earl would be tied up in Ireland, leaving his countess to
continue her royal social activities in London.
'Then, with Barbara Palmer already dreaming of the day when one of her children would sit on
England's throne, a marriage contract was signed between Charles and the Portuguese princess,
Catherine of Braganza. It was no love match, but rather a political expedient by which England,
apart from other privileges, secured Tangier and Bombay. Almost immediately after the couple
were married in England in May 1662, Catherine was pushed into the background away from the
debaucheries of the court and Barbara was appointed the Queen Consort's Lady of the
Bedchamber.
'Later, although Catherine remained barren, Barbara bore the King a son who was christened
Charles Palmer. The advent of this child so delighted the monarch that he insisted his mistress
should sit in the royal coach with him when he rode through the streets of London. Nevertheless,
if Barbara, Countess of Castlemaine, gave all her attention to pleasing her lover she insisted on
being repaid for her efforts. Charles gave her a yearly allowance of about 100,000 in addition to
gifts of almost priceless jewellery. He also accepted her suggestion that he should pass on to her
all the presents subjects seeking special favours pressed on him. Apart from that, she took a cut
from post office revenue and was allowed to sell appointments to the army and civil service. But
if money deluged into Lady Castlemaine's coffers it poured out just as quickly. She was an
obsessive gambler and often lost as much as 20,000 at a sitting.
'Then the day came when Barbara Palmer decided her lover was philandering outrageously and
must be brought to heel. To arouse the King's jealousy the courtesan chose as a lover an ugly,
untitled wastrel who hovered unobtrusively on the court's fringe. Overwhelmed by the advances
of the lovely Lady Castlemaine, the man, Harry Jermyn, was soon strutting about the court like a
peacock boasting of his conquest. When news of the match between the beauty and the beast
reached Charles he ordered his mistress to his private apartments and thundered: "It is not
consistent with my dignity that a mistress whom I have honoured with public distinction and who
receives considerable support from me should appear chained to the chariot of the most
ridiculous conqueror who ever lived."
'Nonetheless Barbara was determined to continue her affair with Jermyn and arouse Charles to an
even greater pitch of jealousy. But the plan collapsed when the ugly little courtier, realising his
danger, fled to Scotland. Now the royal mistress decided to use the same strategy to draw
Charles from the arms of Nell Gwyn. This time she chose as her lover a huge, muscled-bound
tightrope-walker, Jacob Hall. But if he was physically unattractive his love-making was so expert
that Lady Castlemaine found herself falling in love with him. Barbara Palmer had not bargained
for such an eventuality. Nor did she appreciate the bawdy jokes about her and the tightrope-
walker that circulated all over London. In the end she begged Charles to forgive her indiscretion
and take her back. As usual the King, longing for her companionship, agreed but stipulated she
must share him with "that pitiful strolling actress" Nell Gwyn. Barbara agreed.
'All went peacefully enough between the lovers until one night in 1670 when Charles was told by
a courtier that his mistress (now the Duchess of Cleveland) was locked in her rooms with a young
officer of the Guards, John Churchill. Enraged by this latest example of infidelity, the King roared
for his carriage and set off towards the great mansion in Westminster he had just given to the
Duchess as a gift. Stepping smartly up the mansion's elaborately carved staircase, Charles
bounded up to the bedchamber's door and turned the handle. It was locked. So he banged on
the door demanding immediate admission. A full minute passed before it was opened by the
gorgeous Duchess, dressed in a nightgown. Behind her a window lay open admitting the cold
night air. The King hurried to the window just in time to see a male figure jump from the ivy
on the wall and run off into the darkness. Charles shouted at him: "I know who you are, son.
But I forgive you. I know you do it for your bread."
'The monarch then turned to the trembling Duchess. He cried: "Madame, I hope to live to see
you ugly. Then I won't care who you love." Within a week Lieutenant Churchill, later Duke of
Marlborough, had been transferred to disease-ridden Tangier while Charles and his mistress
resumed their interrupted love affair. A year later her fifth and last child was born. Charles
insisted it was the result of his mistress's alliance with Churchill, but in the face of her
protestations agreed to acknowledge its paternity.
'As the years passed Barbara Palmer, Duchess of Cleveland, Baroness Nonsuch and Countess of
Castlemaine and Southampton, continued dabbling in a variety of love affairs. Nevertheless, the
aging Charles accepted her obsession and was quite ready to take her back when the current
liaison had lost its attraction.
'In 1685 Charles died, and although the Duchess had received several fortunes from him during
his reign, she now had to rely on the generosity of her dead lover's brother, James II, to maintain
her standard of living. And even when James fled the country in 1688 his successor, William of
Orange, continued to make provision for the Duchess. Although she was now in her mid 40s she
was still beautiful and able to attract wealthy and noble lovers. Sometimes, to bolster her
income, she turned her mansion into a gambling saloon and personally attended her guests
while her current lover, the actor Cardonell Goodman, acted as croupier.
'In 1705, the Duchess, long since a widow and now 64, married Bob Fielding, who, until he
announced he was already married and therefore not her legal husband, robbed her, abused
her and even beat her. In a blaze of ridicule the Duchess of Cleveland sold all her London
possessions and retired friendless to Chiswick. And there, grotesque with dropsy, she died on
October 9, 1709.'
The barony of Clifford created in 1628
This peerage is one of several created in error. For similar cases see the notes relating to the
peerages of Strange and Percy.
The feudal barony of de Clifford, which dates from the reign of Henry II, was converted into a
barony by writ in 1299. The peerage then descended in the male line to George Clifford, 3rd Earl
of Cumberland, who died in 1605.
On his death, the peerage of de Clifford was inherited by his daughter, Anne Herbert, and this
peerage, notwithstanding it falling into abeyance on four occasions, continues to be extant to
the present time. However, when the 3rd Earl of Cumberland died in 1605, it was mistakenly
assumed that the barony of de Clifford had also passed to the 3rd Earl's brother, Francis Clifford,
4th Earl of Cumberland. His son, Henry Clifford, was summoned to the House of Lords in February
1628, but this writ, instead of being a writ of acceleration of an existing peerage, actually
created a new peerage.
William Hugh Clifford, 10th Baron Clifford of Chudleigh
Like his contemporary, the 4th Earl of Ducie, William Clifford prior to his succession to the title
of 10th Baron Clifford of Chudleigh, had spent many years as a resident of Australia. At the time
he inherited the title the following article appeared in the Hobart 'Mercury' on 21 July 1916:-
'The Hon. William Hugh Clifford, now tenth Baron Clifford of Chudleigh, is a brother of the
deceased nobleman [i.e. the 9th Baron]. Born on December 17, 1858, he is now 58 years of age.
When about 20 years of age he emigrated to New Zealand, and after 12 years' residence there
came to Tasmania, where he has lived for the past 25 years. He took up farming, and for several
years had a property at Forcett, in the Sorell district, and later, another at Colebrook [both near
Hobart]. He had always taken a keen interest in political matters, and in 1903, at the second
election for the [Australian] Federal Parliament, offered himself as a candidate for the Franklin
electorate of the House of Representatives. He was defeated by the present member, Mr.
W[illiam] J[ames] McWilliams, and since then, though retaining his interests in local matters, has
taken no active part in political life. He has done some literary work, and a few months ago
published "A Forecast for the 20th Century," an essay in which the causes of war and peace,
and the conditions which the author thinks will ensure a lasting settlement of international
problems, are dealt with at some length.
The claim to the barony of Clifton of Leighton Bromswold made in 1673/74
The following is extracted from "Proceedings, Precedents and Arguments on Claims and
Controversies concerning Baronies by Writ, and other Honours" by Arthur Collins [London 1734].
'January 8, 1673 - The house of peers, upon reading the petition of CATHERINE, lady O BRIEN, on
behalf of herself and DONATUS [Donough] O BRIEN, her son, claiming a right to the barony of
Leighton Bromswold, in the county of Huntingdon; as also, his Majesty's reference thereof to this
house, and of the report of his Majesty's later attorney general, now lord keeper of the great
seal, concerning the said barony, annexed to the said petition: Ordered etc. to be referred to the
committee of privileges.
'January 11, 1673 - Report from the committee, that the said petition appearing to have a defect
in it, it is their lordships desire, by the directions of this house, that the lady CATHERINE O BRIEN
have leave to withdraw and amend the same.
'January 16, 1673 - The committee report, that upon examination of the business referred to
their lordships, concerning the claim made by CATHERINE, lady O BRIEN, on behalf of herself, and
DONATUS O BRIEN, her son, to the barony of Leighton Bromswold, their lordships do find that
JERVAS, lord Clifton, was summoned by writ to parliament, 6 Jac. 1, by the title of lord Clifton of
Leighton Bromswold; so as the barony being a fee simple ought to descend from the said lord
Clifton, upon his heirs, and that the lady CATHERINE O BRIEN, the petitioner, being the heir
gradually and lineally descended from the said lord Clifton, the barony doth of right descend to
her and her heirs. Hereupon the house made the following order.
"Upon report made this day by the earl of Berks[hire], from the lords committee for privileges,
concerning the claim made by CATHERINE, lady O BRIEN etc., it was ordered etc., that this
house will hear his Majesty's counsel learned in the laws, viz. Mr. Serjeant MAYNARD, Mr.
attorney general, and Mr. solicitor general, on Tuesday next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, upon
the said claim, whereof the said lady O BRIEN is to cause timely notice to be given to his
Majesty's said counsel, to the end that they may be ready accordingly; at which time she may
likewise attend with her counsel."
'January 20, 1673 - Upon the consideration had of what had been offered at the bar, by his
Majesty's learned counsel, as also the counsel of the lady O BRIEN, etc. It is ordered etc. that
the judges present this day, shall be attended by the lady O BRIEN"S agent, with her petition
and claim, the writ of summons to parliament, and the report of his Majesty's late attorney
general, now lord keeper, made in that case, whereon the said judges are to give their opinions.
'February 7, 1673 - The lord chief justice of the King's bench, lord chief justice of the Common
pleas, chief baron, baron TURNER, baron LITTLETON, justice ATKINS, justice ELLIS, and baron
THURLAND, were unanimous in their opinions.
'That taking the case in fact, to be as his Majesty's attorney general reported it to be, and as
it stands transmitted to this house, they find it to be thus, as to this lady's claim of the said
barony:
'That sir JERVAS CLIFTON was summoned to parliament by the name of JERVAS CLIFTON, of
Leighton Bromswold, by writ, dated July 9, 9 Jac. I etc.
'That accordingly he did come and sit in parliament, as one of the peers of England.
'That he died 16 Jac. I leaving issue behind him CATHERINE, his sole daughter and heir, who
married to the lord Aubigny, afterwards duke of Lenox.
'That the said duke, 17 Jac. I was, by letters patent, created baron Leighton of Leighton
Bromswold in the county of Huntingdon, to him and the heirs male of his body, whereof none
are now living.
'That the petitioner is lineally descended from him, and is his heir (by the said report) and as
such now claims the barony of Clifton.
'All which being admitted to be true, they are of opinion,
'First, That the said JERVAS, by virtue of the said writ or summons, and his sitting in parliament
accordingly, was a peer and baron of this kingdom, and his blood thereby ennobled.
'Secondly, That his said honour descended from him to CATHERINE, his sole daughter and heir,
and successively after several descents to the petitioner as lineal heir to the said lord Clifton.
'Thirdly, That therefore the petitioner is well entitled to the said dignity.
'Upon consideration had by this house etc. It is resolved by the lords spiritual and temporal in
parliament assembled, that the said CATHERINE, lady O BRIEN, hath right to the barony of
Clifton.'
Edward Lawless, 3rd Baron Cloncurry
The 3rd Baron Cloncurry committed suicide on 3 April 1869 by throwing himself from a third-floor
window of his house. The following edited report of the subsequent inquest appeared in the
Dublin ''Freeman's Journal' of 6 April 1869:-
'The jury, having viewed the body, the following evidence was given:-
'W.F.Murray, of Lyons, examined - I am a surgeon, and have been the medical attendant of the
late Baron Cloncurry for the last two months; it was in consequence of his being in an unsound
state of mind that I was placed in charge of him; on Saturday, the 3rd of April, I asked his
lordship to take a walk; I put on his hat and coat; he walked about the room, and did not seem
inclined to go out; in about ten minutes he went out by himself, and I followed him; I overtook
him at the corner of the house, as he was going into the shrubbery; I then asked him to walk
to the garden, and he agreed; when he got to the stable-yard he hurriedly walked in, and I lost
sight of him for a moment; I believed he went into the house by the back door, and not wishing
to follow him too closely, I went around to the hall-door to meet him; on looking into the hall I
could not see him; I then supposed that he had gone into the closet, just near the door he
entered by; I returned into the stable-yard and saw two boys looking out of the stable-door; I
asked them if they had seen his lordship going out of the passage, and they said he gone in; I
then went round and entered the house by the hall-door, and was in the act of taking off my
coat when one of the workmen ran in saying, "Where are you? He is dead." I then ran out after
him to where his lordship lay; I found him lying on the grass supported by some of the servants,
his head towards the window; I examined him, and found he was alive, but speechless and
insensible, and in a state of collapse; I had him removed into the house, and he lived for about
two hours and a half; I examined the body since death; there were no bones broken; I attribute
the death to the shock to the system from falling from such a height, and from internal
haemorrhage; for the last three weeks there was a second person in charge of him; on two
occasions I saw indications of a desire to destroy himself - one was when he wanted a rifle from
the gamekeeper, and another when he took up a gun and loaded it; his revolvers were removed,
and the windows of his room were nailed down by order of Dr. Banks; the guns were all removed
out of his reach after the occurrence of his loading the gun.'
Further evidence was given by one of Lord Cloncurry's labourers, who witnessed Cloncurry
throwing himself from the window, and by the consulting physician to the Richmond Lunatic
Asylum, who confirmed that Lord Cloncurry was suffering mental illness. After retiring for only a
few minutes, the jury found that Cloncurry had "met his death by falling from a window on the
third storey of Lyons House, on the 3rd day of April, 1869, being at the time of unsound mind
and unaccountable for his acts."
John Scott, 1st Earl of Clonmell
Clonmell was accused of making his fortune by unorthodox methods. He was suspected of
holding land in trust on behalf of Catholics (who at that time were not allowed to own property)
and then reneging on the agreements. He, like most wealthy Irishmen of the time, was an
experienced duellist. At one time or another, he fought the Lord Chancellor, the Chief Justice
of the Common Pleas, the Master of the Rolls, Lord Tyrawley, his predecessor as Chief Justice
and three privy counsellors.
Clonmell kept a diary in which he recorded many resolutions, few of which he was able to keep.
Perhaps the most amusing was one which he made in 1790, six years after becoming Chief
Justice of Ireland. He resolved to 'seriously set about learning my profession.' In another
resolution, he had resolved to avoid 'snuff, sleep, swearing, gross eating, sloth, malt liquors,
indulgence - and never to take anything after tea but water.' In spite of these resolutions, he
became so obese that he became immobile and at night had to be carried to bed by his
servants. Upon his death, the undertaker's men were unable to carry his body down the stairs
and they were forced to lower it from the bedroom window by a system of ropes and pulleys
into the waiting hearse.
George Hanger, 4th Baron Coleraine
The following is extracted from "The Emperor of the United States of America and Other
Magnificent British Eccentrics" by Catherine Caufield (Routledge & Kegan Paul, London 1981)
Having fought three duels, married a gypsy, and been wounded in the American War of
Independence, George Hanger retired from the army at the age of 22 and devoted himself to
drinking, racing, gambling and whoring. Not surprisingly, he soon became a boon companion of
the Prince of Wales. Like the Prince, Hanger was a man of fashion, the first person in England
to wear a satin coat. Apart from his retirement half-pay, which barely covered his tailor's bill,
Hanger had two sources of income; gambling and moneylenders. He would bet on anything and
once laid a wager on the outcome of a ten-mile race between twenty geese and twenty
turkeys, losing 500 when the turkeys dropped out after 3 miles.
In 1798, after fifteen years of living beyond his means, Hanger was made a prisoner of the
King's Bench. He stayed there for 18 months and, unlike those debtors whose wealthy friends
contrived to maintain them in style within their private cells, Hanger experienced the true
degradation and squalor of life in a debtor's prison. He later wrote an eloquent condemnation
of the soul-destroying conditions in such prisons. When some friends eventually procured his
release by paying off his debts, this pillar of the beau monde immediately embarked on a new
career. He became a coal merchant. Society was aghast, and a number of friends offered to
set him up in a more acceptable line of business. But Hanger, far from finding his new position
a humiliation, positively revelled in embarrassing his fashionable friends by drawing attention
to his changed circumstances.
Hanger sold coal for 14 years. Then, on the death in 1814 of his brother, George acceded to the
estates and title of Baron Coleraine. He despised inherited titles and corrected anyone who used
his, saying, 'Plain George Hanger if you please.' This attitude and other unorthodox opinions
finally put an end to friendly relations with his old companion, now King George IV.
Hanger was quite genuine about his democratic ideas. As his 14 years as a coal seller
demonstrated, he had no desire to hold himself aloof from the lower orders. Shortly after he
succeeded to the title, the artist J T Smith witnessed this scene between him and an old
woman who sold apples in the Portland Road. Hanger saw her packing up her things in
preparation for her tea break. 'Don't balk trade', he said, 'Leave your things on the table as they
are; I will mind your shop till you come back.' Intrigued, Smith loitered and watched Hanger
selling apples to passers-by. On the woman's return, Hanger handed over his takings. 'Well,
mother, I have taken threepence half-penny for you. Did your daughter Nancy drink tea with
you.'
By this time Hanger was quite well known, not so much for his past exploits as for the
controversial views set forth in his highly readable autobiography The Life, Adventures and
Opinions of Col. George Hanger. In it Hanger offers a good deal of advice to women. He insists
that they should settle affairs of honour by duelling amongst themselves, instead of involving
men. He recommends, when eloping, leaving through a window, rather than a door. 'It will
impress your lover with a respect for your heroism, and ever establish you, in his opinion, as a
woman of true spirit, courage and spunk.' He applauds the fashion for loose gowns, which he
says are 'admirably suited either for a young girl to conceal a big belly, or for a shop-lifter to
hide a bale of goods.'
He advised clergymen to supplement their income by hiring out the blind men in their parishes
to beggar-women who find that a genuinely handicapped companion exerts a greater pull on the
heart-strings and purse-strings of the contributing public than even a child or a dog. And he
advocated a tax on Scotsmen who spent more than six months of the year south of the border.
Bernard John Seymour Coleridge, 2nd Baron Coleridge
The 2nd Baron Coleridge succeeded to the title on 14 June 1894. At that time he was a member
of the House of Commons for the seat of Attercliffe in Sheffield.
On 25 June 1894, Coleridge applied to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir William Harcourt, for
the Stewardship of the Chiltern Hundreds. Technically, a member of the House of Commons is
not permitted to resign his or her seat. To get around this restriction, members apply for the
position of the Stewardship of the Chiltern Hundreds or the Manor of Northstead. Both of these
offices are considered to be offices of profit under the Crown, and, under the Act of Settlement,
any member who is appointed to an office of profit must give up his or her seat.
The appointment was finalised on 26 June 1894, and a new writ issued by a by-election in the
seat of Attercliffe. There was no doubt that the seat of Attercliffe had become vacant, but the
question arose as to why it had become so - was it because Coleridge had been appointed to
an office of profit on 26 June, or had it become vacant when Coleridge had succeeded his father
in the peerage on 14 June? After lengthy debate, it was agreed that the cause was Coleridge's
appointment to an office of profit, since he had not, at that time, received a writ summoning
him to the House of Lords.
This interpretation was overturned less than a year later, in a similar case involving the 2nd Earl
of Selborne (qv).
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