PEERAGE
Last updated 10/09/2013
Date Rank Order Name Born Died  Age
HAYHOE
21 Aug 1992 B[L] 1 Bernard John ("Barney") Hayhoe 8 Aug 1925 7 Sep 2013 88
to     Created Baron Hayhoe for life 21 Aug 1992
7 Sep 2013 MP for Heston and Isleworth 1970-1974
and Brentford and Isleworth 1974-1992
Minister Of State,Treasury 1981-1985
PC 1985
Peerage extinct on his death
HAYMAN
2 Jan 1996 B[L] 1 Helene Valerie Hayman 26 Mar 1949
Created Baroness Hayman for life 2 Jan 1996
MP for Welwyn and Hatfield 1974-1979
PC 2000
HAYTER
29 Jan 1927 B 1 Sir George Hayter Chubb,1st baronet 29 Aug 1848 7 Nov 1946 98
Created Baron Hayter 29 Jan 1927
7 Nov 1946 2 Charles Archibald Chubb 11 Nov 1871 3 Mar 1967 95
3 Mar 1967 3 George Charles Chubb 25 Apr 1911 2 Sep 2003 92
2 Sep 2003 4 George William Michael Chubb 9 Oct 1943
HAYTER OF KENTISH TOWN
22 Jun 2010 B[L] 1 Dianne Hayter 7 Sep 1949
Created Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town
for life 22 Jun 2010
HAZLERIGG
12 Feb 1945 B 1 Sir Arthur Grey Hazlerigg,13th baronet 17 Nov 1878 25 May 1949 70
Created Baron Hazlerigg 12 Feb 1945
Lord Lieutenant Leicester 1925-1949
25 May 1949 2 Arthur Grey Hazlerigg 24 Feb 1910 30 Sep 2002 92
30 Sep 2002 3 Arthur Grey Hazlerigg 5 May 1951
HEAD
2 Aug 1960 V 1 Anthony Henry Head 19 Dec 1906 29 Mar 1983 76
Created Viscount Head 2 Aug 1960
MP for Carshalton 1945-1960. Secretary
of State for War 1951-1956. Minister of
Defence 1956-1957.  PC 1951
29 Mar 1983 2 Richard Antony Head 27 Feb 1937
HEADFORT
12 Apr 1762 V[I] 1 Sir Thomas Taylour,3rd baronet 20 Oct 1724 14 Feb 1795 71
Created Baron Headfort 6 Sep 1760,
Viscount Headford 12 Apr 1762 and
Earl of Bective 24 Oct 1766
KP 1783
14 Feb 1795 2 Thomas Taylour 18 Nov 1757 24 Oct 1829 71
29 Dec 1800 M[I] 1 Created Marquess of Headfort
29 Dec 1800
KP 1806
24 Oct 1829 2 Thomas Taylour 4 May 1787 6 Dec 1870 83
Created Baron Kenlis 10 Sep 1831
Lord Lieutenant Cavan PC [I] 1835. KP 1839
MP for Meath 1812-1830
6 Dec 1870 3 Thomas Taylour 1 Nov 1822 22 Jul 1894 71
MP for Westmorland 1854-1870. Lord
Lieutenant Meath 1876-1894  PC [I] 1879
KP 1885
22 Jul 1894 4 Geoffrey Thomas Taylour 12 Jun 1878 29 Jan 1943 64
29 Jan 1943 5 Terence Geoffrey Thomas Taylour 1 May 1902 24 Oct 1960 58
24 Oct 1960 6 Thomas Geoffrey Charles Michael Taylour 20 Jan 1932 21 Oct 2005 73
21 Oct 2005 7 Thomas Michael Ronald Christopher Taylour 10 Feb 1959
HEADLEY
14 Nov 1797 B[I] 1 Sir George Allanson-Winn,1st baronet 1725 9 Apr 1798 72
Created Baron Headley 14 Nov 1797
MP for Ripon 1789-1797
9 Apr 1798 2 Charles Winn-Allanson 25 Jun 1784 9 Apr 1840 55
MP for Ripon 1806-1807, Malton 1807-1808
and Ludgershall 1811-1812
9 Apr 1840 3 Charles Allanson-Winn 25 Jun 1810 30 Jul 1877 67
30 Jul 1877 4 Charles Mark Allanson-Winn 4 Dec 1845 13 Jan 1913 67
13 Jan 1913 5 Rowland George Allanson Allanson-Winn 19 Jan 1855 22 Jun 1935 80
For further information on this peer, see the
note at the foot of this page.
22 Jun 1935 6 Rowland Patrick John George
Allanson-Winn 22 May 1901 17 Dec 1969 68
17 Dec 1969 7 Charles Rowland Allanson-Winn 19 May 1902 23 Feb 1994 91
to     Peerage extinct on his death
23 Feb 1994
HEALEY
29 Jun 1992 B[L] 1 Denis Winston Healey 30 Aug 1917
Created Baron Healey for life 29 Jun 1992
MP for Leeds Southeast 1952-1955 and 
Leeds East 1955-1992. Secretary of State
for Defence 1964-1970. Chancellor of the
Exchequer 1974-1979.  PC 1964  CH 1979
HEALY OF PRIMROSE HILL
19 Jul 2010 B[L] 1 Anna Mary Healy
Created Baroness Healy of Primrose Hill
for life 19 Jul 2010
HEATHFIELD
6 Jul 1787 B 1 George Augustus Eliott 25 Dec 1717 6 Jul 1790 72
Created Baron Heathfield 6 Jul 1787
PC [I] 1775
For further information on this peer,see the
note at the foot of this page
6 Jul 1790 2 Francis Augustus Eliott 31 Dec 1750 26 Jan 1813 62
to     Peerage extinct on his death
26 Jan 1813
HEDINGTON
27 Dec 1676 B 1 Charles Beauclerk 8 May 1670 10 May 1726 56
Created Baron Hedington and Earl of
Burford 27 Dec 1676,and Duke of 
St.Albans 10 Jan 1684
See "St.Albans"
HEDON
14 Jul 1742 B 1 William Pulteney Apr 1684 8 Jul 1764 80
to     Created Baron Hedon,Viscount
8 Jul 1764 Pulteney and Earl of Bath 14 Jul 1742
See "Bath"
HELMSLEY
25 Jul 1868 V 1 William Ernest Duncombe,3rd Baron Feversham 28 Jan 1829 13 Jan 1915 85
Created Viscount Helmsley and Earl of
Feversham 25 Jul 1868
See "Feversham" - this peerage extinct 
1963
HELSBY
21 May 1968 B[L] 1 Laurence Norman Helsby 27 Apr 1908 5 Dec 1978 70
to     Created Baron Helsby for life 21 May 1968
5 Dec 1978 Peerage extinct on his death
HEMINGFORD
1 Feb 1943 B 1 Dennis Henry Herbert 25 Feb 1869 10 Dec 1947 78
Created Baron Hemingford 1 Feb 1943
MP for Watford 1918-1943.  PC 1933
10 Dec 1947 2 Dennis George Ruddock Herbert 25 Mar 1904 19 Jun 1982 78
Lord Lieutenant Huntingdon and
Peterborough 1968-1974
19 Jun 1982 3 Dennis Nicholas Herbert 25 Jul 1934
HEMPHILL
12 Jan 1906 B 1 Charles Hare Hemphill 1822 4 Mar 1908 85
Created Baron Hemphill 12 Jan 1906
MP for Tyrone North 1895-1906. Solicitor
General for Ireland 1892-1895. PC [I] 1895
4 Mar 1908 2 Stanhope Charles John Hemphill 13 Mar 1853 26 Mar 1919 66
26 Mar 1919 3 Fitzroy Hemphill 21 Nov 1860 25 Nov 1930 70
25 Nov 1930 4 Martyn Charles Andrews Hemphill 17 Feb 1901 19 Mar 1957 56
19 Mar 1957 5 Peter Patrick Fitzroy Martyn Martyn-
Hemphill 5 Sep 1928 6 Apr 2012 83
6 Apr 2012 6 Charles Anthony Martyn Martyn-Hemphill 8 Oct 1954
HENDERSON
19 Oct 1945 B 1 William Watson Henderson 8 Aug 1891 4 Apr 1984 92
to     Created Baron Henderson 19 Oct 1945
4 Apr 1984 MP for Enfield 1923-1924 and 1929-1931
PC 1950
Peerage extinct on his death
HENDERSON OF ARDWICK
3 Feb 1950 B 1 Joseph Henderson 1884 26 Feb 1950 65
to     Created Baron Henderson of Ardwick
26 Feb 1950 3 Feb 1950
MP for Ardwick 1931 and 1935-1950
Peerage extinct on his death
HENDERSON OF BROMPTON
1 Feb 1984 B[L] 1 Peter Gordon Henderson 16 Sep 1922 13 Jan 2000 77
to     Created Baron Henderson of Brompton
13 Jan 2000 for life 1 Feb 1984
Peerage extinct on his death
HENEAGE
8 Jun 1896 B 1 Edward Heneage 29 Mar 1840 10 Aug 1922 82
Created Baron Heneage 8 Jun 1896
MP for Lincoln 1865-1868, Great Grimsby
1880-1892 and 1893-1895. Chancellor of 
the Duchy of Lancaster 1886.  PC 1886
10 Aug 1922 2 George Edward Heneage 3 Jul 1866 26 Jan 1954 87
26 Jan 1954 3 Thomas Robert Heneage 24 Jul 1877 19 Feb 1967 89
to     Peerage extinct on his death
19 Feb 1967
HENIG
8 Jun 2004 B[L] 1 Ruth Beatrice Henig 10 Nov 1943
Created Baroness Henig for life 8 Jun 2004
HENLEY
27 Mar 1760 B 1 Robert Henley 1708 14 Jan 1772 63
Created Baron Henley 27 Mar 1760 and
Earl of Northington 19 May 1764
See "Northington"
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  
9 Nov 1799 B[I] 1 Morton Eden 8 Jul 1752 6 Dec 1830 78
Created Baron Henley 9 Nov 1799
PC 1794
6 Dec 1830 2 Robert Henley Henley 3 Sep 1789 3 Feb 1841 51
MP for Fowey 1826-1830
3 Feb 1841 3 Anthony Henley Henley 12 Apr 1825 27 Nov 1898 73
MP for Northampton 1859-1874
Created Baron Northington 28 Jun 1885
27 Nov 1898 4 Frederick Henley Henley  (also 2nd Baron
Northington) 17 Apr 1849 23 Dec 1923 74
23 Dec 1923 5 Anthony Ernest Henley Henley  (also 3rd
Baron Northington) 3 Jul 1858 23 Oct 1925 67
For further information on this peer's wife, see
the note at the foot of this page
23 Oct 1925 6 Francis Robert Eden  (also 4th Baron Northington) 11 Apr 1877 21 Apr 1962 85
21 Apr 1962 7 Michael Francis Eden  (also 5th Baron Northington) 13 Aug 1914 20 Dec 1977 63
20 Dec 1977 8 Oliver Michael Robert Eden  (also 6th Baron 
Northington) 12 Nov 1953
PC 2013
HENNESSY
16 Nov 1999 B[L] 1 David James George Hennessy,3rd Baron 23 Jan 1932 21 Dec 2010 78
to     Windlesham
21 Dec 2010 Created Baron Hennessy for life 16 Nov 1999
Peerage extinct on his death
HENNESSY OF NYMPSFIELD
8 Nov 2010 B[L] 1 Peter John Hennessy 28 Mar 1947
Created Baron Hennessy of Nympsfield for life
8 Nov 2010
HENNIKER
31 Jul 1800 B[I] 1 Sir John Henniker,2nd baronet 15 Jun 1724 18 Apr 1803 78
Created Baron Henniker 31 Jul 1800
MP for Sudbury 1761-1768 and Dover
1774-1784
18 Apr 1803 2 John Henniker-Major 19 Apr 1752 5 Dec 1821 69
MP for New Romney 1785-1790, Steyning 1794-
1802, Rutland 1805-1812 and Stamford
1812-1818
5 Dec 1821 3 John Minet Henniker-Major 20 Nov 1777 22 Jul 1832 54
22 Jul 1832 4 John Henniker-Major 3 Feb 1801 16 Apr 1870 69
Created Baron Hartismere 13 Jul 1866
MP for Suffolk East 1832-1847 and 1856-
1866
16 Apr 1870 5 John Major Henniker-Major  (also 2nd Baron
Baron Hartismere) 7 Nov 1842 27 Jun 1902 59
MP for Suffolk East 1866-1870
27 Jun 1902 6 Charles Henry Chandos Henniker-Major  (also
3rd Baron Hartismere) 25 Jan 1872 4 Feb 1956 84
For further information on this peer, see
the note at the foot of this page
4 Feb 1956 7 John Ernest de Grey Henniker-Major  (also 4th
Baron Hartismere) 18 Jan 1883 9 Feb 1980 97
9 Feb 1980 8 John Patrick Edward Chandos
Henniker-Major  (also 5th Baron Hartismere)
19 Feb 1916 29 Apr 2004 88
29 Apr 2004 9 Mark Ian Philip Chandos Henniker-Major
(also 6th Baron Hartismere) 29 Sep 1947
HERBERT
26 Jul 1461 B 1 William Herbert c 1423 27 Jul 1469
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Herbert 26 Jul 1461
He was created Earl of Pembroke (qv) 
in 1468
27 Jul 1469 2 William Herbert,2nd Earl of Pembroke 5 Mar 1461 16 Jul 1491 30
16 Jul 1491 3 Elizabeth Somerset c 1514
She married Sir Charles Somerset who was
26 Nov 1506 created Baron Herbert on 26 Nov 1506
c 1514 4 Henry Somerset 26 Nov 1549
He succeeded as 2nd Earl of Worcester (qv) in 1526
26 Nov 1549 5 William Somerset,3rd Earl of Worcester c 1527 21 Feb 1589
KG 1570
21 Feb 1589 6 Edward Somerset,4th Earl of Worcester c 1550 3 Mar 1628
KG 1593. Lord Privy Seal 1616-1628
3 Mar 1628 7 Henry Somerset,5th Earl of Worcester,later [1643] 1577 18 Dec 1646 69
      1st Marquess of Worcester
He was summoned to Parliament by a Writ of
Acceleration as Baron Herbert 31 Jan 1604
 
18 Dec 1646 8 Edward Somerset,2nd Marquess of Worcester 1601 3 Apr 1667 65
 
3 Apr 1667 9 Henry Somerset 1629 21 Jan 1700 70
He was created Duke of Beaufort (qv) in 1682
 
21 Jan 1700 10 Henry Somerset,2nd Duke of Beaufort 2 Apr 1684 24 May 1714 30
Lord Lieutenant Hampshire 1710 and
Gloucester 1712. PC 1710, KG 1712
24 May 1714 11 Henry Scudamore,3rd Duke of Beaufort 26 Mar 1707 24 Feb 1745 37
24 Feb 1745 12 Charles Noel Somerset,4th Duke of Beaufort 12 Sep 1709 28 Oct 1756 47
MP for Monmouthshire 1731-1734 and
Monmouth 1734-1745
28 Oct 1756 13 Henry Somerset,5th Duke of Beaufort 16 Oct 1744 11 Oct 1803 58
Lord Lieutenant Monmouth 1771, Brecknock
1787 and Leicester 1787-1799. KG 1786
11 Oct 1803 14 Henry Charles Somerset,6th Duke of Beaufort 22 Dec 1766 23 Nov 1835 68
MP for Monmouth 1788-1790, Bristol 1790-
1796 and Gloucestershire 1796-1803.
Lord Lieutenant Monmouth and Brecknock
1803 and Gloucester 1810. KG 1805
23 Nov 1835 15 Henry Somerset,7th Duke of Beaufort 5 Feb 1792 17 Nov 1853 61
MP for Monmouth 1813-1832 and 
Gloucestershire West 1835. KG 1842
17 Nov 1853 16 Henry Charles Fitzroy Somerset,8th Duke of Beaufort 1 Feb 1824 30 Apr 1899 75
MP for Gloucestershire East 1846-1853.
Lord Lieutenant Monmouth 1867. PC 1858
KG 1867
30 Apr 1899 17 Henry Adelbert Wellington Fitzroy 
Somerset,9th Duke of Beaufort 19 May 1847 27 Nov 1924 77
27 Nov 1924 18 Henry Hugh Arthur Fitzroy Somerset, 4 Apr 1900 5 Feb 1984 83
to     10th Duke of Beaufort
5 Feb 1984 Lord Lieutenant Gloucester. PC 1936
KG 1937
On his death the Barony of Herbert fell into
      abeyance  
10 Jan 2002 19 David John Seyfried 1952
Abeyance terminated in his favour
HERBERT OF CARDIFF
10 Oct 1551 B 1 William Herbert 1506 17 Mar 1570 63
Created Baron Herbert of Cardiff
10 Oct 1551 and Earl of Pembroke 
11 Oct 1551
See "Pembroke"
HERBERT OF CASTLE ISLAND
31 Dec 1624 B[I] 1 Edward Herbert 3 Mar 1583 5 Aug 1648 65
Created Baron Herbert of Castle
Island 31 Dec 1624 and Baron Herbert
of Chirbury 7 May 1629
See "Herbert of Chirbury" below
HERBERT OF CHIRBURY
7 May 1629 B 1 Edward Herbert 3 Mar 1583 5 Aug 1648 65
Created Baron Herbert of Castle
Island 31 Dec 1624 and Baron Herbert
of Chirbury 7 May 1629
5 Aug 1648 2 Richard Herbert c 1608 13 May 1655
13 May 1655 3 Edward Herbert 1633 9 Dec 1678 45
PC [I] 1669
9 Dec 1678 4 Henry Herbert c 1643 21 Apr 1691
to     MP for Montgomery 1665-1678
21 Apr 1691 Peerage extinct on his death
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28 Apr 1694 B 1 Henry Herbert 24 Jul 1654 22 Jan 1709 54
MP for Bewdley 1677-1679 and 1689-1694
and Worcester 1681
Created Baron Herbert of Chirbury
28 Apr 1694
22 Jan 1709 2 Henry Herbert after 1678 19 Apr 1738
to     MP for Bewdley 1708-1709
19 Apr 1738 Peerage extinct on his death
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21 Dec 1743 B 1 Henry Arthur Herbert c 1703 10 Sep1772
16 Oct 1749 B 1 Created Baron Herbert of Chirbury
21 Dec 1743,Baron Powis,Viscount
Ludlow and Earl of Powis 27 May 1748
and Baron Herbert of Chirbury
16 Oct 1749
The creation of the Barony of 1749 contained a
special remainder,failing heirs male of his body,to
his brother Richard Herbert and to Francis Herbert
See "Powis"
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  
14 May 1804 B 1 Edward Clive,2nd Baron Clive of Plassey 7 Mar 1754 16 May 1839 85
Created Baron Powis,Baron Herbert
of Chirbury,Viscount Clive of Ludlow
and Earl of Powis 14 May 1804
See "Powis"
HERBERT OF LEA
15 Jan 1861 B 1 Sidney Herbert 16 Sep 1810 2 Aug 1861 50
Created Baron Herbert of Lea
15 Jan 1861
MP for Wiltshire South 1832-1861. 
Secretary at War 1845-1846 and 1852-1855.
Secretary of State for Colonies 1855.
Secretary of State for War 1859-1861.
PC 1845
2 Aug 1861 2 George Robert Charles Herbert 6 Jul 1850 3 May 1895 44
He succeeded as 13th Earl of Pembroke and 10th
Earl of Montgomery (qv) in 1862 with which title this
peerage then merged and still remains so
HERBERT OF SHURLAND
4 May 1605 B 1 Philip Herbert c 1584 23 Jan 1650
Created Baron Herbert of Shurland
and Earl of Montgomery 4 May 1605
See "Montgomery"
HERBERT OF TORBAY
29 May 1689 E 1 Arthur Herbert c 1648 14 Apr 1716
to     Created Baron Herbert of Torbay and
14 Apr 1716 Earl of Torrington 29 May 1689
Peerages extinct on his death
HEREFORD
c 1067 E 1 William Fitzosbern by 1030 22 Feb 1072
Created Earl of Hereford c 1067
22 Feb 1072 2 Roger de Breteuil by 1053 after 1074
to     The peerage was forfeited in 1074
1074
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25 Jul 1141 E 1 Miles de Gloucester c 1100 24 Dec 1143
Created Earl of Hereford 25 Jul 1141
24 Dec 1143 2 Roger Fitzmiles c 1155
to     On his death the peerage reverted to the
c 1155 Crown
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  
28 Apr 1199 E 1 Henry de Bohun 1176 1 Jun 1220 43
Created Earl of Hereford 28 Apr 1199
1 Jun 1220 2 Humphrey de Bohun by 1208 24 Sep 1275
24 Sep 1275 3 Humphrey de Bohun 1251 31 Dec 1298 47
31 Dec 1298 4 Humphrey de Bohun c 1276 16 Mar 1322
16 Mar 1322 5 John de Bohun 23 Nov 1307 20 Jan 1336 28
20 Jan 1336 6 Humphrey de Bohun 1311 15 Oct 1361 50
15 Oct 1361 7 Humphrey de Bohun 25 Mar 1341 16 Jan 1373 31
to     KG 1365
16 Jan 1373 On his death the peerage reverted to the
Crown
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  
29 Sep 1397 D 1 Henry Plantagenet 1367 1413
to     Created Duke of Hereford 29 Sep 1397
1399 He succeeded to the throne as Henry IV in
1399 when the peerage merged with the
Crown
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  
2 Feb 1550 V 1 Walter Devereux 1491 27 Sep 1558 67
Created Viscount Hereford 2 Feb 1550
KG 1523
27 Sep 1558 2 Walter Devereux,later [1572] 1st Earl of Essex 16 Sep 1541 22 Sep 1576 35
12 Sep 1576 3 Robert Devereux,2nd Earl of Essex 1567 25 Feb 1601 33
to     He was attainted and the peerages forfeited
25 Feb 1601
28 Apr 1604 4 Robert Devereux,3rd Earl of Essex 1591 14 Sep 1646 55
Restored to the peerages
14 Sep 1646 5 Sir Walter Devereux,2nd baronet c 1659
MP for Worcester 1625, Tamworth 1628-
1629 and Lichfield 1640
c 1659 6 Leicester Devereux 1617 1 Dec 1676 59
1 Dec 1676 7 Leicester Devereux c 1667 Mar 1683
Mar 1683 8 Edward Devereux c 1675 9 Aug 1700
9 Aug 1700 9 Price Devereux c 1664 3 Oct 1740 76
MP for Montgomery 1691-1700. Lord
Lieutenant Montgomery 1711-1714
3 Oct 1740 10 Price Devereux 9 Jun 1694 29 Jul 1748 54
MP for Montgomeryshire 1719-1740
29 Jul 1748 11 Edward Devereux c 1710 22 Aug 1760
22 Aug 1760 12 Edward Devereux 19 Feb 1741 1 Aug 1783 42
1 Aug 1783 13 George Devereux 25 Apr 1744 31 Dec 1804 60
31 Dec 1804 14 Henry Fleming Lea Devereux 9 Feb 1777 31 May 1843 66
PC 1830
31 May 1843 15 Robert Devereux 3 May 1809 18 Aug 1855 46
18 Aug 1855 16 Robert Devereux 3 Jan 1843 27 Mar 1930 87
27 Mar 1930 17 Robert Charles Devereux 11 Aug 1865 16 Apr 1952 86
16 Apr 1952 18 Robert Milo Leicester Devereux 4 Nov 1932 25 Feb 2004 71
25 Feb 2004 19 Charles Robin de Bohun Devereux 11 Aug 1975
HERMITAGE
29 Mar 1706 V[S] 1 Henry Scott 1676 25 Dec 1730 54
Created Lord Goldilands,Viscount of
Hermitage and Earl of Deloraine
29 Mar 1706
See "Deloraine"
HERON
8 Jan 1371 B 1 William Heron after 1371
to     Summoned to Parliament as Lord
after 1371 Heron 8 Jan 1371
Peerage extinct on his death
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13 Nov 1393 B 1 William Heron Oct 1404
to     Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Oct 1404 Heron 13 Nov 1393
Peerage extinct on his death
HERRIES
3 Feb 1490 B[S] 1 Herbert Herries c 1505
Created Lord Herries 3 Feb 1490
c 1505 2 Andrew Herries c 1477 9 Sep 1513
9 Sep 1513 3 William Herries 26 Sep 1543
26 Sep 1543 4 Agnes Maxwell c 1534 14 Mar 1594
14 Mar 1594 5 William Maxwell c 1555 10 Oct 1604
10 Oct 1604 6 John Maxwell May 1631
May 1631 7 John Maxwell,later [1667] 3rd Earl of Nithsdale 1677
1677 8 Robert Maxwell,4th Earl of Nithsdale Jan 1628 Mar 1696 68
Mar 1696 9 William Maxwell,5th Earl of Nithsdale 1676 20 Mar 1744 67
to     He was attainted and the peerage forfeited
Jan 1716
23 Jun 1858 10 William Constable-Maxwell 25 Aug 1804 12 Nov 1876 72
After the attainder had been reversed in 1848,he
successfully claimed the peerage in 1858
For further information,see the note at the foot
of this page
12 Nov 1876 11 Marmaduke Francis Constable-Maxwell 4 Oct 1837 6 Oct 1908 71
10 Nov 1884 Created Baron Herries [UK] 10 Nov 1884
to     Lord Lieutenant E Riding Yorkshire 1880-1908
6 Oct 1908 and Kirkcudbright 1885-1908
On his death the UK Barony became extinct
whilst the Scottish Barony passed to -
6 Oct 1908 12 Gwendolen Mary Fitzalan-Howard 11 Jan 1877 28 Aug 1945 68
28 Aug 1945 13 Bernard Marmaduke Fitzalan-Howard,
16th Duke of Norfolk 30 May 1908 31 Jan 1975 66
31 Jan 1975 14 Anne Elizabeth Fitzalan-Howard 12 Jun 1938
HERSCHELL
8 Feb 1886 B 1 Farrer Herschell 2 Nov 1837 1 Mar 1899 61
Created Baron Herschell 8 Feb 1886
MP for Durham City 1874-1885. Solicitor
General 1880-1885. Lord Chancellor 1886
and 1892-1895  PC 1886
1 Mar 1899 2 Richard Farrer Herschell 22 May 1878 14 Oct 1929 51
14 Oct 1929 3 Rognvald Richard Farrer Herschell 13 Sep 1923 26 Oct 2008 85
to     Peerage extinct on his death
26 Oct 2008
HERTFORD
c 1138 E 1 Gilbert de Clare by 1115 1152
Created Earl of Hertford c 1138
1152 2 Roger de Clare by 1137 1173
1173 3 Richard de Clare by 1162 Nov 1217
Nov 1217 4 Gilbert de Clare,later [1218] 1st Earl of Gloucester by 1182 25 Oct 1230
25 Oct 1230 5 Richard de Clare,2nd Earl of Gloucester 4 Aug 1222 13 Jul 1262 39
13 Jul 1262 6 Gilbert de Clare,3rd Earl of Gloucester 2 Sep 1243 7 Dec 1295 52
7 Dec 1295 7 Joan de Clare,Countess of Gloucester 1272 23 Apr 1307 34
She married Ralph Monthermer,later Earl of Athole
(qv) who,by right of marriage,was recognised as
5th Earl of Gloucester and 7th Earl of Hertford.
He died c 1325
23 Apr 1307 8 Gilbert de Clare,5th Earl of Gloucester c Apr 1291 24 Jun 1314 23
to     On his death the peerage reverted to the
24 Jun 1314 Crown
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18 Oct 1537 E 1 Edward Seymour c 1500 22 Jan 1552
to     Created Earl of Hertford 18 Oct 1537
22 Jan 1552 He was later created Duke of Somerset (qv).
Attainted and the peerages forfeited
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  
13 Jan 1559 E 1 Edward Seymour 12 Oct 1537 6 Apr 1621 83
Created Baron Beauchamp of Hache
and Earl of Hertford 13 Jan 1559
6 Apr 1621 2 William Seymour 1588 24 Oct 1660 72
3 Jun 1640 M 1 He was summoned to Parliament by a Writ of
Acceleration as Baron Beauchamp in Feb 1621.
Created Marquess of Hertford 3 Jun 1640
He was restored to the Dukedom of
Somerset in 1660
24 Oct 1660 3 William Seymour,3rd Duke of Somerset 17 Apr 1652 12 Dec 1671 19
2
12 Dec 1671 4 John Seymour,4th Duke of Somerset 29 Apr 1675
to     3 On his death the Marquessate became
29 Apr 1675 extinct whilst the Earldom passed to -
29 Apr 1675 5 Francis Seymour,5th Duke of Somerset 17 Jan 1658 20 Apr 1678 20
20 Apr 1678 6 Charles Seymour,6th Duke of Somerset 13 Jan 1662 2 Dec 1748 86
2 Dec 1748 7 Algernon Seymour,7th Duke of Somerset 11 Nov 1684 7 Feb 1750 65
to     Peerage extinct on his death
7 Feb 1750
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5 Jul 1793 M 1 Francis Seymour-Conway,2nd Baron Conway 5 Jul 1718 14 Jun 1794 75
Created Viscount Beauchamp of Hache
and Earl of Hertford 3 Aug 1750, and
Earl of Yarmouth and Marquess of
Hertford 5 Jul 1793
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 1765-1766. Lord
Lieutenant Warwickshire 1757-1794 and
Montgomery 1775-1776. KG 1756  PC [I] 1750
PC 1763
14 Jun 1794 2 Francis Seymour-Conway (Seymour-Ingram 12 Feb 1743 17 Jun 1822 79
from Dec 1807)
MP for Lostwithiel 1766-1768 and Orford
1768-1794. Chief Secretary for Ireland
1765-1766. PC [I] 1765  PC 1780  KG 1807  
Lord Lieutenant Warwickshire 1816-1822
17 Jun 1822 3 Francis Charles Seymour-Conway 11 Mar 1777 1 Mar 1842 64
MP for Orford 1797-1802, Lisburn 1802-
1812, Antrim 1812-1818 and Camelford 
1820-1822.  PC 1812  KG 1822
1 Mar 1842 4 Richard Seymour-Conway 22 Feb 1800 25 Aug 1870 70
MP for Antrim 1821-1826.  KG 1846
25 Aug 1870 5 Francis Hugh George Seymour 11 Feb 1812 25 Jan 1884 71
PC 1874
For information on the death of this peer,see
the note at the foot of this page
25 Jan 1884 6 Hugh de Grey Seymour 22 Oct 1843 23 Mar 1912 68
MP for Antrim 1869-1874 and Warwickshire
South 1874-1880. Lord Lieutenant Warwick
1905-1912  PC 1879
23 Mar 1912 7 George Francis Alexander Seymour 20 Oct 1871 16 Feb 1940 68
16 Feb 1940 8 Hugh Edward Conway Seymour 29 Mar 1930 22 Dec 1997 67
22 Dec 1997 9 Henry Jocelyn Seymour 6 Jul 1958
HERVEY
5 Aug 1620 B[I] 1 Sir William Hervey,1st baronet 8 Jul 1642
27 Feb 1628 Created Baron Hervey [I] 5 Aug 1620
to     and Baron Hervey [GB] 27 Feb 1628
8 Jul 1642 Peerages extinct on his death
HERVEY OF ICKWORTH
23 Mar 1703 B 1 John Hervey 27 Aug 1665 20 Jan 1751 85
Created Baron Hervey of Ickworth
23 Mar 1703 and Earl of Bristol
19 Oct 1714
See "Bristol"
                   *****************
11 Jun 1733 John Hervey 13 Oct 1696 5 Aug 1743 46
He was summoned to Parliament by a Writ of
Acceleration as Baron Hervey 11 Jun 1733
PC 1730
He was the son and heir apparent of the 1st Earl
of Bristol, but died before he could succeed to
that title
HESELTINE
12 Jul 2001 B[L] 1 Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine 21 Mar 1933
Created Baron Heseltine for life
12 Jul 2001
MP for Tavistock 1966-1974 and Henley
1974-2001. Minister for Aerospace 1972-1974
Sec of State for the Environment 1979-1983
and 1990-1992. Sec of State for Defence 
1983-1986. President of the Board of Trade
1992-1995.First Sec of State and Deputy PM
1995-1997. PC 1979  CH 1997
HESKETH
25 Jan 1935 B 1 Sir Thomas Fermor-Hesketh,8th baronet 17 Nov 1881 20 Jul 1944 62
Created Baron Hesketh 25 Jan 1935
MP for Enfield 1922-1923
20 Jul 1944 2 Frederick Fermor-Hesketh 8 Apr 1916 10 Jun 1955 39
10 Jun 1955 3 Thomas Alexander Fermor-Hesketh 28 Oct 1950
PC 1991
HEWART
28 Oct 1940 V 1 Gordon Hewart 7 Jan 1870 5 May 1943 73
Created Baron Hewart 24 Mar 1922
and Viscount Hewart 28 Oct 1940
MP for Leicester 1913-1918 and Leicester
East 1918-1922. Solicitor General 1919-
1922. PC 1918   Lord Chief Justice 1922-1940
5 May 1943 2 Hugh Vaughan Hewart 11 Nov 1896 23 Jul 1964 67
to     Peerages extinct on his death
23 Jul 1964
HEWETT
9 Apr 1689 V[I] 1 Sir George Hewett,2nd baronet 1652 2 Dec 1689 37
to     Created Baron of Jamestown and
2 Dec 1689 Viscount Hewett 9 Apr 1689
Peerages extinct on his death
HEWLETT
26 Apr 1972 B[L] 1 Thomas Clyde Hewlett 4 Aug 1923 2 Jul 1979 55
to     Created Baron Hewlett for life 26 Apr 1972
2 Jul 1979 Peerage extinct on his death
HEYCOCK
10 Jul 1967 B[L] 1 Llewellin Heycock 12 Aug 1905 14 Mar 1990 84
to     Created Baron Heycock for life 10 Jul 1967
14 Mar 1990 Peerage extinct on his death
HEYHOE FLINT
21 Jan 2011 B[L] 1 Rachael Heyhoe Flint 11 Jun 1939
Created Baroness Heyhoe Flint for life 
21 Jan 2011
HEYTESBURY
23 Jan 1828 B 1 Sir William A'Court,2nd baronet 11 Jul 1779 31 May 1860 80
Created Baron Heytesbury 23 Jan 1828
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 1844-1846
MP for Dorchester 1812-1814  PC 1817
31 May 1860 2 William Henry Ashe A'Court-Holmes 11 Jul 1809 21 Apr 1891 81
MP for Isle of Wight 1837-1847
21 Apr 1891 3 William Frederick Holmes-A'Court 25 Jun 1862 15 Aug 1903 41
15 Aug 1903 4 Leonard Holmes-A'Court 11 Jun 1863 2 Feb 1949 85
2 Feb 1949 5 William Leonard Frank Holmes-A'Court 17 Apr 1906 27 Nov 1971 65
27 Nov 1971 6 Francis William Holmes-A'Court 8 Nov 1931 5 Oct 2004 72
5 Oct 2004 7 James William Holmes-A'Court 30 Jul 1967
HEYWORTH
25 Jul 1955 B 1 Geoffrey Heyworth 18 Oct 1894 15 Jun 1974 79
to     Created Baron Heyworth 25 Jul 1955
15 Jun 1974 Peerage extinct on his death
HICKS OF ILMINGTON
5 May 1628 B 1 Sir Baptist Hicks 1551 28 Oct 1629 78
Created Baron Hicks of Ilmington and
Viscount Campden 5 May 1628
See "Campden"
HIGGINS
28 Oct 1997 B[L] 1 Terence Langley Higgins 18 Jan 1928
Created Baron Higgins for life 28 Oct 1997
MP for Worthing 1964-1997. Minister of
State,Treasury 1970-1972. Financial 
Secretary to the Treasury 1972-1974.
PC 1979
HIGHAM
19 Nov 1733 B 1 Thomas Watson-Wentworth,1st Baron Malton 13 Nov 1693 14 Dec 1750 57
Created Viscount Higham and Earl of
Malton 19 Nov 1733 and Marquess of
Rockingham 19 Apr 1746
See "Rockingham"
HILL
17 May 1814 B 1 Rowland Hill 11 Aug 1772 10 Dec 1842 70
to     Created Baron Hill 17 May 1814 and
10 Dec 1842 16 Jan 1816,and Viscount Hill
27 Sep 1842 V 1 27 Sep 1842
For details of the special remainders included in the
creations of the Barony of 1816 and the Viscountcy,
see the notes at the foot of this page
MP for Shrewsbury 1812-1814. PC 1828
On his death the Barony of 1814 became
extinct whilst the remaining peerages 
passed to -
10 Dec 1842 2 Sir Rowland Hill,4th baronet 10 May 1800 3 Jan 1875 74
MP for Shropshire 1821-1832 and Shropshire
North 1832-1842. Lord Lieutenant 
Shopshire 1845-1875
3 Jan 1875 3 Rowland Clegg Clegg-Hill 5 Dec 1833 30 Mar 1895 61
MP for Shropshire North 1857-1865
30 Mar 1895 4 Rowland Richard Clegg-Hill 12 Feb 1863 19 Dec 1923 60
19 Dec 1923 5 Francis William Clegg-Hill 4 Nov 1866 6 Jul 1924 57
6 Jul 1924 6 Charles Rowland Clegg-Hill 5 May 1876 3 May 1957 80
3 May 1957 7 Gerald Rowland Clegg-Hill 31 Mar 1904 11 May 1974 70
11 May 1974 8 Antony Rowland Clegg-Hill 19 Mar 1931 12 Mar 2003 71
12 Mar 2003 9 Peter David Raymond Charles Clegg-Hill 17 Oct 1945
HILL OF KILWARLIN
21 Aug 1717 B[I] 1 Trevor Hill 1693 5 May 1742 48
Created Baron Hill of Kilwarlin and
Viscount Hillsborough 21 Aug 1717
See "Hillsborough"
HILL OF LUTON
13 Jun 1963 B[L] 1 Charles Hill 15 Jan 1904 22 Aug 1989 85
to     Created Baron Hill of Luton for life
22 Aug 1989 13 Jun 1963
MP for Luton 1950-1963. Postmaster
General 1955-1957. Chancellor of the
Duchy of Lancaster 1957-1961. Minister for
Housing and Local Government and Welsh
Affairs 1961-1962.  PC 1955
Peerage extinct on his death
HILL OF OAREFORD
27 May 2010 B[L] 1 Jonathan Hopkin Hill 24 Jul 1960
Created Baron Hill of Oareford for life 
27 May 2010
PC 2013
HILL OF OLDERFLEET
17 Feb 1766 B[I] 1 Arthur Hill-Trevor 30 Jan 1771
Created Baron Hill of Olderfleet and
Viscount Dungannon 17 Feb 1766
See "Dungannon"
HILL OF WIVENHOE
21 Sep 1967 B[L] 1 Edward James Hill 20 Aug 1899 14 Dec 1969 70
to     Created Baron Hill of Wivenhoe for life
          14 Dec 1969  21 Sep 1967
Peerage extinct on his death
HILLHOUSE
14 Apr 1697 B[S] 1 Lord John Hamilton 26 Jan 1665 3 Dec 1744 79
Created Lord Hillhouse and Earl of
Ruglen 14 Apr 1697
See "Ruglen"
HILLINGDON
15 Feb 1886 B 1 Sir Charles Henry Mills,2nd baronet 26 Apr 1830 3 Apr 1898 67
Created Baron Hillingdon 15 Feb 1886
MP for Northallerton 1865-1866 and
Kent West 1868-1885
3 Apr 1898 2 Charles William Mills 26 Jan 1855 6 Apr 1919 64
MP for Sevenoaks 1885-1892
6 Apr 1919 3 Arthur Robert Mills 13 Oct 1891 5 Dec 1952 61
MP for Uxbridge 1915-1918
5 Dec 1952 4 Charles Hedworth Mills 12 Jan 1922 6 May 1978 56
6 May 1978 5 Patrick Charles Mills 4 Nov 1906 1 Sep 1982 75
to     Peerage extinct on his death
1 Sep 1982
HILL-NORTON
5 Feb 1979 B[L] 1 Peter John Hill-Norton 8 Feb 1915 16 May 2004 89
to     Created Baron Hill-Norton for life 
16 May 2004 5 Feb 1979
Admiral of the Fleet 1971. Chief of the Defence
Staff 1971-1973
Peerage extinct on his death
Rowland George Allanson Allanson-Winn, 5th Baron Headley
In November 1913, shortly after succeeding to the title, Headley announced that he had
converted to Islam. He adopted the name Shaikh Rahmatullah al-Farooq.
The following is extracted from the New York Times of 23 November 1913. My thanks to
Richard Lichten for drawing my attention to this article.
'……his conversion to Islam marks the culmination of a career of much adventure and of interest
and he has enjoyed the….well-nigh unique advantage of reading his obituaries at no less than
three different periods of his life. Indeed, he has been so often reported as dead that when he
is ultimately gathered his fathers it will require something more than mere newspaper 
announcements to carry conviction of his demise.
'He is not unknown in the United States, has spent much time prospecting in Montana, Idaho,
Wyoming and other Western States, also in the northwest of Canada; served through the 
Franco-German War on the staff of his friend the Prussian General von Goeben [this seems a 
little doubtful - he would been only 15 or 16 at the time], fought beside the late Lord
Ashburnham for the late Don Carlos in the several Carlist insurrections in Spain some forty years
ago, and also figured on the Turkish side in the Turko-Russian War, which was brought to a
close by the Treaty of San Stefano and the Congress of Berlin.
'At one time, around about 1892, he was missing [for] three years in central Africa. He had 
started out north of the Zambezi River on a shooting expedition consisting of but six people 
besides himself, narrowly escaped being eaten by cannibals, penetrated regions where no
white man had ever set foot before, killed with his one gun no less than eighteen
rhinoceri, a dozen lions and several elephants [what a hero], and then, after long been given
up as dead, unexpectedly reappeared, just as if nothing had happened, to take his place as
a representative peer of Ireland in the House of Lords. [This is not correct - the 5th baron
was never a representative peer].
'Although nominally possessed of 16,000 acres of land in Ireland, yet, owing to the
embarrassed condition of his property, he has been, at times, in such financial straits, especially
after the failure of some of his mining ventures, that he has known what it was to spend his 
nights on the Thames Embankment for the lack of the price of a night's lodging; and when
ultimately he was able to sell his Irish estates to the tenants under the terms of the Land Act,
he received but little from the transaction , owing to the mortgages with which they were 
burdened. That little went to his invalid wife. When I last saw him he was a cheery-looking,
fresh-collared man, strong in build, not very tall, slightly deaf and with mustache and hair
that were then gray and are now probably white……'
In 1921, Headley married the Australian authoress Barbara Baynton. He was offered the throne
of Albania in 1925, presumably after it was supposedly offered and rejected by the famous 
sportsman C B Fry (although the story of Fry's being offered the throne must be considered to
be doubtful). Headley refused the offer, whereupon his wife appears to have taken the huff and 
returned to Australia. As a good Muslim, he twice made the Haj to Mecca.
George Augustus Eliott, 1st Baron Heathfield
The following biography of Lord Heathfield appeared in the October 1948 issue of the Australian
monthly magazine "Parade":-
'Britain's greatest fortress, Gibraltar, has withstood 10 out of 14 sieges in its battle-scarred 
history, the most famous a continuous battering of 3 and a half years during the American War 
of Independence, when France and Spain attempted to take advantage of Britain's preoccupation
in America to oust her from the Mediterranean. Their plans were foiled by the tiny Gibraltar 
garrison of 5000 to 7000 men, led by one of the most attractive characters among British 
generals, Sir George Eliott, afterwards Baron Heathfield.
 
'Eliott was an "old man" when he was sent to Gibraltar. He had given his whole lifetime to fighting
his country's battles in a hundred campaigns. Distinguished service in every field had seen his
elevation to the rank of Lieutenant-General at the age of 45, but now, at 65, it was thought his 
fighting days were over. And so he was given the post of commander at Gibraltar, an 
appointment in which it seemed likely he would be able to conclude his great military career in
peace and quiet among the company he liked, while the din and fury of battle was concentrated
overseas in America. But at 65 this "washed-up" old soldier whipped a small incident into a front-
rank military campaign that secured for England a permanent place in the Mediterranean and for
himself enduring fame in the annals of the British Army. His defence of Gibraltar became England's
one great success in an otherwise lamentable war, giving a much needed fillip to British morale
while his daring and successful improvisations opened a new chapter in artillery warfare.
'Gibraltar was secured for England by General Rooke in 1704 during the War of Spanish 
Succession. Though the Spaniards besieged it immediately, and again in 1727, they were unable
to recover it. During the next 50 years the British held it without firing a shot and, lulled into a
false sense of security, permitted the fortifications to go to rack and ruin.
'This was the position in 1779, when it seemed clear to France that England was about to lose
her American colonies. The French secretly negotiated with Spain with a view to dividing 
between them the British possessions in the Mediterranean. Awakening to the danger, the 
British Government sent reinforcements to both Minorca and Gibraltar, and to command the
latter chose "old" George Augustus Eliott.
'Eliott was a Scotsman, born at Stobs, Roxburghshire, in 1717, the seventh son of the third
baronet, Sir Gilbert Eliott, himself a soldier. After a local education, George, like most young
Scots of well-to-do families in his day, had been sent to Leyden University and thence by special
permission to the French military college of La Fere, where he received what was considered the
best military education then available. At Gibraltar, the French were to regret they had ever had
him as a pupil.
'In 1735, at the age of 18, he volunteered for service in the Prussian army. For two years Eliott
marched and counter-marched in central Europe, laying the foundations of his future knowledge
of tactics and strategy. Speedy promotion to major came to him during the War of the Austrian
Succession. On peace being signed he returned to England and married, on 8 June 1748, Anne
Pollexfen (daughter and heiress of Sir Francis Henry Drake of Buckland Abbey, Devon), who later
was to bear him a son, Francis, destined to carry on the family tradition as a soldier.
'Service as aide-de-camp to King George II followed. Then the Seven Years War saw him in
command of the 1st Light Horse. Later an expedition to Cuba brought him rich prize money which
enabled him to buy, on his return to England, the estate of Heathfield in Sussex, from which he
afterwards took his title.
'After 10 years of retirement he was given the post of commander-in-chief in Ireland, but
resigned after a year objecting to interferences from Whitehall. Then in the following year he was
sent to Gibraltar. When Eliott arrived elaborate courtesy still prevailed between the British 
garrison and the Spanish headquarters at Algeciras, across the bay, and one of Eliott's first acts
was to pay a courtesy visit to the Spanish governor Mendoza. Eliott detected an embarrassment
in the welcome extended to him and drew his own conclusions. He did not know it, but their two
countries were already at war. Nevertheless, with true Scottish caution, he hastened to make
his fortress's defences secure. A week later hostilities officially began.
'The siege that followed fell into three phases: the blockade simply from June, 1779, until April,
1781, during which time Eliott made thoroughly sure of his defences; the bombardment 
maintained without cease from April 1781, till the end of the siege; and the final fierce attack
by both land and sea lasting from the 8th to the 13th of September, 1782.
'When Eliott took over Gibraltar was almost defenceless and had the Spaniards pushed an
immediate attack nothing could have saved the place. Few guns remained mounted, parapets
had crumbled, ditches were closed with rubble, stores were empty and magazines depleted, and
there was very little food. Eliott immediately demanded from England the minimum requirements
as he saw them. And, as not unusual in such cases, did not get them. He got nothing. He had
to make shift with, and provision for, a garrison of 5382, including over 1000 Hanoverian troops
who set the standard for discipline, and some 500 artillerymen and engineers. In the harbour
below the citadel was a small naval detachment of H.M.S. Panther, three frigates and a sloop,
all under the command of Admiral [Robert] Duff [d. 1787]. The civilian population of the town of
Gibraltar was 15,000 odd, and this also came under his care.
'A camping ground for the 600 reinforcements he had brought with him was cleared near Devil's
Gap overlooking the Spanish lines, and for its defence a mortar battery was erected there. Three
other batteries were constructed to defend the town. An observation post was placed on the
Moorish castle, and bomb-proof shelters were quarried in the rock. The fortifications of the 
citadel were reinforced by traverses, and all exposed parapets were strengthened.
'At first the garrison was supplied with vegetables - an important item in such a hot climate - 
from gardens planted on the north front of "The Rock" outside the fortress gates on the edge
of no-man's land. Later when the Spaniards had encroached there, Eliott had gardens dug to the
south of the peninsula. The Spanish policy was to starve the British town and garrison out, and
though the slackness of the Spanish sea-blockade permitted a thin but constant flow of food
from Ceuta to reach them, within a month of the commencement of the siege Eliott had to
reduce rations for everybody by half.
'It is an interesting comment on the distinction then obtaining between officers and men, 
however, that the officers continued to receive four times as much food per man as the rank and
file, in accordance with regulations. Eliott, on the other hand, set an example of abstemiousness.
To test the adequacy of the reduced rations he lived for eight days on four ounces of rice a day,
thus proving it possible to live on far less than even the ranks were still allowed. His own diet
was always strictly vegetarian; he drank nothing but water, and his only "luxury" was an 
occasional suet pudding garnished with hair powder which he salvaged by ordering guards no 
longer to powder their wigs.
 
'While making the strictest demands upon himself - he slept only four hours nightly - his control
of the troops was marked by great liberality. Whenever it was necessary to make an example of
anyone for discipline he usually contrived to introduce an element of humour into the punishment.
In the case of a would-be deserter to the Spaniards, he declared him to be obviously mad, "since
no sane man would think of becoming a Spaniard." He ordered him to be shaved, trussed in a 
canvas strait-jacket, blistered, bled, and put to bed, and his "restoration to sanity" to be prayed
for in church. He encouraged inventiveness among all ranks, and rewarded it - in one case, of a 
sergeant-major who devised extra mortars by drilling holes in the solid rock and exploding powder
inside them - by securing him a commission - an unheard of promotion in those days when 
officers were born rather than made. 
 
'In January, 1780, the garrison and town were still holding out though near starvation when 
Admiral Sir George Rodney broke through the blockade by sea and landed supplies for 12 months
from a fleet of eight Spanish merchantmen he had just captured off Cape St. Vincent. Though 
the besieged now had food, it was only hard tack, and by June, 1780, their health was in a bad
way. Diphtheria and scurvy swept them - by the time the siege ended 536 had died of sickness
as compared with 333 in action or from wounds.
'Then, on April 12, 1781, the Spaniards opened a fierce bombardment upon the town and fortress
which continued for 18 months without a break of more than 23 hours at any one time. The town
was reduced to ruins, but the loss of life was slight, as the townsfolk lived in caves in the rock.
The chaos, however, occasioned a riot among the troops. A section of them looted the ruins for
food and drink, and were only restored to order when Eliott ordered the ring-leader to be hanged.
'In spite of the fierce bombardment a second relief convoy from England got through - 79 
transports commanded by Admiral [George] Darby [d. 1790]. Though the ships were heavily 
shelled they landed their valuable supplies and took off many sick women and children. The arrival
of food had lifted the spirits of the garrison, and Eliott decided to use the occasion to prepare
for a general sortie against the enemy in spite of the odds against him. 
'Preparations extended over several months. Then, on the evening of November 26, 1781, 2178 
men from the garrison, commanded by Eliott's second, Brigadier-General Ross, advanced three-
quarters of a mile over no-man's land, put completely out of action two Spanish mortar batteries
and three six-gun batteries, and retired in good order to their lines with the loss of only four men.
This "bucked" the garrison "no end." But the outraged Spaniards hanged some of their officers for
dereliction of duty and immediately made plans for a general offensive to offset their humiliating
defeat. For the next eight months they piled up supplies, and engaged Europe's reputed No. 1
engineer, d'Arcon, to devise floating batteries for use against the land forts. Then they gathered
together an army of 40,000 and a fleet of 350 ships. Against them Eliott had 7000 odd men, 96
guns and five ships.
'In June, 1782, Minorca fell to the French, thus increasing the strategic importance of Gibraltar
and enabling the French to reinforce the Spaniards for the coming attack upon it. On September
8, however, Eliott cleverly anticipated by certain signs the Spaniard's zero hour and opened up
a bombardment which put out of action the enemy's newest and most important battery. The
Spaniards launched a great sea-attack next day, ahead of their schedule. They were not fully
prepared and things went badly with them after a small initial success. The heavy swell on the
water made the gunnery from their floating batteries inaccurate, while the English gunners on
firm ground surprised them by a rapid hail of red-hot shot which set their floating batteries alight.
Moreover, the main force of the Franco-Spanish fleet off Algeciras refused to engage, as their
nine admirals anticipated the early advent of the British fleet and deemed it wiser to hold their
fire.
'Towards dawn on September 10 the floating batteries began to blow up. Their crews had to
abandon them in haste and about 350 were saved from drowning by English sailors. The rest were
drowned. The Spaniards thereupon cried enough. The French had already given up the siege in
disgust with their allies. Although the fighting finished, the blockade continued, and the garrison
and unhappy townsfolk endured in the next three weeks their bitterest starvation.
'At the end of that time, on October 10, Lord Howe arrived with an English fleet, and evading the
Franco-Spanish fleet, landed stores and reinforcements and embarked all invalids. By this time
peace negotiations were afoot though they did not mature until February of the following year.
Meantime Eliott had a most trying and difficult job keeping a restless garrison in order and 
bringing a ruined houseless civil community back to discipline and production.
'Eliott himself received the Order of the Bath and the thanks of Parliament before he left the
fortress. After his return to England he retired to his country estate for a well-earned rest. But
he was not forgotten; four years later Prime Minister Pitt raised him to the peerage as Lord
Heathfield. He died at Aix-la-Chapelle of palsy, on the eve of starting on a journey to revisit
his old post on Jul 6, 1790. He was buried at Heathfield Church in England.'
Anthony Ernest Henley Henley, 5th Baron Henley, and his wife Emmaline
Anthony Henley was the second son of the 3rd Baron Henley, upon whose death in 1898,
Anthony's older brother succeeded to the title as 4th Baron. As his older brother left no 
children, Anthony succeeded him as 5th Baron when he died in 1923.
Anthony married in 1889, as his second wife, Emmaline Stuart Maitland. It is with her that this
note is mainly concerned. The following article is from "The Pall Mall Gazette" of 30 November
1895:-
'A WEST END SCANDAL - EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE OF THREATENING TO SHOOT - A charge of
threatening to murder Dr. Montagu Handfield Jones, of 35, Cavendish-square, was brought 
before Mr. Plowden, at the Marylebone police-court, yesterday. The accused was the Hon. Mrs.
Emmaline Henley, who resides with her husband at 2, Park-villas West, Regent's Park. The lady,
who appeared to be in a very excited state of mind, interrupted the proceedings at various 
points, and was several times remonstrated with by the magistrate. Mr. C. C. Underwood
prosecuted, and Mr. Freke Palmer defended. Mr. Underwood, having opened the case, Dr.
Handfield Jones was called, and said he was a ladies' doctor and specialist. He became
professionally acquainted with the accused three years ago, and later on became socially
acquainted with her and her husband. Mr. Underwood: There has not been any other
relationship between you? - Dr. Jones: No, never. The defendant (sotto voce): You lie! You
lie! The prosecutor [i.e. Dr. Jones] (continuing) said Mr. Henley came to his house at half past 
nine at night in January last. He made a complaint about his wife, and, as a result, stayed there
that night. After that he went into lodgings. 
'Subsequently there was a meeting of friends of the family, and he (prosecutor) [Jones] acted
as "go-between" between the husband and wife, and their differences were arranged. On
July 10 he received the following letter from Mrs. Henley: - "If you don't come and see me
I will shoot you as dead as a dog. (Signed) E. S. Henley. You will drive me mad and desperate.
You had best come."  The same day he received another letter as follows:- "If you don't come
to me, in common justice, I shall waylay you and do whatever I think right.  - (Signed) E. S.
Henley." He had been many times requested by the defendant and her husband to renew his
professional attendance, but he had refused. On the night of the 10th he saw the defendant
waiting about in Cavendish-square, and accordingly withdrew in his house and sent for the
police. Meanwhile the front-door bell was rung violently, and upon the door being opened
defendant forced her way into the hall. At this point the accused buried her face in her hands
and cried. Dr. Jones, continuing, said upon the arrival of a policeman he saw him in the drawing-
room, and explained matters. The officer went down and saw the defendant, and, returning,
reported that she had no firearms about her, and that she was willing to go to the police-
station. They accordingly went to the station, but out of consideration for the lady, he
declined to charge her. 
'On August 2 he found his consulting-room window broken, and afterwards a letter came from
the accused acknowledging she had done it. On August 24 the accused, disguised in the garb
of a nurse, gained admission to his house. On discovering who she was, he refused to discuss
any matter with her. Last Wednesday he was returning home at half-past five, and saw the
defendant in the porch next door to his house. She approached him, and asked to speak to him.
but he refused to have any conversation with her.  As he let himself in at the front door, she
pushed him on one side, entered the house and walked into his study. Mrs. Jones appeared on
the scene, and the defendant began to argue, and wanted to make a statement. She also
addressed threats to his wife about him, and said that the threatening letter was written when
she was overwrought and unstrung owing to her husband's illness, but that now she would dog
his steps and would have his life. She did not care if it cost her her life; she would have her
revenge upon him. By the advice of the police, she was allowed to remain about two hours
until her husband arrived. There was a great scene in the drawing-room, the accused, her
husband and a gentleman friend being the chief actors. The accused gave vent to an outburst
of violence and abuse. The cross-examination was directed to prove that the prosecutor had
endeavoured to have her put in an asylum, but the former stated that he only had the
defendant examined with the idea of her being placed under some restraint. Detective-Inspector
Arrow proved arresting the accused on a warrant. She said: "I did threaten to shoot him. He 
risked my husband's life and smirched my good name. I did not threaten to kill and murder him."
At this juncture Mr. Plowden ordered a remand, and admitted the accused to bail in one surety
of £100.'
The charges against Mrs. Henley were heard further on 2 December 1895, following which she
was bound over in her own recognisances in £200, and she was required to find two further 
sureties of £100 each to  keep the peace for 12 months.
Charles Henry Chandos Henniker-Major, 6th Baron Henniker and 3rd Baron Hartismere
As the Henniker barony is an Irish peerage, the title did not automatically mean that its holder
had a seat in the House of Lords. However, the 4th Baron Henniker had also been granted
another peerage, that of Baron Hartismere in the peerage of the United Kingdom, and it was
under this title that its holders sat in the Lords.
An interesting mix-up occurred in 1904, as reported in the 'Weekly Irish Times' of 30 April 1904:-
'The Lord Chancellor had an unusual motion to make in an ordinary case of succession to the
peerage. He stated that it had been the practice, in order to avoid the expense of a Committee
of Privileges, to take the certificate of the Lord Chancellor who investigated the title, and
having satisfied himself as to the title, to issue a writ to the peer to take his seat. It so 
happened that the late Lord Hartismere (Lord Henniker) never called for the writ which was
issued at the commencement of the present Parliament. His son, having succeeded to the title,
called at the office and took the writ which had been issued for his father. On Tuesday last he
presented himself to their Lordships' House and took the oath and subscribed the roll. According
to precedent a fresh writ should be issued in the case of succession, and therefore he now
moved:-
"That the writ of summons directed to Lord Hartismere and the entry of Tuesday last be set
aside; the  name of Lord Hartismere among the lords present on that day be deleted, and
that the signature on the test roll also be deleted."
'He was sorry if the motion caused the noble lord any inconvenience. Of course, it was nothing
but a mistake, and he hoped the noble lord would not be disturbed. He was compelled to make 
the motion in order to comply with the ordinary rules of the house.
'The motion was agreed to.'
William Constable-Maxwell, 10th Lord Herries
The barony of Herries was, in January 1716, a subsidiary title of the Earl of Nithsdale, who was
attainted and his honours forfeited for taking part in the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. In 1848, an
Act of Parliament was passed which restored in blood [i.e. reversed the attainder] the descend-
ants of the attainted 5th Earl of Nithsdale. William Constable-Maxwell, being the lineal heir of the
body of Agnes, Lady Herries in her own right, petitioned that he be found to be entitled to the
peerage. 
The following report on the hearing before the House of Lords Committee for Privileges appeared
in the 'York Herald' on 26 June 1858:-
'This was the case of William Constable Maxwell, Esq., of Nithsdale, in the county of Dumfries, 
and Everingham, in the county of York. The evidence on behalf of the claimant went to show
that Herbert Herries, of Terregles, took his seat in the Scottish Parliament in the year 1491. Two
of his sons alone left issue, Andrew, his successor, and Roger of Maidenhaugh. Andrew was killed
at the battle of Flodden Field, leaving his son and successor William. William left a daughter, 
Agnes, who succeeded to the title, and whose husband, Sir J. Maxwell, was created Lord Herries
by Queen Mary, and sat in Parliament in 1567. [He was not, as far as I am aware, "created" 
Lord Herries; rather, he was allowed, as a courtesy, the right to represent his wife's peerage
in the Scottish Parliament.] The title descended to their heirs until, in 1667, John Maxwell, Lord
Herries succeeded to the earldom of Nithsdale, and that title was held by his descendants until
the year 1715, when both titles were forfeited by the then holder for high treason in espousing
the cause of the Pretender. His son William succeeded to the estates which had been attached
to both titles, and his youngest daughter, his only surviving child, married William Haggerston
Constable, of Everingham, whose grandson was the present claimant. The attainder of William
Earl of Nithsdale, having been reversed by Act of Parliament, the claimant urged his right to the
title of Lord Herries, contending that the title passed through Agnes, Lady Herries, as co-heiress
of Robert Lord Herries, whose lineal descendant the claimant was, and that therefore he was 
entitled to the dignity.
'William Maxwell, of Carruchan, opposed the claim, on the ground that he is the lineal descendant
of Roger Lord Herries, and that the title did not descend through Agnes Lady Herries, and that 
the title held by her husband was not held by him in right of his wife, but was a fresh creation in 
his own person, and that consequently their son succeeded to the new title granted to his 
father, and not to the old one granted to Herbert, the first Lord Herries. [In summary, his 
argument was:-
1. That in cases where a Scottish peerage had been created but no instrument of creation could
    now be found, as was the case in this claim, the law presumed a limitation to heirs male of the 
    body of the grantee;
2. That as a result of 1. Agnes Herries did not inherit the peerage;
3. That Sir John Maxwell was not therefore a peer by courtesy in his wife's peerage, and thus his
    sitting in the Scottish Parliament must have been the result of a fresh peerage creation, again
    with a presumed remainder (as no instrument of creation could be found) to heirs male of the
    body of Sir John Maxwell; and
4. That William Maxwell of Carruchan was the heir male of the body of John Maxwell, Lord Herries]
The question, therefore, was whether the original title descended through the female line, or 
whether it passed to lineal male descendants. The case has been before the House [of Lords] for 
several years, and each session has witnessed the production of masses of documentary 
evidence.
'Lord Cranworth and Lord Brougham delivered their opinion in favour of the clamant. Lord 
Redesdale was of opinion that the claimant had not made out his claim. The majority being in
favour of the claimant, the committee resolved that the claim had been made out.'
Francis Hugh George Seymour, 5th Marquess of Hertford
The 5th Marquess died following a hunting accident in January 1884. The following report
appeared in the 'Birmingham Daily Post' of 22 January 1884:-
'An accident of a serious nature occurred to the Marquis of Hertford, yesterday morning, at
Dunnington, near Alcester, while hunting with the Warwickshire hounds. The meet was at Ragley
Park, his lordship's seat, and after ineffectually searching the estate the hounds were trotted
to Dunnington. Here a fox was started, and the field were galloping after it when the Marquis
of Hertford was seen to fall from his horse. Those riding near him state that the horse trod upon
some obstacle, and fell heavily to the ground. The marquis failed to disengage his feet from the
stirrups, and the animal rolled upon him. With some difficulty his lordship was released, and it
was found that he was bleeding freely from the nose and mouth. The Earl of Yarmouth, his 
eldest son, was with the party, which also included Drs. Hobbs and Fosbrooke. These gentlemen
immediately rendered assistance. A bed was procured from a nearby house, and the marquis was
carried home on a litter. An attempt was made to put his lordship into a carriage, but the
jolting caused such acute agony that is was deemed advisable to carry him. Accordingly, the bed
upon which he lay was placed upon a gate. A party of gentlemen gave assistance, and the 
injured nobleman was carried very gently the whole distance. The journey occupied about an
hour, and when the party arrived at Ragley Hall the marquis, who had been unconscious the
whole of the time, opened his eyes as he was being carried up the steps in front of the mansion,
and murmured twice, "No more." Dr. Smith, of Alcester, was promptly in attendance, and 
telegrams were instantly despatched to London summoning the marquis's own physicians to
Ragley. These gentlemen arrived late last evening, and their opinion is that the condition of his
lordship is most critical. There is an ugly wound in the forehead, which has caused concussion
of the brain, and his chest and side are seriously injured, these injuries being caused by violent
kicks from the horse as it lay struggling on the ground. There are in addition serious internal
injuries. His lordship remained unconscious for several hours; and, being over seventy years of
age, the gravest fears are entertained as to his recovery. His medical advisers are in constant
attendance at his bedside. A touching incident in connection with the accident is that when the
Marquis was being carried into the Hall, the rector of a neighbouring parish, who was among
the crowd of spectators, fell upon his knees in front of the Marquis, and prayed aloud that God
would spare the sufferer's life.'
The Marquess's injuries were too severe to allow him to recover, and he died on the evening of
25 January 1884.
The special remainder to the Barony of Hill created in 1816
From the "London Gazette" of 31 October 1815 (issue 17075, page 2186):-
"His Royal Highness the Prince Regent has been pleased, in the name and on the behalf of His
Majesty, to grant the dignity of a Baron of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, unto
the Right Honourable Lieutenant-General Rowland Baron Hill, Knight Grand Cross of the Most
Honourable Military Order of the Bath, and the Heirs Male of his Body lawfully begotten, by the
name, style, and title of Baron Hill, of Almaraz, and of Hawkstone and Hardwicke, in the county
of Salop, and in default of such issue, to the heirs male lawfully begotten of his late brother John
Hill, of Hawkstorie, in the said county of Salop, Esq. deceased."
 
 
The special remainder to the Viscountcy of Hill created in 1842
 
From the "London Gazette" of 6 September 1842 (issue 20136, page 2398):-
"The Queen has been pleased to direct letters patent to be passed under the Great Seal, 
granting the dignity of a Viscount of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland unto General
Rowland Baron Hill, G.C.B. and the heirs male of his body lawfully begotten, by the name, style,
and title of Viscount Hill, of Hawkstone, and of Hardwicke, in the county of Salop; and, in default
of such issue male, the said dignity of Viscount to Sir Rowland Hill, Bart. (nephew of the said 
Rowland Baron Hill), and the heirs male of his body lawfully begotten."
 
 
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