PEERAGE
Last updated 31/12/2013
Date Rank Order Name Born Died Age
HILLSBOROUGH
21 Aug 1717 V[I] 1 Trevor Hill 1693 5 May 1742 48
Created Baron Hill of Kilwarlin and
Viscount Hillsborough 21 Aug 1717
MP for Aylesbury 1715-1722. Lord
Lieutenant Down 1729 PC [I] 1717
5 May 1742 2 Wills Hill 30 May 1718 7 Oct 1793 75
3 Oct 1751 E[I] 1 Created Viscount Kilwarlin and Earl of
Hillsborough [I] 3 Oct 1751,Baron
28 Aug 1772 E 1 Harwich 17 Nov 1756 and Viscount
Fairford and Earl of Hillsborough [GB]
28 Aug 1772
He was subsequently created Marquess of
Downshire (qv) with which title these
peerages then merged
HILTON OF EGGARDON
14 Jun 1991 B[L] 1 Jennifer Hilton 12 Jan 1936
Created Baroness Hilton of Eggardon
for life 14 Jun 1991
HILTON OF UPTON
11 May 1965 B[L] 1 Albert Victor Hilton 14 Feb 1908 3 May 1977 69
to Created Baron Hilton of Upton for life
3 May 1977 11 May 1965
MP for Norfolk Southwest 1959-1964
Peerage extinct on his death
HINCHINGBROOKE
12 Jul 1660 V 1 Edward Montagu 27 Jul 1625 28 May 1672 46
Created Viscount Hinchingbrooke and
Earl of Sandwich 12 Jul 1660
See "Sandwich"
HINDLIP
16 Feb 1886 B 1 Sir Henry Allsopp,1st baronet 19 Feb 1811 2 Apr 1887 76
Created Baron Hindlip 16 Feb 1886
MP for Worcestershire East 1874-1880
2 Apr 1887 2 Samuel Charles Allsopp 24 Mar 1842 12 Jul 1897 55
MP for Staffordshire East 1873-1880 and
Taunton 1882-1887
12 Jul 1897 3 Charles Allsopp 22 Sep 1877 2 Dec 1931 54
2 Dec 1931 4 Charles Samuel Victor Allsopp 5 Nov 1906 30 Mar 1966 59
30 Mar 1966 5 Henry Richard Allsopp 1 Jul 1912 19 Dec 1993 81
19 Dec 1993 6 Charles Henry Allsopp 5 Aug 1940
HINTON OF BANKSIDE
28 Jan 1965 B[L] 1 Christopher Hinton 12 May 1901 22 Jun 1983 82
to Created Baron Hinton of Bankside for life
22 Jun 1983 28 Jan 1965
OM 1976
Peerage extinct on his death
HINTON OF HINTON ST.GEORGE
24 Dec 1706 V 1 John Poulett c 1663 25 May 1743
Created Viscount Hinton of Hinton
St.George and Earl Poulett
24 Dec 1706
See "Poulett"
HIRSHFIELD
30 Aug 1967 B[L] 1 Desmond Barel Hirschfield 17 May 1913 6 Dec 1993 80
to Created Baron Hirshfield for life
6 Dec 1993 30 Aug 1967
Peerage extinct on his death
HIRST
28 Jun 1934 B 1 Sir Hugo Hirst,1st baronet 26 Nov 1863 22 Jan 1943 79
to Created Baron Hirst 28 Jun 1934
22 Jan 1943 Peerage extinct on his death
HIVES
7 Jul 1950 B 1 Ernest Walter Hives 21 Apr 1886 24 Apr 1965 79
Created Baron Hives 7 Jul 1950
CH 1943
24 Apr 1965 2 John Warwick Hives 26 Nov 1913 8 Oct 1997 83
8 Oct 1997 3 Matthew Peter Hives 25 May 1971
HOBART
28 May 1728 B 1 John Hobart 1695 22 Sep 1756 61
Created Baron Hobart 28 May 1728
and Earl of Buckinghamshire 5 Sep 1746
See "Buckinghamshire"
**************
30 Nov 1798 Robert Hobart 6 May 1760 4 Feb 1816 55
He was summoned to Parliament by a Writ of
Acceleration as Baron Hobart 30 Nov 1798
He succeeded as Earl of Buckinghamshire (qv)
in 1804
HOBHOUSE
2 Jul 1885 B 1 Arthur Hobhouse 10 Nov 1819 6 Dec 1904 85
to Created Baron Hobhouse 2 Jul 1885
6 Dec 1904 PC 1881
Peerage extinct on his death
HOBHOUSE OF WOODBOROUGH
1 Oct 1998 B[L] 1 Sir John Stewart Hobhouse 31 Jan 1932 15 Mar 2004 72
to Created Baron Hobhouse of Woodborough
15 Mar 2004 for life 1 Oct 1998
Lord Justice of Appeal 1993-1998. Lord of
Appeal in Ordinary 1998-2004 PC 1993
HOBSON
20 Jan 1964 B[L] 1 Charles Rider Hobson 18 Feb 1903 17 Feb 1966 62
to Created Baron Hobson for life 20 Jan 1964
17 Feb 1966 MP for Wembley North 1945-1950 and
Keighley 1950-1959.
Peerage extinct on his death
HODGSON OF ABINGER
16 Sep 2013 B[L] 1 Fiona Ferelith Hodgson 1954
Created Baroness Hodgson of Abinger for life
16 Sep 2013
HODGSON OF ASTLEY ABBOTTS
7 Jun 2000 B[L] 1 Robin Granville Hodgson 25 Apr 1942
Created Baron Hodgson of Astley Abbotts
for life 7 Jun 2000
MP for Walsall North 1976-1979
HODSON
1 Oct 1960 B[L] 1 Francis Lord Charlton Hodson 17 Sep 1895 11 Mar 1984 88
to Created Baron Hodson for life 1 Oct 1960
11 Mar 1984 Lord Justice of Appeal 1951-1960. Lord of
Appeal in Ordinary 1960-1971. PC 1951
Peerage extinct on his death
HOFFMANN
21 Feb 1995 B[L] 1 Leonard Hubert Hoffmann 8 May 1934
Created Baron Hoffmann for life 21 Feb 1995
Lord Justice of Appeal 1992-1995. Lord of
Appeal in Ordinary 1995-2009 PC 1992
HOGG
3 Feb 1995 B[L] 1 Sarah Elizabeth Mary Hogg 14 May 1946
Created Baroness Hogg for life 3 Feb 1995
HOGG OF CUMBERNAULD
24 Sep 1997 B[L] 1 Norman Hogg 12 Mar 1938 8 Oct 2008 70
to Created Baron Hogg of Cumbernauld
8 Oct 2008 for life 24 Sep 1997
MP for Dunbartonshire East 1979-1983 and
Cumbernauld and Kilsyth 1983-1997
Peerage extinct on his death
HOLAND
29 Jul 1314 B 1 Robert de Holand 1290 7 Oct 1328 38
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Holand 29 Jul 1314
7 Oct 1328 2 Robert de Holand 1312 16 Mar 1373 60
16 Mar 1373 3 Maud Lovel 1356 c 1420
c 1420 4 William Lovel,7th Lord Lovel 1397 13 Jun 1454 56
13 Jun 1454 5 John Lovel,8th Lord Lovel 1432 9 Jan 1465 32
9 Jan 1465 6 Francis Lovel,9th Lord Lovel,later [1483]
to 1st Viscount Lovel
Jun 1487 He was attainted and the peerages forfeited
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
15 Jul 1353 B 1 Thomas de Holand 28 Dec 1360
Summoned to Parliament as Lord
Holand 15 Jul 1353
He was subsequently created Earl of Kent
(qv) in 1360
28 Dec 1360 2 Thomas de Holand,2nd Earl of Kent 1350 29 Apr 1397 46
29 Apr 1397 3 Thomas de Holand,3rd Earl of Kent,later
[Sep 1397] 1st Duke of Surrey 1374 6 Jan 1400 25
6 Jan 1400 4 Edmund de Holand,4th Earl of Kent 6 Jan 1384 18 Sep 1408 24
to On his death the barony fell into abeyance
18 Sep 1408
HOLDEN
4 Jul 1908 B 1 Sir Angus Holden,2nd baronet 16 Mar 1833 25 Mar 1912 79
Created Baron Holden 4 Jul 1908
MP for Bradford East 1885-1886 and
Buckrose 1892-1900
25 Mar 1912 2 Ernest Illingworth Holden 8 Jan 1867 30 Jan 1937 70
30 Jan 1937 3 Angus William Eden Holden 1 Aug 1898 6 Jul 1951 52
to Peerage extinct on his death
6 Jul 1951 For further information on the death of this peer,
see the note at the foot of this page
HOLDENBY
1666 B 1 Charles Stuart 4 Jul 1666 22 May 1667 -
to Designated Baron of Holdenby,Earl of
22 May 1667 Wigmore and Duke of Kendal 1666
3rd son of James II
Peerages extinct on his death
HOLDERNESS
7 Aug 1979 B[L] 1 Richard Frederick Wood 5 Oct 1920 11 Aug 2002 81
to Created Baron Holderness for life 7 Aug 1979
11 Aug 2002 MP for Bridlington 1950-1979. Minister of
Power 1959-1963. Minister of Pensions and
National Insurance 1963-1964. Minister of
Overseas Development 1970-1974. PC 1959
Peerage extinct on his death
HOLDERNESSE
22 Jan 1621 E 1 John Ramsay c 1580 28 Feb 1626
to Created Lord Ramsay of Barns and
Feb 1626 Viscount of Haddington 11 Jun 1606,
Lord Ramsay of Melrose 25 Aug 1615,
and Baron of Kingston upon Thames
and Earl of Holdernesse 22 Jan 1621
Peerages extinct on his death
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
24 Jan 1644 D 1 Prince Rupert,Count Palatine of the Rhine 27 Dec 1619 29 Nov 1682 62
to Created Earl of Holderness and Duke
29 Nov 1682 of Cumberland 24 Jan 1644
Peerages extinct on his death
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dec 1682 E 1 Conyers Darcy,5th Baron Conyers 24 Jan 1599 14 Jun 1689 90
Created Earl of Holdernesse
Dec 1682
14 Jun 1689 2 Conyers Darcy 3 Mar 1622 13 Dec 1692 70
MP for Boroughbridge 1660 and Yorkshire
1661-1679
He was summoned to Parliament by a Writ of
Acceleration as Baron Conyers 1 Nov 1680
13 Dec 1692 3 Robert Darcy 24 Nov 1681 20 Jan 1722 40
President of the Board of Trade 1718. Lord
Lieutenant N Riding Yorkshire 1714-1721 PC 1718
20 Jan 1722 4 Robert Darcy 17 May 1718 16 May 1778 59
to Secretary of State 1751-1761. Lord Warden
16 May 1778 of the Cinque Ports 1765. Lord Lieutenant
N Riding Yorkshire 1740-1778. PC 1751
Peerage extinct on his death
HOLFORD
29 Jan 1965 B[L] 1 William Graham Holford 22 Mar 1907 17 Oct 1975 68
to Created Baron Holford for life 29 Jan 1965
17 Oct 1975 Peerage extinct on his death
HOLLAND
24 Sep 1624 E 1 Henry Rich 19 Aug 1590 9 Mar 1649 58
Created Baron Kensington 5 Mar 1623
and Earl Holland 24 Sep 1624
MP for Leicester 1614. Lord Lieutenant
Berkshire and Middlesex 1642-1643 KG 1625
9 Mar 1649 2 Robert Rich c 1620 16 Apr 1675
He succeeded to the Earldom of Warwick
(qv) in 1673 with which title this peerage
then merged (extinct 1759)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
7 Mar 1762 B 1 Georgiana Caroline Fox 27 Mar 1723 24 Jul 1774 51
Created Baroness Holland 7 Mar 1762
24 Jul 1774 2 Stephen Fox 20 Feb 1745 26 Dec 1774 29
MP for Salisbury 1768-1774
26 Dec 1774 3 Henry Richard Vassall Fox 21 Nov 1773 22 Oct 1840 66
Lord Privy Seal 1806-1807. Chancellor of
the Duchy of Lancaster 1830 and 1835-1840
PC 1806
22 Oct 1840 4 Henry Edward Fox 7 Mar 1802 18 Dec 1859 57
to MP for Horsham 1826-1827
18 Dec 1859 Peerage extinct on his death
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
17 Apr 1763 B 1 Henry Fox 28 Sep 1705 1 Jul 1774 68
Created Baron Holland 17 Apr 1763
MP for Hindon 1735-1741, Windsor 1741-
1761 and Dunwich 1761-1762. Secretary at
War 1746-1755. Secretary of State 1755-
1756. Paymaster General 1757-1765.
PC 1746
On his death the peerage merged with the
creation of 1762 (see above) and became
extinct in 1859
HOLLENDEN
9 Feb 1912 B 1 Samuel Hope Morley 3 Jul 1845 18 Feb 1929 83
Created Baron Hollenden 9 Feb 1912
18 Feb 1929 2 Geoffrey Hope Hope-Morley 28 Jan 1885 19 Oct 1977 92
19 Oct 1977 3 Gordon Hope Hope-Morley 8 Jan 1914 12 Apr 1999 85
12 Apr 1999 4 Ian Hampden Hope-Morley 23 Oct 1946
HOLLES
20 Apr 1661 B 1 Denzil Holles 31 Oct 1599 17 Feb 1680 80
Created Baron Holles 20 Apr 1661
MP for St.Michaels 1624 and Dorchester
1628 and 1660-1661. PC 1679
17 Feb 1680 2 Sir Francis Holles,1st baronet 19 Aug 1627 1 Mar 1690 62
MP for Dorchester 1679-1680
1 Mar 1690 3 Denzil Holles 26 Apr 1675 c 1692
to Peerage extinct on his death
c 1692
HOLLICK
20 Jun 1991 B[L] 1 Clive Richard Hollick 20 May 1945
Created Baron Hollick for life 20 Jun 1991
HOLLINS
15 Nov 2010 B[L] 1 Sheila Clare Hollins 22 Jun 1946
Created Baroness Hollins for life 15 Nov 2010
HOLLIS OF HEIGHAM
1 Jun 1990 B[L] 1 Patricia Lesley Hollis 24 May 1941
Created Baroness Hollis of Heigham for life
1 Jun 1990
PC 1999
HOLME OF CHELTENHAM
29 May 1990 B[L] 1 Richard Gordon Holme 27 May 1936 4 May 2008 71
to Created Baron Holme of Cheltenham for life
4 May 2008 29 May 1990
PC 2000
Peerage extinct on his death
HOLMES
11 Sep 1760 B[I] 1 Thomas Holmes 2 Nov 1699 21 Jul 1764 64
to Created Baron Holmes 11 Sep 1760
Jul 1764 MP for Newtown IOW 1727-1729 and 1734-1741
and Yarmouth IOW 1747-1764
Peerage extinct on his death
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4 Mar 1798 B[I] 1 Leonard Holmes c 1732 18 Jan 1804
to Created Baron Holmes 4 Mar 1798
18 Jan 1804 Peerage extinct on his death
HOLMES OF RICHMOND
13 Sep 2013 B[L] 1 Christopher Holmes
Created Baron Holmes of Richmond for life
13 Sep 2013
HOLMESDALE
19 Dec 1826 V 1 William Pitt Amherst,2nd Baron Amherst 14 Jan 1773 13 Mar 1857 84
Created Viscount Holmesdale and Earl
Amherst 19 Dec 1826
See "Amherst"
HOLM PATRICK
27 Jul 1897 B 1 Ion Trant Hamilton 14 Jul 1839 10 Mar 1898 58
Created Baron Holm Patrick 27 Jul 1897
MP for Dublin 1863-1865. Lord Lieutenant
Dublin 1892-1898. PC [I] 1887
10 Mar 1898 2 Hans Wellesley Hamilton 8 Aug 1886 5 Sep 1942 56
5 Sep 1942 3 James Hans Hamilton 29 Nov 1928 Feb 1991 62
Feb 1991 4 Hans James David Hamilton 15 Mar 1955
HOLYROODHOUSE
20 Dec 1607 B[S] 1 John Bothwell 26 Nov 1609
Created Lord Holyroodhouse
20 Dec 1607
26 Nov 1609 2 John Bothwell 10 Nov 1638
to Peerage extinct on his death
10 Nov 1638
HOME
2 Aug 1473 B[S] 1 Alexander Home 1491
Created Lord Home 2 Aug 1473
1491 2 Alexander Home c 1460 9 Sep 1506
9 Sep 1506 3 Alexander Home 8 Oct 1516
to He was convicted of treason and the
8 Oct 1516 peerage forfeited
12 Aug 1522 4 George Home Apr 1549
Restored to the peerage 1522
Apr 1549 5 Alexander Home 11 Aug 1575
to Peerage forfeited 1573
1573
25 Jul 1578 6 Alexander Home c 1566 5 Apr 1619
4 Mar 1605 E[S] 1 Restored to peerage 1578
Created Lord Dunglass and Earl of
Home 4 Mar 1605
5 Apr 1619 2 James Home c 1607 Feb 1633
Feb 1633 3 James Home Dec 1666
Dec 1666 4 Alexander Home 1674
1674 5 James Home 22 Jul 1706
22 Jul 1706 6 Charles Home 20 Aug 1706
20 Aug 1706 7 Alexander Home 1720
1720 8 William Home 28 Apr 1761
Governor of Gibraltar 1757-1761
28 Apr 1761 9 Alexander Home 8 Oct 1786
8 Oct 1786 10 Alexander Home 11 Nov 1769 20 Oct 1841 71
Lord Lieutenant Berwick 1806-1841
20 Oct 1841 11 Cospatrick Alexander Douglas-Home 27 Oct 1799 4 Jul 1881 81
Created Baron Douglas of Douglas
11 Jun 1875
4 Jul 1881 12 Charles Alexander Douglas-Home 11 Apr 1834 30 Apr 1918 84
Lord Lieutenant Berwick 1879-1890 and
Lanark 1890-1915. KT 1899
30 Apr 1918 13 Charles Cospatrick Archibald
Douglas-Home 29 Dec 1873 11 Jul 1951 77
Lord Lieutenant Berwick 1930-1951
KT 1930
11 Jul 1951 14 Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home 2 Jul 1903 9 Oct 1995 92
to 1 MP for Lanark 1931-1945 and 1950-1951,
23 Oct 1963 and Kinross and Western 1963-1974.
19 Dec 1974 B[L] Minister of State for Scotland 1951-1955.
to Secretary of State for Commonwealth
9 Oct 1995 Relations 1955-1960. Lord President of the
Council 1957 and 1959-1960. Foreign
Secretary 1960-1963. Prime Minister 1963-
1964. Foreign Secretary 1970-1974.
PC 1951 KT 1962
For further information on this peer's brother, see
the note at the foot of this page.
He disclaimed the peerage for life 23 Oct
1963.
Created Baron Home of the Hirsel for life
19 Dec 1974
On his death the life peerage became
extinct whilst the Earldom passed to -
9 Oct 1995 15 David Alexander Cospatrick Douglas-Home 20 Nov 1943
KT 2013
HOO
2 Jun 1447 B 1 Thomas Hoo by 1400 13 Feb 1455
to Created Baron of Hoo 2 Jun 1447
13 Feb 1455 KG 1445
Peerage extinct on his death
HOOD
1 Jun 1796 V 1 Sir Samuel Hood,1st baronet 12 Dec 1724 27 Jan 1816 91
Created Baron Hood [I] 2 Sep 1782
and Viscount Hood 1 Jun 1796
MP for Westminster 1784-1788 and 1790-
1796 and Reigate 1789-1790.
His wife,Susanna,was created Baroness
Hood 1795
27 Jan 1816 2 Henry Hood 25 Aug 1753 25 Jan 1836 82
Succeeded to his mother's Barony
25 May 1806
25 Jan 1836 3 Samuel Hood (Hood-Tibbits from 12 Feb 1840) 10 Jan 1808 8 May 1846 38
8 May 1846 4 Francis Wheler Hood 4 Jul 1838 27 Apr 1907 68
27 Apr 1907 5 Grosvenor Arthur Alexander Hood 13 Nov 1868 26 Apr 1933 64
26 Apr 1933 6 Samuel Hood 15 Oct 1910 13 Oct 1981 70
13 Oct 1981 7 Alexander Lambert Hood 11 Mar 1914 2 Oct 1999 85
2 Oct 1999 8 Henry Lyttelton Alexander Hood 16 Mar 1958
HOOD OF AVALON
22 Feb 1892 B 1 Arthur William Acland Hood 14 Jul 1824 15 Nov 1901 77
to Created Baron Hood of Avalon
15 Nov 1901 22 Feb 1892
Peerage extinct on his death
HOOPER
10 Jun 1985 B[L] 1 Gloria Dorothy Hooper 25 May 1939
Created Baroness Hooper for life
10 Jun 1985
HOOSON
26 Jul 1979 B[L] 1 Hugh Emlyn Hooson 26 Mar 1925 21 Feb 2012 86
to Created Baron Hooson for life 26 Jul 1979
21 Feb 2012 MP for Montgomery 1962-1979
Peerage extinct on his death
HOPE
15 Apr 1703 B[S] 1 Charles Hope 1681 26 Feb 1742 60
Created Lord Hope,Viscount Aithrie
and Earl of Hopetoun 15 Apr 1703
See "Hopetoun"
HOPE OF CRAIGHEAD
28 Feb 1995 B[L] 1 James Arthur David Hope 27 Jun 1938
Created Baron Hope of Craighead for life
28 Feb 1995
President of the Court of Session 1989-1996
Lord of Appeal in Ordinary 1996-2009. Justice of
the Supreme Court 2009- PC 1989 KT 2009
HOPE OF THORNES
31 Mar 2005 B[L] 1 David Michael Hope 14 Apr 1940
Created Baron Hope of Thornes for life
31 Mar 2005
Bishop of London 1991-1995. Archbishop of
York 1995-2005. PC 1991
HOPETOUN
15 Apr 1703 E[S] 1 Charles Hope 1681 26 Feb 1742 60
Created Lord Hope,Viscount Aithrie
and Earl of Hopetoun 15 Apr 1703
Lord Lieutenant Linlithgow 1715 KT 1738
26 Feb 1742 2 John Hope 7 Sep 1704 12 Feb 1781 76
12 Feb 1781 3 James Hope-Johnstone 23 Aug 1741 29 May 1816 74
Created Baron Hopetoun [UK] 3 Feb 1809
For details of the special remainder included in the
creation of this peerage,see the note at the
foot of this page
Lord Lieutenant Linlithgow 1794-1816
29 May 1816 4 John Hope 17 Aug 1765 27 Aug 1823 58
Created Baron Niddry 17 May 1814
MP for Linlithgow 1790-1800. Lord
Lieutenant Linlithgow 1816-1823
PC [I] 1812
27 Aug 1823 5 John Hope 15 Nov 1803 8 Apr 1843 39
Lord Lieutenant Linlithgow 1825-1843
8 Apr 1843 6 John Alexander Hope 22 Mar 1831 2 Apr 1873 42
Lord Lieutenant Linlithgow 1863-1873
2 Apr 1873 7 John Adrian Louis Hope 25 Sep 1860 29 Feb 1908 47
He was created Marquess of Linlithgow
(qv) in 1902 with which title this peerage
then merged
HOPTON
4 Sep 1643 B 1 Ralph Hopton 13 Mar 1596 Sep 1652 56
to Created Baron Hopton 4 Sep 1643
Sep 1652 MP for Bath 1625, Somerset 1626 and
Wells 1628-1642
Peerage extinct on his death
HORAM
4 Sep 2013 B[L] 1 John Rhodes Horam 7 Mar 1939
Created Baron Horam for life 4 Sep 2013
MP for Gateshead West 1970-1983 and
Orpington 1992-2010
HORDER
23 Jan 1933 B 1 Sir Thomas Jeeves Horder,1st baronet 7 Jan 1871 13 Aug 1955 84
Created Baron Horder 23 Jan 1933
For further information on this peer,see the
note at the foot of this page
13 Aug 1955 2 Thomas Mervyn Horder 8 Dec 1910 30 Jun 1997 86
to Peerage extinct on his death
30 Jun 1997
HORE-BELISHA
14 Jan 1954 B 1 Leslie Hore-Belisha 7 Sep 1893 16 Feb 1957 63
to Created Baron Hore-Belisha 14 Jan 1954
16 Feb 1957 MP for Devonport 1923-1945. Financial
Secretary to the Treasury 1932-1934.
Minister of Transport 1935-1937. Secretary
of State for war 1937-1940. Minister of
National Insurance 1945. PC 1935
Peerage extinct on his death
HORNE
8 Oct 1919 B 1 Henry Sinclair Horne 19 Feb 1861 14 Aug 1929 68
to Created Baron Horne 8 Oct 1919
14 Aug 1929 Peerage extinct on his death
HORNE OF SLAMANNAN
9 Jun 1937 V 1 Robert Stevenson Horne 28 Feb 1871 3 Sep 1940 69
to Created Viscount Horne of
3 Sep 1940 Slammanan 9 Jun 1937
MP for Hillhead 1918-1937. Minister of
Labour 1919-1920. President of the Board
of Trade 1920-1921. Chancellor of the
Exchequer 1921-1922. PC 1919
Peerage extinct on his death
HORNSBY-SMITH
13 May 1974 B[L] 1 Margaret Patricia Hornsby-Smith 17 Mar 1914 3 Jul 1985 71
to Created Baroness Hornsby-Smith for life
3 Jul 1985 13 May 1974
MP for Chislehurst 1950-1974. PC 1959
Peerage extinct on her death
HORSBRUGH
16 Dec 1959 B[L] 1 Florence Gertrude Horsbrugh 13 Oct 1889 6 Dec 1969 80
to Created Baroness Horsbrugh for life
6 Dec 1969 16 Dec 1959
MP for Dundee 1931-1945 and Moss Side
1950-1959. Minister of Education 1951-1954
PC 1945
Peerage extinct on her death
HOTHAM
17 Mar 1797 B[I] 1 William Hotham 8 Apr 1736 7 May 1813 77
Created Baron Hotham 17 Mar 1797
7 May 1813 2 Beaumont Hotham 5 Aug 1737 4 Mar 1814 76
MP for Wigan 1768-1775
4 Mar 1814 3 Beaumont Hotham 9 Aug 1794 12 Dec 1870 76
MP for Leominster 1820-1841 and Yorkshire
East 1841-1868
12 Dec 1870 4 Charles Hotham 27 May 1836 29 May 1872 36
29 May 1872 5 John Hotham 13 May 1838 13 Dec 1907 69
13 Dec 1907 6 Frederick William Hotham 19 Mar 1863 7 Oct 1923 60
7 Oct 1923 7 Henry Frederick Hotham 13 Aug 1899 18 Nov 1967 68
18 Nov 1967 8 Henry Durand Hotham 3 May 1940
HOTHFIELD
11 Oct 1881 B 1 Sir Henry James Tufton,2nd baronet 4 Jun 1844 29 Oct 1926 82
Created Baron Hothfield 11 Oct 1881
Lord Lieutenant Westmorland 1881-1926
29 Oct 1926 2 John Sackville Richard Tufton 8 Nov 1873 21 Dec 1952 79
21 Dec 1952 3 Henry Hastings Sackville Thanet Tufton 16 Mar 1897 20 Aug 1961 64
20 Aug 1961 4 Thomas Sackville Tufton 20 Jul 1916 16 May 1986 69
16 May 1986 5 George William Anthony Tufton 28 Oct 1904 5 Feb 1991 86
5 Feb 1991 6 Anthony Charles Sackville Tufton 21 Oct 1939
HOUGHTON (co Norfolk)
6 Feb 1742 B 1 Robert Walpole 26 Aug 1676 18 Mar 1745 68
Created Baron Houghton and Earl of
Orford 6 Feb 1742
See "Orford"
HOUGHTON (co York)
20 Aug 1863 B 1 Richard Monckton Milnes 19 Jun 1809 10 Aug 1885 76
Created Baron Houghton 20 Aug 1863
MP for Pontefract 1837-1863
For further information on this peer,see the
note at the foot of this page
10 Aug 1885 2 Robert Offley Ashburton Milnes 12 Jan 1858 20 Jun 1945 87
He was created Marquess of Crewe (qv) in
1911 with which title this peerage
then merged
HOUGHTON OF SOWERBY
20 Jun 1974 B[L] 1 Arthur Leslie Noel Douglas Houghton 11 Aug 1898 2 May 1996 97
to Created Baron Houghton of Sowerby for life
2 May 1996 20 Jun 1974
MP for Sowerby 1949-1974. Chancellor of
the Duchy of Lancaster 1964-1966. Minister
without Portfolio 1966-1967. PC 1964
CH 1967
Peerage extinct on his death
HOWARD
15 Oct 1470 B 1 John Howard 22 Aug 1485
to Summoned to Parliament as Lord
22 Aug 1485 Howard 15 Oct 1470
Later created Duke of Norfolk. Attainted
and the peerage forfeited
HOWARD OF BINDON
13 Jan 1559 V 1 Lord Thomas Howard c 1520 28 Jan 1582
Created Viscount Howard of
Bindon 13 Jan 1559
28 Jan 1582 2 Henry Howard 1590
1590 3 Thomas Howard 1 Mar 1611
to KG 1606
1 Mar 1611 Peerage extinct on his death
HOWARD OF CASTLE RISING
7 Mar 1669 B 1 Henry Howard 12 Jul 1628 11 Jan 1684 55
Created Baron Howard of Castle
Rising 7 Mar 1669 and Earl of Norwich
19 Oct 1672
See "Norfolk" - these creations became
extinct in 1777
HOWARD OF CHARLTON
22 Jan 1622 B 1 Thomas Howard c 1590 16 Jul 1669
Created Baron Howard of Charlton
and Viscount Andover 22 Jan 1622, and
Earl of Berkshire 7 Feb 1626
See "Berkshire"
************
18 Nov 1640 Charles Howard c 1615 Apr 1679
He was summoned to Parliament by a Writ of
Acceleration as Baron Howard of Charlton
18 Nov 1640
He succeeded as Earl of Berkshire (qv) in 1669
HOWARD OF EFFINGHAM
11 Mar 1554 B 1 Lord Thomas Howard c 1510 11 Jan 1573
Created Baron Howard of Effingham
11 Mar 1554
See "Effingham"
HOWARD OF ESCRICK
12 Apr 1628 B 1 Edward Howard 24 Apr 1675
Created Baron Howard of Escrick
12 Apr 1628
24 Apr 1675 2 Thomas Howard 24 Oct 1625 24 Aug 1678 52
24 Aug 1678 3 William Howard c 1630 24 Apr 1694
MP for Winchelsea 1660-1661
Apr 1694 4 Charles Howard 29 Apr 1715
to Peerage extinct on his death
29 Apr 1715
HOWARD OF GLOSSOP
9 Dec 1869 B 1 Lord Edward George Fitzalan-Howard 20 Jun 1818 1 Dec 1883 65
Created Baron Howard of Glossop
9 Dec 1869
MP for Horsham 1848-1852 and Arundel
1852-1868. PC 1846
1 Dec 1883 2 Francis Edward Fitzalan-Howard 9 May 1859 22 Sep 1924 65
22 Sep 1924 3 Bernard Edward Fitzalan-Howard 10 May 1885 24 Aug 1972 87
24 Aug 1972 4 Miles Francis Stapleton Fitzalan-Howard 21 Jul 1915 24 Jun 2002 86
He had previously succeeded as 12th Lord
Beaumont (qv) in 1971 and subsequently
succeeded as 17th Duke of Norfolk (qv) in 1975
with which title this peerage then merged
and still remains so
HOWARD OF HENDERSKELFE
1 Jul 1983 B[L] 1 George Anthony Geoffrey Howard 22 May 1920 27 Nov 1984 64
to Created Baron Howard of Henderskelfe
27 Nov 1984 for life 1 Jul 1983
Peerage extinct on his death
HOWARD OF LYMPNE
13 Jul 2010 B[L] 1 Michael Howard 7 Jul 1941
Created Baron Howard of Lympne for life
13 Jul 2010
MP for Folkestone & Hythe 1983-2010. Secretary
of State for Employment 1990-1992. Secretary
of State for Environment 1992-1993. Home
Secretary 1993-1997. PC 1990 CH 2011
HOWARD OF MARNHULL
13 Mar 1604 B 1 Henry Howard 25 Feb 1540 15 Jun 1614 74
to Created Baron Howard of Marnhull
15 Jun 1614 and Earl of Northampton 13 Mar 1604
Lord Privy Seal 1608-1614. KG 1605
Peerages extinct on his death
HOWARD OF MORPETH
30 Apr 1661 V 1 Charles Howard 1629 24 Feb 1685 55
Created Baron Dacre of Gillesland,
Viscount Howard of Morpeth and Earl
of Carlisle 30 Apr 1661
See "Carlisle"
HOWARD OF PENRITH
10 Jul 1930 B 1 Esme William Howard 15 Sep 1863 1 Aug 1939 75
Created Baron Howard of Penrith
10 Jul 1930
PC 1919
1 Aug 1939 2 Francis Philip Howard 5 Oct 1905 13 Nov 1999 94
13 Nov 1999 3 Philip Esme Howard 1 May 1945
HOWARD OF RISING
4 Jun 2004 B[L] 1 Greville Patrick Charles Howard 22 Apr 1941
Created Baron Howard of Rising for life
4 Jun 2004
Angus William Eden Holden, 3rd Baron Holden
Lord Holden choked to death when a piece of lobster became stuck in his throat. According
to a report in 'The Manchester Guardian' of 18 July 1951, "Lord Holden, aged 52, deputy
Chairman and Speaker of the House of Lords who died after collapsing at dinner on July 6,
had a large piece of undigested lobster flesh in his larynx. This was stated at the Westminster
inquest yesterday. The coroner recorded a verdict of death from misadventure and said that
death was caused by asphyxiation due to inhalation of food while at dinner."
William Douglas-Home, brother of Sir Alec Douglas-Home (1912-1992)
William was the son of the 13th Earl of Home and Lady Lilian Lambton, daughter of the 4th
Earl of Durham. Perhaps William's later eccentricity was inherited from his mother. On one
occasion she had all her teeth taken out at one go (without the benefit of an anaesthetic)
and then attended a formal lunch to which her false teeth were to be delivered. When they
arrived, she popped them in, but they flew out of her mouth as she shook hands with an
admiral.
After being educated at Eton and Oxford, William trained to be an actor, sharing a London
flat with two friends - Jo Grimond (later Baron Grimond) who was later to become leader of
the Liberal Party, and Brian Johnston, later known to all cricket followers as a respected
cricket commentator.
When he received his call-up papers after the outbreak of World War II, he sent a telegram
to the War Office. 'Prepared to be conscripted on the understanding that if my most strongly
held principles should be challenged by Winston Churchill's government to a point beyond
endurance I cannot be relied on.'
In September 1944, William's scruples were severely challenged. At the time, he was a tank
commander with the Royal Armoured Corps. He received an order to attack Le Havre, which
still contained a large number of civilians whom the Germans had not allowed to evacuate.
William drove his tank for 25 laps of a turnip field before refusing to carry out the order, for
which he was court-martialled and sentenced to a year in prison. His brother, the future
Prime Minister, visited him there, but when he saw that William had grown a beard, he stood
with his back to him and discussed cricket with the warders.
After the war, William became a successful playwright, but not, however, a successful owner
of racehorses. He once entered a horse for the Derby - when the horse, named Goblin, got
off to a poor start, William thought it had got its tail caught in the starting gate, but in fact
the horse had fallen asleep.
He was fond of practical jokes. Once he smuggled a stuffed crocodile into the grounds of the
family home and then took his mother for a walk in the grounds. As they crossed a bridge over
a stream, an accomplice pushed the crocodile into the water. His mother, however, was
unperturbed, remarking that 'I didn't realise they came this far north.'
The special remainder to the Barony of Hopetoun created in 1809
From the "London Gazette" of 24 January 1809 (issue 16223, page 109):-
"The King has been pleased to grant the Dignity of a Baron of the United Kingdom of Great
and Ireland unto the Right Honorable James Earl of Hopetoun, and the Heirs Male of his Body
lawfully begotten, by the Name, Style, and Title of Baron Hopetoun of Hopetoun, in the County
of Linlithgow, with Remainder to the Heirs Male lawfully begotten of his late Father, John Earl
of Hopetoun, deceased."
Thomas Jeeves Horder,1st Baron Horder
The following biography of Lord Horder appeared in the March 1969 issue of the Australian
monthly magazine "Parade":-
'When the all-powerful newspaper magnate Lord Northcliffe lay dying in June 1922, his family
decided to call in one of England's most distinguished doctors, Sir Thomas (later Lord) Horder.
A short, energetic little man, famous for his treatment of Britain's great from the King down,
Horder bustled into the huge bedroom where the ailing Press lord lay. His reception was the
strangest in his long career, for at the sight of the new doctor Northcliffe grabbed a revolver
from under his pillow. He levelled it at Horder's heart and was squinting through the sights when
a quick thinking male nurse standing beside the bed knocked it out of his grasp. After that the
doctor proceeded with his examination of the now meek Northcliffe as though nothing had
happened.
'Horder's reputation was such that he was frequently called in for similar consultations as a last
resort by desperate relatives of dying patients. On another occasion when a woman heard that
he had been summoned to see her she burst into tears and wailed: "Oh, am I that bad?"
'Lord Horder dominated British medicine from the time he was first called in to treat Edward VII
in 1910 until his own death 45 years later. During that period Horder, a draper's son who
became the most fashionable doctor in the land, tended five British monarchs from Edward VII
to Elizabeth II. A recognised wizard at diagnosis and with a breezy, friendly manner, he treated
prime ministers, Indian maharajahs, captains of industry and literary lights that included H.G.
Wells to Sir James Barrie.
'He was born Thomas Jeeves Horder on January 7, 1871, above his father's modest drapery
shop at Shaftesbury in Dorset. After spending two years working on a farm to cure suspected
tuberculosis he won scholarships to London University where he lived largely on prunes for
economy. Ultimately young Thomas Horder qualified as a doctor at the renowned St.
Bartholomew's Hospital in 1896 and remained on its staff for the next 40 years.
'After he fainted at his first few operations he decided he was not cut out for surgery. As a
physician Dr. Horder set out to master the whole of medicine and such was his genius for
systematic study that ultimately he frequently confounded specialists in their own fields. In
September 1902 he married a nurse at St. Bart's and they moved into a Harley Street house
where he began private practice. At first patients for the future physician to the King of
England were few and he was glad of the security of his St. Bart's appointment as well as the
private coaching of medical students. Even the provision of a gramophone and piles of jig-saw
puzzles in the waiting room did not attract many patients to his Harley Street surgery. In his
first couple of years private patients averaged one a fortnight. Five years later they had
reached one a day. Economy was the watchword of the Horder household in those early years
since the doctor could not afford proper laboratory equipment. Consequently his wife became
used to having test tubes of microbes (requiring constant warm temperature for incubation)
stored under the pillows at night.
'Horder was also on the staff of a London children's hospital and from this source came most
of his early private patients. To aid him in handling them the trained a large black cat to sit on
his desk. When he gave the order it would open its mouth and let him push down its tongue
with a teaspoon so its throat could be inspected. Children who saw such antics had no
objection to opening their mouths and proving that as patients they were "just as good as
pussy." In time the cat came to enjoy the routine and for the rest of its life was always jumping
up in front of Horder and opening its mouth expectantly.
'Horder's big chance came in 1910. One of his superiors at St. Bart's, the venerable Dr. Samuel
Gee [1839-1911] who had long been on the panel of royal physicians, suggested that this
brilliant young doctor take his place in treating the ailing King Edward VII. On his first visit
Horder and the other physicians examined the royal patient then withdrew to a corner of the
bedroom to discuss what might be wrong with the King. Horder suggested that they remove
for a couple of days the well-stocked cabinet of patent medicines beside the patient's bed with
which he kept dosing himself - and his cigars. In this way they would be able to obtain truer
specimens of blood and urine for pathological analysis which would help diagnosis.
'The older royal physicians were horrified at Horder's temerity in even thinking of banning both
the King's home remedies and cigars. But Horder pressed his suggestion and voices became
heated. Ultimately the King demanded to know what all the commotion was about. The senior
royal physician explained: "It is nothing really, Your Majesty. Just a small matter where we
differ from Dr. Horder." Edward VII was not satisfied. He insisted on hearing what Horder had to
say. And when he did he immediately imposed his own ban on the medicines and cigars for the
required period. Thus, from the specimens obtained, the glycosuria [excretion of glucose into
the urine], from which he was suffering, and its origin were revealed and proper treatment
begun. Although Edward VII died later that year (officially from bronchitis) Dr. Horder's reput-
ation was made.
'Over subsequent years he became physician to George V, Edward VIII, George VI and Elizabeth
II. For such services he was knighted in 1919, made a baronet in 1923 and ultimately in 1933
became the first Baron Horder. And naturally other patients flocked to his Harley Street rooms
to be treated by the Royal Family's own doctor. By the 1920s Horder was seeing 20 patients
a day. To conserve time he had the habit of reading correspondence and even writing letters
in the pulled out central drawer of his desk - while patients sat in an armchair and rambled on
about their symptoms. One day a certain duchess caught him at this and was delighted. She
told him he was the only doctor who ever bothered to take notes of what she was saying.
'From the 1920s Horder was also generally the chosen physician at No. 10 Downing Street. It
was on his advice that the ailing Andrew Bonar Law resigned the Prime Ministership in May 1923.
Both Ramsay MacDonald and Neville Chamberlain when Prime Minister were Horder patients. In
fact he breakfasted with MacDonald at Downing Street every Tuesday morning during the
Labour leader's term of office from 1929-35. As he received his peerage during this period it is
quite evident how highly the Prime Minister valued Horder's professional attention.
'So it seems did the Welsh coal magnate Lord Rhondda, who left his doctor 10,000 in his will -
and started Horder on a long battle with the income tax authorities. They contended the
Rhondda bequest was in effect further payment for Horder's medical services and ultimately
he had to pay income tax on it. Sir James Barrie was another Horder patient. He was a lonely
lonely old bachelor and the busy doctor frequently answered urgent calls to his residence only
to find the author simply wanted his company on a walk in the park. He always accompanied
Barrie with good grace but he was not so happy about the idiosyncrasy of H.G. Wells. When
Wells was dying in 1946 Horder was called in but he did not remain on the case for long. The
famous author wanted newspaper reporters and photographers to be present in the room during
his doctor's daily visits and medical examinations. Horder was adamant this was impossible so
Wells got another doctor.
'The sort of patients who could afford Lord Horder as doctor were used to getting their own
way. One titled lady would brook no opposition even from her own bowels. When Horder rather
diffidently asked her if they opened regularly she replied with determination: "They'd better."
Another Horder patient was a lord who had recently inherited both the title and a famous cellar
of port from his father. He telephoned the doctor and asked him to investigate all the latest
remedies for the gout he was sure he was going to get as he overindulged in the port.
'Despite his large practice Lord Horder still found time to crusade for a variety of pet causes in
the Press, on public platforms and in the House of Lords. He was known as an enthusiastic
champion of birth control and cremation, was always attacking quack medicines and food
substitutes and had two particular hates - the national health scheme and the weakness of
English beer. The modern craze for dieting also roused his ire regularly and he liked to point
out that "many Britons a century ago were bursting with good health although they knew
absolutely nothing about vitamins."
'At 75 he was still quite capable of dealing with a burglar whom he found one night systemat-
ically ransacking his Harley Street rooms. Grabbing a bamboo curtain rod Horder challenged the
startled intruder who stood open-mouthed as the old doctor boldly asserted the power of his
medical knowledge. "I know my anatomy considerably better than you," Horder told the intruder.
"I know exactly where to jab you with this so you won't be much good for anything hereafter."
And the threat so frightened the burglar that he huddled in a corner while Horder dialled the
police. The intruder was still there when they arrived to arrest him.
'On the morning of August 13, 1955, Lord Horder suffered a heart attack at his country home
and to the doctors who were summoned he calmly gave a dissertation on his own symptoms as
if he were diagnosing a patient. They administered pain-deadening drugs but could not deceive
the man who was called "the greatest diagnostician of his time." He continued to give a running
commentary on tell-tale signs which showed his heart was gradually failing and told them his
chances of surviving until the following day were negligible. The prognosis was correct. Lord
Horder died at six that evening after warning relatives to make sure his body was cremated and
not buried.'
Richard Monckton Milnes, 1st Baron Houghton
The biography of Monckton Milnes was written in two books by James Pope-Hennessy. The first
book, "Monckton Milnes, the Years of Promise 1809-1851," was published by Constable in 1949.
The second book, "The Flight of Youth 1851-1885," was published two years later.
A review of the second book was published in the Launceston, Tasmania 'Examiner' on 9
February 1952:-
The life of Monckton Milnes (born 1809, Mayfair; died 1885, Vichy) is the story of a dilettante
and failure. The first and better volume of Pope-Hennessy's frank biography of this Victorian
notable was entitled "The Years of Promise." The second is called "The Flight of Youth." For
youth has flown, but promise has not been realised.
'What, asks the puzzled reader, did Monckton Milnes really do? As much (the answer may be)
as any son of a rich manufacturing family with 7500 acres of land and a rent-roll of 11,000 a
year can be expected to do. In that case why should he have impressed himself on his age to
the extent that he did? There are several reasons.
'He was the rejected suitor of Florence Nightingale. He was kind to struggling genius, like
Swinburne. He collected famous men, like Carlyle. He was a social entrepreneur, who gathered
at his famous breakfast parties distinguished personalities who would not otherwise have met
one another.
'He had some talent. One of his poems ["Shadows"] has reached the Oxford Book of English
Verse. He spoke pompously in Parliament for liberal causes, hoped in vain for office. Each
speech, said Disraeli, was worse than the one before. He was an intriguer and a gossip. He kept
his friends, but not their confidences.
'A faint air of absurdity clings to him. The liking of his acquaintances stopped short of
admiration. Carlyle found him "almost bland, smiling, semi-quizzical, affectionate, high-bred
Italianised little man who has long olive-blond hair, a dimple, next to no chin." Blackwoods
Magazine dismissed him as "glib, fluent, pushing, confident, unabashed." Hardly a monarch in
Europe could review his troops, but Monckton Milnes would be there in his Yorkshire militia
uniform.
'The chief crisis in this second half of his life is semi-comic. Time is the closing stages of the
Crimean War; Milnes is happily married, accepts political failure, but is not reconciled to it.
He said: "The worst part of failure is the envy of the successful. It is impossible to be just
at once to them and to ourselves." Feeling that he must have some reward for his political
services, Milnes sought a peerage, "the token of a half-success in life" for his father. It was
not the first time he had tried to confer such a benefit. After an earlier effort, Peel had once
written to him "Out of respect for your father, I advise him to retain the distinction of not
being a baronet."
'This time, through Palmerston, and after immense lobbying by Milnes - a letter was sent to
the elder Milnes in Yorkshire. He was an upright, level-headed Unitarian, who, without consulting
his family, sent the Prime Minister a note courteously declining the peerage. Disraeli noted the
son's "despair" and (wrongly) attributed the refusal to old Milne's desire to mortify his heir.
Milnes sulked and stormed. His father made matters worse by deriding the notion that the
peerage was offered in recognition of his son's merits.
'The wound festered for seven years when Milnes, his father being dead, accepted a barony.
His friends, who had called him "Lord Tattle of Scandal," had now to call him Lord Houghton.
'There was, however, a less-known side of Milnes apart from the public work which Queen
Victoria recognised with a peerage. The Dictionary of National Biography demurely glances at
it. "He had many fine tastes and some coarse ones." His first biographer said that genealogical
histories, rare German treatises, a wonderful collection of criminal trials were "but a few of the
subjects illustrated in this unique library." It was an understatement. Milnes gathered together
in Fryston, his Yorkshire seat, one of the most complete pornographic libraries in Europe.
'Before leaving for church on a Sunday morning, he would genially indicate to his guests the
choicer items in an astounding collection. Milnes' chief adviser in obtaining such books was a
psychopathic Englishman living in Paris named Fred Hankey, son of a general. This macabre
individual (thought to have died in an asylum) had the head of "some emaciated and ecstatic
young priest" and manners of exquisite sweetness. He had a taste for cruelty, but thought it
wicked to kill animals for food. One of the volumes in his library was bound in human skin.
'Hankey became known to French authors, who spread the belief that sadism was the English
vice. How did Hankey pass the books to Milnes through the watchful British Customs? Some
were sent in the British Embassy bag addressed to a friend of Hankey's in the Foreign Office.
Most were brought in by Mr. Harris, manager of Covent Garden Opera House, who would return
from business trips to Paris with quarto volumes hidden in the small of his back. Thus emerged
the strange erotic collection on which young Swinburne descended with shrill cries of delight.
Milnes has been blamed for corrupting the poet. But Swinburne, it is clear, was half-corrupted
before he reached the shelves of Fryston.
'In the company of a busy amiable man, whose character had a curious streak, James Pope-
Hennessy conducts an interesting tour of the Victorian world, with glimpses of some of its
darker corners.'
Copyright @ 2003-2013 Leigh Rayment